The American missionary. / Volume 38, Note on Digital Production Creation of machine-readable edition. Cornell University Library 442 page images in volume Cornell University Library Ithaca, NY 1999 ABK5794-0038 /moa/amis/amis0038/

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The American missionary. / Volume 38, Note on Digital Production 0038 000
The American missionary. / Volume 38, Note on Digital Production A-B

The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 1 [an electronic edition] Creation of machine-readable edition. Cornell University Library 442 page images in volume Cornell University Library Ithaca, NY 1999 ABK5794-0038 /moa/amis/amis0038/

Restricted to authorized users at Cornell University and the University of Michigan. These materials may not be redistributed.

The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 1 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York Jan 1884 0038 001
The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 1, miscellaneous front pages i-ii

JANUAJ~Y, 1884. VOL XXXVIII NO 1 __ EDIIIL .~ ~erica __ PAGE. I 2 3 4 EDITORIAL: ANOTHER YEARTHIS NUMBER PAMPHLET AMERICAN MISSIoNARY JOINT COMMITTEE ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS A DAY PARAGRAPHS WANTED BENEFACTIONS GENERAL NOTES ... TRAVELING IN AFRICA (CUT) CHINESE WOMEN (CUT). . BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK: THE INDIAN WOMAN, BY MRS. A. L. RIGGS 5 6 8 9 PAGE. THE CHINESE, BY MRS. W. C. POND.. If1 MOUNTAIN WHITE WORK IN KENTUCKY. BY MRS. A. A. MYERS 12 COLORED PEOPLE OF THE SOUTH, BY MISS IDA M. BEACH i6 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 19 FORM OF CONSTITUTIONTHE BUREAU IN THE WEST 21 CHILDRENS PAGE CHRISTMAS GIVING AT MYSTIC, CONN.. 23 CHILDREN BEARING CHRiSTMAS GIFTS (CuT) . 24 RECEIPTS 28 CONSTITUTION 30 NEW YORK: PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, Rooms, 56 Reade Street. Price 50 Cents a Year, in Advance. Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. V. as second-class matter. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. PRESIDENT. Hon. WE. B. WASHBURN, LL.D., Mass. VICE-PRESIDENTS. Rzv. C. L. GOODELL, D. D.; REV. F. A. NOBLE, D. D.; REV. A. 3. F. BEERENDS, D. D.; REY. J. E. RANEIN, D. D.; REv. ALEX. MCKENZIE, D. D. CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.. -REV. M. E. STRIEBY. D. D., 56 Reade Street, N. Y. TIIEASURHR.H. W. HUBBARD, Esq., 56 Reade Street, N Y. AUDITORS.WM. A. NASH, W. H. ROGERS. EXECUTIVE COEXIUTEE. Jo~ II. WASusuair, Chairman; .A. P. FosTmt, Secretary; Lvswe ArnIoUT, A. S. BARNES, 3. R. DANFORTE, CLINTON B. Fisx, S. B. H.& u~n~.sx, EDWARD HAWES, SAMUEL HOLMES. CHARLES A. HULL, SAMUEL S. MARPLES, CHARLES L. MEAD, S. H. VIRGIN, WE. H. WARD, J. L. WITEROW. DISTRICT SECRETARIES. Rev. C. L. WOODWORTE. D.D., Boston. Rev. G. D. PIKE, D.D., New York. Rev. JAMES PowEu~, Chicago. COMMUNiCATIONS relating~to the work of the Association may be addressed to the Corresponding Secretary; those relating to the collecting fields, to the District Secretaries; letters for the Editor of the American Missionary, to Rev. G. D. Pike, D. D., at the New York Office; letters for the Bureau of Woman s Wor~c, to Miss D. E. Emerson, at the New York Office. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS may be sent to H. W Hubbard Treasurer 56 Reade Street, New York, or, when more con- venient, to either of the Branch 6ffices, 21 bongregational House, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street, Chicago, ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a Life Member. Fonir CF A BEQUEST. I BEQEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay I he sam In days after my decease to the person who, when the same is payade, shall act as Treasurer of the American Missionary Associstion, of New York City, to be applied, under the directinit of the Executive Committee of the Association. to its charitable uses and purposes. The Will LLould be attested by three witnesses. S IJORSFORDs~ ACID PHOSPHATE. (LIQUID.) FOR DYSPEPSIA, MENTAL AND PHYSICAL EXHAUSTION NERVOUSNESS, DI MINISHED VITALITY, URINARX DTFFICULT[ES, ETd. PREPARED ACCORDING TO THE DIRECTION OF Prof. N. N. florstord, of Cambridge, Mass. There seems to be no difference of opinion in high medical authority of the value of phos- phoric acid, and no preparation has ever been otered to the public which seems to so happily meet the general want as this. It Is not nauseous, but agreeable to the taste. No danger can attend its use. Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. It makes a dellcious drink with water and sugar only Prices reasonable. Pamphlet giving further parrisuiars mailed free on application. MANUFACTURED BY THE RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I., AND FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS. MAN HATTAN LIFE INS. CO. OF NEW YORK, 156 and 158 Broadway. DESCRIPTIONOne of the oldest, strongest, best. POLICIESIncontestable, non-forfeitable, deti. nite cash surrender values. RATESSafe, low, and participating or not, as desired. RISKS carefully selected. PROMPT, liberal dealing. GENERAL AGENTs AND CANVASSERS WANTED in desirable territory, to whom permanent espploy- ment and llberal compensation will be given. Address H. STOKES, President. H. Y. WEMPLE, Secy. 3. L. HALSET, lstV.-P. S. N. StEBBINS, Acty. H. B. STOKES, 2d V.-P.

Another Year Editorial 1

.) V ~L3~ V THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL. XXXVIII. JANUARY, 1884. No. 1. ~m~rii~n ~tissbn~mj ~ss~wiathin. Another year. Are we ready for it, ready to work and to win? The harvest is still plenteous and every increase of store is precious. Who can measure such privilege? And what of opportunities? The swift- winged events of our civilization are continually hurrying us into the midst of them. It is a day of speedy rewards. Christ comes quickly in these times. The business of the Church is helped as absolutely as secu- lar business by the development and use of material agencies for advance- ment. What is wanted is the good seed of the word. It is thatthe light which shines forth from thatwhich gives life and growth and mas- terly power. We want faith in the promises. It shall be said, The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord and His Christ. The truth of it is not to be doubted or eclipsed. We want power from on high, and that is neither distant nor subject to unseasonable delay. What the year shall be is for us, under God, to determine. Let us labor and pray that the word of promisethe divine imbuementmay make rich and fruitful, and place the great religious interests of our land on the foundation of God which standeth sure. We devote considerable space in this nuiuber of the Missionary to the papers and reports presented at the Womans Meeting held in connection with our Annual Meeting in Brooklyn. The topics considered related to the wide range of work conducted by this Association. They were treated by persons having much experience in our mission fields, and will be welcomed not only as interesting reading, but as furnishing authorita- tive data for the encouragement of the friends of our work. The consti- tution proposed at the meeting, for Womens co-operative societies is given, and is commended to the attention of those ladies who desire to aid mission work in our own country.

This Number Editorial 1-2

.) V ~L3~ V THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL. XXXVIII. JANUARY, 1884. No. 1. ~m~rii~n ~tissbn~mj ~ss~wiathin. Another year. Are we ready for it, ready to work and to win? The harvest is still plenteous and every increase of store is precious. Who can measure such privilege? And what of opportunities? The swift- winged events of our civilization are continually hurrying us into the midst of them. It is a day of speedy rewards. Christ comes quickly in these times. The business of the Church is helped as absolutely as secu- lar business by the development and use of material agencies for advance- ment. What is wanted is the good seed of the word. It is thatthe light which shines forth from thatwhich gives life and growth and mas- terly power. We want faith in the promises. It shall be said, The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord and His Christ. The truth of it is not to be doubted or eclipsed. We want power from on high, and that is neither distant nor subject to unseasonable delay. What the year shall be is for us, under God, to determine. Let us labor and pray that the word of promisethe divine imbuementmay make rich and fruitful, and place the great religious interests of our land on the foundation of God which standeth sure. We devote considerable space in this nuiuber of the Missionary to the papers and reports presented at the Womans Meeting held in connection with our Annual Meeting in Brooklyn. The topics considered related to the wide range of work conducted by this Association. They were treated by persons having much experience in our mission fields, and will be welcomed not only as interesting reading, but as furnishing authorita- tive data for the encouragement of the friends of our work. The consti- tution proposed at the meeting, for Womens co-operative societies is given, and is commended to the attention of those ladies who desire to aid mission work in our own country. 2 ParagraphsJoint committee. The valuable Paper on Womans Work in Modern Charity and Missions, read by Rev. A. H. Bradford at our Annual Meeting, not pub- lished elsewhere, has been put in pamphlet form, with a view to general distribution. We will be pleased to furnish copies gratuitously, in such numbers as may be desired, to those wishing it for the promotion of womans work. WE are happy to report that the practice~of paying for sub~criptions for the American lilissionary i~~becoming more general year by year. This is as it should be. We try to make the Missionary worth the price, which is fifty cents annu2lly. We believe the information it contains is of value to all, and that most of it cannot be found elsewhere. Will not our friends kindly aid us in its circulation, remitting to our treasurer at once what may be gathered for that purpose? JOINT COMMITTEE. The Joint Committee appointed by the American Home Missionary Society and the American Missionary Association for the consideration of the relation between the two societies, met by adjournment at Springfield, Mass., Dec. 11. The committee on the part of the A. H. M. S. consisted of Rev. J. E. Twitchell, D.D., Rev. Lyman Abbott, D.D., Rev. Geo. L. Walker, D.D., Rev. C. L. Goodell, D.D., and A. S. Barnes, Esq. The Committee on the partof the A. M. A. consisted of Rev. J. L. Withrow, D.D., Rev. Washington Gladden, D.D., Rev. D. 0. Mears, D.D., Prest. S. C. Bartlett, and Rev. Y~T. H. Ward, D.D. All were present except Dr. Goodell, and his place was filled by Mr. S. B. Capen. A letter from Dr. Goodell was read. Dr. Barrows, representing the Home Missionary Society, and Dr. Strieby, representing the American Missionary Associa- tion, were also present by invitation. It was manifest that the members of the Committee were equally friends of both societies and sought only their greatest efficiency. No partisan feeling found utterance. ~The] members of the Committee are men of independent views and judgment, and examined the subject before them from differentstand points, and yet reached in the paper presented below a. remarkable degree of unanimityevery item receiving a unanimous vote. The result will command and deserves the attention of the churches. The following is THE ACTION OF TIlE COMMITTEE. Consulting the principle of comity between the two societiesthe A. H. M. S. and the A. M. A.and that traditional policy of Congregational- ists which ignores caste and color lines, and also in view of the present relative position and strength of the two societies, we, the Joint Commit- tee, give as our judgment:

Pamphlet Editorial 2

2 ParagraphsJoint committee. The valuable Paper on Womans Work in Modern Charity and Missions, read by Rev. A. H. Bradford at our Annual Meeting, not pub- lished elsewhere, has been put in pamphlet form, with a view to general distribution. We will be pleased to furnish copies gratuitously, in such numbers as may be desired, to those wishing it for the promotion of womans work. WE are happy to report that the practice~of paying for sub~criptions for the American lilissionary i~~becoming more general year by year. This is as it should be. We try to make the Missionary worth the price, which is fifty cents annu2lly. We believe the information it contains is of value to all, and that most of it cannot be found elsewhere. Will not our friends kindly aid us in its circulation, remitting to our treasurer at once what may be gathered for that purpose? JOINT COMMITTEE. The Joint Committee appointed by the American Home Missionary Society and the American Missionary Association for the consideration of the relation between the two societies, met by adjournment at Springfield, Mass., Dec. 11. The committee on the part of the A. H. M. S. consisted of Rev. J. E. Twitchell, D.D., Rev. Lyman Abbott, D.D., Rev. Geo. L. Walker, D.D., Rev. C. L. Goodell, D.D., and A. S. Barnes, Esq. The Committee on the partof the A. M. A. consisted of Rev. J. L. Withrow, D.D., Rev. Washington Gladden, D.D., Rev. D. 0. Mears, D.D., Prest. S. C. Bartlett, and Rev. Y~T. H. Ward, D.D. All were present except Dr. Goodell, and his place was filled by Mr. S. B. Capen. A letter from Dr. Goodell was read. Dr. Barrows, representing the Home Missionary Society, and Dr. Strieby, representing the American Missionary Associa- tion, were also present by invitation. It was manifest that the members of the Committee were equally friends of both societies and sought only their greatest efficiency. No partisan feeling found utterance. ~The] members of the Committee are men of independent views and judgment, and examined the subject before them from differentstand points, and yet reached in the paper presented below a. remarkable degree of unanimityevery item receiving a unanimous vote. The result will command and deserves the attention of the churches. The following is THE ACTION OF TIlE COMMITTEE. Consulting the principle of comity between the two societiesthe A. H. M. S. and the A. M. A.and that traditional policy of Congregational- ists which ignores caste and color lines, and also in view of the present relative position and strength of the two societies, we, the Joint Commit- tee, give as our judgment:

American Missionary Editorial 2

2 ParagraphsJoint committee. The valuable Paper on Womans Work in Modern Charity and Missions, read by Rev. A. H. Bradford at our Annual Meeting, not pub- lished elsewhere, has been put in pamphlet form, with a view to general distribution. We will be pleased to furnish copies gratuitously, in such numbers as may be desired, to those wishing it for the promotion of womans work. WE are happy to report that the practice~of paying for sub~criptions for the American lilissionary i~~becoming more general year by year. This is as it should be. We try to make the Missionary worth the price, which is fifty cents annu2lly. We believe the information it contains is of value to all, and that most of it cannot be found elsewhere. Will not our friends kindly aid us in its circulation, remitting to our treasurer at once what may be gathered for that purpose? JOINT COMMITTEE. The Joint Committee appointed by the American Home Missionary Society and the American Missionary Association for the consideration of the relation between the two societies, met by adjournment at Springfield, Mass., Dec. 11. The committee on the part of the A. H. M. S. consisted of Rev. J. E. Twitchell, D.D., Rev. Lyman Abbott, D.D., Rev. Geo. L. Walker, D.D., Rev. C. L. Goodell, D.D., and A. S. Barnes, Esq. The Committee on the partof the A. M. A. consisted of Rev. J. L. Withrow, D.D., Rev. Washington Gladden, D.D., Rev. D. 0. Mears, D.D., Prest. S. C. Bartlett, and Rev. Y~T. H. Ward, D.D. All were present except Dr. Goodell, and his place was filled by Mr. S. B. Capen. A letter from Dr. Goodell was read. Dr. Barrows, representing the Home Missionary Society, and Dr. Strieby, representing the American Missionary Associa- tion, were also present by invitation. It was manifest that the members of the Committee were equally friends of both societies and sought only their greatest efficiency. No partisan feeling found utterance. ~The] members of the Committee are men of independent views and judgment, and examined the subject before them from differentstand points, and yet reached in the paper presented below a. remarkable degree of unanimityevery item receiving a unanimous vote. The result will command and deserves the attention of the churches. The following is THE ACTION OF TIlE COMMITTEE. Consulting the principle of comity between the two societiesthe A. H. M. S. and the A. M. A.and that traditional policy of Congregational- ists which ignores caste and color lines, and also in view of the present relative position and strength of the two societies, we, the Joint Commit- tee, give as our judgment:

Joint Committee Editorial 2-3

2 ParagraphsJoint committee. The valuable Paper on Womans Work in Modern Charity and Missions, read by Rev. A. H. Bradford at our Annual Meeting, not pub- lished elsewhere, has been put in pamphlet form, with a view to general distribution. We will be pleased to furnish copies gratuitously, in such numbers as may be desired, to those wishing it for the promotion of womans work. WE are happy to report that the practice~of paying for sub~criptions for the American lilissionary i~~becoming more general year by year. This is as it should be. We try to make the Missionary worth the price, which is fifty cents annu2lly. We believe the information it contains is of value to all, and that most of it cannot be found elsewhere. Will not our friends kindly aid us in its circulation, remitting to our treasurer at once what may be gathered for that purpose? JOINT COMMITTEE. The Joint Committee appointed by the American Home Missionary Society and the American Missionary Association for the consideration of the relation between the two societies, met by adjournment at Springfield, Mass., Dec. 11. The committee on the part of the A. H. M. S. consisted of Rev. J. E. Twitchell, D.D., Rev. Lyman Abbott, D.D., Rev. Geo. L. Walker, D.D., Rev. C. L. Goodell, D.D., and A. S. Barnes, Esq. The Committee on the partof the A. M. A. consisted of Rev. J. L. Withrow, D.D., Rev. Washington Gladden, D.D., Rev. D. 0. Mears, D.D., Prest. S. C. Bartlett, and Rev. Y~T. H. Ward, D.D. All were present except Dr. Goodell, and his place was filled by Mr. S. B. Capen. A letter from Dr. Goodell was read. Dr. Barrows, representing the Home Missionary Society, and Dr. Strieby, representing the American Missionary Associa- tion, were also present by invitation. It was manifest that the members of the Committee were equally friends of both societies and sought only their greatest efficiency. No partisan feeling found utterance. ~The] members of the Committee are men of independent views and judgment, and examined the subject before them from differentstand points, and yet reached in the paper presented below a. remarkable degree of unanimityevery item receiving a unanimous vote. The result will command and deserves the attention of the churches. The following is THE ACTION OF TIlE COMMITTEE. Consulting the principle of comity between the two societiesthe A. H. M. S. and the A. M. A.and that traditional policy of Congregational- ists which ignores caste and color lines, and also in view of the present relative position and strength of the two societies, we, the Joint Commit- tee, give as our judgment: One Thousand Dollars a Day. 1. That, as heretofore, the principal work of the American Home Mis- sionary Society should be in the West, and the principal work of the American Missionary Association should be in the South. 2. Whatever new work may be called for in any locality should~be under the charge of the society already occupying the ground. No exception to this rule should be allowed unless it be by agreement between the two societies. 3. Concerning work already established by either society, we would recommend that if either comity, economy or efficiency will be advanced by it, such a transfer of the work should be made as shall bring the work of the societies into harmony with the preceding reconmendations. 4. We would recommend to the two societies to consider the practi- cability of using a common superintendent in those portions of the field where an economical and efficient administration will be secured by it. ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS A DAY. What can be done with it? We can sustain efficiently our current work of educating teachers and preachers and the planting of churches. In the progress of development, more requires more. If the Association did not need increased receipts it would be evidence of lack of growth. There is no such lack. New demands are springing up at every point, and it is wise economy to meet these demands. They are simply the healthy development of legitimate missionary work. Just now there is urgent demand for the increase of facilities for promoting industrial education. The South is arising into a new life. New fields of labor are rapidly opening. Skilled workmen are wanted. The possibilities of agricultural prosperity are becoming better under- stood. The aspiring youth of both sexes are comprehending their oppor- tunities, and the industrial departments in connection with our institu- tions are patronized as never before. We ought to make the most of them now. We need more means for supplying the minds of those hungering for knowledge with good reading. The colored people have few, if any, books or periodicals. We ought to have the means at once for furnishing fifty libraries and reading-rooms at as many different points. Such help to those willing to help themselves to some extent should be provided. The students leaving our schools to go forth as teachers may be num- bered by thousands. These explore the dark places of the land. They open schools in such buildings as can be found, or, finding none, teach out of doors. We need means to aid many such with supplemental support, making it possible for them to continue their schools longer than

One Thousand Dollars a Day Editorial 3-4

One Thousand Dollars a Day. 1. That, as heretofore, the principal work of the American Home Mis- sionary Society should be in the West, and the principal work of the American Missionary Association should be in the South. 2. Whatever new work may be called for in any locality should~be under the charge of the society already occupying the ground. No exception to this rule should be allowed unless it be by agreement between the two societies. 3. Concerning work already established by either society, we would recommend that if either comity, economy or efficiency will be advanced by it, such a transfer of the work should be made as shall bring the work of the societies into harmony with the preceding reconmendations. 4. We would recommend to the two societies to consider the practi- cability of using a common superintendent in those portions of the field where an economical and efficient administration will be secured by it. ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS A DAY. What can be done with it? We can sustain efficiently our current work of educating teachers and preachers and the planting of churches. In the progress of development, more requires more. If the Association did not need increased receipts it would be evidence of lack of growth. There is no such lack. New demands are springing up at every point, and it is wise economy to meet these demands. They are simply the healthy development of legitimate missionary work. Just now there is urgent demand for the increase of facilities for promoting industrial education. The South is arising into a new life. New fields of labor are rapidly opening. Skilled workmen are wanted. The possibilities of agricultural prosperity are becoming better under- stood. The aspiring youth of both sexes are comprehending their oppor- tunities, and the industrial departments in connection with our institu- tions are patronized as never before. We ought to make the most of them now. We need more means for supplying the minds of those hungering for knowledge with good reading. The colored people have few, if any, books or periodicals. We ought to have the means at once for furnishing fifty libraries and reading-rooms at as many different points. Such help to those willing to help themselves to some extent should be provided. The students leaving our schools to go forth as teachers may be num- bered by thousands. These explore the dark places of the land. They open schools in such buildings as can be found, or, finding none, teach out of doors. We need means to aid many such with supplemental support, making it possible for them to continue their schools longer than Paragraphs. the few months provided for by the limited State appropriations. Thou- sands of dollars could be used wisely in this way. The opportunity now for temperance work is more promising than ever. A temperance wave has been sweeping some portions of the South. Our students are thoroughly indoctrinated in the principles of total abstinence. They make the best advocates of the cause that can be had for many localities. It is a crucial period. The time to do this work is nownow, while the great questions at issue are being agitated and settled. We ought to have means for extending our efforts to the utmost in this direction. Of more importance still is evangelistic work, supplemental to the labors of our pastors. This is coming into more than usual prominence. Our students have had thorough training for it, and no little experience in it during their course of study. A score of them in every Southern State could be set to work with profit, if we had the money for such outlay. Nothing could do more for immediate results in developing a pure Christianity among the untaught and unsaved poor of the South. We might also, with a thousand dollars a day, do more than we have ever done to foster the growth of right and permanent institutions in all our fields of labor. This is the great and urgent necessity. Out of Christian churches and schools will flow all the benefits demanded by a Christian civilization. For this especially we emphasize our appeal. To what better use can the Christians and patriots of our country devote a thousand dollars a day? A friend, noting the annual average addition of churches as five or six, raised the question whether the time had not come for doubling that rate. The Association is glad to recognize this worthy aspiration and itself to avow the spirit of it, and still further to remind the friends that the dis- position of leaders on the field to magnify the work of each year is also in the same line. Nevertheless, we find that those who become in some sense responsible for the nurture and support of these ecclesiastical children born to us become conservative instead of becoming rash, as is sometimes averred. Yet we are able to give assurance that the Field Superintendent and his associates, with their eyes upon the whole field, watching the germs and their unfolding, are only anxious to set out these plants of the Lords house as fast as is at all consistent. We also see, in no far-away future, a large church work for us as the fruitage of our school work. Aprize of *75 is given annually to the best male Greek scholar in the High School at Newport, R. I. The best examination this year was by the daughter of George Rice, the colored steward of the steamer Pilgrim. As she was not eligible to the award a gentleman from New York sent her *75 in gold.

Paragraphs Editorial 4-5

Paragraphs. the few months provided for by the limited State appropriations. Thou- sands of dollars could be used wisely in this way. The opportunity now for temperance work is more promising than ever. A temperance wave has been sweeping some portions of the South. Our students are thoroughly indoctrinated in the principles of total abstinence. They make the best advocates of the cause that can be had for many localities. It is a crucial period. The time to do this work is nownow, while the great questions at issue are being agitated and settled. We ought to have means for extending our efforts to the utmost in this direction. Of more importance still is evangelistic work, supplemental to the labors of our pastors. This is coming into more than usual prominence. Our students have had thorough training for it, and no little experience in it during their course of study. A score of them in every Southern State could be set to work with profit, if we had the money for such outlay. Nothing could do more for immediate results in developing a pure Christianity among the untaught and unsaved poor of the South. We might also, with a thousand dollars a day, do more than we have ever done to foster the growth of right and permanent institutions in all our fields of labor. This is the great and urgent necessity. Out of Christian churches and schools will flow all the benefits demanded by a Christian civilization. For this especially we emphasize our appeal. To what better use can the Christians and patriots of our country devote a thousand dollars a day? A friend, noting the annual average addition of churches as five or six, raised the question whether the time had not come for doubling that rate. The Association is glad to recognize this worthy aspiration and itself to avow the spirit of it, and still further to remind the friends that the dis- position of leaders on the field to magnify the work of each year is also in the same line. Nevertheless, we find that those who become in some sense responsible for the nurture and support of these ecclesiastical children born to us become conservative instead of becoming rash, as is sometimes averred. Yet we are able to give assurance that the Field Superintendent and his associates, with their eyes upon the whole field, watching the germs and their unfolding, are only anxious to set out these plants of the Lords house as fast as is at all consistent. We also see, in no far-away future, a large church work for us as the fruitage of our school work. Aprize of *75 is given annually to the best male Greek scholar in the High School at Newport, R. I. The best examination this year was by the daughter of George Rice, the colored steward of the steamer Pilgrim. As she was not eligible to the award a gentleman from New York sent her *75 in gold. WantedBenefactionsGeneral Notes. WANTED! We greatly need a new school building, for the lower grades at Tou- galoo University, a two-story building with school rooms below and a chapel above. Who will give *3000 for Hall at Tougaloo? We need also a steam engine for the Industrial Department at Ton- galoo, a portable engine of ten or twelve horse-power. Who will give it, or the money needful? We need twenty or more sets of carpenters tools for schools of car- pentry at Talladega and elsewhere. Who will give one or more sets ? We need illustrated books and magazines for our Reading Rooms. Who will give us subscriptions to IVide Awake, St. Nicholas, etc., or money to buy such books as will help to create the reading habit? BEN EFACTION S. Rutgers College has received *1,000 toward an endowment fund from Mr. R. H. Ballentine, Newark, N. J. Mayor Low, of Brooklyn, has given the city of Salem, Mass., *7,500, the income of which is to be applied in aid of needy students in college. Illinois College has recently received a gift of *1,000 from Mr. E. W. Blatchford, of Chicago, who was a member of the class of 65. Mr. George W. Dixon, of Bethlehem, Pa., has given *20,000 to Linden Hall Female Seminary, to build a Gothic chapel in memory of his daughter. Mr. Roland Mather, of Hartford, Conn., has given *10,000 to Olivet College, Mich. Joseph Dean, of Minneapolis, has placed in the hands of the tructees of Hamlin University *25,000 to increase the endowment of that insti- tution. Mrs. Robert L. Stuart has given *150,000 to Princeton College to endow the department of philosophy and pay the salaries of professors in logic, ethics and psychology. Among the wants specified in the report of the Executive Committee of the A. if. A. for the coming year was *10,000 for a new hall for the Edward Smith College, at Little Bock, Ark. It is proposed that the donor of the amount name the hall at his discretion. GENERAL NOTES. AFRIcA. Among the Belgians no less than six commercial societies have been constituted to explore the Congo. The Livingstone Inland Mission has founded a new station at Ngo- mas Town, one hundred kilometers up the river from Stanley Pool.

Wanted Editorial 5

WantedBenefactionsGeneral Notes. WANTED! We greatly need a new school building, for the lower grades at Tou- galoo University, a two-story building with school rooms below and a chapel above. Who will give *3000 for Hall at Tougaloo? We need also a steam engine for the Industrial Department at Ton- galoo, a portable engine of ten or twelve horse-power. Who will give it, or the money needful? We need twenty or more sets of carpenters tools for schools of car- pentry at Talladega and elsewhere. Who will give one or more sets ? We need illustrated books and magazines for our Reading Rooms. Who will give us subscriptions to IVide Awake, St. Nicholas, etc., or money to buy such books as will help to create the reading habit? BEN EFACTION S. Rutgers College has received *1,000 toward an endowment fund from Mr. R. H. Ballentine, Newark, N. J. Mayor Low, of Brooklyn, has given the city of Salem, Mass., *7,500, the income of which is to be applied in aid of needy students in college. Illinois College has recently received a gift of *1,000 from Mr. E. W. Blatchford, of Chicago, who was a member of the class of 65. Mr. George W. Dixon, of Bethlehem, Pa., has given *20,000 to Linden Hall Female Seminary, to build a Gothic chapel in memory of his daughter. Mr. Roland Mather, of Hartford, Conn., has given *10,000 to Olivet College, Mich. Joseph Dean, of Minneapolis, has placed in the hands of the tructees of Hamlin University *25,000 to increase the endowment of that insti- tution. Mrs. Robert L. Stuart has given *150,000 to Princeton College to endow the department of philosophy and pay the salaries of professors in logic, ethics and psychology. Among the wants specified in the report of the Executive Committee of the A. if. A. for the coming year was *10,000 for a new hall for the Edward Smith College, at Little Bock, Ark. It is proposed that the donor of the amount name the hall at his discretion. GENERAL NOTES. AFRIcA. Among the Belgians no less than six commercial societies have been constituted to explore the Congo. The Livingstone Inland Mission has founded a new station at Ngo- mas Town, one hundred kilometers up the river from Stanley Pool.

Benefactions Editorial 5

WantedBenefactionsGeneral Notes. WANTED! We greatly need a new school building, for the lower grades at Tou- galoo University, a two-story building with school rooms below and a chapel above. Who will give *3000 for Hall at Tougaloo? We need also a steam engine for the Industrial Department at Ton- galoo, a portable engine of ten or twelve horse-power. Who will give it, or the money needful? We need twenty or more sets of carpenters tools for schools of car- pentry at Talladega and elsewhere. Who will give one or more sets ? We need illustrated books and magazines for our Reading Rooms. Who will give us subscriptions to IVide Awake, St. Nicholas, etc., or money to buy such books as will help to create the reading habit? BEN EFACTION S. Rutgers College has received *1,000 toward an endowment fund from Mr. R. H. Ballentine, Newark, N. J. Mayor Low, of Brooklyn, has given the city of Salem, Mass., *7,500, the income of which is to be applied in aid of needy students in college. Illinois College has recently received a gift of *1,000 from Mr. E. W. Blatchford, of Chicago, who was a member of the class of 65. Mr. George W. Dixon, of Bethlehem, Pa., has given *20,000 to Linden Hall Female Seminary, to build a Gothic chapel in memory of his daughter. Mr. Roland Mather, of Hartford, Conn., has given *10,000 to Olivet College, Mich. Joseph Dean, of Minneapolis, has placed in the hands of the tructees of Hamlin University *25,000 to increase the endowment of that insti- tution. Mrs. Robert L. Stuart has given *150,000 to Princeton College to endow the department of philosophy and pay the salaries of professors in logic, ethics and psychology. Among the wants specified in the report of the Executive Committee of the A. if. A. for the coming year was *10,000 for a new hall for the Edward Smith College, at Little Bock, Ark. It is proposed that the donor of the amount name the hall at his discretion. GENERAL NOTES. AFRIcA. Among the Belgians no less than six commercial societies have been constituted to explore the Congo. The Livingstone Inland Mission has founded a new station at Ngo- mas Town, one hundred kilometers up the river from Stanley Pool.

General Notes Editorial 5-9

WantedBenefactionsGeneral Notes. WANTED! We greatly need a new school building, for the lower grades at Tou- galoo University, a two-story building with school rooms below and a chapel above. Who will give *3000 for Hall at Tougaloo? We need also a steam engine for the Industrial Department at Ton- galoo, a portable engine of ten or twelve horse-power. Who will give it, or the money needful? We need twenty or more sets of carpenters tools for schools of car- pentry at Talladega and elsewhere. Who will give one or more sets ? We need illustrated books and magazines for our Reading Rooms. Who will give us subscriptions to IVide Awake, St. Nicholas, etc., or money to buy such books as will help to create the reading habit? BEN EFACTION S. Rutgers College has received *1,000 toward an endowment fund from Mr. R. H. Ballentine, Newark, N. J. Mayor Low, of Brooklyn, has given the city of Salem, Mass., *7,500, the income of which is to be applied in aid of needy students in college. Illinois College has recently received a gift of *1,000 from Mr. E. W. Blatchford, of Chicago, who was a member of the class of 65. Mr. George W. Dixon, of Bethlehem, Pa., has given *20,000 to Linden Hall Female Seminary, to build a Gothic chapel in memory of his daughter. Mr. Roland Mather, of Hartford, Conn., has given *10,000 to Olivet College, Mich. Joseph Dean, of Minneapolis, has placed in the hands of the tructees of Hamlin University *25,000 to increase the endowment of that insti- tution. Mrs. Robert L. Stuart has given *150,000 to Princeton College to endow the department of philosophy and pay the salaries of professors in logic, ethics and psychology. Among the wants specified in the report of the Executive Committee of the A. if. A. for the coming year was *10,000 for a new hall for the Edward Smith College, at Little Bock, Ark. It is proposed that the donor of the amount name the hall at his discretion. GENERAL NOTES. AFRIcA. Among the Belgians no less than six commercial societies have been constituted to explore the Congo. The Livingstone Inland Mission has founded a new station at Ngo- mas Town, one hundred kilometers up the river from Stanley Pool. (3 Traveling in Africa. The merchants of Lisbon have constituted a company for the navi- gation of the Quanza. They have constructed to this effect in England a steamer, the Serpa Pinto, which was to be delivered in September. The Scotch Presbyterian Church have decided to furnish a steamer for the use of the Old Calabar Mission. The young peoplc throughout the church have been requested to take up the matter and secure the money by the time the steamer is ready. According to a dispatch from Sierra Leone the Queen of Massah, with the consent of the native chiefs, has authorized the annexation of the neighboring territory of Sherbro to the English possession, which will thus extend without interruption from Sierra Leone to Liberia. The fever of speculation reigns at Axim and in the districts of the Golden Coast. From the climate and the conditious of exploration, the working of the mines proceeds slowly. Commander Cameron, director of the West Africau Goldilelds Company, has introduced upon his grant the hydraulic processes employed in California. TRAVELING IN AFRICA. General Notes. 7 The Journal of Geneva announces that the International African As- sociation is occupied at present in seeking colonists who. will receive gratuitously land in the countries of the Congo, of which Stanley has taken possession. It is negotiating to attract the Germans and already the Prussian journals speak of the creation of a German Consulate. Flegel has offered to the African German Society to make a new exploration in a region entirely unknown, which extends to the Congo; or, if they choose, to return toward the west to Mount Cameroon. The Government of the German Empire has granted a sum of 50,000 francs for this exploration. On the other hand, some private individuals of Lagos, where Flegel has resided since his last voyage, have furnished him funds with which to conduct an exploration to the basin of the Niger and to B6nou6, in the advancement of science and commerce. Mr. Petersen and Dr. Sims have founded at Stanley Pool a new station for the Livingstone Inland Mission. Dr. Sims very quickly com- menced to heal the sick, which gained him the confidence of the natives. These latter do not labor hard enough to produce from their land the provisions necessary for the number of Europeans established at Stanley Pool, and the price of provisions has greatly increased. The steamer, Henry Reed, destined for the Upper Congo was to start out the first of August. THE INDIANS. Of the 6,000 Pi-Utes it is said that there are never more than 600 on their reservation at one time. Not more than fifty attend the agency school. The National Indian Association, an organization composed exclu- sively of ladies, has for its object to obtain for the Indians the rights of citizens, and to induce the Government to allow them to own farms. The General Council of the Choctaw Nation, recently closed, appro- priated *100,000 for the erection of a new council house, the old one to be used as a manual-labor school for the education and training in indus- trial pursuits of fifty orphan boys. The ceremony of receiving Sitting-Bull into the Catholic Church at Fort Yates has been indefinitely postponed because Sitting-Bull cannot make up his mind which of his two wives he will let go. Bishop Marty has had him under his care for several months, and his instructions were being rapidly absorbed by the Chief; but separation from his wives proved too much, and he will probably return to heathenism. THE CHINESE. The missionaries in China, to the number of 231, have presented another petition to the House of Commons against the infamous opium traffic. Uhinese Women. There is a Chinaman at work in Tahiti, in the South Sea Islands, who is said to be a whole Bible society in himself, expending twenty dollars a. month out of a salary of twenty-five dollars, for Bibles to distribute among his countrymen there. The largest bell in the world is in Kiota, Japan. It is 24 feet high and 16 inches thick at the rim. It is sounded by a suspended piece of wood, like a battering ram, which strikes it on the outside, and its boom- ing can be heard for miles. Nobody knows when or by whom it was cast, and though its surface is covered with characters, no scholar has yet been able to translate them. The Foreign llfissionary says the great secret of success in teaching the Chinese in America lies in the direct personal influence of the teacher over the pupil. Generally each pupil is provided with a teacher, and the chances of spiritual benefit are in direct proportion to the cordial sym- pathy and manifest kindness evinced. The first important revelation that dawns upon the Chinaman is that there are those in this land who are not hoodlums, and that brutality is not the universal law in America; that Christianity is higher and purer than the enactments of Congress, and that Christ is the friend of all men, and jhas died for Chinamen as well as. Melicans. CHINESE WOMEN. Th6 Indian Woman. BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. Miss D. E. EMERSON, SECRETARY. PAPERS READ 4T THE WO?~ANS 1~EETINQ IN BROOKLYN. THE INDIAN WOMAN. BY MRS. A. L. RIGGS. To describe an Indian woman is no easy task for one who lives among them, for every peculiarity becomes so familiar, and so interwoven with our common every- day experience, that we forget how strange and unlike white women she appeared to us at first. But she is a woman, even though she wears her shawl over her head and carries her baby on her back. How uninteresting, you must think, and she probably thinks the same of you. She does not know that you care for her. She fe8ls that she is different in some way, and most likely if you smile upon her she will not know it, for she is too mod est even to look at you ; but speak to her in a pleasant tone and offer to shake hands with her and notice her baby, and she begins to think that you are a wo- man. In her no trace of dignity nor Pocahontas beauty are discernible, but she is untidy in person and attire, her movements are decidedly lackadaisical. An unin- teresting object, indeed, to one who does not care to help her. But we believe that she has a womans heart; and more than thatshe has a soul. Her aspirations for herself are limited, but she wants her child to grow up in the white peoples way. Yet how small her conception of how this is to be accom- plished! She is a heathenhemmed in on every side by fear and superstition. Her gods are gods of fear. She believes in witchcraft, is afraid of a world full of evil spirits. Under a pagan religion her place is next to the mere animals. She goes with her husband to the hunt, not as a companion, but as the drudge, the human pack- horse; she prepares the food, and her husband devours it regardless of her needs; he may boast of his old woman as being nina mimi heca (swift or good to work) for that is the only accomplishment required in his selfish, egotistical mind. The Indian woman comes into the world under a species of protestevery Indian parent desiring to have boys, rather than girls, hence she grows up into a condi- tion of servitude. In the Indian nation to purchase a wife is the honorable way, all other ways are dishonorable, and the man having bought his wife, although the custom of the country does not allow him to dispose of her to another, yei he may put her away, or leave her, at his pleasure. He may also whip her and beat her, for she is his money. I never shall forget one poor woman who came to me soon after we went to th~ Indian country. She showed me her back covered with the marks where her husband had beaten her. Now I have given you a brief description of the Indian woman as we find her. What can be done for her? What would you do for her? There is only one thing. Help her to become a Christian. This is not to be accomplished in a hurry, for she is in bondage to her husbandto her religion. But faith and prayer, together with a genuine interest in the Indian home, can accomplish touch. Deso-. late and comfortless though that home may be, it can be transformed, and the husband even can be made to see that there is something more real, something that is more satisfying, something that is more comforting than this life of fear and bondage to his heathen gods. The man has more to give ap than the woman

Mrs. A. L. Riggs Riggs, A. L., Mrs. The Indian Woman Bureau of Woman's Work 9-11

Th6 Indian Woman. BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. Miss D. E. EMERSON, SECRETARY. PAPERS READ 4T THE WO?~ANS 1~EETINQ IN BROOKLYN. THE INDIAN WOMAN. BY MRS. A. L. RIGGS. To describe an Indian woman is no easy task for one who lives among them, for every peculiarity becomes so familiar, and so interwoven with our common every- day experience, that we forget how strange and unlike white women she appeared to us at first. But she is a woman, even though she wears her shawl over her head and carries her baby on her back. How uninteresting, you must think, and she probably thinks the same of you. She does not know that you care for her. She fe8ls that she is different in some way, and most likely if you smile upon her she will not know it, for she is too mod est even to look at you ; but speak to her in a pleasant tone and offer to shake hands with her and notice her baby, and she begins to think that you are a wo- man. In her no trace of dignity nor Pocahontas beauty are discernible, but she is untidy in person and attire, her movements are decidedly lackadaisical. An unin- teresting object, indeed, to one who does not care to help her. But we believe that she has a womans heart; and more than thatshe has a soul. Her aspirations for herself are limited, but she wants her child to grow up in the white peoples way. Yet how small her conception of how this is to be accom- plished! She is a heathenhemmed in on every side by fear and superstition. Her gods are gods of fear. She believes in witchcraft, is afraid of a world full of evil spirits. Under a pagan religion her place is next to the mere animals. She goes with her husband to the hunt, not as a companion, but as the drudge, the human pack- horse; she prepares the food, and her husband devours it regardless of her needs; he may boast of his old woman as being nina mimi heca (swift or good to work) for that is the only accomplishment required in his selfish, egotistical mind. The Indian woman comes into the world under a species of protestevery Indian parent desiring to have boys, rather than girls, hence she grows up into a condi- tion of servitude. In the Indian nation to purchase a wife is the honorable way, all other ways are dishonorable, and the man having bought his wife, although the custom of the country does not allow him to dispose of her to another, yei he may put her away, or leave her, at his pleasure. He may also whip her and beat her, for she is his money. I never shall forget one poor woman who came to me soon after we went to th~ Indian country. She showed me her back covered with the marks where her husband had beaten her. Now I have given you a brief description of the Indian woman as we find her. What can be done for her? What would you do for her? There is only one thing. Help her to become a Christian. This is not to be accomplished in a hurry, for she is in bondage to her husbandto her religion. But faith and prayer, together with a genuine interest in the Indian home, can accomplish touch. Deso-. late and comfortless though that home may be, it can be transformed, and the husband even can be made to see that there is something more real, something that is more satisfying, something that is more comforting than this life of fear and bondage to his heathen gods. The man has more to give ap than the woman 10 The Indian Woman. if he becomes a Christian. If a woman changes her gods and her religion, no one cares very much; it is only a woman. But a man must abandon his ancestral faith, which binds him more strongly than the woman, for the very reason that he is a man, and has been inducted into manhood through the ceremonies of his reli- gion. He can be led to see that his wife is worth more to him than his horse or his dog; and he begins to see that he can do some of the work which she has been obliged to do, and thus she is enabled to make home more attractive. With the dawn of Christianity comes the first effort toward civilized ways. The husband now brings the wood and water, and little by little a few household conveniences appear, such as chairs, a table, a few dishes; also knives and forks are used instead of fingers; even lambrequins are sometimes seen hung, however, in the most absurd way, outside the shadesand we are astonished to see in some of the houses white counterpanes and ruffled pillow-shams. Also a U. S. T. D. blanket is often spread down for a carpet, and the rude, rough walls are covered with pictures cut from illustrated newspapers. We find them ready and anxious to be taught many simple and needful domestic arts, such as making light bread and preparing wholesome dishes of food for the sick. The teaching of making light bread became quite an important part of my duties as a missionarys wife, and for the Indian women to take lessons in bread-making became quite fashionable. Then she shows a desire to dress like white women, and instead of the broad- cloth skirt tied around her waist with a string and the short calico sack, and moc- casins upon her feet, she appears with a kilt plaiting around her dress skirt, and, what probably in her mind is an improvement upon white womans taste, the plaiting is headed with two or three rows of bright Worsted skirt braid. As she admires the thin and lightly covered head of the white baby, she closely clips her own babys hair so as to have it as nearly like a white baby as possible. But all this is the mere outside of lifeone benefit which Christianity brings to her per- sonally. She begins to show that she has become a missionary at heart and that. she has a desire to send this great blessing which has wrought such a change in her home into other homes; and as others like herself, near at hand, have been treasuring up the blessed words of the Lord Jesus, Go ye and preach my gos- pel, they begin to think that they can do something to send the good tidings to those who are in the darkness which so recently surrounded themselves. Now, in the Dakota mission, we have thirteen churches, and in every one a. woman s missionary society, and the money raised is used to support native missionariesthat is, Christian Indians are sent out among the heathen Indians as missionaries, and are supported by Indian societies. The Indian womans society is conducted very much like any sewing society among white women. Some woman is appointed to lead the devotional exercises, and we have our officers appointed annually. They make childrens clothing after the white woman s fashion, and many useful articles similar to those usually made in sewing societies. Those women who are able make articles after their own styles, such as moccasins, pretty bags handsomely ornamented with porcupine, bead or ribbon work. These articles are gifts to the society, and we have no difficulty in disposing of them to those who wish specimens of Indian womans skill in fancy work, or who may wish to help this native missionary work which is being so nobly carried on. Some of these women are really wonderful in their zeal and faithfulness, walking six, seven, or eight miles to the meeting every week. I could tell you many things about these faithful Christian Indian women, but do you wish any better proof of the hold Christianity has upon Indians? The Chinese. ii As I said before, an Indian womans aspirations for herself are limited, but she wants her child to grow up in the white peoples way. Now. if we are to elevate the Indian nation, let us plant in the homes the desire for the Gospel, and as we do it gather the children as fast as they are old enough to leave their mothers care into Christian training schools. Now out in the Indian country we are all the time carrying on missionary work in the homes, planting schools, organizing churches, and sending out native missionaries. We have at Santee Agency, Neb., a large school of advanced grade, well estab- lished for the education of children and youth. So well known is this school among Christian Indians that our accommodations have become very limited, and last year we were obliged to refuse many who wished to come. I think you can- not know how hard it is for us to say, We cannot take you. The great Dakota nation is ready to receive the Christian religion. We have the Bible in the Dakota languagea monument grand and beautiful to one who has just gone to his reward. Years of patient, quiet toil were spent in translating the precious words from the Greek and the Hebrew into the language of over fifty thousand savages. Then what hinders the work? We have hymns in the Dakota tongue. Who will go and sing these precious words to those who never heard them? There are those who are ready to go, but where is the money to send them? If you cannot go, what hinders you from sending some one? To be sure, this is a work of difficulty, for how can we expect a few years of training to so revolutionize a savages live that he can withstand the heathenism which still per- meates his native home? But we have those whom we can trust, and who are filling places of responsibility and usefulness. Besides those who have gone out as mis- sionaries and teachers, we have in our school at Santee native teachers, and our own children are taught by them. One of our pupils is assistant matron in the Dakota Home. One who has been under our care is in the little city of Pierre, D. T., giving music lessons to white pupils. I give only a few instances, to show that we are beginning to see the results of our work. Then give the free Gospel of the love of Christ to this great heathen nation right here so near us. Here is the Bible, here are the hymns; who will provide the means to scatter them, and who will go to carry them? We are preparing those who will go with you as assistants and interpreters. We hear of those who wish to get rid of the Indians; the surest way to do it is to educate them and Christian- ize them. THE CHINESE. EXTRACT FROM ADDRESS OF MRS. W. C. POND. I will not waste time upon an introduction. I will only say that I am glad to be among you; glad that you are interested in the Chinese work, with which we have been connected so many years in California. We feel that we are greatly privileged in having these dark souls within our reach. We can obey our Saviours last command, Disciple all nations, without having to go far from our homes and native land. They are with us and we have but to open our hearts and our churches to them and they will come in. They are coming in; not in large numbers but one by one. In the church of which my husband has been the pastor for nearly ten years there are over seventy Chinese membersabout one- third of our whole membership. Many inquire how Chinese converts are tested. They join the Christian Asso- ciation on probation and after a test of six or eight months are recommended to

Mrs. W. C. Pond Pond, W. C., Mrs. The Chinese Bureau of Woman's Work 11-12

The Chinese. ii As I said before, an Indian womans aspirations for herself are limited, but she wants her child to grow up in the white peoples way. Now. if we are to elevate the Indian nation, let us plant in the homes the desire for the Gospel, and as we do it gather the children as fast as they are old enough to leave their mothers care into Christian training schools. Now out in the Indian country we are all the time carrying on missionary work in the homes, planting schools, organizing churches, and sending out native missionaries. We have at Santee Agency, Neb., a large school of advanced grade, well estab- lished for the education of children and youth. So well known is this school among Christian Indians that our accommodations have become very limited, and last year we were obliged to refuse many who wished to come. I think you can- not know how hard it is for us to say, We cannot take you. The great Dakota nation is ready to receive the Christian religion. We have the Bible in the Dakota languagea monument grand and beautiful to one who has just gone to his reward. Years of patient, quiet toil were spent in translating the precious words from the Greek and the Hebrew into the language of over fifty thousand savages. Then what hinders the work? We have hymns in the Dakota tongue. Who will go and sing these precious words to those who never heard them? There are those who are ready to go, but where is the money to send them? If you cannot go, what hinders you from sending some one? To be sure, this is a work of difficulty, for how can we expect a few years of training to so revolutionize a savages live that he can withstand the heathenism which still per- meates his native home? But we have those whom we can trust, and who are filling places of responsibility and usefulness. Besides those who have gone out as mis- sionaries and teachers, we have in our school at Santee native teachers, and our own children are taught by them. One of our pupils is assistant matron in the Dakota Home. One who has been under our care is in the little city of Pierre, D. T., giving music lessons to white pupils. I give only a few instances, to show that we are beginning to see the results of our work. Then give the free Gospel of the love of Christ to this great heathen nation right here so near us. Here is the Bible, here are the hymns; who will provide the means to scatter them, and who will go to carry them? We are preparing those who will go with you as assistants and interpreters. We hear of those who wish to get rid of the Indians; the surest way to do it is to educate them and Christian- ize them. THE CHINESE. EXTRACT FROM ADDRESS OF MRS. W. C. POND. I will not waste time upon an introduction. I will only say that I am glad to be among you; glad that you are interested in the Chinese work, with which we have been connected so many years in California. We feel that we are greatly privileged in having these dark souls within our reach. We can obey our Saviours last command, Disciple all nations, without having to go far from our homes and native land. They are with us and we have but to open our hearts and our churches to them and they will come in. They are coming in; not in large numbers but one by one. In the church of which my husband has been the pastor for nearly ten years there are over seventy Chinese membersabout one- third of our whole membership. Many inquire how Chinese converts are tested. They join the Christian Asso- ciation on probation and after a test of six or eight months are recommended to 12 Aliountain White Work in Kuntucicy. the church. Then they come before a committee of the church and are examined, and after studying the articles of faith, in their own language, for several weeks they are propounded for church membership, and if they prove satisfactory ar baptized and come into full fellowship with the church. They are not hurried into the church and are themselves timid and prefer to wait. We have no work among the Chinese women that we can call our own. Both Presbyterians and Methodists have such a work in San Francisco, and it divides into very little sections what can be at best but a small work, because there are only three or four hundred Chinese women in San Francisco, and not a tenth of these accessible. But if means would allow we would be glad to attempt a work among the women at Sacramento, where nothing is done for them. With our very limited resources we can save more by working among the thousands of men and boys. But we have much work by women of whom I would like to make mention. Patient and heroic, prayerful and soul-saving have been their efforts among the Chinese. I would like to tell you of one who has recently gone to her reward. Before leaving my home two months ago I called upon her and found her strength failing. But she was hopeful respecting her recovery, and the strongest incentive she had to get well was that she might have more opportunitks to tell the story of Jesus to her boys, as she called those in the Chinese school. And when death came to her, six Chinese acted as pall-bearers at her funeral, at her own request. The church was more than half ifiled with Chinese, and the scene was touching in the extreme, as one by one they went to look upon her face for the last time. You are all, doubtless, more or less familiar with the American Missionary, and read from time to time Mr. Ponds reports found therein. I will give a few statistics quoted from my husbands report, read recently before the General Asso- ciation of California, convened in Santa Cruz. They are as follows: Nineteen schools, as against 15 the last year; total enrollment of scholars, 2,823, as against 2,567 the former year; 40 teachers, of whom 14 were Chinese, as against 31 teachers the previous year, of whom 11 were Chinese; number of those who have professed to cease from idolatry, 175, as against 156 the year before; number of those who have given evidence of conversion, 121, as against 106 the former year, and the whole number of those who have turned to Christ during the history of the Mission. 400, who are scattered over the United States and in China. We hear of many of them who are doing good work for the Master and for the salva- tion of their countrymen. Toward the expense of the Mission during the past year the Chinese themselves have contributed $730.05. I would like to have you remember the name of our church. It is Bethany. Remember us in your prayers, for God has laid a great ~vork upon us. We started in much weakness, but God has been with us and blessed us. We have felt His presence in our Bethany as Martha and Mary of old did in theirs. We have heard the Masters voice saying unto us freqtiently, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these, My brethren, ye have done it unto Me. MOUNTAIN WHITE WORK IN KENTUCKY. BY MRS. A. A. MYERS. 4 There is an unnoticed class of people dwelling almost in the very centre of the settled portion of the United States. Our brother in black has been held up to the view of two continents for the last fifty years. And what is America going to

Mrs. A. A. Myers Myers, A. A., Mrs. Mountain White Work in Kentucky Bureau of Woman's Work 12-16

12 Aliountain White Work in Kuntucicy. the church. Then they come before a committee of the church and are examined, and after studying the articles of faith, in their own language, for several weeks they are propounded for church membership, and if they prove satisfactory ar baptized and come into full fellowship with the church. They are not hurried into the church and are themselves timid and prefer to wait. We have no work among the Chinese women that we can call our own. Both Presbyterians and Methodists have such a work in San Francisco, and it divides into very little sections what can be at best but a small work, because there are only three or four hundred Chinese women in San Francisco, and not a tenth of these accessible. But if means would allow we would be glad to attempt a work among the women at Sacramento, where nothing is done for them. With our very limited resources we can save more by working among the thousands of men and boys. But we have much work by women of whom I would like to make mention. Patient and heroic, prayerful and soul-saving have been their efforts among the Chinese. I would like to tell you of one who has recently gone to her reward. Before leaving my home two months ago I called upon her and found her strength failing. But she was hopeful respecting her recovery, and the strongest incentive she had to get well was that she might have more opportunitks to tell the story of Jesus to her boys, as she called those in the Chinese school. And when death came to her, six Chinese acted as pall-bearers at her funeral, at her own request. The church was more than half ifiled with Chinese, and the scene was touching in the extreme, as one by one they went to look upon her face for the last time. You are all, doubtless, more or less familiar with the American Missionary, and read from time to time Mr. Ponds reports found therein. I will give a few statistics quoted from my husbands report, read recently before the General Asso- ciation of California, convened in Santa Cruz. They are as follows: Nineteen schools, as against 15 the last year; total enrollment of scholars, 2,823, as against 2,567 the former year; 40 teachers, of whom 14 were Chinese, as against 31 teachers the previous year, of whom 11 were Chinese; number of those who have professed to cease from idolatry, 175, as against 156 the year before; number of those who have given evidence of conversion, 121, as against 106 the former year, and the whole number of those who have turned to Christ during the history of the Mission. 400, who are scattered over the United States and in China. We hear of many of them who are doing good work for the Master and for the salva- tion of their countrymen. Toward the expense of the Mission during the past year the Chinese themselves have contributed $730.05. I would like to have you remember the name of our church. It is Bethany. Remember us in your prayers, for God has laid a great ~vork upon us. We started in much weakness, but God has been with us and blessed us. We have felt His presence in our Bethany as Martha and Mary of old did in theirs. We have heard the Masters voice saying unto us freqtiently, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these, My brethren, ye have done it unto Me. MOUNTAIN WHITE WORK IN KENTUCKY. BY MRS. A. A. MYERS. 4 There is an unnoticed class of people dwelling almost in the very centre of the settled portion of the United States. Our brother in black has been held up to the view of two continents for the last fifty years. And what is America going to lfountain White Work in Kentucky. 13 do with him and for him, has been a question which has interested the whole civil- ized world. This same question for a still longer time has been propounded in regard to the red man of the forest, and in later years concerning the Chinese. And right nobly has the Christian brotherhood evidenced its purpose to make men of these degraded classes. But until recently it has escaped the notice of these Chris- tian workers that we have another class as needy perhaps as any. No spice of romance is connected with them. No barbarous tale of cruelty could be told~to awaken sympathy in them. They are simply poor people, who during slavery were unable to obtain large plantations and so were driven ly the arrogant Blue- grass slaveholder on the one side, and the greedy cotton-planter on the other, back into the mountains, where they are shut away from the rest of the world by moun- tain barriers, and still more hopelessly by the haughty caste spirit of the slave- holding monarchs, who disdain to have anything to do with them except to seek their votes. These people are not really poor. Most of them own farms of three or four hun- dred acres; and the soil, if properly tilled, would be quite productive. Their plow- ing is done in the most primitive manner. A single horse attached to a little shovel plow simply tears the sod a little, enough so the weeds spring up luxuri- ani ly, and the women and children must work hard in the hot sun to destroy them, while the lord of the home saddles his horse and rides to town, to sit on store boxes and tell low stories. This people, especially the male portion, seem to have a natural distaste for labor. They would be aristocratic if they could. In days of slavery they had their household servants, and tried to imitate the more wealthy slave-owners by living in idleness, and they still look upon labor as degrading. They make no effort to get themselves homes. The large majority live in log cabins, with no windows. The doors stand open winter and summer. The women in cool weather always sit with a little shawl around them and a sun- bonnet on. There are generally two rooms to each house, usually with a chimney or open hall between them, so you have to go out of doors to pass from one to the other. In the kitchen (which also serves as dining-room) is a large fireplace and a cook stove, if they are the happy possessors of one. The other is the sitting and sleeping-room. You will often see three beds and one or two trundle-beds in a single room. Here the whole family and all the visitors sleep. We have sought to rest with thirteen of us in a room, perhaps 15 by 20 feet, and not a window in it and the doors shut. Fortunately the large- mouthed fireplace gave a pittance of ventilation. No carpets are used, and furni- ture is very limited. I believe nine-tenths of the people could put all their goods on a couple of loads and be ready to movc at an hours notice. Families are large, numbering twelve, fifteen or even nineteen children. Girls marry young, and seem to be entirely satisfied with their condition. You seldom hear a desire expressed for anything they dont possess. Give them a box of snuff and a stick to chew it with and you never hear a murmur escape their lips. To- bacco is indispensable. Old and young, male and female, are wedded to it. I have known of an old gentleman working all day for fifty cents and spending forty cents at night for tobacco for himself and wife and nine children. They seem to be without a standard in the land. They live so isolated, and have measured themselves by themselves until they have lost all idea of accurate judg- ment. Morality and sobriety are hardly looked for, even among church members and ministers. Religion may be up to fever heat, while morality is down to zero. People confess, as they call it, and join the church, and in their entire life thereafter you could never know any difference. 14 Afountajit White Work in Kentucky. They are satisfied if their names are on the chuych book. I dont think they ever question their eternal salvation after they are once inside a church. If a per- son dies without having joined a church his friends frame some theory on which they rest their hope of his salvation. A young man was shot a little while ago in a drunken broil. As he fell mortally wounded he cried, Oh, Lord ! His mother is sure he is safe because he called on the Lord. They have no conception of living religion. They have no prayer or conference meetings. Aside from our own I doubt if there is a prayer meeting nearer than Berea, seventy miles away. There is no family prayer in all the land. I asked my class of boys, twenty or more in number, how many had ever heard their mothers voice in prayer. Not on? of them could raise a hand. At another school I asked a still larger class the same question, and only one girl raised her hand. There is no gathering of the little home nestlings together and instructing tnemno Bible instruction given in the family. It has ceased to be a wonder to me, to ask nearly grown boys some of the most simple Bible questions, and hear them answer, I dont know. An M. E. minister in one of his pastoral visits took occasion to dwell with some stress on the blessedness of walking in the light. The mother showed how she liter- alized by promptly remarking, Yes; Ive told John I wanted a hole sawed in this end of the house, but he wont do it. During the same call he asked a young lady if she was preparing to go to judgment. She replied, No, I reckin I wont go. If I do Ill have to walk, for we haint got but two nags, and Rachel and Becky always ride them. The prevailing churches are the Reform or Camphellites, the Methodists, and the Missionary and Anti-Missionary Baptists. The latter church is strong all through the mountains. They are bigoted and ignorant, and boast that their knowledge comes direct from the throne, and they have nothing to do with man- made theories, as they call education, Their preaching is a sort of canting reiter- ation of the text and what few Scripture verses they chance to know and some hackneyed expressions. They are great on arguing, and it would be laughable if it was not so pitiful to hear the profound questions they discuss. Last season one of these preachers nearly broke up one of our mission Sunday-Schools, which we could attend only each alternate Sabbath. In the passage that reads And anon they tell Him, he contended that A-non was an angel, and they referred to the angel A-non. Each Sunday when we were not there that important question had to be discussed. One of these same preachers took his children from school because they were taught the heresy in geography that the world is round. They do all they can to prejulice the people against our work. They call our religion railroad religion. They are great barriers in our way. Still we have been cheered this year to see that their hold on the young people is loosening, and we are getting their hearts in spite of the protests of their parents. One of our mission Sunday-Schools, which has averaged this season one hundred, is composed almost entirely of young people and children, seldom ever a parent there. The Smith American Organ Co. have honored God and themselves, and will ever be held by some hearts in grateful remembrance by their gift to that society of a new organ. I have some times thought, as I have heard the young voices ring out with such enthusiasm, that, though critics might smile at our endeavor, Heaven would not disdain our offering of praise. The dingy low walls, the glass- less windows, the tobacco besmeared floor, become transformed to a holy temple, where God deigned to naake visible His presence, and it has been a sacred place. Our hope of this people centres largely in the young. If it were not for them, we could not feel it right to stay among them. Afountain White Work in Kentucky. 15 Another barrier to be overcome is their habits of worship. They have meetings but once a month during the summer and none at all during the winter. When they have service it is more for a visit than worship. Their churches are rough log houses, and so small that the greater part of the congregation remain out of doors. Four or more ministers are always in attendance, and all must preach. The congregation expect a tiresome tiiue, and from the first are restless. They go out and come in, and they keep a constant march to and from the water pail, which usually sits on the desk in front of the speaker. Several grown people at a time will be standing waiting on each other at the pail. The speaker seems to be used to such things, and not at all disconcerted. Nearly all their services are funeral services for those who may have been dead for years. They bury their dead the same day or the day following death. They have no religious service, except a prayer at the grave, if there chance to be a minister present. Generally about a year after death, but often from five to fifteen years after, they have the funeral sermon preached. In regard to healthfulness of our mountain home, we have felt somewhat dis- appointed. Up so high, with nice springs and spring streams, one would expect a healthy climate. On the contrary, almost every one is ailing. Coughs and colds are universal. It is no wonder the natives are unhealthy; their habits of living would seem to prohibit health. They eat corn bread or hoe cake and bacon; some have flour, but it is always made up into hot biscuit, shortened with lard. They have this, with little variation, three times a day, 365 days in a year. In summer, green beans cooked with bacon is added to the bill of fare. Of course the blood becomes impoverished, and almost every one has scrofula. Calomel and pills are the great panacea for all their bodily ills. Pills are brought on by the quart, and sold by the merchants like any other commodity. Cleanliness of the person is an unheard of luxury ; I doubt whether they ever bathe. Children come to the table with unwashed faces. They are put to bed with the same clothes they wear during the day. Then add to all this the fact that tobacco is used almost from the cradle, and whiskies and toddies from the time the poor child opens its eyes to this world, and its no great marvel that gray-haired men are exceedingly rare, and its the old man and the old woman when one has reached the age of twenty-five. Now comes the question, What are we doing for the people? We have been with them nearly two years, and this has been our effort from the first, to get them to see that religion is a life rather than a sectarian belief. We have sought to impress upon them that joining a church is not Christianity. We have succeeded in getting a few to take part in our prayer meetings, and we have the assurance that all the people are awaking to the fact that God has some demands upon them. We have from the first kept up regular Thursday ui~ht prayer meetings; have had good attendance, but often only Mr. Myers and myself to take part in them except as others read Scripture verses. On the Sabbath we have Sunday-school at 9:30. Average attendance, 100: preaching at 11. I hasten home, saddle my horse, and ride six miles to the next railroad station (Pleasant View). Here I have met 100 or more young people. I have been surprised that in a land where a woman isnt expected to know any- thing, or be anything but a doll or a drudge that there has been so little prejudice against my school. Some, of course, have thought a woman entirely out of her sphere to undertake such work and have taken occasion to remark to my friends: Why, Mrs. Myers opens the school by prayer, just as Mr. Myers would. I dont know but its all right, but it dont seem just the proper thing for a woman to do. Mr. M. has a mission in South Williamsburg or the mills, where numbers of chil 16 Colored People of the South dren are growing up in the midst of gambling and shooting. Prof. W. has, about the same hour, a school two miles out in another direction. At night we have ser- vices again in Williamsburg. At these services we have more than can get into the house, and many are obliged to leave for lack of accommodation. Tuesday nights we go to Pleasant View and help them learn the Gospel Songs. Each alternate Wednesday evening, church socials; each alternate Friday afternoon, Band of Hope ; Saturday evening, choir drill; Covenant Meeting once a month on Satur- day afternoon. Mr. Myers has preached during the year beginning with Oct. 82, one hundred and forty-two sermons. The services, together with the other public services just mentioned, have amounted to three hundred and forty. Have attended fifty or more meetings conducted by others. We spend all the remaining time our strength will permit in calling at the homes. We hive a neat modern church nearly finished, and so far without foreign help. But no one knows what an effort has been required. Mr. Myers would announce a working bee to draw stone or any such work; would try to enthuse the people ashe has so often done in the North. But when the time would come he has worked all day alone. We have learned at last that this people dont enthuse. We are hard at work in our high-school enterprise. We have Prof. and Mrs. W. and Miss G., all from the North, with us. We hope to get a school, the good influence of which will never die out of these mountains. These are peculiar people. What I have said of them has reference to the gen- eral class of society. But there are some who seem of better stock, who are~ shrewd, keen, far-sighted people. You cannot find their superiors in native ability in any country. Though often lacking in culture and morality, they still hold a. wide influence over the rest, so that something besides goodness is required in those who wish to come among them as helpers. There must be ability to adapt oneself to these widely diverse conditions. One needs wisdom and tact to get along with the shrewdest, and such a love for souls that he can come with a help- ing hand to the most degraded, nor be discouraged if, with a heart brimful of sympathy, he reaches the hand a long time only to see it rejected by those most in need. The work is a work of time. The majority of the people are unstable, thriftless improvident and ignorant. Slavery left its blight of impotency and profligacy upon them. They come and go as did their fathers a hundred years ago. Their tools and utensils are the same their great-grandparents used, and they are con-- tent with them. We never worked harder and saw less result in the conversion of sinners than while in Kentucky, and yet never felt more satisfied that we were where God wants us, and doing an important work. Unless these people have help. they will prove a fretting leprosy in our nation. WORK AMONG THE COLORED PEOPLE OF THE SOUTH. BY MISS IDA H. BEACH. No small part of the work undertaken by the A. M. A. is that among the colored people of the South. Perhaps we may judge something of how vast this work is n itself, and how far-reaching in its results, if we consider for a few moments the numbers and condition of the colored people. Twenty years ago about 4,000,000 people were liberated from bondage, with all the evils resulting from the system of slavery resting upon them. There was great rejoicing among lovers of freedom when the Proclamation of Emancipation was issued. The slaves themselves, w ild

Miss Ida M. Beach Beach, Ida M., Miss Work Among the Colored People of the South Bureau of Woman's Work 16-19

16 Colored People of the South dren are growing up in the midst of gambling and shooting. Prof. W. has, about the same hour, a school two miles out in another direction. At night we have ser- vices again in Williamsburg. At these services we have more than can get into the house, and many are obliged to leave for lack of accommodation. Tuesday nights we go to Pleasant View and help them learn the Gospel Songs. Each alternate Wednesday evening, church socials; each alternate Friday afternoon, Band of Hope ; Saturday evening, choir drill; Covenant Meeting once a month on Satur- day afternoon. Mr. Myers has preached during the year beginning with Oct. 82, one hundred and forty-two sermons. The services, together with the other public services just mentioned, have amounted to three hundred and forty. Have attended fifty or more meetings conducted by others. We spend all the remaining time our strength will permit in calling at the homes. We hive a neat modern church nearly finished, and so far without foreign help. But no one knows what an effort has been required. Mr. Myers would announce a working bee to draw stone or any such work; would try to enthuse the people ashe has so often done in the North. But when the time would come he has worked all day alone. We have learned at last that this people dont enthuse. We are hard at work in our high-school enterprise. We have Prof. and Mrs. W. and Miss G., all from the North, with us. We hope to get a school, the good influence of which will never die out of these mountains. These are peculiar people. What I have said of them has reference to the gen- eral class of society. But there are some who seem of better stock, who are~ shrewd, keen, far-sighted people. You cannot find their superiors in native ability in any country. Though often lacking in culture and morality, they still hold a. wide influence over the rest, so that something besides goodness is required in those who wish to come among them as helpers. There must be ability to adapt oneself to these widely diverse conditions. One needs wisdom and tact to get along with the shrewdest, and such a love for souls that he can come with a help- ing hand to the most degraded, nor be discouraged if, with a heart brimful of sympathy, he reaches the hand a long time only to see it rejected by those most in need. The work is a work of time. The majority of the people are unstable, thriftless improvident and ignorant. Slavery left its blight of impotency and profligacy upon them. They come and go as did their fathers a hundred years ago. Their tools and utensils are the same their great-grandparents used, and they are con-- tent with them. We never worked harder and saw less result in the conversion of sinners than while in Kentucky, and yet never felt more satisfied that we were where God wants us, and doing an important work. Unless these people have help. they will prove a fretting leprosy in our nation. WORK AMONG THE COLORED PEOPLE OF THE SOUTH. BY MISS IDA H. BEACH. No small part of the work undertaken by the A. M. A. is that among the colored people of the South. Perhaps we may judge something of how vast this work is n itself, and how far-reaching in its results, if we consider for a few moments the numbers and condition of the colored people. Twenty years ago about 4,000,000 people were liberated from bondage, with all the evils resulting from the system of slavery resting upon them. There was great rejoicing among lovers of freedom when the Proclamation of Emancipation was issued. The slaves themselves, w ild Colored People qf the South. with joy, shouted, Were free! Were free! The year of jubilee has come ! Free! yes, free! but with the burdens of manhood and womanhood suddenly thrust upon them. Freedom brought the right and opportunity of establishing homes. Glorious privilege! But do we not all know how much good judgment and wisdom and thought and planning it takes to maintain a true home? Freedom gave them the right of keeping their little ones and seeing them grow to manhood and womanhood, but oh! how much of patience and God-given power it requires to train the little feet to tread the right way! Four million people, half civilized, uneducated, untrained, with the judgment and reason of children, hitherto knowing little of the ways of the outer world, suddenly brought into lifes conflicts! What an amount of instruction they needed! Right here the American Missionary Association stepped in and assumed the work of training these people. Christian men and women, filled with love for the Master, went down among these lowly ones. They carried the Gospel of Jesus Christ, established schools and churches, teaching in the open air, or in rude huts and deserted cabins. For twenty years this work has been carried on, and much good has been done in the name of the Lord. But to-day there are between six and seven million colored people in our Southland. The work of the A. M. A., together with all done by other societies and by students going forth from the colleges as teachers, as yet scarcely begins to reach this great number. Their first need is to be Christianized, for this alone lifts them up and gives a desire for better things. It is the religion of Jesus Christ alone which has given to us our high estate. How much we owe to the training of Christian mothers! Let us pity and stoop to lift up these ignorant ones. Send out those who can carry the glad tidings and point to the Lamb of God, who taketh away the sin of the world. Let us do all we can to teach them what the pure religion is. But we cannot stop here. We must teach them how to use it. Womans work for woman, surely, for this must be done in the homes. Freedom gave them the right to establish homes! They did the best they knew how, many of them, but they needed teachingthey need it to-day. They must be taught thrift and industry, and cleanliness and order. They want some one to come to them aad help them to transform their huts into homes. Could you see their rags, their ugly, misshapen garments, you would agree with me that the women and girls greatly need to be taught the use of the needle. Of course Christian schools need to be multiplied among them, where the rudi- ments of an English education shall be thoroughly given, where sewing and cooking, the care of the house and the care of the sick shall be carefully taught the girls, where the boys may learn the use of tools and all that pertains to good farming. Our stronghold is the children. We can never eradicate the evils existing among the older generation. Slavery left too much ignorance and superstition to ever be driven from the minds of those who lived under its sway. But we are responsible for the coming generations. The American Missionary Association alms to reach the young and meet their needs by the workers sent out. Perhaps our work in Savannah will be illustrative of that done in many other parts of the field. We have there established a church and school. There are no~v in school over 200 pupils. The majority of these remain long enough with us to obtain a good common-school education. We have also a normal grade, where methols of teaching are taught those who desire to fit themselves for teachers.. 18 fIolored People of the South. Besides this we have fitted up a sewing-room, where the girls learn every part of sewing and repairing, cutting and basting. Many schools have shops for boys; we look forward to the time when we may be able to have them, too. We are just establishing a reading-room. Those who have read Prof. Salisburys article in the November MISSIONARY understand how much this is needed. In our present circumstances we arrange it so that all pupils of higher grades have a daily reading hour, with teacher to direct. Then once in two weeks the older pupils meet for a social reading. In our devotional exercises and school prayer meetings we aim to assist them in a knowledge of true religion. Last year we observed the Week of Prayer, and in the daily meetings held for several weeks some found the way to Christ and Christian life. Our Church and Sunday-School work reaches many who are not connected with our school. We have a devoted mi~sionary who spends her time in visiting the parents and children in their homes, ministering to the wants of the sick and needy, and holding Bible and Missionary meetings. This is a bare outline of our work. I presume many of you are saying. Have there been no results during these last twenty years ? Oh yes, we have a bright side to the picture. When we are tired and discouraged, and wonder if harvest time will never come, we go to some of the pleasant homes where great changes have been wrought. We point to a scholar and tell her past history, and then thank God that the seed sown found a lodging place and good soil. In the cities when the large schools are, and where there are fair public schools where there is constant contact with civilized life, many of the colored people live well. Yet there may be a neat, cosy home just across the street, and a few doors beyond, a wretched hovel. In the country, when the Teachers Home and little school house are built beside their log cabins, they catch a glimpse of better things than they have known. The modest house, freshly painted, with the neat, cosy rooms inside very simple and plain to usseems like a palace to them. They begin to want the same. The children go to school and come home with wonderful things to tell. Faces and hands become clean, the woolly heads are mars. ~r~!ully combed, rents are mended, the girls put on clean collars. The missionary shows the women how to fashion home-made lounges and stools, they are covered with some bright calico, the floor is scrubbed white, and they begin to live. The teacher says that they must work if they want to have homes, money begins to be saved, and before you know it little frame houses are going up beside the old cabin. A good horse or mule, with a bright shiny buggy, takes the place of the old steer and cart. Yes, indeed, much has been accomplished. But we had very few workers in the early days among four million people, although just as many as could be supported with the means furnished, and to-day, among nearly seven millions, we have but 336 workers. Millions sit in darkness right here in our own land. A mighty work is to be done, and the work in Africa must be done largely by these people, too. We need more money; Christian men and women to go forth, and Christian men and women who are willing to send them. The harvest truly is plenteous, but the laborers are few. Pray ye therefore the Lard of the harvest that he will send forth laborers into his harvest. He that reapeth receiveth wages, and gathereth fruit unto life eternal. 19 Report of the Secretary. REPORT OF THE SECRETARY. The information from the field, to which you have listened, explains to you the necessity for the organization of a Bureau of Womans Work. It was organized in April, 1883, for the purpose, as was then stated: 1. To give information to the ladies in the churches of the variety of work sus- tained by the Aseociation and to assist in devising plans of help. 2. To promote correspondence with churches, Sabbath-schools, missionary soci- eties or individuals who will undertake work of a special character, such as the support of missionaries, aiding of students, supplying clothing, furnishing goods, and meeting other wants on mission ground. 3. To send to the churches, conferences or associations desiring it, experienced and intelligent lady missionaries to address them, giving fuller details of our methods of work. It was believed that the growing interest on the part of the ladies of our churches, and their evident disposition to aid more effectively in the elevation of women, particularly the women of the South, called for such a department. Already the ladies of one State had organized the Womans Aid to the A. M. A., that they might have their definite line of work in the support of lady mis- sionaries, and inquiry had been made by many how best to assist in this work. It was recognized that in no other way could a general interest be awakened and maintained so well as by giving direct information from the field, and the twenty years experience of the Association in the South, during which time more than 3,000 different ladies had been employed as missionaries and teachers, the knowledge gained of the peculiarities of the field and best methods of reaching the people, and the thorough organization of the different departments of labor in home, school, and church, prepared us to bring before the ladies the information necessary, and to offer most excellent opportunities for special work for women. The ready response to this movement confirms the wisdom of the step, and we trust that ere long the Bureau will open new avenues of usefulness to the ladies of the churches, and give enlargement and efficiency to the work in the field. Immediately following the organization of the Bureau, Miss Rose Kinney, of Oberlin, 0., for many years engaged in the Southern work, and recently located in one of the dark corners of the field, McIntosh, Ga., was detailed for service in the North. She spent about six weeks in Ohio, Michigan, Illinois and Iowa, ad- dressing ladies meetings at the General Associations, and with good results. In June the Secretary of the Bureau was present at the State Conferences of Vermont and Maine, and gave information of the work in the field, resulting in the appoint- m~nt of a State Committee of ladies in Vermont, to secure funds for the support of a missionary. Early in September Miss Anna M. Cahill, for nine years connected with Fisk University, Nashville, Tenn., was detailed for special service, and has recently attended a series of meetings in Michigan and Illinois. It is our purpose thus to bring the work before the ladies whenever and wherever opportunity is given, through different teachers and missionaries whom we may be able to spare temporarily from the field. Within the year just closed, Sept. 3), the Association has had special aid from ladies North in the support of seven missionaries, as follows: Ladies of Maine, support of Miss Lunt at Selma, Ala., and Miss Farrington at Wilming ton, N. C $675 00 Ladies of First and Second Cong. Churches, Oberlin, 0., support of Miss Stevenson at Atlanta, Ga 387 00 Ladies of Illinois, support of Miss Clark at Mobile, Ala 214 46

Report of the Secretary Bureau of Woman's Work 19-21

19 Report of the Secretary. REPORT OF THE SECRETARY. The information from the field, to which you have listened, explains to you the necessity for the organization of a Bureau of Womans Work. It was organized in April, 1883, for the purpose, as was then stated: 1. To give information to the ladies in the churches of the variety of work sus- tained by the Aseociation and to assist in devising plans of help. 2. To promote correspondence with churches, Sabbath-schools, missionary soci- eties or individuals who will undertake work of a special character, such as the support of missionaries, aiding of students, supplying clothing, furnishing goods, and meeting other wants on mission ground. 3. To send to the churches, conferences or associations desiring it, experienced and intelligent lady missionaries to address them, giving fuller details of our methods of work. It was believed that the growing interest on the part of the ladies of our churches, and their evident disposition to aid more effectively in the elevation of women, particularly the women of the South, called for such a department. Already the ladies of one State had organized the Womans Aid to the A. M. A., that they might have their definite line of work in the support of lady mis- sionaries, and inquiry had been made by many how best to assist in this work. It was recognized that in no other way could a general interest be awakened and maintained so well as by giving direct information from the field, and the twenty years experience of the Association in the South, during which time more than 3,000 different ladies had been employed as missionaries and teachers, the knowledge gained of the peculiarities of the field and best methods of reaching the people, and the thorough organization of the different departments of labor in home, school, and church, prepared us to bring before the ladies the information necessary, and to offer most excellent opportunities for special work for women. The ready response to this movement confirms the wisdom of the step, and we trust that ere long the Bureau will open new avenues of usefulness to the ladies of the churches, and give enlargement and efficiency to the work in the field. Immediately following the organization of the Bureau, Miss Rose Kinney, of Oberlin, 0., for many years engaged in the Southern work, and recently located in one of the dark corners of the field, McIntosh, Ga., was detailed for service in the North. She spent about six weeks in Ohio, Michigan, Illinois and Iowa, ad- dressing ladies meetings at the General Associations, and with good results. In June the Secretary of the Bureau was present at the State Conferences of Vermont and Maine, and gave information of the work in the field, resulting in the appoint- m~nt of a State Committee of ladies in Vermont, to secure funds for the support of a missionary. Early in September Miss Anna M. Cahill, for nine years connected with Fisk University, Nashville, Tenn., was detailed for special service, and has recently attended a series of meetings in Michigan and Illinois. It is our purpose thus to bring the work before the ladies whenever and wherever opportunity is given, through different teachers and missionaries whom we may be able to spare temporarily from the field. Within the year just closed, Sept. 3), the Association has had special aid from ladies North in the support of seven missionaries, as follows: Ladies of Maine, support of Miss Lunt at Selma, Ala., and Miss Farrington at Wilming ton, N. C $675 00 Ladies of First and Second Cong. Churches, Oberlin, 0., support of Miss Stevenson at Atlanta, Ga 387 00 Ladies of Illinois, support of Miss Clark at Mobile, Ala 214 46 20 Report of the Secretary. Ladies of Wisconsin, support of Miss Jillson at Montgomery, Ala 254 33 Ladies of Congregational Churches, Chelsea, Mass., supuort of Mrs. Steele at Chatta- nooga, Tenn 488 8t Ladies of Iowa, support of Miss Gerrish at New Orleans, La 406 45 Total $2,426 03 In this connection we would mention also that a lady missionary, Miss Clary,. at B3aufort, S. C., was sustained to the amount of $300 by the Sunday-school of the Central Congregational Church, Brooklyn. Supplies in the furnishing of Mission Homes and dormitories have been recently furnished, and there is very marked increase of aid in the furnishing of clothing, both new and second-hand, for the benefit of students who are struggling in the greatest poverty to obtain an education. While, therefore, but a few months have elapsed since the organization of the Bureau of Womans Work, its advantage is already manifest. Since the field of missionary operations in our own country is large and diversi- fied, and three leading societies exist, each having its distinct and important work, viz.: The New West Education Commission, the American Home Missionary Society, and the American Missionary Associationno effort has been made by the American Missionary Association to organize local societies auxiliary to itself; but that a society should exist in every church, able to co-operate directly with this. Association in its great work for the Chinese, the Indians, the negroes and the needy whites of the South, seems apparent. To this end we urge upon the ladies, organization, as helpful to systematic giving, and to facilitate such movement we present a form of constitution for a co- operative society, that may be open to the call from all parts of our country. This we greatly prefer as avoiding complication and preserving feliowship and unity in the home work. Such is the pressure of claims upon us, however, through the needs of our field, that except as such opportunity is afforded for aid to the Am. Miss. Assoc., we feel that we may be constrained to ask for organi- zation auxiliary to the A. M. A. exclusivelyfor the women and children of 6,000,000 of colored people of the South alone presents a field for missionary work in the elevation of women, which we must not ignore, from the responsibility of which we cannot escape. We are just now entering upon a new year of work. Of the 175 ladies appointed to the various departments of missionary labor, twelve are engaged for special home visitation among the people. You can see at a glance that this number is insufficient for that line of duty. Although our teachers are miB3ionaries, and accomplish much through the scho& s and various agencies set at work for the elevation of the people, yet we ought to have at least one experienced and efficient woman at every mission station, whose entire time should be given to special work in the homes of the people. Not only do we desire this, but the most urgent appeals are sent us from the field for help of this kind, not instead of that which we are doing in school and church, but supplementary to it, as necessary in securing the re~ults we seek. Already fifteen applications are before us for lady missionaries to work in the homes, and we wait only for the women of the North to furnish us the necessary funds. As fast as we receive pledges of support the missionaries will be sent out. May the heart of every Christian woman be quickened to new impulse for the development of womanhood in those in our own land, so degraded and helpless! Con.stitutionThe Bureau in the West. FORM OF CONSTITUTION OF WOMANS MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. ART. 1. This Society shall be called the Womans Co-operative Missionary Society, Church. ART. 2. Its object shall be to co-operate with the established missionary socie- ties of the Congregational churches of America, in diffusing missionary intelli- gence, increasing interest in prayer, and in raising funds for missionary work in this country. ART. 3. The officers of this Society shah be a President, a Vice-President, a Secretary, a Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of members. The Treasurer shall keep separate accounts for the different societies co-operating, or, if preferred, a Treasurer may be appointed for each. ART. 4. Contributors to this Society may designate to which branch of mission- ary work they wish their contributions applied. Undesignated contributions may be assigned by vote of the Executive Committee. ART. 5. Any lady may become a member of this Society by contributing a sum not less than one dollar annually, or ten cents monthly. Gentlemen elected at any regular meeting may become honorary members by the payment of dollars. ART. 6. members present at any regularly called meeting shall constitui;e a quorum for business. ART. 7. Meetings shall be held monthly, at which the Secretary shall give infor- mation of the work of the various societies assisted. Special meetings may be ~called by the officers and Executive Committee. Meetings shall be opened by devotional exercises. ART. 8. A vote of two-thirds of the members present at any regular meeting shall be requisite for making any change in this constitution. THE BUREAU IN THE WEST. BY MISS ANNA M. CAHILL. One main object of the Womans Bureau, as stated at the time of its organiza- tion, is to diffuse information among the ladies of our churches, as to our work in its various departments. The carrying out of this purpose led to my eight weeks of itineracy among the conferences and churches of Wisconsin and Michigan. If I went to inform I went also to learnto see how fares our cause in these .churches. Especially I sought to learn how strong a hold the work of the Amen- can Missionary Association has upon the sympathy and effort of the Christian ladies of that section, what organized system of helpfulness they already have in this line, or what in their judgment can be done and will be done toward incor- porating this work in their regular l)lan of missionary operations for each year. As I expected, I found the interest in our cause in various stages of develop- ment. It is not strange that in some places thi ladies did not even so much as know that there was a Womans Bureau. The Bureau is in its infancy, and the fact of its existence has not yet taken hold of us all in any practical way. In many churchesnot by any means always the larger onesI found an intelligent appreciation of the needs and claims of the South. We have had many workers from these States of the West, or rather of the in- tenor, and when I had the pleasure of going into a community that had sent out one or more to the work in some part of our field, I found always an enthusiastic interest and a warm response to my appeals. My introduction to the warm-hearted Christian people of Wisconsin was at the

Form of Constitution of Woman's Missionary Societies Bureau of Woman's Work 21

Con.stitutionThe Bureau in the West. FORM OF CONSTITUTION OF WOMANS MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. ART. 1. This Society shall be called the Womans Co-operative Missionary Society, Church. ART. 2. Its object shall be to co-operate with the established missionary socie- ties of the Congregational churches of America, in diffusing missionary intelli- gence, increasing interest in prayer, and in raising funds for missionary work in this country. ART. 3. The officers of this Society shah be a President, a Vice-President, a Secretary, a Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of members. The Treasurer shall keep separate accounts for the different societies co-operating, or, if preferred, a Treasurer may be appointed for each. ART. 4. Contributors to this Society may designate to which branch of mission- ary work they wish their contributions applied. Undesignated contributions may be assigned by vote of the Executive Committee. ART. 5. Any lady may become a member of this Society by contributing a sum not less than one dollar annually, or ten cents monthly. Gentlemen elected at any regular meeting may become honorary members by the payment of dollars. ART. 6. members present at any regularly called meeting shall constitui;e a quorum for business. ART. 7. Meetings shall be held monthly, at which the Secretary shall give infor- mation of the work of the various societies assisted. Special meetings may be ~called by the officers and Executive Committee. Meetings shall be opened by devotional exercises. ART. 8. A vote of two-thirds of the members present at any regular meeting shall be requisite for making any change in this constitution. THE BUREAU IN THE WEST. BY MISS ANNA M. CAHILL. One main object of the Womans Bureau, as stated at the time of its organiza- tion, is to diffuse information among the ladies of our churches, as to our work in its various departments. The carrying out of this purpose led to my eight weeks of itineracy among the conferences and churches of Wisconsin and Michigan. If I went to inform I went also to learnto see how fares our cause in these .churches. Especially I sought to learn how strong a hold the work of the Amen- can Missionary Association has upon the sympathy and effort of the Christian ladies of that section, what organized system of helpfulness they already have in this line, or what in their judgment can be done and will be done toward incor- porating this work in their regular l)lan of missionary operations for each year. As I expected, I found the interest in our cause in various stages of develop- ment. It is not strange that in some places thi ladies did not even so much as know that there was a Womans Bureau. The Bureau is in its infancy, and the fact of its existence has not yet taken hold of us all in any practical way. In many churchesnot by any means always the larger onesI found an intelligent appreciation of the needs and claims of the South. We have had many workers from these States of the West, or rather of the in- tenor, and when I had the pleasure of going into a community that had sent out one or more to the work in some part of our field, I found always an enthusiastic interest and a warm response to my appeals. My introduction to the warm-hearted Christian people of Wisconsin was at the

Miss Anna M. Cahill Cahill, Anna M., Miss The Bureau in the West Bureau of Women's Work 21-23

Con.stitutionThe Bureau in the West. FORM OF CONSTITUTION OF WOMANS MISSIONARY SOCIETIES. ART. 1. This Society shall be called the Womans Co-operative Missionary Society, Church. ART. 2. Its object shall be to co-operate with the established missionary socie- ties of the Congregational churches of America, in diffusing missionary intelli- gence, increasing interest in prayer, and in raising funds for missionary work in this country. ART. 3. The officers of this Society shah be a President, a Vice-President, a Secretary, a Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of members. The Treasurer shall keep separate accounts for the different societies co-operating, or, if preferred, a Treasurer may be appointed for each. ART. 4. Contributors to this Society may designate to which branch of mission- ary work they wish their contributions applied. Undesignated contributions may be assigned by vote of the Executive Committee. ART. 5. Any lady may become a member of this Society by contributing a sum not less than one dollar annually, or ten cents monthly. Gentlemen elected at any regular meeting may become honorary members by the payment of dollars. ART. 6. members present at any regularly called meeting shall constitui;e a quorum for business. ART. 7. Meetings shall be held monthly, at which the Secretary shall give infor- mation of the work of the various societies assisted. Special meetings may be ~called by the officers and Executive Committee. Meetings shall be opened by devotional exercises. ART. 8. A vote of two-thirds of the members present at any regular meeting shall be requisite for making any change in this constitution. THE BUREAU IN THE WEST. BY MISS ANNA M. CAHILL. One main object of the Womans Bureau, as stated at the time of its organiza- tion, is to diffuse information among the ladies of our churches, as to our work in its various departments. The carrying out of this purpose led to my eight weeks of itineracy among the conferences and churches of Wisconsin and Michigan. If I went to inform I went also to learnto see how fares our cause in these .churches. Especially I sought to learn how strong a hold the work of the Amen- can Missionary Association has upon the sympathy and effort of the Christian ladies of that section, what organized system of helpfulness they already have in this line, or what in their judgment can be done and will be done toward incor- porating this work in their regular l)lan of missionary operations for each year. As I expected, I found the interest in our cause in various stages of develop- ment. It is not strange that in some places thi ladies did not even so much as know that there was a Womans Bureau. The Bureau is in its infancy, and the fact of its existence has not yet taken hold of us all in any practical way. In many churchesnot by any means always the larger onesI found an intelligent appreciation of the needs and claims of the South. We have had many workers from these States of the West, or rather of the in- tenor, and when I had the pleasure of going into a community that had sent out one or more to the work in some part of our field, I found always an enthusiastic interest and a warm response to my appeals. My introduction to the warm-hearted Christian people of Wisconsin was at the 22 The Bureau in the West. State Association, met at Racine Sept. 24. Finding on my arrival a large rcpre- sentation of ladies gathered to celebrate the anniversary of their Foreign Mission- ary Society, I felt sure that there must be also an active sympathy for the work in our own land, and I was not disappointed. On the following day, at a special gathering of the ladies, a State society was organized, whose range of objects should include all the benevolent societies of our denomination, working in this country, leaving conferences and local organizations at liberty to contribute through one treasurer or several treasurers, to any of these societies. After attending this gathering of the tribes it was my privilege to go by invitation to a few of the towns in southern Wisconsin. Of course the State organization has not yet stretched out its arms over the State in the formation of local societies. I can but think that Beloit, Whitewater, Geneva and Keno- sha will be among the first to take definite steps in this direction. Wisconsin has by special contributions fr)m her ladies supported a missionary in the South for several years and is still doing so. When through regular channels of organiza- tion they shall make this a part of their regular yearly charity, the arrangement can be more permanently relied upon by the Womans Bureau. Many, I think, will endorse the sentiment of a prominent lady in Michigan who said to me: I think the ladies of each one of these Western States ought to support one or more teachermissionaries under the Association. On the 9th of October, at Grand Rapids, I joined the representative of the Womans Department of the American Home Missionary Society, with whom the longer tour of six weeks was to be made in Michigan. We were then on our way to the Grand River Conference at Allendale, where we found a hearty welcome. In this Conference there is a branch of the State Womans Home Mis- sionary Society, a society already more than a year old and organized on the same bro3d platform as that adopted in Wisconsin. Before the meeting of the Southern Michigan Conference we were able to visit, in rapid succession, the churches at Middleville, Vermontrille, and Olivet, in all of which an evident sympathy in the various forms of our work led me to hope that increased effort might result from this new presentation of our needs. In the Southern Conference we found also a branch organization, union in its character, and so efficiently officered that all is likely to be done that can be accomplished through it. Nowhere did I find stancher friends for our Christian educational work in the South than in this conference. At this point a short break occurred in our Michigan tour. A rapid journey brought us to Lake City in time to spend one day at the Minnesota State Associa- tionjust to grasp the hands of our Minnesota friends and be assured of their continued helpfulness. The Womans Home Missionary Society voted that at the next annual meeting the constitution should be reconsidered, with a view to enlarging its borders and including all the benevolent societies of our home work. The giving of a years notice before any change can be made is required by the constitution itself. We took up the work in Michigan again at St. Joseph, and from there went to the Kalamazoo Association. We found here, as elsewhere, that these autumn con- ferences are generally held with the smallar and less accessible churches, where the attendance of ladies is necessarily limited, and we must, therefore, give our message to the pastors, charging them with the responsibility of carrying it to the ladies of their churches. Before the next conference we were able to take in our plan the central points, Jackson, Ann Arbor, Flint and Lansing, and when we went up from there to Christmas Giving. 23 Nashville to the Marshall Conference we felt that we were meeting old friends in the pastors and people, at whose homes we had already been. Another tour through Kalamazoo, Allegan, Owosso, Port Huron, St. Clair, Detroit, Union City and Chelsea brought us much the same experiences as before. We came finally to the large Eastern Conference, which was to be our last place of labor in Michigan. The ladies of this Conference, though not yet organized for home work under the State society, for several years supported a missionary in the South, largely through the personal effort of one active lady, who made this special collection her care. With the closing of this Bureau visit to the ladies of Michigan the work is left in their handsnot to be forgotten by them, but to be developed and strengthened until there shall be a rich annual fruitage of effort and practical result. (JIIILDHENS PAGE. CHRISTMAS GIVING AT MYSTIC, CONN. REV. CHARLES H. OLIPHANT. The Editor has asked me to give some account of the way our Sunday-school behaves itself at Christmas-time. There are two ideas about the Church; and as parents feel and think about the Church the children will be pretty sure to think and feel about the Sunday-school. One conception of the Church is that it is a kind of receptacle for pious people. When one becomes good enough he is expected to get into this receptacle and there be acted upon by the means of grace. It is one of the mischiefs of this notion that it seems to excuse laymen from any active part in Christian work, if only they are regular attendants upon divine service. So, many people come to the preaching and the praying as if there were nothing for them to do, nothing either great or small. Such members may be said to be found in the passive voice. The other and better notion is that the Church is not a receptacle, but an engine; not a box for Christians to get into, but a body for them to operate, and through which Christ can act upon the world of to-day. According to this view, the minister is not the only member whom the Master has called into His vineyard, the ideal Church is not so much a company of sheep as a company of soldiers; the congregation come~ together not simply to hear Mr. , but to organize for work. This may be called the Churchs active voice. I cannot (within the verbal limits assigned me) measure the miles of distance which lie between these two views. The same confusion of thought prevails in the Sunday-school. We know how the small boy finds that Sunday-school the most attractive (and that teacher the nicest ) whose Christmastree pays the largest dividend. When I came to my present field of work it had been the immemorial custom to have a tree and a treat for the children of the school. After a year or two of competition with other schools in making it worth while for children to attend our own, we braced up and put the question to vote whether we would make the Christmas festival a feast for ourselves or a feast for others; whether we would have our school at this time a dispenser of sw etmeats and ourselves the beneficiaries, or dispense a gift instead to some more needy servants of the Master, who had no parental pocketbook to tap; no good things to give away. To the

Rev. Charles H. Oliphant Oliphant, Charles H., Rev. Christmas Giving at Mystic, Conn Children's Page 23-28

Christmas Giving. 23 Nashville to the Marshall Conference we felt that we were meeting old friends in the pastors and people, at whose homes we had already been. Another tour through Kalamazoo, Allegan, Owosso, Port Huron, St. Clair, Detroit, Union City and Chelsea brought us much the same experiences as before. We came finally to the large Eastern Conference, which was to be our last place of labor in Michigan. The ladies of this Conference, though not yet organized for home work under the State society, for several years supported a missionary in the South, largely through the personal effort of one active lady, who made this special collection her care. With the closing of this Bureau visit to the ladies of Michigan the work is left in their handsnot to be forgotten by them, but to be developed and strengthened until there shall be a rich annual fruitage of effort and practical result. (JIIILDHENS PAGE. CHRISTMAS GIVING AT MYSTIC, CONN. REV. CHARLES H. OLIPHANT. The Editor has asked me to give some account of the way our Sunday-school behaves itself at Christmas-time. There are two ideas about the Church; and as parents feel and think about the Church the children will be pretty sure to think and feel about the Sunday-school. One conception of the Church is that it is a kind of receptacle for pious people. When one becomes good enough he is expected to get into this receptacle and there be acted upon by the means of grace. It is one of the mischiefs of this notion that it seems to excuse laymen from any active part in Christian work, if only they are regular attendants upon divine service. So, many people come to the preaching and the praying as if there were nothing for them to do, nothing either great or small. Such members may be said to be found in the passive voice. The other and better notion is that the Church is not a receptacle, but an engine; not a box for Christians to get into, but a body for them to operate, and through which Christ can act upon the world of to-day. According to this view, the minister is not the only member whom the Master has called into His vineyard, the ideal Church is not so much a company of sheep as a company of soldiers; the congregation come~ together not simply to hear Mr. , but to organize for work. This may be called the Churchs active voice. I cannot (within the verbal limits assigned me) measure the miles of distance which lie between these two views. The same confusion of thought prevails in the Sunday-school. We know how the small boy finds that Sunday-school the most attractive (and that teacher the nicest ) whose Christmastree pays the largest dividend. When I came to my present field of work it had been the immemorial custom to have a tree and a treat for the children of the school. After a year or two of competition with other schools in making it worth while for children to attend our own, we braced up and put the question to vote whether we would make the Christmas festival a feast for ourselves or a feast for others; whether we would have our school at this time a dispenser of sw etmeats and ourselves the beneficiaries, or dispense a gift instead to some more needy servants of the Master, who had no parental pocketbook to tap; no good things to give away. To the 24 Christmas & ~fts. U CHILDREN BEARING CHRISTMAS GIFTS C!hristmas Giving. surprise of all the vote was unanimous against the old, and in favor of the new, way. There was much misgiving as to results. Many confidently predicted that the offerings (each class was invited to bring its own in a sealed envelope) would be microscopic. It was distinctly understood that no moneynot the smallest sum was asked from those who di~approved the plan. Teachers were urged to dis- suade their classes from perfunctory gifts. Inquiring next for a suitable object, we were advised by the Home Missionary Society of a poor servant of theirs in a Western State, whose poorer and more to be pitied wife was the mother of seven children. We put her to vote, and she was promptly and unanimously chosen~ With the introduction into the plan of a persona~1 element, enthusiasm began, and it became evident at once that there was to be sharp rivalry between the classes as to the size of their gifts. At length came the Christmas Eve con- cert, and with it a bright, full company of children. They never looked so happy, and every one of them knows that he never was so happy on such an occasion, as when, class by class, the offerings were handed to the Superintendent. With each of these a passage of Scripture was recited. It became only too evident, as the pile within his hand increased, that the prognostications of those who were sure that an old Sunday-school could not be taught new trieks were false. We are a small schoolonly 80 scholars but the class offerings on this occasion footed up twenty-eight dollars and some cents. A letter was accordingly written and the money inclosed to the wife (this was the best part of it, for we were sure that the minister could not then, as min- isters will, mistake the remittance for a portion of his salary), who was asked to purchase with the amount some article or articles of which she was individually in need. The letter which came back to us after a week made those who heard it read in open school clear their throats and wink away an inevitable tear. It revealed (among other things) the fact that this poor servant had hitherto made all the clothing for seven children with the bare needle. Now she has a sew- ing machine. We all think, but none more fervently than the children, that the memory of a few oranges, more or lessoranges eaten three years agowould not compensate for the glad consciousness that life is easier every day in at least one prairie home. Thus we were led to translate the Beatitude pronounced upon the giver~~ into our own experience, and we have its meaning in the continuous stream of happiness which many have felt at the remembrance of what our pen- nies wrought. We have recently chosen an object for this years offering; for the practice of giving and not receiving at Christmas-time is now habitual with us. Dr. Pike has told us about Philip Page, the African lad now at Atlanta, seeking eagerly, but with insufficient means, such an education as will qualify him to go hack to his people a missionary. We shall send him enough for his support for one, and perhaps for two months. Let me urge those who may read these words to allow no seeming obstacle to prevent the putting in practice, in the schools to which they belong, of the plan here described. Do not fail to give the children for their Christmas gift the happi- ness that giving brings. Do not delay to teach the young by so simple a lesson the difference between the blessedness of giving and that of receiving. Identify by all means the aims and methods of the Church and Sunday-school. Let it not, even in a figure, appear to the child that the Christian attitude is one of idle enjoy- ment. No matter how small the gift, it is the giving up which makes us the Lords disciples. ~26 Receipts. RECEIPTS FOR NOVEMBER 1883. MAINE, $425.02. Bangor. Central Cong. Cli. and Soc.... $250 95 Bangor. Central Cong. Cli. and Soc., for Dikota M 1 56 Brunswick. Young Ladies Missiona~ Soc. of First Parish, for Student Ai Tr4lodega C 15 00 Eastport. Central Cong. Sab. Sch .. . 5 00 Falmoutli First Cong. Cli. and Soc., 30; Second Cong. Ch. and Soc., 7.20. 37 20 Hiram. . for Selma, Ala 1 75 Portland. State Street Cong. Ch., 50; Saint Lawrence Street Cli. and Soc., 11.17 61 17 Wells. Ladies of First Cong. Cli., Bbl. of C., for Wilminqton, N. C. Winthrop. Cong. Cli 16 00 Yarmouth. First Cong. Ch. and 5...... 15 39 York. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 21 00 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $715.46. East Jaifrey. Cong. Cli 20 68 Dover. Mrs. A. Fairbanks, 7: Mrs. S. Foye, 5, for Student Aid. Atlanta U 12 00 Great Falls. First Cong. Cli 39 12 Haverbull. Cong. Cli. and Soc 15 63 Hinsdale. Cong. Cli. and Soc., 9.33; Cyrus Newliall, 1 10 33 Keene. Geo. E. Whitney 5 00 Keene. Ladies Benev. Soc. of Second Cli., for Mclnt osh, Ga 2 50 Lyme. Cong. Sab. Sch 10 00 Marlborough. Freedmens Aid Soc., 2 bhls. of C.. val. 60, for Talladega C., 4for Freight. 400 Nashua. First Cong Cli. and Soc 29 43 New Ipswich. Childrens 21st Annual Fair for benevolent objects 10 50 Pembroke. Cong. Cli. (adl), 5; Rev. D. Goodhue, oos,y Rev. G. E 6 00 Pittsfield. Box of Hill. for Marion, Ala. Riodge. Cong. Ch. and Soc 5 00 Tilton and Nortlifield. Cong. Cliand Soc. 25 00 Walpole. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 27 West Lebanon. Childrens Mlssion Band. Christmas Box, for Birds Nest, Santee Agency. \eb. West Lehanon. Bbl. of C.. by Rev. T. C. Pease, for Marietta, Ga. ______ $215 46 LEGACY. Francestown. Estate of Mrs. Harriet F. Downes, by Geo. E. Dcwnes. . 500 00 $715 46 48 13 VERMONT, $175.05. Barnet. Cong. Cli and Soc Berlin. Ladies Benev. Soc., Bbl. and Box of C., for Talladega C. Brattleborougli. H. Halsey, for Student Aid, Talladega C Manchester. Mrs. A. C. Reed, Bhl. of C., for Atlanta U. Norwich. Cong. Cli. and Soc Itandoiph. Mrs. Mary K. Nichols Rupert. Cong. C h.and Soc Sam Jolinsliury. Mrs. V. M. Howard, 25; Mrs. E. ~. Blodgett, 25,for Student Aid, Fisk U Swanton. H. Stone, wife and daughter. Vershire. Luella D. Carpenter Worcester. Cong. Cli. and Soc 5 00 10 00 3 00 11 25 50 00 5 00 1 00 10 55 West Randolph. Mrs. Susan E. Albin... $6 00 Westminster West. Cong. Cli. and Soc. 19 10 WinAham. Cong.Sab.Sch 602 MASSACHUSETTS, $2,795.19. Abinrten. A Friend, to const. NA- HUM FULLERTON L. M Amesbury. Cong. Cli and Soc Amherst. A FrIend, for Student Aid, Atlanta U Andover. G. W. W. Dove, f~ ~9tuelent Aid, Atlanta U Andover. Sab. Scli. of South Cli., for Student Aid. Fisk V Attleborough. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc., 90.72; incorrectly ack. in De- cember number from Vt. Auburn. Cong. Cli., to coust. REV. SAM- UEL D. HOSMER, L. M Boylston. Lcdies Soc. of Cong. Cb., Box of C., val. 16 Boston. Pilgrim Soc. of Phillips Ch,for Student Aid. Fisk U Boston. Mrs. D. C. Holden, Blil. of C., for Chattanooga. Tenn. Boston. Cash Boxford. Cong. Cli Brookline. Mrs. Crafts, Books. Brimfield. Ladies of Second Cong. Cli., for Freight Brockton. Porter Cli. and Soc., A Friend, 20 (adi.) to coust. Mas. AL- PHEU5 GURNEY and EVERETT C. RAN- DALL L. Ms.; Mrs. Mary E. Perkins, 5.. Brockton. Mrs. Baylis Sanford, Bbl. of C.. 2for Freight, for Tougaloo U Bradford. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., for Student Aid, Chattanooga, Tenn Billerica. Ladies of 0. C. Cli., Chest of (.,for Atlanta U. Bridgewater. Central Sq. TrIn. Cong. Cli. and Soc. 40. to const. ANNIE M. EnsoN L. M.; Central Sq. Sab. Sch., 15.. Brimfield. Ladies of Second Cong. Cli. and Soc., Bbl. of C., for Chattanooga, Tenn., val. 34. Cambridge. A tithing Chelsea. Ladies Union Home Mission Bano, for Lady Missy, Chattanooga, Tenn Chelsea. Third Cong. Cli. and Soc Chicopee. Second Cong. Cli Clinton. Womans Home Missy Assn, to const. Miss ANNIE C. PIERCE L. M.. Deiham. First Cong. Cli. and Soc Dorchester. Second Cong. Sab. 5db., (adl) Duxhury. A. P. Ellison, Bbl. of C., for Atlanta U. East Bridgewater. Mrs. S. D. Shaw. Florence. Florence Cong. Cli Fitclibur~. Calvinistic Ch. and Soc Gilbertsville. Sab. Sch. of Cong. Cli., for Student Aid. Fisk U Hatfield. Cong. Cli Haverhill. Algernon R. Nichols, for Student Aid, Talladega C Haverhill. Sew. Soc. of No. Cong. Cli., Bbl. of C., val. 75.37.for Touga loo U. Holliston. Friends, 15.97; Mission- ary Concert, 4 03, for Student Aid; Friends, Shoemakers kit. val. 10, Shoe-lasts and clothing, for Talladega C 5000 12 30 700 2500 2000 4767 50 00 10 00 37 87 2 00 25 00 2 00 101 00 5500 2500 12 67 31 87 3000 159 81 1 24 3 00 15 81 160 87 50 00 5800 3500 2000 Receipts. H Park. and Hand Soc., 25 U.~Ur~~iag $40 00 Ipswich. First Cong. Cb. and Soc., 9.31 andBbLofC 931 Lawrence. EFE 500 Lee. Cong. Sab. Sch 75 00 Leominster. Orthodox Cong. Cli. and Soc 2645 Lexington. Hancock Cli. and Soc 24 75 Ludlow. Cong. Cli 35 16 MaIden. Trin. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Stu- dent Aid. Fisk U 2500 Medtleld. Ladies of Second Cong. Cli., Bbl. of C , 3for Freight,for Savannah Ga 300 Meirose. Orthodox Cli. and Soc 60 77 Middleboro. Central Cong. Cli. and Soc 56 59 Monson. Cong. Cli. (12 of which from Mrs. H. Deweys class, for Howard U.) 37 00 Newbury. First Parish, 2 Bbls. of C., for Tougaloo U. Newburyport. North Cong. Oh. and Soc., 36 83; Prospect St. Cong. Cli., 29.50.. 66 33 Newton. Ladies Fre~ mans Aid Sew. Cir.. Bbl of C., for Macon, Ga. Newton Center. First Cong. Sab. Sch. f~ir Student Aid, Chattanooqa, Tenn. 100 00 Newton Lower Falls. Friend, for Student Aid, Straight U 50 Norfolk. Cong. Cli. and Soc 6 75 North Amherst. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Atlanta U 51 06 Norwood. Cong. Cli. and Soc 5 14 Oxford. Ladies Missy Soc., for Mis- sionary, Topeka. Kan 15 00 Oxford. Ladies Mis.sy Soc.. Bbl. of C., 2 for Freight for Wilmington, N. C 2 00 Palmer. Thorndike Cong. Cli 1 44 Pepperell. Friends, libi. of C.,for Avery Inst. Pittsfield. Mrs. Hurd. Bbl. of C., 2. 50 for Freight. for Talladega C 2 50 Randcl ph. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. (10 of which from Sab. Scli., forS. S. work.) 143 00 Rockport. Busy Bee Coc., by Sadie W. Butman, for Student Aid, Talladega C 600 Rockport. Pastors Class, .4w Da kotaM 564 Rockport. First Cong. Sab. Scli., 2 Bdls. of i~. S. Exercises Shirley Village. Cong. Cli. and Soc.... 7 00 South Abington. Cong. Ch. and Soc... 50 05 Spencer. Cong. Cli. andSoc 136 60 Spencer. Young Ladies Mission Circle. Bdl. of C. Springfield. Hope Cong. Cli 30 00 Sunderland. Ladies of Cong. Cli., Blil. of C., 3 for Freight, for Atlanta U 3 00 SEtton. Cong. Ch. and Soc 49 83 Taunton. Union Cli. and Soc 13 54 Tewkshury Ladies Benev. Soc., for Freight. for Talladega C 2 00 Townsend. Ladies Benev. Soc., Bbl. of C.. val. 22.50. Watertown. Young Ladies Mission Band of Phillips Ch., for Student Aid, Straight U 50 00 Webster. Cong. Cli. and Soc SQ CO Westborough. Evan. Cong. Sab Sch 50 00 Westliorough. Freedmens M I ss ion Assn, Bhl. of C., 1. for Freight, for Atlanta U 1 00 West Medway. cyrus Adams 10 00 West Newton. A Friend. Bbl. of 0. Weymouth. First Cong. Cb. and Soc 9 75 Winchendon. First Cong. Sab. Sch., to const. Mrs. HARRIET Biceis L. M 30 00 Worcester. Plymouth Cong. Cli. and Soc., 163.26; Salem St. Cli., 94; E. C. C. 20 277 26 27 Worcester. A Friend, for Student Aid, Talladega C $100 00 Worcester. Plymouth (~h. Sab. 5db., for Student Aid, Tallade~,a C 8 66 Worcester. Infant Class Piedmont Sab. Seli ,for Student Aid, A tianta U 30 00 Worthington. An Aged Lady, by Rev. F S. Huntington 10 00 Yarm)utli. Ladies Sew. C. of First Cong. Cli.. Bbl. of C., for Chatta- nooga, Tenn. . A Friend 20 00 RHODE ISLAND, $337.80. Kingston. Cong. Cli 22 91 LEGAcY. Providence. Estate o! Sarah P. Phillips, by T. Salisbury, Admr 314 89 CONNECTICUT. $1,972.41. Branford. Rev. C. P. Osborne $10.00 Brookfit-ld Center. Cong. Cli 14 81 Clie-hire. Cong. Sab. Sc .,for Sab. Sch. Work, Marion, Ala 25 00 Coventry. First Cong. Cli 41 93 Panbury. First Cong. Cli 12 00 Derby. First Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db., for Til?otson C. N. Inst 10 00 East Hartford. South Cong. Ch., 15; Mrs. E. M. Roberts, 5 20 00 East Woodstock. Cong. Cli. and Soc 25 00 Ellington. Cong. Cli 26 14 Guilford. A member of Third Cong. Ch.for Student Aid, Tillotson C. t N. Inst 2 00 Haddam Neck. Cong. Cli 5 00 Hartford. Pearl St. ong Ch 84 41 Higganum. Cong. Sab. 5db., 31.43. to const. JOHN H. FREEMAN L. M.; Cong. Cli., 20 51 43 Kensington. Cong. Oh 35 73 Killingly. E. F. Jencks 5 00 Lakevil le. Childrens Mission Circle, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 50 00 Litchfiell. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Meriden. First Cong. Cli.. to const. CATITARINE C. HINSnALE, Mas. Waz. ROMAN, JOSEPH U. PRATT, E. B. CowLEs, MARGARET LOGAN, LILLiAN B. SMITH, Lucy B. GRIswoLn, SALLIE E. CoLLINs, JOHN WARREN and MARSHALL A. FOWLER L. Ms 300 00 Meriden. Center Cong. Cli 50 00 Middletown. First Ch.,25.29 ;A Friend, 5 3029 Milton. Cong. Cli 7 13 Millington. Cong. Cli 5 00 New Britain. South Cong. Cli 7 00 New Haven. A Friend, in commemo- ration of fiftieth birthday, 50; Mrs. Sylvia Johnson, 10 60 00 New London. Church of Christ 49 90 New London. Mrs. B. P. MeEwen. Bbl.ot C. and Chest of Books,for Talladega C. Nortlifield. Cong. Cli. and Soc., to const. MISS MARY MCCALL L M 51 02 Norwalk. First Cong. Cli 75 41 Norwich. Rev. W. S. Palmer 5 00 Norwich Town. Charles B. Baldwin 10 00 Putnam. Missionary Workers of Cong. Cli.. for Student Aid, Talladega C 2500 Stamford. First Cong. Cli 44 69 South Coventry. Cong. Sab. 5db.. for Student Aid. Talladega C 25 00 Stonington. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc 98 00 I homaston. Cong. Cli 30 50 Thompsonville. First Presh. Sab. Seli., for Straight U., Library 6 61 West Avon. A Friend 10 00 West Haven. Cong. Cli. and Soc 12 91 West Hartford Cong. Cli 5 50 28 Receipts. Wetherstleld. Rev. G. J. Tillotson, for Tiflotson C. ~ N. Inst., Lend $50 00 Westport. Amasa Warren 5 CO Wiochester. Cong. Cli 8 02 Vernon Centre. Cong Ch 31 98 $1,472 41 LEGACY. New Britain. Estate of Mrs. Laura F. Stanley, by Oliver Stanley, Ex 500 00 NEW YORK, $891.01. $1,972 41 Adams Basin. Mrs. Ezekiel Clark 5 00 Albany. Chas. A. Beach 25 00 Brooklyn. A Friend ... Brooklyn. Estate of Chas. ~ 2 00 Bibles. Camden. Cong. Cli. & Sab. Sch., for Ta~~adega C Clinton. Miss Cynthia Chipman, .,~ 28 00 Student Aid. Fisk U 5 00 Crown Point. Second Cong. Cli 5 00 Durham. A Friend 3 00 Elllngton. George Waith 1 00 Fairport. First Cong Ch 79 11 Fredonia. Sab. Scli. of Pres. Ch., for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Gloversville. Cong. Cli. (100 of which from A. Judsonl 127 00 Hamilton. Sab. Sch. of Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Fisk U 20 00 Homer. Ladies of Cong. Cli., Bhl. of C., for Talladega C. Le Roy. Miss Delia A. Phillips, for Lady Missy, Topeka, Kansas 10 00 Liverpool. A Friend, for Student Aid,Fisk U 100 Malone. First Cong. Cli 32 20 Marion. Cong. Cli 22 60 Morristown. Cong. Cli 12 00 Munnsville. N. S. Hall. for Tiflotson C. d? N. Inst., Reading Room 5 00 New York. Pilgrim Cong. Cli., 81.50, for Talladega C. and bal. to const. Da JOsEPH F. LAND, EDMUND L. CHAMPLIN and MRS. Louisz S. Avazs L. Ms.; Gen. Clinton B. Fisk, 30, to const. MIss FANNY GLEASON L. M.; A Friend, 1; Harper & Brothers, 200 vols. School Books, val. 100 112 50 New York. D. J. Carson, for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 New Haven. A Friend, to const. Rxv. FRANK N. GREELEY and Mas. ANNA C. GREELEY L. Ms 60 00 Penn Yan. Chas. C. Sheppard 150 00 Portland. Cong. Sali. Scli 8 60 West Chazy. Rev. L. Prindle 2 00 West Durham. Diantha Scoville 10 00 Warsaw. Mrs. H. L. Booth, Pkg. of Papers. Waterville. Mrs. J. S. Hitchcock, for Student Aid, Fisk U Whitestown. S. Hoxie, for ~4~4 5 00 Talladega C Yale 59, fo~~ stue;t Ad 10 00 Talladega C 50 00 A Friend, Blacksmith and Shoemakers tools, val. 80.00, for Tal. ladega C. NEW JERSEY, $281.00. Bernardsville. J. L. Roberts 40 00 Elizabeth. Mrs. Hannah W. Page 1 00 Jersey City. Tabernacle Sali. Sch., for indian Girl, Santee Agency 25 00 Montclair. First Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Bampton A. ~ N. Inst 35 00 Paterson. P. Van Houten 5 00 Upper Montclair. eliristian Union Cong. Ch.(tO.S0cfwhichforDakotaM.).... 17500 Raritan. Box of Papers. PENNSYLVANIA, $35.00. Clark. Mrs. Elizabeth Dickson 15 00 Meadville. Miss Eliza Dickson 15 00 North East. Mrs. M. K. Spooner 5 00 OHIO, $472.61. Alliance. Welsh Cong. Sab. Sch 55 00 Andover. Cong. Ch 7 25. Bellevue. Cong. Cli., Collection 10.35, 8. W. Boise 25., to const. Ray. W. G. Roszavs L. M 35 35 Berea. Mrs. Fred. Sinedley, for Lexing- ton, Ky 3 75 Cleveland. First Cong. Cli 24 2~ Cleveland. Sab. Sch. of First Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Fisk U 25 00 Cleveland. White Sew. Machine Co., Sewing Machine, for Straight U. Farmer. E. M. Ensign 10 00 Geneva. Mrs.S.Kingsliury, in memory of her daugliter Madelin, to const. Miss EMMA A. JOHNSON L. M 30 00 Huron. Theodore Alvord 1 50 Hudson. Cong. Cli. and Soc 43 l~ Hudson, Cong. Sali. Sch., for Student Aid, Fisk U 5 00 New Lyme. Ladies Missy Soc., for Straight U., Library 7 60 North Bloomfield. E. A. Brown, for Theo. Dept.. Talladega C 100 00 Oberlin. A Friend 10 00 Peru. Friends, for Student Aid, Talladega C 63 75 Ruggles. First Cong. Cli 6 23 Saybrook. Win. C. Sexton 1 50 Strongsville. E. Lyman, bal. to const. MRS. JULIA A. Avzav L. M 10 00 Toledo. Mrs. Eliza H. Weed S 00 West Ando~?er. Cong. Cli 17 4& Wellington, First Cong. Cli 59 27 York. Cong Cli. (adl) 1 50 ILLINOIS, $663.80. Cable. Maria B. Holyoke 2 00 Camp Point. Mrs. S. B. McKinney 10 00 Chicago. New Eng. Cong. Cli., 40.53; Ladies Missy 8oc. of New Eng. Cong. Cli., 9.10 49 6& Dover. Cong. Cli 25 31 Dover. Ladies Miqsy Soc., for Lady Missy, Mobile, Ala 10 00 Englewood. First Cong. Ch 10 00 Evanston. Cong. Sab. Sch 11 00 Farmington. Phineas Chapman 50 00 Freeport. L. L. Farwell, for Talladega C 10 00 Galesburg. Infant Class First Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, 17 50 Galesburg. C. S. Halsey, case of medi- cines, for Talladega C Hampton. Cong. Cli 4 (10 Jacksonville. Cong. Cli 49 30 Millburn. Ladies Missy Soc., for Lady Missy Mobile. Ala 25 00 Moline. First Cong. Cli 55 39 Naperville. Cong. Cli 17 40 Ottawa. First Cong. Cli 41 00 Onarga. Gentleman so Providence. Cong. Cli 11 00 Roclielle. W. H. Holcomb, for Student Aid, Fisk U 90 00 Roclielle. A Friend, for Tillotson C. and N. Inst., Reoding Room 50 00 Sheffield. Etta M. Kingburn 3 27 Sparta. Win. Rosborough, 5; Bryce Crawford 5 D P Barker, 2; P. B. Gault, 1; J. i{ood, j S Alexander, 1; J. Alexander, 1; H. ii. Rosliorough, 1; .L. Fulton, SOc 17 50 Sycamore. I. H. Rogers, for Student Aid, Fisk U 104 00 MICHIGAN, $387.14. Alamo.. Ladies Missy Soc 5 00 Allegan. Friends, for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 85. Adrian. C. C. Spooner 5 00 Baldwin. Rev. S. B. Demarest 2 00 Churchs Corners. Cong. Cli., 13.40, and Sali Sch 1260; J. F. Douglass, 4; AW. Doug~Iass, 2; James Rolihins,2 34 00

Receipts for November 1883 28-30

28 Receipts. Wetherstleld. Rev. G. J. Tillotson, for Tiflotson C. ~ N. Inst., Lend $50 00 Westport. Amasa Warren 5 CO Wiochester. Cong. Cli 8 02 Vernon Centre. Cong Ch 31 98 $1,472 41 LEGACY. New Britain. Estate of Mrs. Laura F. Stanley, by Oliver Stanley, Ex 500 00 NEW YORK, $891.01. $1,972 41 Adams Basin. Mrs. Ezekiel Clark 5 00 Albany. Chas. A. Beach 25 00 Brooklyn. A Friend ... Brooklyn. Estate of Chas. ~ 2 00 Bibles. Camden. Cong. Cli. & Sab. Sch., for Ta~~adega C Clinton. Miss Cynthia Chipman, .,~ 28 00 Student Aid. Fisk U 5 00 Crown Point. Second Cong. Cli 5 00 Durham. A Friend 3 00 Elllngton. George Waith 1 00 Fairport. First Cong Ch 79 11 Fredonia. Sab. Scli. of Pres. Ch., for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Gloversville. Cong. Cli. (100 of which from A. Judsonl 127 00 Hamilton. Sab. Sch. of Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Fisk U 20 00 Homer. Ladies of Cong. Cli., Bhl. of C., for Talladega C. Le Roy. Miss Delia A. Phillips, for Lady Missy, Topeka, Kansas 10 00 Liverpool. A Friend, for Student Aid,Fisk U 100 Malone. First Cong. Cli 32 20 Marion. Cong. Cli 22 60 Morristown. Cong. Cli 12 00 Munnsville. N. S. Hall. for Tiflotson C. d? N. Inst., Reading Room 5 00 New York. Pilgrim Cong. Cli., 81.50, for Talladega C. and bal. to const. Da JOsEPH F. LAND, EDMUND L. CHAMPLIN and MRS. Louisz S. Avazs L. Ms.; Gen. Clinton B. Fisk, 30, to const. MIss FANNY GLEASON L. M.; A Friend, 1; Harper & Brothers, 200 vols. School Books, val. 100 112 50 New York. D. J. Carson, for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 New Haven. A Friend, to const. Rxv. FRANK N. GREELEY and Mas. ANNA C. GREELEY L. Ms 60 00 Penn Yan. Chas. C. Sheppard 150 00 Portland. Cong. Sali. Scli 8 60 West Chazy. Rev. L. Prindle 2 00 West Durham. Diantha Scoville 10 00 Warsaw. Mrs. H. L. Booth, Pkg. of Papers. Waterville. Mrs. J. S. Hitchcock, for Student Aid, Fisk U Whitestown. S. Hoxie, for ~4~4 5 00 Talladega C Yale 59, fo~~ stue;t Ad 10 00 Talladega C 50 00 A Friend, Blacksmith and Shoemakers tools, val. 80.00, for Tal. ladega C. NEW JERSEY, $281.00. Bernardsville. J. L. Roberts 40 00 Elizabeth. Mrs. Hannah W. Page 1 00 Jersey City. Tabernacle Sali. Sch., for indian Girl, Santee Agency 25 00 Montclair. First Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Bampton A. ~ N. Inst 35 00 Paterson. P. Van Houten 5 00 Upper Montclair. eliristian Union Cong. Ch.(tO.S0cfwhichforDakotaM.).... 17500 Raritan. Box of Papers. PENNSYLVANIA, $35.00. Clark. Mrs. Elizabeth Dickson 15 00 Meadville. Miss Eliza Dickson 15 00 North East. Mrs. M. K. Spooner 5 00 OHIO, $472.61. Alliance. Welsh Cong. Sab. Sch 55 00 Andover. Cong. Ch 7 25. Bellevue. Cong. Cli., Collection 10.35, 8. W. Boise 25., to const. Ray. W. G. Roszavs L. M 35 35 Berea. Mrs. Fred. Sinedley, for Lexing- ton, Ky 3 75 Cleveland. First Cong. Cli 24 2~ Cleveland. Sab. Sch. of First Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Fisk U 25 00 Cleveland. White Sew. Machine Co., Sewing Machine, for Straight U. Farmer. E. M. Ensign 10 00 Geneva. Mrs.S.Kingsliury, in memory of her daugliter Madelin, to const. Miss EMMA A. JOHNSON L. M 30 00 Huron. Theodore Alvord 1 50 Hudson. Cong. Cli. and Soc 43 l~ Hudson, Cong. Sali. Sch., for Student Aid, Fisk U 5 00 New Lyme. Ladies Missy Soc., for Straight U., Library 7 60 North Bloomfield. E. A. Brown, for Theo. Dept.. Talladega C 100 00 Oberlin. A Friend 10 00 Peru. Friends, for Student Aid, Talladega C 63 75 Ruggles. First Cong. Cli 6 23 Saybrook. Win. C. Sexton 1 50 Strongsville. E. Lyman, bal. to const. MRS. JULIA A. Avzav L. M 10 00 Toledo. Mrs. Eliza H. Weed S 00 West Ando~?er. Cong. Cli 17 4& Wellington, First Cong. Cli 59 27 York. Cong Cli. (adl) 1 50 ILLINOIS, $663.80. Cable. Maria B. Holyoke 2 00 Camp Point. Mrs. S. B. McKinney 10 00 Chicago. New Eng. Cong. Cli., 40.53; Ladies Missy 8oc. of New Eng. Cong. Cli., 9.10 49 6& Dover. Cong. Cli 25 31 Dover. Ladies Miqsy Soc., for Lady Missy, Mobile, Ala 10 00 Englewood. First Cong. Ch 10 00 Evanston. Cong. Sab. Sch 11 00 Farmington. Phineas Chapman 50 00 Freeport. L. L. Farwell, for Talladega C 10 00 Galesburg. Infant Class First Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, 17 50 Galesburg. C. S. Halsey, case of medi- cines, for Talladega C Hampton. Cong. Cli 4 (10 Jacksonville. Cong. Cli 49 30 Millburn. Ladies Missy Soc., for Lady Missy Mobile. Ala 25 00 Moline. First Cong. Cli 55 39 Naperville. Cong. Cli 17 40 Ottawa. First Cong. Cli 41 00 Onarga. Gentleman so Providence. Cong. Cli 11 00 Roclielle. W. H. Holcomb, for Student Aid, Fisk U 90 00 Roclielle. A Friend, for Tillotson C. and N. Inst., Reoding Room 50 00 Sheffield. Etta M. Kingburn 3 27 Sparta. Win. Rosborough, 5; Bryce Crawford 5 D P Barker, 2; P. B. Gault, 1; J. i{ood, j S Alexander, 1; J. Alexander, 1; H. ii. Rosliorough, 1; .L. Fulton, SOc 17 50 Sycamore. I. H. Rogers, for Student Aid, Fisk U 104 00 MICHIGAN, $387.14. Alamo.. Ladies Missy Soc 5 00 Allegan. Friends, for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 85. Adrian. C. C. Spooner 5 00 Baldwin. Rev. S. B. Demarest 2 00 Churchs Corners. Cong. Cli., 13.40, and Sali Sch 1260; J. F. Douglass, 4; AW. Doug~Iass, 2; James Rolihins,2 34 00 Receipts. Clinton. Sab. Sch. of Cong. Oh., for Student Aid, Fisk U . East Saginaw. Sab. Sch. of Cong. Oh., for Student Aid, Fisk U Grand Rapids. Park Cong. Oh., for Rev. J. H. H. Sengstack Greenville. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Atlanta U Hailoway James Vincent Hudson. Young Peoples Benev. Soc., for Student Aid, Fisk U Kalamaz~o. Mrs. Henry Montague, 5; Mr. Reimer, 3, for Student Aid, Fisk U Lansing. plymouth Oh Litchfleld. Cong. Oh., 11.60; Ladies Missy Soc.. 11.20 Olivet. First Cong. Oh Salem. First Cong. Cli., for Fisk U.. Saint Clair. Cong. Ch Three Oaks. Cong. Ch Union City. J. R. Blake Vienna. Cong. Oh IOWA, $208.46. Alden. Mrs.E. Rogers Anamosa. Ladies Freedmens Soc., Clothing, for Straight U. Bellevue. Ladies of on Oh., for Lady Missy, New Orleans, La Chester Center. First Cong. Ch Council Bluffs. Cong. Oh., for Talla- dega C Decorah. Ladies Soc., Bbl. of C., val. 40, for Straight U. Des Moines. Ladies of First Cong. Cli., 3 Bbls of C., for Tafladega C. Eldora. Cong. Oh Grinneil. First Cong. Oh McGregor. Young Ladies Mission Band of Cong. Oh McGregor. Cong. Oh., for Lady Missy, New Orleans, La Montour. Cong. Cli Onawa. Cong. Oh Staceyvifle. Miss P. D. Shattuck, bed- ding for Straight U. . Hawkeye, for Student Aid, Tal- ladega C WISCONSIN, $163.69. Burlington. Plymouth Oh Cooksville. Edward Gille~.: Emerald Grove. Cong. C Janesrille. Cong. Ch Kan Kanna. Cong. Oh La Orosse. Mission Sch Milton. First Cong. Oh Madison. First Cong. Oh Platteville. Cong. Oh.... Shopiere. Sab. 5db., for Student Aid Straight U Whitewater. Winchester & Partridge Mfg. Co., Corn and Feed Mill, val. 40, for Tougaloo U. MINNESOTA, $62.69. Detroit. First Cong. Cli Glyndon. Union Oh Minneapolis. Plymouth Oh Rochester. First Cong. Oh KANSAS, $9.70. Lawrence. Plymouth Cong. Oh NEBRASKA, $107.25. Nebraska City. Cong. Oh York. Dr. Benjamin Bissell ARKANSAS, $6.00. Little Rock. Tuition CALIFORNIA, $20.00. Arcata. A Friend MARYLAND, $129.22. Baltimore. First Cong. Oh $9 60 3400 30 00 25 00 10 00 25 00 8 00 2174 2250 6 63 10 00 42 37 35 65 5 00 4 50 2 00 400 40 00 50 55 11 71 16 0(1 17 00 15 00 32 60 12 60 4 00 15 00 5 00 13 50 10 32 5 00 15 00 6 87 50 00 3500 8 00 3 00 5 17 3046 21 06 9 70 7 25 100 00 6 00 20 00 129.22 29 KENTUCKY, $122.75. Lexington. Tuition 87 50 Newport. F. W. C. Crane 5 00 Williamsburg. Tuition 30 25 TENNESSEE, $2,195.53. Nashville. Fisk U., Tuition, 886.93; Rent. 75 961 93 Knoxville. Cong. Oh 12 00 ~Iemphis. Friends, for Le Moyne Sch., Enlargement of Building 1,000 00 Memphis. Le Moyne Sch.. Tuition 221 60 NORTH CAROLINA, $232.10. Raleigh. Friends, 2; Miss E. P. Hayes, 6 (of which 1 for Freight) for Student Aid, Atlanta U 8 00 Wilmington. Normal Sch., Tuition, 219.10; Cong. Cli.. 5 224 10 GEORGiA, $450.05. Atlanta. Storrs Sch., Taition, 244.05; Rent 3~ First Cong. Oh., 30 277 05 Macon: 6ong. Cli 10 00 Savannah. Beach Inst., Tuition. 142, Rent, 10; Cong. Cli., 10 162 00 Woodville. A Friend ~ 00 ALABAMA, $458.15. Athens. Tuition, 63.90, Student Aid, 20 8390 Marion. Cong. Oh 10 00 Mobile. Emerson Inst., Tuition, 295.85; Cong. Oh , 1.20 297 05 Montgomery. Cong. Oh 20 00 Talladega. Talladega C., Tuition, 37.20; Cong. Oh., 10 47 20 LOUISIANA, $207.00. New Orleaiis. Straight U., Tuition 207 00 MISSISSIPPI, $1.00. Jackson. Cong. Cli 1 00 TEXAS, $251.00. Austin. Tillotson C. & . N. Inst., Tuition 251 00 ____ $25.00. Port Arthur. Rev. H. H. Robins, for Talladega C 25 00 INCOMES, $933.03. Avery Fund, for Mendi M 575 00 C. F. Hammond Fund, for Straight U 125 00 De Forest Fund, for Presidents Chair, Talladega C 37 50 Howard Theo. Fund, for 85 53 Income Fund, for Straight U 20 00 Le Moyne Fund, for Memphis, Ten 50 00 Luke Mem. 5db. Fund, for Talladega C 10 80 N. M. and A. Stone Fund, for Talladega C 2500 Yale Library Fund, for Tailadega C.... 4 20 Total for November $14,734 11 Total from Oct. 1st to Nov. 30th... 29,977 09 FOR AMERICAN MISSIONARY. Subscriptions from Oct. 1st to Nov. 30... 76 07 H. W. HUBBARD, Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New York. TO INVESTOI~S. $926 and accrued Interest will buy a $1,000 6 per cent. gold coupon bond of the EAST all~EST RI RICO. OFALABA1~A This Is a strictly first class Investment bond, se- cured by a first mortgage on an old road, fully built and equipped, that has always p aid Its Interest, and earns a dividend on Its stock besides. This bond will pay you $30 every six months. No taxes, no trouble, and a safe Investment. For sale by the EAST AND WE4T R. B. CO. OFAE.A., 502 Bway .or AMERICAN LOAN AND TRUST 00,113 Bway,N. V 30 Constitution. CONSTITUTION. ART. I. This society shall be called the American Missionary Association. ART. II. The object of this Association shall be to conduct Christian missionary and educational operations and diffuse a knowledge of the Holy Scriptures in our own country and other countries which are destitute of them, or which present. open and urgent fields of effort. ART. III. Members of evangelical churches may be constituted members of this. Association for life by the payment of thirty dollars into its treasury, with the written declaration at the time or times of payment that the sum is to be applied to constitute a designated person a life member; and such membership shall begin sixty days after the payment shall have been completed. Other persons, by the payment of the same sum, may be made life members without the privilege of voting. Every evangelical church which has within a year contributed to the funds of the Association and every State Conference or Association of such churches may appoint two delegates to the Annual Meeting of the Association; such delegates,~ duly attested by credentiaLs, shall be members of the Association for the year for which they were thus appointed. ART. IV. The Annual Meeting of the Association shall be held in the month of October or November, at such time and place as may be designated by the Asso-- ciation, or, in case of its failure to act, by the Executive Committee, by notice printed in the official publication of the Association for the preceding month. ART. V. The officers of the Association shall be a President, five Vice-Presidents,. a Corresponding Secretary or Secretaries, a Recording Secretary, a Treasurer,. Auditors, and an Executive Committee of fifteen members, all of whom shall be elected by ballot. At the first Annual Meeting after the adoption of this Constitution, five mem- bers of the Executive Committee shall be elected for the term of one year, five for two years and five for three years, and at each subsequent Annual M eting, five- members shall be elected for the full term of three years, and such others as shall be required to fill vacancies. ART. VI. To the Executive Committee shall belong the collecting and disbursing of funds, the appointing, counseling, sustaining and dismissing of missionaries. and agents, and the selection of missionary fields. They shall have authority to. fill all vacancies in office occurring between the Annual Meetings; to apply to any Legislature for acts of incorporation, or conferring corporate powers; to make provision when necessary for disabled missionaries and for the widows and children of deceased missionaries, and in general to transact all such business as usually appertains to the Executive Committees of missionary and other benevolent socie- ties. The acts of the Committee shall be subject to the revision of the Annual Meeting. Five members of the Committee constitute a quorum for transacting business. ART. VIL No person shall be made an officer of this Association who is not a member of some evangelical church. AnT. VIII. Missionary bodies and churches or individuals may appoint and sus-- tam missionaries of their own, through the agency of the Executive Committee,, on terms mutually agreed upon. ART. IX. No amendment shall be made to this Constitution except by the vote of two-thirds of the members present at an Annual Meeting and voting, the amendment having been approved by the vote of a majority at the previous An-. nual Meeting.

Constitution 30-32

30 Constitution. CONSTITUTION. ART. I. This society shall be called the American Missionary Association. ART. II. The object of this Association shall be to conduct Christian missionary and educational operations and diffuse a knowledge of the Holy Scriptures in our own country and other countries which are destitute of them, or which present. open and urgent fields of effort. ART. III. Members of evangelical churches may be constituted members of this. Association for life by the payment of thirty dollars into its treasury, with the written declaration at the time or times of payment that the sum is to be applied to constitute a designated person a life member; and such membership shall begin sixty days after the payment shall have been completed. Other persons, by the payment of the same sum, may be made life members without the privilege of voting. Every evangelical church which has within a year contributed to the funds of the Association and every State Conference or Association of such churches may appoint two delegates to the Annual Meeting of the Association; such delegates,~ duly attested by credentiaLs, shall be members of the Association for the year for which they were thus appointed. ART. IV. The Annual Meeting of the Association shall be held in the month of October or November, at such time and place as may be designated by the Asso-- ciation, or, in case of its failure to act, by the Executive Committee, by notice printed in the official publication of the Association for the preceding month. ART. V. The officers of the Association shall be a President, five Vice-Presidents,. a Corresponding Secretary or Secretaries, a Recording Secretary, a Treasurer,. Auditors, and an Executive Committee of fifteen members, all of whom shall be elected by ballot. At the first Annual Meeting after the adoption of this Constitution, five mem- bers of the Executive Committee shall be elected for the term of one year, five for two years and five for three years, and at each subsequent Annual M eting, five- members shall be elected for the full term of three years, and such others as shall be required to fill vacancies. ART. VI. To the Executive Committee shall belong the collecting and disbursing of funds, the appointing, counseling, sustaining and dismissing of missionaries. and agents, and the selection of missionary fields. They shall have authority to. fill all vacancies in office occurring between the Annual Meetings; to apply to any Legislature for acts of incorporation, or conferring corporate powers; to make provision when necessary for disabled missionaries and for the widows and children of deceased missionaries, and in general to transact all such business as usually appertains to the Executive Committees of missionary and other benevolent socie- ties. The acts of the Committee shall be subject to the revision of the Annual Meeting. Five members of the Committee constitute a quorum for transacting business. ART. VIL No person shall be made an officer of this Association who is not a member of some evangelical church. AnT. VIII. Missionary bodies and churches or individuals may appoint and sus-- tam missionaries of their own, through the agency of the Executive Committee,, on terms mutually agreed upon. ART. IX. No amendment shall be made to this Constitution except by the vote of two-thirds of the members present at an Annual Meeting and voting, the amendment having been approved by the vote of a majority at the previous An-. nual Meeting. (31) - V :4 For R IDE 1884 is an Elegant Book of 130 Pages, 3 Colored Plates of FLOWERS and Vegetables, and more than 1000 Illustra- tions of the choicest Flowers, Plants and VEGETABLEiS and Directions for Growing. It Is handsome enough for the Center Table or a Holiday Present. Send on your siame and Postoffice address, with se cents, and we will send you a copy, p mt-paid. This is not a quarter of its cost. Itis p rinted in both En glish and German. If you afterwards order seeds deduct the 10 cents. VICES SEEDS ARE THE BEST IN THE WORLD. The FLORAL GuIOE will tell how to get and grow them. TICKS Illustrated Monthly Magazine, 32 Pages, a Colored Plate in every siuneber and many fine Engravings. Price $1.23 a year; Five Copies for $5. Specimen sium- bers sent for ie cents; 3 trial copies 25 cts. Address, - JA~IES VICK, Rochester, N. V. The Great Ii I~UT Church Wit. FluNKS Patent Refleetoss give the Most Powerful, the Softest, Cheapest and the BestLight known for Churches, Stores, Show Windows. Parlors, Banks. Offices, Picture Galler- ies. Theatres, Depots, etc. New and ele- gant designs. Send size of room. Gel circalarandestimate. A libera,l discount to churches and the trede. I. P. FRINE, Ill Pearl St. N.Y. SKIN HUMORS CAN BE CURED BY GLENNS SULPIIUR SOAP. SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 16, 1883. Mr. C. N. Crittenton: DEAR SIR: I wish to call your attention to the good your Sulphur Soap has done me. For nearly fourteen years I have been troubled with a skin humor resembling salt rheum. I have spent nearly a Small fortune for doctors and medicine, but with only temporary relief. I commenced using your ~Glenns Sulphur Soap nearly two years agoused it in baths and as a toilet soap daily. My skin is now as clear as an infants, and no one would be able to tell that I ever had a skin complaInt. I would not be without the soap if It cost five times the amount. Yours respectfully. M. H. MORRIS. LicK HOUSE. San Francisco. Cal. The above testimonial is indisputable evidence that Glenns Sulphur Soap will eliminate poison- ous Skin Diseases WHKN ALL OTHER MEAN5 HAVE FAILED. To this fact thousands have testified; and ttiat it will banish lesser afflictions, such as common PIMPLES, ERUPTIONS and SORES, and keep the skin clear and beautiful, is abso- lutely certain. For this reason ladies whose complexions have been impruved by the use of this soap NOW MARE IT A CON5TANT TOILET AP- PENDAOH. The genuine always beass the name of C. N. CRITTENTON, lid Fulton street, New York, sole proprietor. For sale by all druggists or mailed to any address on receipt of 30 cents in stamps, or three cakes for 75 cents. J. & R. LAMB, ~O Carmine Street. Sixth Ave. cars pass the door. BANNERS IN SILK, NEW DESIGNS. CHURCH FUR NIT URE SEND FOR HAND BOOK BT MAIL. PEARLS 1~IE MOUTH Beauty and Fragance Are communicated to the mouth by SOZODONT which renders the teeth pearly white, the gums rosy, and the breath sweet. By those who have used It, it is regarded as an indispensable adjunct of the toilet. It thoroughly removes tartar from the teeth, without injuring the enamel. SOLD BY DRUGGISTS ~v~wII:EI11~:. (32) MASON & HAM uN ORGANS. A cable dispatch announces that at the Ixiterriatloxial Iridxistrial Exhlbltlon (1883) now in progress (1883) at AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS, These Organs have been Awarded the GRAND DIPLOMA OF HONOR, Being the VERY HIGHEST AWARD, ranking above the GOLD lYIEDAL, and given only for EXCEPTIONAL SUPER-EXCELLENCE. THUS IS CONTINUED THE UNBROKEN SERIES OF TRIUMPHS OF THESE ORGANS AT EVERY GREAT WORLDS INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION FOR SIXTEEN YEARS, No other American Organs having been found equal to them in any. THE RECORD OF TRIUMPHS of MASON & HAMLIN ORGANS in such severe and pro- longed comparisonS by the BEST JUDGES OF SUCH iNSTRUMENTS IN THE WORLD now stands: at PARIS, VIENNA, SANTIAGO, PHILA., PARIS, MILAN, AMSTERDAM, 1867 1873 1875 1876 1878 1881 1883 FRANCE. AUSTRIA. CHILL U. S. AMER. FRANCE. ITALY. NETHERLANDS. Tesll~ollJ Of MllS1C1~llS is llqil~11y BII11Jft~Itic. VJOF?L1 WOF~ A NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE FOR 1883-4 (dated October, 1883) is now ready and will be Sent free; including MANY NEW STYLESthe best assortment and most attractive organs we have ever offered. ONE HUNDRED STYLES are fully described and illustrated, adapted to a uses, in plain and elegant cases in natural woods, and Superbly decorated in gold, silver and colors. Prices, $22 for the sinalleSI size, but having as much power as any single reed organ and the characteristic Mason & Hamlin excellence, up to $900 for the largest size. 50 styles between $100 and $200. Sold also for easy payments. Catalogues free. THE IVIASON & HAMLIN ORGAN AND PIANO SO., 154 Treinont St., Boston; 46 East 14th Street (Union SQure), Jew York; 149 Wabash ivenne, Chicago.

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The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 2 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York Feb 1884 0038 002
The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 2, miscellaneous front pages 32A-32B

F~JaUA~y, 1884. PAGE. EDITORIAL. PARAGRAPHS 33 WANTEDWANTED AT LITTLE RocK... 34 WANTED AT VVILMINGTON WANTED AT TOUGALOO 35 WANTED AT TILLOTSON INSTITUTE WANTED 36 A BIT OF SOUTHERN SCENERY (cut) 37 BENEFACTIONS 3S GENERAL NOTES 39 INDIANS ATTACKING A STAGE (cut). .... 40 THE JOINT COMMITTEE AT SPRINGFIELD 41 LIST OF MISSIONARIES AND TEACHERS.. 44 PAGE. THE SOUTH. ITEMS FROM THE FIELD 51 EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS 52 THE CHINESE. ITEMS FROM THE FIELD 53 BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. PLEDGES FOR MISSIONARIES 54 CHILDRENS PAGE. Two PICTURES FROM LIFE 55 RECEIPTS NEW YORK: PUBLISHEE BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, Rooms, 5~ Reade Street. Price 50 Cents a Year, in Advance. Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. V., as secopd-class matter. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. PRESIDENT. Hon. WM. B. WASHBuRN, LL.D., Mass. CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.. -REV. M. E. STRIEBY. D. D., 56 Recsde Street, 1V~ Y. ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COLLECTION.REV. JAMES POWELL, 56 Recede Street, N. Y. TREASURERH. W. HUBBARD, Esq., 56 Recede Street, N. Y. AUDITORS.WM. A. NASH, W. H. ROGERS. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. Jomi H. WASHBURN, Chairman; A. P. FOSTER, Secretary; Lvswe Arniorr, A. S. BAzzrss, J. R. DANFORTE, CLINTON B. FISK, S. B. HALLIDAY, EDWARD HAWES, SAMUEL HOLMES, CHARLES A. HULL, SAMUEL S. MARPLES, CHARLES L. MEAD, S. H. VIRGIN, WM. H. WARD, J. L. WITHROW. DISTRICT SECRETARIES. ReV. C. L. WOODWORTE, D.D., Boston. Rev. G. D. PIKE, D.D.. New 1~ort , Chicago. COMMUNICATIONS relating to the work of the Association maybe addressed to the Corresponding Secretary; those relating to the collecting fields, to the District Secretaries; letters for the Editor of the merican Missionary, to Rev. G. D. Pike, D. D., at the New York Office; letters for the Bureau of Womans Work, to Miss D. E. Emerson. at the New York Office. DONATIQNS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS may be sent to H W Hubbard Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New York, or, when more con. Venient, to either of the Branch 6ffices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street. Chicago. Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a Life Member. FORM OF A BEQUEST. I SEQEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay the sam3 in davq afte- my decease to the person who, when the same is payaole, shall act as Treasurer of the American Missionary Association, of New York City, to be applied, under the direction of the Executive Committee of the Association, to its charitable uses and p~ses. The Willahould b~ attested by three witnesses. S HORSFORDS ACID. PHOSPHATE. (LIQUW.) FOR DYSPEP& A, MENTAL AND PHYSICAL EXHAUSTION, NERVOUSNESS, DI MINISHED VITALITY, URINARY DIFFICULTIES, ETC. PREPARED ACCORDING TO THE DIRECTION OF Prof. N. N. Horstord, of Cambridge, Mass. There seems to be no difference of opinion in high medical authority of the value of phos- phoric acid and DO preparation has ever been offered to the public which seems to so happily meet the general want as this. It is not nauseous, but agreeable to the taste. No danger can attend its use. Its action will harmonize with such stimulants as are necessary to take. it makes a delicious drink with water and Sugar only. Prices reasonable. Pamphlet giving further parr.ieulars mailed free on application. MANUFACTURED BY THE RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, H. I., AND FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS. MAN HATTAN LIFE INS. CO. OF NEW YORK, 1541 end 158 Rre~d.c.p. I1TIn~i:y-TIIIflD YEAR. DESCRIPTIONOne of the oldest, strongest, best. POLICIESIncontestable, non-forfeitable, defi- nite cash surrender values. RATESSafe, low, and participating or Hot, as desired. RISES carefully selected. PROMPT, liberal dealing. GENERAL AGENTS AND CANVASSERS WANTED in desirable territory, to whom permanent employ- ment and liberal compensatio4rill be given. Address H. STOKE41~ President. H. Y. WEMPLE, Secy. J. L. HALSEY, 1st h-P. S. N. STEBBINS, Acty. H. B. STOKES, 2d V.

Paragraphs Editorial 33-34

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL. XXXVIII. FEBRUARY, 1884. No. 2. ~m~zric~ux Iissii~nax~ ~ssi~wiatb~n. Gun readers will find in this number of the Miissionary a complete list of the names of persons appointed for the current year to the mission fields occupied by this Association. The number is large and composed of worthy and experienced workers, in whom we have great confidence. We bespeak the prayers and help of Gods people in their behalf, that their labors be blessed and abundant. Gun Annual Report is now ready for distribution. Those of our friends who are interested in noting the work of this Association from year to year would do well to secure a copy, which can be had by application to this office. SOME changes have taken place in the arrangement for the Secretaries on the collecting field. Rev. James Powell, who has so acceptably and efficiently occupied the post of District Secretary in Chicago, has been transferred to this office as Assistant Secretary for Collection. His field is thus widened, and we bespeak for him the welcome at the East that he has so fully merited and won at the West. District Secretary Pike is retained as Editor of the 3lissiouary, his office as such being continued as heretofore at 56 Reade St., New York, to which his correspondence as Editor should be addressed. His collecting field is made up of Western Massachusetts, Connecticut and Vermont, with office to be opened May 1, in Hartford. District Secretary Woodworth retains his office in Boston, with Eastern Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Maine as his field for collection. A successor for Mr. Powell in Chicago will be appointed as soon as practicable. 34 Wanted Wanted at Little Rock. ACCORDING to the census of 1870, i1literat~s committed ten times their pro rata of crime, taking the whole of the United States together. IN the city of New York, the expense imposed for protection against a few thousand criminals, most of whom have been made such by the neglect of society to educate properly the young, is fifty per cent. more than the whole cost of the public schools. WANTED. A full and easy-working treasury for the general ex- pensesat least one thousand dollars a day, for every day of the year. FROM REPORT OP Ex. COM. WANTED AT LITTLE ROCK. Three-fourths of the colored people of Arkansas are renorted as illiter- ate. This Association has been so occupied and its funds so much de- manded by institutions in other States that it has not been able to plant a boarding-school in this needy portion of our country. Nearly three years since, Mr. Edward Smith, of Enfield, Mass., pledged property valued at *15,000 for founding an institution to be known as the Edward Smith College. Thirteen acres of land on Capitol Hill, commanding a view of the city, the river and a large stretch of surrounding country, have been purchased and fenced. We have *10,000 available from Mr. Smiths gift for the first building, which will serve for a mission home and a girls dor- mitorv. This should be constructed of brick and adapted for permanent use. The cost is estimated at *20,000. Few cities in the South have grown with such rapidity as Little Rock, and the prospects of a flourish- ing school, if once properly established, are all that could be wished. Our Executive Committee in their annual reports for 1882 and 1883 appealed for *10,000 to supplement Mr. Smiths gift, but no responses were made. We now feel that further delay would be hazardous, and that we should commence work at Little Rock; and urge the friends of this Association. to come to our relief as rapidly as may be needful to assure the comple- tion of the proposed building by the 1st of October. As the college takes- the name of Mr. Smith, we would like to call the first hail by the name of the second donor.

Wanted Editorial 34

34 Wanted Wanted at Little Rock. ACCORDING to the census of 1870, i1literat~s committed ten times their pro rata of crime, taking the whole of the United States together. IN the city of New York, the expense imposed for protection against a few thousand criminals, most of whom have been made such by the neglect of society to educate properly the young, is fifty per cent. more than the whole cost of the public schools. WANTED. A full and easy-working treasury for the general ex- pensesat least one thousand dollars a day, for every day of the year. FROM REPORT OP Ex. COM. WANTED AT LITTLE ROCK. Three-fourths of the colored people of Arkansas are renorted as illiter- ate. This Association has been so occupied and its funds so much de- manded by institutions in other States that it has not been able to plant a boarding-school in this needy portion of our country. Nearly three years since, Mr. Edward Smith, of Enfield, Mass., pledged property valued at *15,000 for founding an institution to be known as the Edward Smith College. Thirteen acres of land on Capitol Hill, commanding a view of the city, the river and a large stretch of surrounding country, have been purchased and fenced. We have *10,000 available from Mr. Smiths gift for the first building, which will serve for a mission home and a girls dor- mitorv. This should be constructed of brick and adapted for permanent use. The cost is estimated at *20,000. Few cities in the South have grown with such rapidity as Little Rock, and the prospects of a flourish- ing school, if once properly established, are all that could be wished. Our Executive Committee in their annual reports for 1882 and 1883 appealed for *10,000 to supplement Mr. Smiths gift, but no responses were made. We now feel that further delay would be hazardous, and that we should commence work at Little Rock; and urge the friends of this Association. to come to our relief as rapidly as may be needful to assure the comple- tion of the proposed building by the 1st of October. As the college takes- the name of Mr. Smith, we would like to call the first hail by the name of the second donor.

Wanted at Little Rock Editorial 34-35

34 Wanted Wanted at Little Rock. ACCORDING to the census of 1870, i1literat~s committed ten times their pro rata of crime, taking the whole of the United States together. IN the city of New York, the expense imposed for protection against a few thousand criminals, most of whom have been made such by the neglect of society to educate properly the young, is fifty per cent. more than the whole cost of the public schools. WANTED. A full and easy-working treasury for the general ex- pensesat least one thousand dollars a day, for every day of the year. FROM REPORT OP Ex. COM. WANTED AT LITTLE ROCK. Three-fourths of the colored people of Arkansas are renorted as illiter- ate. This Association has been so occupied and its funds so much de- manded by institutions in other States that it has not been able to plant a boarding-school in this needy portion of our country. Nearly three years since, Mr. Edward Smith, of Enfield, Mass., pledged property valued at *15,000 for founding an institution to be known as the Edward Smith College. Thirteen acres of land on Capitol Hill, commanding a view of the city, the river and a large stretch of surrounding country, have been purchased and fenced. We have *10,000 available from Mr. Smiths gift for the first building, which will serve for a mission home and a girls dor- mitorv. This should be constructed of brick and adapted for permanent use. The cost is estimated at *20,000. Few cities in the South have grown with such rapidity as Little Rock, and the prospects of a flourish- ing school, if once properly established, are all that could be wished. Our Executive Committee in their annual reports for 1882 and 1883 appealed for *10,000 to supplement Mr. Smiths gift, but no responses were made. We now feel that further delay would be hazardous, and that we should commence work at Little Rock; and urge the friends of this Association. to come to our relief as rapidly as may be needful to assure the comple- tion of the proposed building by the 1st of October. As the college takes- the name of Mr. Smith, we would like to call the first hail by the name of the second donor. Wanted at Wilmington Wanted at Tougaloo. 35 WANTED AT WILMINGTON. North Carolina has a negro population of 351,145. Of these 271,933, or u per cent., are reported as unable to read and write. The A. M. A. has maintained day schools in this State since the spring of 1865, but for lack of funds has not been able to establish boarding schools, although at different times preliminary steps have been taken for that purpose. Our school at Wilmington has been well attended, and for eighteen years has worked steadily for the development of the colored people of that city. There have been connected with it a church, an industrial school, and at one time an orphan asylum. Chiefly through the liberality of Hon. J. J. H. Gregory we have a brick church edifice, a commodious mission home, also of brick, and a school building with accommodations for from three to four hundred day scholars. What is wanted is two dormitory buildings, one for girls and one for boys, to accommodate worthy students from out of town who may desire to fit themselves for teachers and other useful vocations. As we have no boarding school in South Carolina, it is believed that the proposed one at Wilmington, in consequence of its proximity to that State, would serve for both North and South Carolina for the present, supplying a want signified by the alarming state of illiteracy among the colored people of those States. If the funds are forthcoming for the two buildings, the i~idustrial departments of the school will be modified and enlarged so as to embrace teaching and practical agriculture. WANTED AT TOUGALOO. Tougaloo University is our institution for the State of Mississippi, a State in which the black population is enormous and, for the most part, in the lowest condition, with the greatest hindrances to progress. in no part of the nation is the situation of the freed people more serious and alarming. This school, located a few miles north of Jackson, the State capital, has had a slow but continuous growth, and has reached the full limit of its accommodations. School rooms and dormitories are crowded, and the progress of the work is much obstructed by the lack of larger facilities. We are developing at this point more fully than any other the idea of industrial education, putting in this year a Farm Superintendent, a school of carpentry, a brick-yard, etc. All this increases the exigent demand for more room. What is first needed here is a new school building with accommoda- tions in the lower story for the primary and intermediate departments, with recitation rooms for practice teaching, and in the upPer story a chapel for church and general services. We shall make our own brick on the ground and utilize as far as possible the school of carpentry in its con- struction. By so doing, it is thought that a suitable building can be pro-

Wanted at Wilminton Editorial 35

Wanted at Wilmington Wanted at Tougaloo. 35 WANTED AT WILMINGTON. North Carolina has a negro population of 351,145. Of these 271,933, or u per cent., are reported as unable to read and write. The A. M. A. has maintained day schools in this State since the spring of 1865, but for lack of funds has not been able to establish boarding schools, although at different times preliminary steps have been taken for that purpose. Our school at Wilmington has been well attended, and for eighteen years has worked steadily for the development of the colored people of that city. There have been connected with it a church, an industrial school, and at one time an orphan asylum. Chiefly through the liberality of Hon. J. J. H. Gregory we have a brick church edifice, a commodious mission home, also of brick, and a school building with accommodations for from three to four hundred day scholars. What is wanted is two dormitory buildings, one for girls and one for boys, to accommodate worthy students from out of town who may desire to fit themselves for teachers and other useful vocations. As we have no boarding school in South Carolina, it is believed that the proposed one at Wilmington, in consequence of its proximity to that State, would serve for both North and South Carolina for the present, supplying a want signified by the alarming state of illiteracy among the colored people of those States. If the funds are forthcoming for the two buildings, the i~idustrial departments of the school will be modified and enlarged so as to embrace teaching and practical agriculture. WANTED AT TOUGALOO. Tougaloo University is our institution for the State of Mississippi, a State in which the black population is enormous and, for the most part, in the lowest condition, with the greatest hindrances to progress. in no part of the nation is the situation of the freed people more serious and alarming. This school, located a few miles north of Jackson, the State capital, has had a slow but continuous growth, and has reached the full limit of its accommodations. School rooms and dormitories are crowded, and the progress of the work is much obstructed by the lack of larger facilities. We are developing at this point more fully than any other the idea of industrial education, putting in this year a Farm Superintendent, a school of carpentry, a brick-yard, etc. All this increases the exigent demand for more room. What is first needed here is a new school building with accommoda- tions in the lower story for the primary and intermediate departments, with recitation rooms for practice teaching, and in the upPer story a chapel for church and general services. We shall make our own brick on the ground and utilize as far as possible the school of carpentry in its con- struction. By so doing, it is thought that a suitable building can be pro-

Wanted at Tougaloo Editorial 35

Wanted at Wilmington Wanted at Tougaloo. 35 WANTED AT WILMINGTON. North Carolina has a negro population of 351,145. Of these 271,933, or u per cent., are reported as unable to read and write. The A. M. A. has maintained day schools in this State since the spring of 1865, but for lack of funds has not been able to establish boarding schools, although at different times preliminary steps have been taken for that purpose. Our school at Wilmington has been well attended, and for eighteen years has worked steadily for the development of the colored people of that city. There have been connected with it a church, an industrial school, and at one time an orphan asylum. Chiefly through the liberality of Hon. J. J. H. Gregory we have a brick church edifice, a commodious mission home, also of brick, and a school building with accommodations for from three to four hundred day scholars. What is wanted is two dormitory buildings, one for girls and one for boys, to accommodate worthy students from out of town who may desire to fit themselves for teachers and other useful vocations. As we have no boarding school in South Carolina, it is believed that the proposed one at Wilmington, in consequence of its proximity to that State, would serve for both North and South Carolina for the present, supplying a want signified by the alarming state of illiteracy among the colored people of those States. If the funds are forthcoming for the two buildings, the i~idustrial departments of the school will be modified and enlarged so as to embrace teaching and practical agriculture. WANTED AT TOUGALOO. Tougaloo University is our institution for the State of Mississippi, a State in which the black population is enormous and, for the most part, in the lowest condition, with the greatest hindrances to progress. in no part of the nation is the situation of the freed people more serious and alarming. This school, located a few miles north of Jackson, the State capital, has had a slow but continuous growth, and has reached the full limit of its accommodations. School rooms and dormitories are crowded, and the progress of the work is much obstructed by the lack of larger facilities. We are developing at this point more fully than any other the idea of industrial education, putting in this year a Farm Superintendent, a school of carpentry, a brick-yard, etc. All this increases the exigent demand for more room. What is first needed here is a new school building with accommoda- tions in the lower story for the primary and intermediate departments, with recitation rooms for practice teaching, and in the upPer story a chapel for church and general services. We shall make our own brick on the ground and utilize as far as possible the school of carpentry in its con- struction. By so doing, it is thought that a suitable building can be pro-

Wanted at Tillotson Institute Editorial 35-36

Wanted at Wilmington Wanted at Tougaloo. 35 WANTED AT WILMINGTON. North Carolina has a negro population of 351,145. Of these 271,933, or u per cent., are reported as unable to read and write. The A. M. A. has maintained day schools in this State since the spring of 1865, but for lack of funds has not been able to establish boarding schools, although at different times preliminary steps have been taken for that purpose. Our school at Wilmington has been well attended, and for eighteen years has worked steadily for the development of the colored people of that city. There have been connected with it a church, an industrial school, and at one time an orphan asylum. Chiefly through the liberality of Hon. J. J. H. Gregory we have a brick church edifice, a commodious mission home, also of brick, and a school building with accommodations for from three to four hundred day scholars. What is wanted is two dormitory buildings, one for girls and one for boys, to accommodate worthy students from out of town who may desire to fit themselves for teachers and other useful vocations. As we have no boarding school in South Carolina, it is believed that the proposed one at Wilmington, in consequence of its proximity to that State, would serve for both North and South Carolina for the present, supplying a want signified by the alarming state of illiteracy among the colored people of those States. If the funds are forthcoming for the two buildings, the i~idustrial departments of the school will be modified and enlarged so as to embrace teaching and practical agriculture. WANTED AT TOUGALOO. Tougaloo University is our institution for the State of Mississippi, a State in which the black population is enormous and, for the most part, in the lowest condition, with the greatest hindrances to progress. in no part of the nation is the situation of the freed people more serious and alarming. This school, located a few miles north of Jackson, the State capital, has had a slow but continuous growth, and has reached the full limit of its accommodations. School rooms and dormitories are crowded, and the progress of the work is much obstructed by the lack of larger facilities. We are developing at this point more fully than any other the idea of industrial education, putting in this year a Farm Superintendent, a school of carpentry, a brick-yard, etc. All this increases the exigent demand for more room. What is first needed here is a new school building with accommoda- tions in the lower story for the primary and intermediate departments, with recitation rooms for practice teaching, and in the upPer story a chapel for church and general services. We shall make our own brick on the ground and utilize as far as possible the school of carpentry in its con- struction. By so doing, it is thought that a suitable building can be pro- 36 Wanted at Tillotson Institute Wanted. vided at a cost of five thousand dollars. The completion of such a build- ing will release two primitive buildings now used for school-rooms to be occupied as shops for the industrial department, besides affording relief in other directions. Five thousand dollars added to the assets of a rich Northern college makes but a small showing; but the same amount applied to relieve the pressing wants of this institution for the poor and helpless black will yield a prompt and rich result that can be seen and felt. The need is imperative. Who will help us to the sum needed, and place his name on a memorial more enduring than granite or marble? WANTED AT TILLOTSON INSTITUTE. This is our only institution of higher grade in Texasthat vast State which is tilling up so rapidly with both colored and white people. The In- stitute is most eligibly situated on a fine campus of twenty-two acres near the capitol in Austin, and has been most warmly welcomed by the leading white citizens of the place ; Ex-Gov. Pease, Rev. Dr. Wright and others accepting places on its Board of Trustees. The one building, Allen Hall, was erected in 1880 and was almost immedi- ately crowded to overflowing with students, the two sexes occupying the same building, necessitating a division, thus adding inconvenience to the overcrowding. For both these reasons, to relieve the overcrowding and to place the two sexes in separate houses, a new building for a Boys Hall is most imperatively needed. Prof. Salisbury, our School Superintend- ent, on a recent visit to Austin, says: The institution is crowded t& excess. There are now more boarding students than can be properly accommodated and they had to turn away applicants yesterday. There is great need of another building before next year. The field is truly a promising one. Its President, Rev. Mr. Brooks, writes: It does seem that every interest demands more room. There must be great loss if we cannot provide for this. I hear of large numbers who propose to come next year. We could more thau double our numbers if we had room for them. The building so much needed at Austin will cost $20,000. The present effort to secure the needed funds was begun with this year. A conditional pledge of over $1,000 has been obtained, and we appeal to the friends of the colored man, and of the nation as well, to aid us speedily in providing this relief for an overcrowded school and this facility for the education of those that have now to be turned away. WANTED. A contribution from every Congregational Church, from every Con- gregational Sunday-school, and from every Congregational Ladies Mis- sionary Society in the country, to help us respond to the wants above spread before our readers. We have not told you all our wants. They

Wanted Editorial 36-38

36 Wanted at Tillotson Institute Wanted. vided at a cost of five thousand dollars. The completion of such a build- ing will release two primitive buildings now used for school-rooms to be occupied as shops for the industrial department, besides affording relief in other directions. Five thousand dollars added to the assets of a rich Northern college makes but a small showing; but the same amount applied to relieve the pressing wants of this institution for the poor and helpless black will yield a prompt and rich result that can be seen and felt. The need is imperative. Who will help us to the sum needed, and place his name on a memorial more enduring than granite or marble? WANTED AT TILLOTSON INSTITUTE. This is our only institution of higher grade in Texasthat vast State which is tilling up so rapidly with both colored and white people. The In- stitute is most eligibly situated on a fine campus of twenty-two acres near the capitol in Austin, and has been most warmly welcomed by the leading white citizens of the place ; Ex-Gov. Pease, Rev. Dr. Wright and others accepting places on its Board of Trustees. The one building, Allen Hall, was erected in 1880 and was almost immedi- ately crowded to overflowing with students, the two sexes occupying the same building, necessitating a division, thus adding inconvenience to the overcrowding. For both these reasons, to relieve the overcrowding and to place the two sexes in separate houses, a new building for a Boys Hall is most imperatively needed. Prof. Salisbury, our School Superintend- ent, on a recent visit to Austin, says: The institution is crowded t& excess. There are now more boarding students than can be properly accommodated and they had to turn away applicants yesterday. There is great need of another building before next year. The field is truly a promising one. Its President, Rev. Mr. Brooks, writes: It does seem that every interest demands more room. There must be great loss if we cannot provide for this. I hear of large numbers who propose to come next year. We could more thau double our numbers if we had room for them. The building so much needed at Austin will cost $20,000. The present effort to secure the needed funds was begun with this year. A conditional pledge of over $1,000 has been obtained, and we appeal to the friends of the colored man, and of the nation as well, to aid us speedily in providing this relief for an overcrowded school and this facility for the education of those that have now to be turned away. WANTED. A contribution from every Congregational Church, from every Con- gregational Sunday-school, and from every Congregational Ladies Mis- sionary Society in the country, to help us respond to the wants above spread before our readers. We have not told you all our wants. They A Bit of K~omthern Scenery. 37 are ~o numerous, we cannot. From every side they press, each insisting on its special right to be heard and answered. Could our friends be in telephonic communication with this office but for one day, so as to catch the many-voiced appeals that from all parts of our vast field clamorously ry for help, they would understan why we so urgently beg that our churche and missionary organizations connected with them hould not fail to aid a:, XX e hall anxiously watch for the returns. 38 Ben~,btctions. A Connecticut Inve?~tion.On the last Sabbath of the old year the members of the Sunday-school connected with the Congregational Church of Chester, Coun., voted to bring the next Sabbath as many pennies each as they were years old, as a gift to this Association, the money to be applied toward the education of a girl at Tougaloo University, Miss. The number present New Years Sabbath was ninety-four, the amount received $24.10, indicating an average age of over twenty-five years. The invention is a good one, and, as our Connecticut friends have no patent upon it, we trust other Sunday-schools will make its use so common as to assure freedom for it in coming time. BEN E FACTIO N S. Rev. Mr. Goucher, of Baltimore, gives *3,000 conditionally, for an Anglo-Japanese college at Tokio, and *7,000 for the theological school at Foo Choo. The Missionary Committee of the Methodist Episcopal Chureh accepts the offer of Mrs. Philander Smith, of Little Rock. Ark., of *10,000 for a medical college at INankin, China. Governor Cleveland of New York has given the public school at Hol- land Patent *~00 for additions to its library, selecting and purchasing books, and secnring discounts from publishers. Geo. 0. Clark, of Milton, Mass., has bequeathed his estate amounting to *300,000 to Harvard College, the benefit of the bequest to be realized after the death of certain relatives. Mr. Henry Packer and Miss Mary Packer are about to build a chapel at Leigh University in memory of their mother. Judge Packer is corn~ pleting the work of furnishing the laboratory undertaken by his father. The late Julius Haligarten left *750,000 to be distributed among rela- tives and various institutions. Under certain contingencies Yale, Har- vard, Columbia and Williams Colleges are to be benefited. Dartmouth College gets *50,000. The sum of *250,225 has been subscribed by wealthy Bostonians as a permanent fund for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, to be called the William Barton Rogers fund. The income from the fund only is to be used for the support of the institute. Hamlin University in Minnesota has received a gift of *30,000 from Rev. J. F. Chaffee, D.D., of Minneapolis to endow the chair of mental science. Five thousand dollars are needed 1y the A. 111. A. for a model school Imilding of two stories, with accommodations for model school and chapel at Tougaloo University. This in4itution hasfive hundred acres of land, and buildings suitable for a variety of educational work, but press of stu- dents makes the demand for thz~ proposed building imperative.

Benefactions Editorial 38

38 Ben~,btctions. A Connecticut Inve?~tion.On the last Sabbath of the old year the members of the Sunday-school connected with the Congregational Church of Chester, Coun., voted to bring the next Sabbath as many pennies each as they were years old, as a gift to this Association, the money to be applied toward the education of a girl at Tougaloo University, Miss. The number present New Years Sabbath was ninety-four, the amount received $24.10, indicating an average age of over twenty-five years. The invention is a good one, and, as our Connecticut friends have no patent upon it, we trust other Sunday-schools will make its use so common as to assure freedom for it in coming time. BEN E FACTIO N S. Rev. Mr. Goucher, of Baltimore, gives *3,000 conditionally, for an Anglo-Japanese college at Tokio, and *7,000 for the theological school at Foo Choo. The Missionary Committee of the Methodist Episcopal Chureh accepts the offer of Mrs. Philander Smith, of Little Rock. Ark., of *10,000 for a medical college at INankin, China. Governor Cleveland of New York has given the public school at Hol- land Patent *~00 for additions to its library, selecting and purchasing books, and secnring discounts from publishers. Geo. 0. Clark, of Milton, Mass., has bequeathed his estate amounting to *300,000 to Harvard College, the benefit of the bequest to be realized after the death of certain relatives. Mr. Henry Packer and Miss Mary Packer are about to build a chapel at Leigh University in memory of their mother. Judge Packer is corn~ pleting the work of furnishing the laboratory undertaken by his father. The late Julius Haligarten left *750,000 to be distributed among rela- tives and various institutions. Under certain contingencies Yale, Har- vard, Columbia and Williams Colleges are to be benefited. Dartmouth College gets *50,000. The sum of *250,225 has been subscribed by wealthy Bostonians as a permanent fund for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, to be called the William Barton Rogers fund. The income from the fund only is to be used for the support of the institute. Hamlin University in Minnesota has received a gift of *30,000 from Rev. J. F. Chaffee, D.D., of Minneapolis to endow the chair of mental science. Five thousand dollars are needed 1y the A. 111. A. for a model school Imilding of two stories, with accommodations for model school and chapel at Tougaloo University. This in4itution hasfive hundred acres of land, and buildings suitable for a variety of educational work, but press of stu- dents makes the demand for thz~ proposed building imperative.

A Connecticut Invention Editorial 38-39

38 Ben~,btctions. A Connecticut Inve?~tion.On the last Sabbath of the old year the members of the Sunday-school connected with the Congregational Church of Chester, Coun., voted to bring the next Sabbath as many pennies each as they were years old, as a gift to this Association, the money to be applied toward the education of a girl at Tougaloo University, Miss. The number present New Years Sabbath was ninety-four, the amount received $24.10, indicating an average age of over twenty-five years. The invention is a good one, and, as our Connecticut friends have no patent upon it, we trust other Sunday-schools will make its use so common as to assure freedom for it in coming time. BEN E FACTIO N S. Rev. Mr. Goucher, of Baltimore, gives *3,000 conditionally, for an Anglo-Japanese college at Tokio, and *7,000 for the theological school at Foo Choo. The Missionary Committee of the Methodist Episcopal Chureh accepts the offer of Mrs. Philander Smith, of Little Rock. Ark., of *10,000 for a medical college at INankin, China. Governor Cleveland of New York has given the public school at Hol- land Patent *~00 for additions to its library, selecting and purchasing books, and secnring discounts from publishers. Geo. 0. Clark, of Milton, Mass., has bequeathed his estate amounting to *300,000 to Harvard College, the benefit of the bequest to be realized after the death of certain relatives. Mr. Henry Packer and Miss Mary Packer are about to build a chapel at Leigh University in memory of their mother. Judge Packer is corn~ pleting the work of furnishing the laboratory undertaken by his father. The late Julius Haligarten left *750,000 to be distributed among rela- tives and various institutions. Under certain contingencies Yale, Har- vard, Columbia and Williams Colleges are to be benefited. Dartmouth College gets *50,000. The sum of *250,225 has been subscribed by wealthy Bostonians as a permanent fund for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, to be called the William Barton Rogers fund. The income from the fund only is to be used for the support of the institute. Hamlin University in Minnesota has received a gift of *30,000 from Rev. J. F. Chaffee, D.D., of Minneapolis to endow the chair of mental science. Five thousand dollars are needed 1y the A. 111. A. for a model school Imilding of two stories, with accommodations for model school and chapel at Tougaloo University. This in4itution hasfive hundred acres of land, and buildings suitable for a variety of educational work, but press of stu- dents makes the demand for thz~ proposed building imperative. General Notes. GENERAL NOTES. AFRICA. Au Mahoom, a young slave liberated at Khartoum l.y Gordon Pacha and given to the missionary Felkin, who educated him in England, has been engaged by Consul Baker and has already set out for Khartoum. The National German Committee not being able to furnish the 3Th,OOO francs necessary to the new expedition of Lieutenant Wissman, the King of the Belgians has oflTered to defray from his own means the expenses ~f this journey of exploration. According to the African Times, the two Sultans of the islands Jo- hanna and Mohilla have decided to abolish slavery in their territories after the 4th of August, 1889, and the English Consul of the Comores Islands has written them upon the list of enlightened and civilized monarchies. The British Government has named Captain Foot as Consul in the region of Nyassa and the other lakes, to suppress the slave trade and develop civilization and commerce in Central Africa. He will be sec- onded in his efforts by C. E. Gissing, as Vice-Consul. From a Letter from the missionary Barn, of Bethany, Mr. Vogelsang, chief of the German expedition to Angra Pequena, has promised to abstain, as far as his agents are concerned, from the importation of spirit uous liquors in the country of the Namaquas. They will endeavor to teach the natives to carry on an honest commerce and to take up all sorts of work. Two French missionaries and some brothers familiar with manual occupations have gone to Stanley Pool to establish a mission. The Priest Guyot, who had been charged by Monseigneur Lavigerie with the explor- ation of the shores of the Upper Congo to found stations, was drowned in the river, with Lieutenant Janssen, on returning from the Wabouma, where they had been establishing a station for a school and the first mission. Their boat was commanded by eleven Zanzibarites, of whom eight were drowned. The Arab journal Nusret announces that the King of Abyssinia, hav- ing learned that his vassal, M 6n6lik, proposed sending an ambassador to Paris to solicit the protectorate of France, has declared war against him and has in vaded the Choa with an Abyssinian army. The Germans have charged themselves with a new expedition to be undertaken by Lieutenant Wissmann, who will return to Muquengu6 to attempt from there an exploration in the direction of the Congo, to study the hydrographic system of that part of the Central African plateau. There has been constituted at Barcelona, under the name of the Spanish- African Company, a society of commerce and navigation, whose aim is to develop the commercial relations oE Spain with Africa, for the establish-

General Notice Editorial 39-41

General Notes. GENERAL NOTES. AFRICA. Au Mahoom, a young slave liberated at Khartoum l.y Gordon Pacha and given to the missionary Felkin, who educated him in England, has been engaged by Consul Baker and has already set out for Khartoum. The National German Committee not being able to furnish the 3Th,OOO francs necessary to the new expedition of Lieutenant Wissman, the King of the Belgians has oflTered to defray from his own means the expenses ~f this journey of exploration. According to the African Times, the two Sultans of the islands Jo- hanna and Mohilla have decided to abolish slavery in their territories after the 4th of August, 1889, and the English Consul of the Comores Islands has written them upon the list of enlightened and civilized monarchies. The British Government has named Captain Foot as Consul in the region of Nyassa and the other lakes, to suppress the slave trade and develop civilization and commerce in Central Africa. He will be sec- onded in his efforts by C. E. Gissing, as Vice-Consul. From a Letter from the missionary Barn, of Bethany, Mr. Vogelsang, chief of the German expedition to Angra Pequena, has promised to abstain, as far as his agents are concerned, from the importation of spirit uous liquors in the country of the Namaquas. They will endeavor to teach the natives to carry on an honest commerce and to take up all sorts of work. Two French missionaries and some brothers familiar with manual occupations have gone to Stanley Pool to establish a mission. The Priest Guyot, who had been charged by Monseigneur Lavigerie with the explor- ation of the shores of the Upper Congo to found stations, was drowned in the river, with Lieutenant Janssen, on returning from the Wabouma, where they had been establishing a station for a school and the first mission. Their boat was commanded by eleven Zanzibarites, of whom eight were drowned. The Arab journal Nusret announces that the King of Abyssinia, hav- ing learned that his vassal, M 6n6lik, proposed sending an ambassador to Paris to solicit the protectorate of France, has declared war against him and has in vaded the Choa with an Abyssinian army. The Germans have charged themselves with a new expedition to be undertaken by Lieutenant Wissmann, who will return to Muquengu6 to attempt from there an exploration in the direction of the Congo, to study the hydrographic system of that part of the Central African plateau. There has been constituted at Barcelona, under the name of the Spanish- African Company, a society of commerce and navigation, whose aim is to develop the commercial relations oE Spain with Africa, for the establish- 40 Indians Attacking a Stage. inent of factories and for the creation of a regular line of steamers, for which the Government accords a grant. THE INDIANS. A school for Indian children is to be opened in Philadelphia. The authorities of Beloit College, Wis., have agreed to undertake he education and industrial training of twenty Indian youths at their institution. An Indian of the Wyandotte tribe attending a monthly concert of prayer, and hearing what missions had done for other tribes, especially for the Choctaws, testifies to the liberality and practicability of Indians by an account of one of his fellows who, when an appeal was made for a contribution, laid down his subscription, saying, There, take that, and give the Gospel another push. -The Papagos and Navajos are a grazing people, making corn and vegetable crops wherever there are springs of water in the great riverless region they occupy. The latter are the wealthiest Indians on the conti- nent, having in fifteen years increased from 9,000 to 16,000, and owning an average of over U0o apiece in silver and coral ornaments (they do not care for gold), having over 25,000 ponies and 1,000,000 sheep. The women are the principal property holders, and retain their wealth after marriage. INDIAN ATTACK ON AN OVERLAND STAGE The Joint Uorn~mittee at Springfield. 41 THE CHINESE. The Presbyterian Synod of China reports one huudred per cent. increase of accessions to the membership in the past five years. It is estimated that at the present rate of progress of missions in China the next forty years will report 26,000,000 communicants and 100,000,000 adherents in the Celestial Kingdom. Dr. Otis Gibson, of the San Francisco Chinese Mission, has been unanimously requested by the Oregon Conference to organize a Chinese mission in Portland, where it is estimated 7,000 Chinese reside. Low Foo, a Chinaman, when converted at Canton, sold himself as a slave in order that he might go to Demarara and preach the Gospel to his fellow countrymen there. This he has done so successfully that there is now a church of 200 Chinamen there who are supporting missionaries among their own people. Three of the six additions to the Bethany Church, San Francisco, Rev. W. C. Pond, pastor, were Chinese. The sum of $650 has been raised to pay for furniture and improvements in the church edifice. The Bethany Church (Chinese), Marysville, contributed out of their poverty $140 to the American Board, with special reference to its South China mission. Of BARNES HISTORICAL SERIES we have examined two volumesthe GENERAL HISTORY and the EPITOME OF ENGLISH HIsToRY. The former, a neat book of 600 pages, gives in its large type a good r6suiin6 of ancient, mediteval and modern history, suitable for schools and convenient for reference, while the smaller type compacts a large amount of information for the general reader. The maps are good and the illustrations abund- ant. The EPITOME 15 an enlarged chronological table with the important facts of English history well arranged for the use of the pupils or to be consul ted for specific information. THE JOINT COMMITTEE AT SPRINGFIELD. EXTRACTS FROM THE RELIGIOUS PRESS. In the last MISSIONARY we gave a copy of the action of the Committees at Springfield on the relations of the A. H. M. S. and the A. M. A., with brief reference to the absence of partisanship in the discussions and to the unanimity in the conclusions reached. We now present extracts from the editorials of the religious press on the subject, that our readers may see the drift of public sentiment, as shown by these utterances. FROM THE CONGREGATIONALIST, DEC. 20, 1883. We print on our fifth page the finding of the conference committees of the A. H. M. S. and the A. M. A. Re-affirming their principle of mutual comity and dir-

The Joint Committee at Springfield Editorial 41-44

The Joint Uorn~mittee at Springfield. 41 THE CHINESE. The Presbyterian Synod of China reports one huudred per cent. increase of accessions to the membership in the past five years. It is estimated that at the present rate of progress of missions in China the next forty years will report 26,000,000 communicants and 100,000,000 adherents in the Celestial Kingdom. Dr. Otis Gibson, of the San Francisco Chinese Mission, has been unanimously requested by the Oregon Conference to organize a Chinese mission in Portland, where it is estimated 7,000 Chinese reside. Low Foo, a Chinaman, when converted at Canton, sold himself as a slave in order that he might go to Demarara and preach the Gospel to his fellow countrymen there. This he has done so successfully that there is now a church of 200 Chinamen there who are supporting missionaries among their own people. Three of the six additions to the Bethany Church, San Francisco, Rev. W. C. Pond, pastor, were Chinese. The sum of $650 has been raised to pay for furniture and improvements in the church edifice. The Bethany Church (Chinese), Marysville, contributed out of their poverty $140 to the American Board, with special reference to its South China mission. Of BARNES HISTORICAL SERIES we have examined two volumesthe GENERAL HISTORY and the EPITOME OF ENGLISH HIsToRY. The former, a neat book of 600 pages, gives in its large type a good r6suiin6 of ancient, mediteval and modern history, suitable for schools and convenient for reference, while the smaller type compacts a large amount of information for the general reader. The maps are good and the illustrations abund- ant. The EPITOME 15 an enlarged chronological table with the important facts of English history well arranged for the use of the pupils or to be consul ted for specific information. THE JOINT COMMITTEE AT SPRINGFIELD. EXTRACTS FROM THE RELIGIOUS PRESS. In the last MISSIONARY we gave a copy of the action of the Committees at Springfield on the relations of the A. H. M. S. and the A. M. A., with brief reference to the absence of partisanship in the discussions and to the unanimity in the conclusions reached. We now present extracts from the editorials of the religious press on the subject, that our readers may see the drift of public sentiment, as shown by these utterances. FROM THE CONGREGATIONALIST, DEC. 20, 1883. We print on our fifth page the finding of the conference committees of the A. H. M. S. and the A. M. A. Re-affirming their principle of mutual comity and dir- 42 foint Committee at Springfield. avowing the spirit of caste, it goes on to advise the former society to confine itself chiefly to the West, and the latter cliefly to the South, as heretofore. It also recommends that new work called for anywhere be under the charge of the society already occupying the ground; that any transfer of work already begun, from the care of one to that of the other, be made which may seem desirable ; and that, if practicable, a common superintendent be employed, wherever advisable. The committee thus has limited ea(h society territorially with some definiteness, and the bearing of its suggestion is adver-e to any enlargement of the work of the A. H. M. S. in the South. It has been our own feeling that no great increase of that work would prove possible, at present. but that in special cases the A. H. M. S. might be able to work with better advantage than the A. M. A., and that Christian good sense, and the course of circumstances, would settle the whole matter quietly in due time. The joint committee prefers to settle it at once, and we acquiesce. cheerfully in their decision, because of their presumably better opportunity of knowing all the facts. In view of this decision their recommenda- tions are xvise, and ought to be acted upon as fast aid as far as possible. Now let the great work which both societies are doing be pushed on with more prayer and labor and generous support than ever ! FR)M THE CHRISTIAN UNION, DEC. 20. 1883. We think that the report of the Joint Committee of the two Home Missionary Societies of the Congregationalists, given in another column, will commend itself to the judgment of all judi~ions me. If it abates a little the excessive enthu- siasm for a Congregational mission in the South. it will do no harm. Its essential principles are four in number. 1. That each Society had best continue its work chiefly in the field which it now occiip sthe Home Missionary Society in the West, the American Missionary Association in the South. 2. That neii her Society shall enter in a locality pre-occupied by the other. 3. That, wherever practicable. such transfers of work already establish: d be made as will serve economy and efficiency. 4. That, where it is practicable, one Superintendent be used by both Socieies. * * * The Southern communities are still poor and are not able to expend as much money per capita for education as their more prosperous Northern neighbors. But to found a new school systerui requires a much greater expenditure per capita. The nation has not yet grown wise enough and liberal ~nough to follow the lead of Senators Hoar of Massachu~tts and Brown of Georgia, and use some of the sur- plus funds in its overflowing treasury to build up educational systems in the South. Under these circumstances there can be no wiser work than that which the Ameri- can Missionary Association is doing, in planting foci of light in various Soul hem centres, in industrial and in normal schools, and so preparing the way for univer- sal education when pmjudice and poverty, the two chief foes, have been van- quished. Congregationalists cannot, indeed, refuse their sympathy and support to such churches of their faith and order as spring spontaneously on Southern soil. But they had better put the stret gth ot their missionary energies in the South into the welcomed movements to give the working classes a more intelligent industry, the colored schools better educat d teachers, and the colored church?s a more cultured minbtry. And this is the work of the American Missionary Associ- ation. On the other hand, the strcam of immigration which is filling up our Western States and Territories comes disorganized. It is without churches. The school- house keeps pace with the railroad. There are no better public schools in New England than in some of our Western St tes. But if the churches are to keep pace with the railroad they must be planted and sustained by men and money from Joint (Jo7nmittee at Springfield. the East. It is in the West, too, that the Gospel has its four worst obstacles to encounterMormondom. Romanism, Infidelity, and the spirit of mere worldly getting-on. The Home Missionary Society will have all it can do to occupy the unoccupied Territories of the Great West. It need not weep for want of worlds to conquer: and worlds in which there are plenty of pagans and tremendous pagan influences.~~ FROM THE ADVANCE, DEC. 27, 1883. The report of the joint committee of the American Home Missionary Society and the American Missionary Association which we published last week, on its face leaves matters just where they were. It is easy to see, however, that such an interpretation as the Congregationalist and Independent give might be made. Both of these papers assume that the committee meant to define the territorial limits of each society. But such a suggestion is not in the report of the committee. The only clause in the resolution as adopted which can be so construed is the recommendation that the principal work of the one society should be in the West and that of the other in the South. There is nothing revolutionary in this expression of opinion. That has been the history of the two societies in the past. * * * ~The committee has, so far as any recommendations to the societies are con cerned, done nothing ; under the circumstances, perhaps that was the wisest course The adjustment of the relations of two great benevolent societies is too large a question for any committee, however well constituted. Neither society, as it seems to us, should limit its work on any recommendation short of that of the National Council. FROM THE INDEPENDENT, DEC. 20, 1883. It will be seen that the joint committee does not see its way clear to recoin- mend any very stringent line of division between the fields of the two societies. Only one division would be possible, and that the committee virtually recommends as far as possible. The field of one society is chiefly at the West and that of the other at the South. If the spirit of these recommendations is followed out, the Southern field, excepting, of course, those portions which have been invaded by a northern population, and which are held already by the A. H. M. S., will remain under the care of the A. M. A., which will be under obligation to promote the organization of churches, when called for, without distinction of color. Should such a case as that at Atlanta come up again, it will be the society already holding the field which will be asked for help. This is a wise conclusion. While neither society would willingly favor caste, it will be impossible not to seem to favor it if the same field, Georgia, for example, is divided between a white and a colored society, just as the Methodists divide it between a white and a colored conference. There are a plenty of caste churches there now; and five churches that hate caste are better than a hundred which yield to it. Another advantage of this conclusion is that it leaves each society free to make its separate appeal. The one society appeals for the West, the other for the South. A society lives on the fruit of its appeal to the churches. The appeal which asociety holds is its support. If one society holds the appeal, we will say for the South, then any other society which comes in to divide that appeal really robs the treasury of its fellow. The field is very large, and each society should be allowed to work without the interference or rivalry oi~ the other. One society for white churches and another for colored churches would be an abomination. The Field. Rev. W. H. Thrall, NORTI{ WILMINGTON. Minister. Rev. D. D. Dodge, Nashua, N. H. NORMAL SCHOOL. Principal. Derby, Ct. Assistants. Miss H. L. Fitts, Candia, N. H. E. A. Warner, Lowell, Mass. H. M. Woodward, Albion, N. Y. M. E. Wolverton, Easton, Pa. Mary D. Hyde, Zumbrota, Minn. Lizzie S. Hayward, Red Bank, N. J. Mrs. Janet Dodge, Nashua, N. H. Special Missionary. Miss A. E. Farringtou, Portland. Me. RALEIGH. Minister. Rev. Geo. S. Smith, Raleigh, N. C. Special Missionary, Miss E. P. Hayes. Limerick, Me. DUDLEY. Minister and Teacher. Rev. J. E. B. Jewett, Pepperell, Mass. Mrs. J. E. B. Jewett, Miss P. M. Lee, KITTRELL. Teacher. Oxford, Mass. CAROLINA. McLEANSVILLE. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Alfred Connet, Soisberry, md. OAKS. Minister and Teacher. Rev. J. N. Ray, Oaks, N. C. Miss E. W. Douglas, Decorah, Iowa. HILLSBORO. Teacher. A.tlanta, Ga. HAVELOCK. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Z. Simmons, Dudley, N. C. Mrs. G. A. Rumbley, Philadelphia, Pa. BEAUFORT. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Michael Jerkins, Beaufort, N. C. Miss Lydia Hatch, Miss M. B. Curtiss, STRIEBY. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Islay Walden, Strieby, N. C. Mrs.. Islay Walden, TROY. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Win. H. Ellis, Southlleld, Mass PEKIN. Minister and Teacher. Rev. J. E. Smith, Pekin, N. C. Rev. E. T. Hooker, SOUTh CHARLESTON. Minister. Castleton, Vt. AVERT INsTITUTE. Principal. Prof. J. A. Nichols, Merrimac, Mass. Assistants. Miss Hattie E. Dowd, Oswego, ~. Y. E. A. Huntoon, Wallingford, Vt. Addle NI. Phelps, Moravia, N. Caroline H. Loomis, Hartford, Ct, Marianna Lockwood, Denville, N. J. Agnes Duncan, Weston, Mass. Mrs. Gertrude A. Harding, Rhmebeck, N. Y. CAROLINA. Mr. E. A. Lawrence, Miss NI. H. McKinley, Mrs. E. T. Hooker, Miss Nellie E. Blood, Charleston, S. C. Charleston, S. C. Castleton, Vt. Peperell, Mass. ORANGEBURG. Minister. Rev. H. C. Campbell, Orangeburg, S. C. GREENWOOD. BREWER NORMAL 5~HOOL. Mr. J. D. Backenstose, Geneva, N. Y. Win. Clark, Greenwood, S. C. LADIES ISLAND. Miss M. H. Clary, Conway, Mass ATLANTA. Ministers. Rev. C. W. Francis, Atlanta, Ga. Evarts Kent, Chicago, Ill. ATLANTA UNIVERSITY. Instructors and Managers. Rev. Edmund A. Ware, Atlanta, Ga. Prof. Thomas N. Chase, Rev. Cyrus W. Fiancis, Horace Bumstead, D.D., Mr. Horace M. Sessions, Wilbraham, Mass. Charles P. Sinnott, Marshfield, Mass. C. C. Tucker. Fitchburg, Mass. GEORGIA. Miss Emma C. Ware, Mary E. Sands, Ella W. Moore, Rebecca Massey, Margaret Neel, Sarah E. Marsh, Mrs. Lucy E. Case, M. N. Chapman, L. R. Green, H. W. Chase, Miss M. C. Roberts, E. C. Witbeck, Fannie M. Andrews, Norfolk, Mass. Saco, Me. Chicago. Ill. Oberlin, 0. Livonia, N. Y. Lake Forrest, Ill. Millbury, Mass. Bostoo, Mass. Amherst, Mass. West Randolph, Vt Greenfleld, Mess. Boston, Mass. MillIown, N. B. 45

List of Missionaries and Teachers The Field 44-51

The Field. Rev. W. H. Thrall, NORTI{ WILMINGTON. Minister. Rev. D. D. Dodge, Nashua, N. H. NORMAL SCHOOL. Principal. Derby, Ct. Assistants. Miss H. L. Fitts, Candia, N. H. E. A. Warner, Lowell, Mass. H. M. Woodward, Albion, N. Y. M. E. Wolverton, Easton, Pa. Mary D. Hyde, Zumbrota, Minn. Lizzie S. Hayward, Red Bank, N. J. Mrs. Janet Dodge, Nashua, N. H. Special Missionary. Miss A. E. Farringtou, Portland. Me. RALEIGH. Minister. Rev. Geo. S. Smith, Raleigh, N. C. Special Missionary, Miss E. P. Hayes. Limerick, Me. DUDLEY. Minister and Teacher. Rev. J. E. B. Jewett, Pepperell, Mass. Mrs. J. E. B. Jewett, Miss P. M. Lee, KITTRELL. Teacher. Oxford, Mass. CAROLINA. McLEANSVILLE. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Alfred Connet, Soisberry, md. OAKS. Minister and Teacher. Rev. J. N. Ray, Oaks, N. C. Miss E. W. Douglas, Decorah, Iowa. HILLSBORO. Teacher. A.tlanta, Ga. HAVELOCK. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Z. Simmons, Dudley, N. C. Mrs. G. A. Rumbley, Philadelphia, Pa. BEAUFORT. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Michael Jerkins, Beaufort, N. C. Miss Lydia Hatch, Miss M. B. Curtiss, STRIEBY. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Islay Walden, Strieby, N. C. Mrs.. Islay Walden, TROY. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Win. H. Ellis, Southlleld, Mass PEKIN. Minister and Teacher. Rev. J. E. Smith, Pekin, N. C. Rev. E. T. Hooker, SOUTh CHARLESTON. Minister. Castleton, Vt. AVERT INsTITUTE. Principal. Prof. J. A. Nichols, Merrimac, Mass. Assistants. Miss Hattie E. Dowd, Oswego, ~. Y. E. A. Huntoon, Wallingford, Vt. Addle NI. Phelps, Moravia, N. Caroline H. Loomis, Hartford, Ct, Marianna Lockwood, Denville, N. J. Agnes Duncan, Weston, Mass. Mrs. Gertrude A. Harding, Rhmebeck, N. Y. CAROLINA. Mr. E. A. Lawrence, Miss NI. H. McKinley, Mrs. E. T. Hooker, Miss Nellie E. Blood, Charleston, S. C. Charleston, S. C. Castleton, Vt. Peperell, Mass. ORANGEBURG. Minister. Rev. H. C. Campbell, Orangeburg, S. C. GREENWOOD. BREWER NORMAL 5~HOOL. Mr. J. D. Backenstose, Geneva, N. Y. Win. Clark, Greenwood, S. C. LADIES ISLAND. Miss M. H. Clary, Conway, Mass ATLANTA. Ministers. Rev. C. W. Francis, Atlanta, Ga. Evarts Kent, Chicago, Ill. ATLANTA UNIVERSITY. Instructors and Managers. Rev. Edmund A. Ware, Atlanta, Ga. Prof. Thomas N. Chase, Rev. Cyrus W. Fiancis, Horace Bumstead, D.D., Mr. Horace M. Sessions, Wilbraham, Mass. Charles P. Sinnott, Marshfield, Mass. C. C. Tucker. Fitchburg, Mass. GEORGIA. Miss Emma C. Ware, Mary E. Sands, Ella W. Moore, Rebecca Massey, Margaret Neel, Sarah E. Marsh, Mrs. Lucy E. Case, M. N. Chapman, L. R. Green, H. W. Chase, Miss M. C. Roberts, E. C. Witbeck, Fannie M. Andrews, Norfolk, Mass. Saco, Me. Chicago. Ill. Oberlin, 0. Livonia, N. Y. Lake Forrest, Ill. Millbury, Mass. Bostoo, Mass. Amherst, Mass. West Randolph, Vt Greenfleld, Mess. Boston, Mass. MillIown, N. B. 45 STORItS SCHOOL (104 Houston St.). Principal. Miss Amy Williams, Livonia Sta., N. Y. Assistants. Miss Julia A. Goodwin, Mason, N. H. Amelia L. Ferris, Oneida, Ill. Mrs. C. G. Ball, Palermo, N. Y. Miss Alice M. Field, Bachellorville, N. Y. A. H. Levering, Philadelphia, Pa. Carrie J. Parry, Chicago, fli. Special Missionary. Miss Lizzie Stevenson, Bellefontaine, 0. Rev. S. E. Latlirop. Mr. W. A. Hodge, MACON. Minister. ~ew London, Wis. LEWIS HIGH SCHOOL. Principal. W. Rosendale, Wis. Assistants. W. Rosendale, Wis. Janesville, Wis. Dakoto City, Ia. Nashua, N. H. Oberlin, 0. New London, Wis. Mrs. W. A. Hodge, Miss Susie A. JetTries, Gertrude F. Yard, Flora A. Austin, Christabel Lee, Mrs. S. E. Lathrop, MARIETTA. Minister and Teacher. Rev. E. J. Penney, Marietta, Ga. AUGUSTA. Teacher. Ashley, Mass. THOMASYILLE. Teacher. Savannah, Ga ALBANY. Teacher. Albany, Ga. WASHINGTON. Teacher. Mr. W. H. Harris, Mr. W. C. Greene, CUTHBERT. Teacher. Mr. F. H. Henderson, Cuthbert, Ga. STONE MOUNTAIN. Teacher. Mr. Eugene Martin, Atlanta. Ga. BAINBEIDGE. Teacher. IPLORTD A. ST. AUGUSTINE. Teachers. Miss Emma R. Caughey, Helen D. Barton. ATHENS. Minister. R~sv. Geo. V. Clark, Atlanta, Ga. Teachers. Mr 0. A. Combs, Athens, Ga. Miss Lizzie McCornb. Minnie Young, BYRON. Minister and Teacher. Rev. N. B. James, New Orlenas. La.. SAVANNAH. Minister and Supt of Missions. Rev. Dana Sherrill, Forrest, Ill.. BEACH INSTITUTE. Principal. Miss Ida M. Beach, Vernon, Conn.. Asststants. Miss Lizzy Hardy, Shelburne, Mass. M. M. Foote, Norwich, N. Y. H. E. Wells, Mic!dletown, N. Y. Georgiana Hunter, Brooklyn, N. Y. Mary F Lord, Fredonia, N. Y. Mrs. Dana Shsrrill, Forrest. ill. Special Missionary. Miss J. S. Hardy, Shelburne, Mass~ WOODVILLE. Minister and Teacher. Rev. .1. H. H. Sengstacke, Savannah, Ga. Assistant. Miss E. A. Thompson, Savarnah, Ga. MILLERS STATION. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Wilson Callen, Selma. Ala. LOUISVILLE AND BELMONL Minister. Selma, Ala. Rev Wilson Callen, EAST SAVANNAH. Minister. Rev. Dana Sherrill, Forrest, Ill. McINTOSH, LIBERTY CO. THE GROVE. Minister. Rev. Floyd Snelson, Mcintosh. (hi. Teachers. Miss Elizabeth Plimpton, Walpole, Mas~. Jennie McCabon, Canonsburg. Pa. Carrie I. Gibson, Boston. Mass. CYPHESS SLASH. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Geo. C. Rowe. Cypress Slash, Ga. Kingsville, 0. Terre Haute. md. 46 The F/eld Miss S. A. Hosmer, 47 The Field. ALABAMA. TALLADEGA. Minister. Rev. 0. XV. Fay, Geneseo, Ill. TALLADEGA COLLEGE. Instructors and Managers. Rev. H. S. Dc Forest, D.D., Muscatine. Ia. G. XV. Andrews, Collinaville, Ct. 0. W. Fay, Geneseo, ill. Mr. Geo. H. Howe, Orwell, Pa. C. B. Rice, W. Brattlehoro, Vt. Miss Mary N. Sawyer, Framingham, Mass. L. F. Partridge, Holliston, Mass. C. A. Virgin, Abington, Mass. Mrs. Clara S. Rindge, Homer, N. Y. Miss Bes~ie B. Noyes, Holliston, Mass. I,Inry L. Phillips, Canonsburg, Pa. Mary L. Barnes, Stowe, Vt. Miss Sarah Hillyer, Orange, N. J. Emma M. Wright, Rochester, N. Y. .1. C. Andrews, Milltown, N. B. Frances Yeomans. Danville, Ill. Mrs H. S. De Forest, Muscatine, Ia. H. XV. Andrews, Collinsville, Ct. 0. W. Fay, Geneseo, Ill. Geo. H. Howe, Orwell, Pa. C. B. Rice, W. Brattleboro, Vt. KYMULGA. Minister. Rev. Spencer Snell, Talladega, Ala. SHELBY IRON WORKS. Rev. J. R. Sims, Talladega, Ala. CHLLDERSBURG. Minister. Talladega, Ala. ANNISTON. Minister and Teacher. Rev. H. W. Conley, Talladega, Ala. Assistant. Talladega, Ala. LAWSONVILLE AND COVE. Minister. Talladega, Ala. ALABAMA FURNACE. Minister. Talladega, Ala. TECUMSEH. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Milus Harris, Talladega. Ala. Rev. J. R. Sims, lirs. H. W. Conley, Rev. J. R. McLean, Rev. J. B. Grant, Rev. A. J. Headen, Rev. M. B. Churchill, BIRMINGHAM. Minister. Talladega, Ala. MOBILE. Rev. W. H Davis, Minister. Mobile, Ala. EMERSON INSTITUTE. Princtpal. Galesburg, Ill. Assistants. Miss Millie Bryant, Baxter Spa, Kan. Isadore M. Caughey, Kiagsville, 0. Carrie E. Ferris, Passaic, N. J. Nellie S. Donnell, Bath, Me. Lillian Peers. Ann Arbor, Mich. Mary Williams, Minneapolis, Mimi. Mrs. M. E. Churchill, Galesburg, Ill. Special Missionary. Miss Lizzie A. Pingree, Denmark. Me. MONTGOMERY (P.O. Box 62). Rev. H. C. Bedford, Minister. Watertown, Wis. SELMA. Minister. Rev. C. B. Curtis, Burlington, Wis. Special Missionary. Miss Mary K. Lunt, New Gloucester, Me Rev. A. XV. Curtis, Miss Lucy Gantt. MARION. Minister. Crete, Nebraska. Teacher. Talladega, Ala. ATHENS. Minister. llev. H. S. XVilliams, Wetumpka, Ala. Miss M. F. Well; Mary E. Cull, Louise Deaton, Belle J. Ferris, TRINITY ScHOOL. Teachers. Ann Arbor, Mich. Salem, Wis. Hempatead, L I. Sound Wach, Ct FLORENQ4~. Minister and Teacher. Rev. S. G. Norcross, North Conway, N. H Mrs. S. G. Norcross, TENNESSEE. NASHVILLE. Minister. Rev. Henry S. Bennett, Nashville, Tena. Rev. E. M. Cravath, FISK UNIvERsITY. Instructors and Managers. Nashville, Tenn. The Field. Rev. A. K. Spence, H. S. Bennett, F. A. Chase, Prof. H. H. Wright, Rev. C. W. Hawley, Miss Helen C. Morgan, Mrs. A. A. F. Sprague, Mrs. L. A. Shaw, Miss Laura A. Parmelee, Juliet B. Smith, Mary E. Edwards, Hattie Curtis, Henrietta Matson, Martha A. Perry, Mary A. Dwight, Anna Whelan, Harriet E. Cushman, Fanny Gleason, Mrs. A.. K. Spence, E. M. Cravath, Nashville, Tenn. Oberlin, 0. Amherst. Mass. Cleveland, 0. Geergiaville, R. I. Owego, N. Y. Toledo, 0. Scotland, Mass. Westhampton, Mass. Vermontville, Mich. N. BloomfIeld, 0. Holden, Mass. Dudley, Mass. Minneapolis, Minn. Mattoon, Ill. Brooklyn, N. Y. Nashville, Tenn. HOwARD MISsION. Minister. Rev. Win. A. Sinclair, Washington, D. C. Rev. S. N. Brown, NEw MIssION. Minister. Nashville, Tenn. JONESBORO. Teachers. Mrs. Julia B. Nelson, Red Wing, Minn. Miss Orra Angell, Greenville, R. I. Rev. S. P. SmIth, KNOXVILLE. Minister. Knoxville, Tenn. CHATTANOOGA. Minister. Rev. Jos. E. Smith, Atlanta, Ga. Special Missionary. Mrs. A. S. Steele, Revere, Mass. MEMPHIS. Minister. Rev. B. A. lines, Oberlin, 0. LE MOYNE scHOOL. Principal. Whitewater, Wis. Prof. A. J. Steele, Rev. B. A. lines, Miss Julia Pelton, Julia M. Corey, Ruth E. Stinson, M. A. L. Stewart, Hattie Corell, Rebecca M. Green, M. A. Kinney, Mary A. Comes, Mrs. B. A. lines, Mr. G. W. Jackson, Assistants. Oberlin, 0. Memphis, Tenn. Hamlet, N. Y. Woolwich, Me. Wilmot, N. S. Hamlet, N. Y. Whitewater, Wis. Medina, N. Y. Oberlin, C. WHITESIDE. Teacher. Tougaloo, Miss. BEREA. Minister. Rev. John G. Fee, Berea, Ky. BERHA cOLLEGE. Instructors and Managers. Rev. E. H. Fairchild, D. D., John G. Fee, Prof. L. V. Dodge, Walter E. C. Wright, P. D. Dodge, Rev. B. S. Hunting, Mr. J. F. Browne. Miss L A. Darling, Kate Gilbert, Mrs. H. F. Woodruff, Miss E. F. Moore, Carlie W. Haynes, Grace E. Beebe, EttaE.Busbiaelf, Maria A. Muzzy, Berea, Ky. Sublet, Ill. KENTUCKY. Miss Cora J. Seward, Guilford, Conn. Hattie Fay, Bowling Green, 0. Hettie C. Minton, Mrs. G. F. Jewett, Pepperell, Mass. CAMP NELSON. Teacher. Miss Juan R. Kumler, Oberlin, 0. LOUISVILLE. Minister. Akron, 0. W.Brookfleld,Mass. Grand Rapids,Mich. Wattsburg, Pa. Oberlin, 0. Berea, Ky. Romeo, Mich. LEXINGTON. NORMAL scHOOL. Instructors. Prof. Geo. F. Jewett, Pepperell, Mass. Rev. J. D. Smith, Rev. A. A. Myers, Louisville, Ky. WILLIAMSBURG. Minister. Teachers. Williamsburg, Ky. Mr. W. E. Wheeler, Marshileld, Wis. Mrs. W. E. Wheeler, Marshileld, Wis. Miss Mary Glassburn, , Ohio. Special Missionary. Mrs. A. A. Myers. Williamsburg, Ky. CLOVER BOTTOM. Teacher. Miss M. R. Barton, Ohio. I~ANSAS. TOPEKA. Minister. Rev. R. F. Markham, Twelve Mile, Kan. Mrs. Mary Halbert, Missionary. Twelve Mile, Kan. 48 The Field. Rev. A. K. Spence, H. S. Bennett, F. A. Chase, Prof. H. H. Wright, Rev. C. W. Hawley, Miss Helen C. Morgan, Mrs. A. A. F. Sprague, Mrs. L. A. Shaw, Miss Laura A. Parinelee, Juliet B. Smith, Mary E. Edwards, Hattie Curtis, Henrietta Matson, Martha A. Perry, Mary A. Dwight, Anna Whelan, Harriet E. Cushman, Fanny Gleason, Mrs. A.. K. Spence, E. M. Cravath, NashvilJe, Tenn. Oberlin, 0. Amherst. Mass. Cleveland, 0. Geergiaville, R. I. Owego, N. Y. Toledo, 0. Scotland, Mass. Westhampton, Mass. Verniontville, Mich. N. Bloomfield, 0. Holden, Mass. Dudley, Mass. Minneapolis, Minn. Mattoon, Ill. Brooklyn, N. Y. Nashville, Tenn. HOWARD MISSION. Minister. Rev. Win. A. Sinclair, Washington, D. C. NEW MIssION. Minister. Rev. S. N. Brown, Nashville, Tenn. JONESBORO. Teachers. Mrs. Julia B. Nelson, Red Wing, Minn. Miss Orra Angell, Greenville, R. I. KNOXVILLE. Minister. Rev. S. P. SmIth, Knoxville, Tenn. CHATTANOOGA. Minister. Rev. Jos. E. Smith, Atlanta, Ga. Special Missionary. Mrs. A. S. Steele, Revere, Mass. MEMPHIS. Minister. Rev. B. A. lines, Oberlin, 0. LE MOYNE ScHOOL. Principal. Whitewater, Wis. Assistants. Oberlin, 0. Memphis, Tenn. Hamlet, N. Y. Woolwich, Me. Wilmot, N. S. Hamlet, N. Y. Whitewater, Wis. Medina, N. Y. Oberlin, C. Prof. A. J. Steele, Rev. B. A. lines, Miss Julia Pelton, Julia M. Corey, Ruth E. Stinson, M. A. L. Stewart, Hattie Corell, Rebecca M. Green, M. A. Kinney, Mary A. Comes, Mrs. B. A. lines, Mr. G. W. Jackson, WHITESIDE. Teacher. Tougaloo, Miss. BEREA. Minister. Rev. John G. Fee, Berea, Ky. BERMA cOLLEGE. Instructors and Managers. Rev. E. H. Fairchild, D. D., Berea, Ky. John G. Fee, Prof. L. V. Dodge, Walter E. C. Wright, P. D. Dodge, Rev. B. S. Hunting, Sublet, Ill. Mr. J. F. Browne. Miss L A. Darling, Kate Gilbert, Mrs. H. F. Woodruff, Miss E. F. Moore, Carlie W. Haynes, Grace E. Beebe, EttaE.Bushiielf, Maria A. Muzzy, KIENTUCK~. Akron, 0. W.Brookfleld,Mass. Grand Rapids,Mich. Wattsburg, Pa. Oberlin, 0. Berea, Ky. Romeo, Mich. LEXINGTON. NORMAL scHooL. Instructors. Prof. Geo. F. Jewett, Pepperell, Mass. Miss Cora J. Seward, Guilford, Conn. Hattie Fay, Bowling Green, 0. Hettie C. Minton, Mrs. G. F. Jewett, Pepperell, Mass. CAMP NELSON. Teacher. Miss Juan R. Kumler, Oberlin, 0. LOUISVILLE. Minister. Louisville, Ky. Rev. J. D. Smith, Rev. A. A. Myers, WILLIAMSBURcI. Minister. Teachers. Williamsburg, Ky. Mr. W. E. Wheeler, Marshfleld, Wis. Mrs. W. E. Wheeler, Marshfield, Wis. Miss Mary Glassburn, , Ohio. Special Missionary. Mrs. A. A. Myers. Williamsburg, Ky. CLOVER BOTTOM. Teacher. Miss M. R. Barton, Ohio. I~ANSAS. TOPEKA. Minister. Rev. R. F. Markham, Twelve Mile, Kan. Mrs. Mary Halbert, Missionary. Twelve Mile, Kan. 48 The Field. LAWRENCE. Minister. Rev. Welborn Wright, Lawrence. Kan. EUREKA. Minister. Rev. W. W. Weir, Eureka, Kan. ARI~A.NSAS. LITTLE ROCK. Minister. Rev. Y. B. Sims, Talladega, Ala. Teacher and Missionary. Miss Rose K. Kinney, Oberlin, 0. Elizabeth K. Keyes, Unionville, Ct. TOUGALGO. Minister. Rev. G. S. Pope, Strongsville, 0. TOUGALOO UNIVERSITY. Instructors and Managers. Rev. G. S. Pope, Strongsville, 0. Rev. E. C. Stickel, Oberlin, 0. Rev. Azel Hatch, Oberlin, 0. Mr. Henry P. Kennedy. Jackson, Mich. Win. D. Hitchcock, Jackson, Mich. W. H. Bishop, Amherst, Mass. Miss A. B. Hawes, Litchfleld, Me. Mary H. Scott, Amherst. Mass. H. K. Hegeman, Island City, N. Y, Josephine Kellogg, Clyde, 0. Jessie M. Leonard, Oberlin, 0. Mrs. E. C. Stickel, Oberlin, 0. Azel Hatch, Oberlin, 0. FAYETTEVILLE. Minister and Teacher. Rev. J. K. Shippen, Miss S. P. Kingston. MISSISSIPPI. Miss S. L. Emerson, Anna Coffin, Mrs. Florence E. Green, Washington, D. C. Talladega, Ala. Hallowell, Me. Haverhill, Mass. Rochester, N. Y. CALEDONIA AND NEW RUHAMAH. Minister. Rev. K. J. Witherspoon, Caledonia, Miss. MERIDIAN. Minister. Rev. J. L. Grice, WashIngton, D. C. Teacher and Missionary. Miss K. E. Green, Constant, Kan. JACKSON. Minister. Jackson, Miss. Rev. C. L. Harris, LOUISIANA.. NEW ORLEANS. Ministers. Rev.W. S. Alexander, D.D., Pomfret, Ct. Isaac H. Hall, New Orleans, La. Henry Ruffin, New Orleans, La. STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY. Instructors and Manaqers. Rev.W. S. Alexander, D.D., Pomfret, Ct. Mr. H. C. Hitchcock, Thompsonvilje, Ct. W. J. McMurtry, Wayne, Mich. Charles B. Perry, Oxford, Ct. Miss Florence L. Sperry, Topeka, Kan. Katherine T. Plant, Minneapolis, Mlnn. Frances D. McNair, Brodhead, Wis. Anna M. Nicholas, Toledo, 0. E. E. Wilcox, Portland, Ct. Mrs. C. H. Grant, Chesterfield Mich. Miss M. F. Felt, Temple, N. H. Mrs. H. C. Hitchcock, Thompsonvllle, Ct. Special Missionary. Miss A. D. Gerrish, Leetonia, 0. NEW IBERIA. Minister. FAUSSE POINT AND BELLE PLACE. Mznister. Rev. William Butler, New Iberia, La. ALGIERS. Minlster. Rev. James Craig, Algiers, La. LAKE PEIGNEUR. Minister. Rev. Homer Jones, Lake Peigneur, La. TERREBONNE AND TERREBONNE STATION Minister. Terrebonne, La. LITTLE PECAN. Minister. Rev. Samuel Smith, NAPOLEONVILLE. Minister. Napoleonville, La. Rev. Daniel Clay, Rev. J. K. Jones, Little Pecan, La. GRAND BAYOU. Minister. Rev. Squire Williams, Grand Bayou, La. GRETNA, HARANGVILLE AND LOCKPORT Minister. Rev. W. P. Ward, Gretna, La. BAYOU DU LARGE. Minister. Bayou Du Large Rev. H. Williams, 4() The Field. TEXAS. AUSTIN. TILLOTSON INSTITUTE. instructors and Managers. Rev. W. E. Broo,s, W. Haven, Ct. Mr. W. L nordon, Austin. Tex. Samuel H. Dean, High Bridge, N. J. Mrs. W. L. Gordon, Austin, Tex. Miss Ruby A Smth, Be!mont, N. Y. A. D. Newman, Middleton. Mass. AcleliA Hunt, Elkhorn, Wis. N E. Carey, Huntsburg, 0. Mrs. W. E. Brooks, W. Haven, Ct. Special Missionary. Miss N. J. Adans, Fox Lake, Wis. GOLIAD. Minister. Rev. T. T. Benson, Goliad, Tex. Teacher. Mr. J. R. S. Hallowell, New Orleans, La. H ELENA. Minister. Rev. Mitchell Thomps n, Helena, Tax. CORPUS CHRISTI. Minister. Rev. J. W. Strong, Talladega, Ala. FLATONIA AND LULING. Minister. Rev. Thos. E. Hillson, New Orleans, La. Teachers. Mrs. T. E. Hillson, Flatonia, Tax. Miss H. Canningham, Tougaloo, Miss. PARIS. Minister and Teacher. Rev. J. W. Roberts, Savannah, Ga. DODDS CITY. Minister. Rev. Byron Gunner, Paris, Tex. AMONG THE INDIANS. SANTEE AGENCY, NEBRASKA. NORMAL TRAINING SCHOOL. superintendent and Missionary. A. L. Riggs, A~ N., B. D., Santee Agency, Neb. Treasurer. Jo eph H. Steer, Santee Agency, Neb. Teachers. Mr. Lee S. Pratt, Binghamton, N. Y. Miss Ha:riet B. lisley, Newark, N. J. Mrs. Mary E. Wood, Spirit Lake, Iowa. Assistant Teachers. Miss Anna Redwing, Santee Agency, Neb. Eli Abraham, Daniel Cetaumani, Dennis Mazaodidi, James Redwing Oyemaza, Jsmes l3rown Dowanmani, James Garvie, SissetonAgency,D.T. Matrons. Miss Susan Webb (Dakota Home), Weymouth, Mass. Mss Herriet A. Brown (Birds Nest:. Brooklyn, N. Y. hiss .renaie E. Kennedy (Young Mens Hill). Montrose, Iowa. Mi-s S. Lizzie Voorhees (Boys Cottage). Rocky Hill, N. J. Miss Sarah A. Paddock (Teachers Club), Crystal Lake, Ill. Assistant Matrons. Mi~s Ellen Kitto, Santee Agency, Neb. Miss Fanny Ellis, Yankton, Dak. Missionaries. hire. A. L. Riggs, Santee Agency, Neb. Mr~. J H. Seer, Mrs I. P. Wall, Mrs. L. S. Pr .tt, Binghamton, N. Y. Miss Nettle Caihoun, Kenton, 0. Industrial Departsnent. Joseph H Steer, Santee Agency, Neb. IvorP. Wold, Solouon S. Wands, Reuben Cash, Niobrara, Nab. Native Pastor. Rae. Artemas Ehnamani, Santee Agency, Neb FORT SULLY STATION. Superintendent. Rev. T. L. Riggs, Oahe, Dak, Teachers. Miss Mary C. Collins, Onhe, Dak. Miss Margaret L. Irvine, Native Teachers. Isaac Renville, Cheyenne River, No. 1. Mrs. Nancy Renville, Eli Spotted Bear, Cheyenne River, No. 2 rs. Ellen Spotted Bear, Samuel Sm~ley. Cheyenne River, No. 3. Mrs. Elizabeth Winyan, Edwin Phelps, GraDd River Ste tion. Mrs. Ellen P helps Ste hen Yellow Hawk, Oshe. Dak. William Lee, Bad River, Dak. FORT BERTHOLD AGENCY, DAKOTA. Missionary Rev. C. L. Hall, Now York, N. Y. Teacher. Mr. W. W Wheeler, Kempstee, Wis. FORISTF.VENSON 5CNOOL. (Supported by Government.) Superintendent. Mr. F. B. Wells, Rhiaebeck, N. Y. Teacher Miss E. L. Ward, Appleton, Wis. Matron. Mrs. F. B. Wells, Rhinebeck, N. Y. SKOKOMISH AGENCY, W. T. Missionary. Rev. Myron Eells, Skokomish, W. T Items from tli e Field. AMONG THE CHINESE. Alameda. Mrs. Geo. Morris. San Francisco, Central, Pon Fang. No. ~ Griffith Griffiths. Marysville Miss M. A. Flint. San Francisco, BarnesMrs. C. A. Sheldc.n. Joe Jet. Lue D. Lune. Oakland Miss Mattie L. Sanford. San Francisco, Beth. Miss M. A. Brewer. any Mrs. J. C. Snook. Oroville Miss Maggie A. Daniel. Hong Gain, Petaluina Miss Carrie L. Ross. San Francisco, West Miss F. N. Worley. Placervlile Mrs. A. M. McLain. Miss E. D. Worley. Sacramento Miss Maria Carrington. San Francisco, North Miss M. C. Waterbury. Sing Lan. Chin Foy. Santa Barbara Mrs. B. B. Williams. San Francisco, Central, Gen Foo King. No. 1 J. J. Masoii. Santa Cruz Mrs. A. L. Willett. Jee Gain. Wong Ock. Miss Jessie S. Worley. Stockton Mrs. M. B. Langdon. Miss Anna L. Sno9k. Yong .Jin. ITEMS FROM THE FIELD. Rev. W. R. Davis, lately of Detroit, Mich., has become the pastor at Mobile. The Warner Institute, at Jonesbor6~,Tenn., was opened in the fall by Mrs. Julia B. Nelson, with Miss Angell as assistant, under hopeful auspices. Miss rose M. Kinney, formerly Principal of the Dorchester Academy at Midway, Ga., has been put in charge of the school at Little Rock, Ark., which is the precursor of the Edward Smith College. Miss Elizabeth Keyes is her missionary associate. Superintendent Roy, on his tour of visitation, lectured to the colored people upon the theme, How to Make Money, urging industry, economy, education, investment, as the royal process. Prof. Albert Salisbury held a greatly successful Teachers Institute at Tou- galoo, Miss., during the week before Christmas, and will hold another in Talla- dega the last week in March. Rev. Islay Waldens school and church, whose post-office was formerly that of Lassiters Milis, have now secured a new post route and their -own post-office, called by the government Strieby. and served by the pastor as postmaster. The school-house church at Hillsboro, N. C., was dedicated on the 6th of January. Mrs. E. A. Gray, of Oakland, Cal., had given the four or five hundred dollars of needed aid, the lot having been presented by Mr. Henry N. Brown, a white citizen, a well-known friend of the colored people, who themselves helped on the house as they were able. Miss M. B. Curtis, a graduate of the Atlanta University, is the teacher. Rev. A. Connet, of McLeansville, has had the super- vision of the building, having traveled on the business 250 miles by his own con- veyance. He was assisted at the dedication by Supt. Roy and Rev. Dr. Welker, of the German Reformed Church. On the day followitig, at Oaks, a dozen miles in the country from Mebanesville, the same company participated in a dedication of a school-house church which had been built in a neighborhood of colored land owners with only $150 of aid from the A. M. A. Miss E. W. Douglass, a veteran in the service, is the mission- ary teacher, and the Rev. J. N. Ray (colored), the pastor. This house has also been under the supervision of pastor Connet. The three fall State Associations had meetings of unusual interest. They were that of Georgia, at Athens; that of Centtal South, at Chattanooga; and that of

Items from the Field The Field 51-52

Items from tli e Field. AMONG THE CHINESE. Alameda. Mrs. Geo. Morris. San Francisco, Central, Pon Fang. No. ~ Griffith Griffiths. Marysville Miss M. A. Flint. San Francisco, BarnesMrs. C. A. Sheldc.n. Joe Jet. Lue D. Lune. Oakland Miss Mattie L. Sanford. San Francisco, Beth. Miss M. A. Brewer. any Mrs. J. C. Snook. Oroville Miss Maggie A. Daniel. Hong Gain, Petaluina Miss Carrie L. Ross. San Francisco, West Miss F. N. Worley. Placervlile Mrs. A. M. McLain. Miss E. D. Worley. Sacramento Miss Maria Carrington. San Francisco, North Miss M. C. Waterbury. Sing Lan. Chin Foy. Santa Barbara Mrs. B. B. Williams. San Francisco, Central, Gen Foo King. No. 1 J. J. Masoii. Santa Cruz Mrs. A. L. Willett. Jee Gain. Wong Ock. Miss Jessie S. Worley. Stockton Mrs. M. B. Langdon. Miss Anna L. Sno9k. Yong .Jin. ITEMS FROM THE FIELD. Rev. W. R. Davis, lately of Detroit, Mich., has become the pastor at Mobile. The Warner Institute, at Jonesbor6~,Tenn., was opened in the fall by Mrs. Julia B. Nelson, with Miss Angell as assistant, under hopeful auspices. Miss rose M. Kinney, formerly Principal of the Dorchester Academy at Midway, Ga., has been put in charge of the school at Little Rock, Ark., which is the precursor of the Edward Smith College. Miss Elizabeth Keyes is her missionary associate. Superintendent Roy, on his tour of visitation, lectured to the colored people upon the theme, How to Make Money, urging industry, economy, education, investment, as the royal process. Prof. Albert Salisbury held a greatly successful Teachers Institute at Tou- galoo, Miss., during the week before Christmas, and will hold another in Talla- dega the last week in March. Rev. Islay Waldens school and church, whose post-office was formerly that of Lassiters Milis, have now secured a new post route and their -own post-office, called by the government Strieby. and served by the pastor as postmaster. The school-house church at Hillsboro, N. C., was dedicated on the 6th of January. Mrs. E. A. Gray, of Oakland, Cal., had given the four or five hundred dollars of needed aid, the lot having been presented by Mr. Henry N. Brown, a white citizen, a well-known friend of the colored people, who themselves helped on the house as they were able. Miss M. B. Curtis, a graduate of the Atlanta University, is the teacher. Rev. A. Connet, of McLeansville, has had the super- vision of the building, having traveled on the business 250 miles by his own con- veyance. He was assisted at the dedication by Supt. Roy and Rev. Dr. Welker, of the German Reformed Church. On the day followitig, at Oaks, a dozen miles in the country from Mebanesville, the same company participated in a dedication of a school-house church which had been built in a neighborhood of colored land owners with only $150 of aid from the A. M. A. Miss E. W. Douglass, a veteran in the service, is the mission- ary teacher, and the Rev. J. N. Ray (colored), the pastor. This house has also been under the supervision of pastor Connet. The three fall State Associations had meetings of unusual interest. They were that of Georgia, at Athens; that of Centtal South, at Chattanooga; and that of 52 Extracts from Letters. Kentucky, at Berea. The meetings of the National Council, at Concord, and of the A. M. A., at Brooklyn, were duly reported. The discussions of practical themes were animated and profitable. Rev. J. H. Parker, with a letter from the Central West Association, of Illinois, to the Georgia, was gladly received. On the 6th of December, at Fayetteville, Ark., by a mall Council, Mr. John M. Shippen, the preacher and teacher, a graduate of the Normal and Theological Departments of Howard University, was ordained to the Gospel ministry. Ser- mon by Rev. J. H. Harwood, D. D., of St. Louis, prayer and charge by Supt. Roy, right hand by the moderator, Rev. Y. B. Sims, of Little Rock, who remained over the Sabbath to preach while the Superintendent went on to supply his church. EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS. Emerson Institute.We are suffering from lack of room, having almost daily to turn away pupils from the lower grades for this reason. I think another room could be easily filled, if we had it. Tailadega College.Judging from the past, we shall have forty or more students knocking at Cassedy Hall as soon as seats and teacher are provided. We have received eight more than the 140 for whom seats were prepared, because some of our applicants we could not refuse. About twenty others have applied, and others have said they should send as soon as we can receive. Straight University.Our school is filling up very rapidly, and in some depart- ments we must soon commence refusing pupils admission. The primary grade is full. There is a very bright class coming in, and I think at no age is it more important to get hold of them. I dont want to shut our doors to the blessed little ones, and pray almost without ceasing for the means to put up that model building, which we could fill at once and make pay its way. Marion, Ala.Thanksgiving was a great day with us. All the colored people united at the Second Baptist Church. I was appointed preacher; many said after- ward it was the first time they had heard a Thanksgiving sermonhad been accustomed to go on a hunt or have a frolic. Several said they had never learned before why Northeners should have meetings in the church or what the day was for anyway. Thursday night we had a very large union Thanksgiving prayer- meeting at the M. E. Church, led by a former slaveholder, and well led, too. Williamsburg, KyI share fully with Mr. Myers in a feeling of reluctance in taking money from a treasury which is supplied so often by great sacrifice, but it seems there is no other way, and I trust we may so use the money given us that the donors as well as ourselves may see at the great settlement that it has been wisely appropriated. We go to Pleasant View every Tuesday evening to teach the young people the gospel songs, and intend going to State Line every Friday evening for the same and for a sort of Sabbath School service, as we cannot get there on the Sabbath. I wish you could have looked in on my Sunday-school yesterday afternoon. All the seats were full; two rails, which had been brought in, were full; a long table full, and then a row of men and boys standing or sitting on the floor at the side and one end of the room. Allow me to give you an example of their progress in Scripture knowledge, and see if you do not think I am accomplishing something. In the review of the whole school yesterday I asked what the Lord wanted them to do with the stones which he commanded them to pick up from the bed of the River Jordan as they passed over. A young man, probably twenty-three years of age, answered promptly: He wanted them to make graven images of them.

Extracts from Letters The Field 52-53

52 Extracts from Letters. Kentucky, at Berea. The meetings of the National Council, at Concord, and of the A. M. A., at Brooklyn, were duly reported. The discussions of practical themes were animated and profitable. Rev. J. H. Parker, with a letter from the Central West Association, of Illinois, to the Georgia, was gladly received. On the 6th of December, at Fayetteville, Ark., by a mall Council, Mr. John M. Shippen, the preacher and teacher, a graduate of the Normal and Theological Departments of Howard University, was ordained to the Gospel ministry. Ser- mon by Rev. J. H. Harwood, D. D., of St. Louis, prayer and charge by Supt. Roy, right hand by the moderator, Rev. Y. B. Sims, of Little Rock, who remained over the Sabbath to preach while the Superintendent went on to supply his church. EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS. Emerson Institute.We are suffering from lack of room, having almost daily to turn away pupils from the lower grades for this reason. I think another room could be easily filled, if we had it. Tailadega College.Judging from the past, we shall have forty or more students knocking at Cassedy Hall as soon as seats and teacher are provided. We have received eight more than the 140 for whom seats were prepared, because some of our applicants we could not refuse. About twenty others have applied, and others have said they should send as soon as we can receive. Straight University.Our school is filling up very rapidly, and in some depart- ments we must soon commence refusing pupils admission. The primary grade is full. There is a very bright class coming in, and I think at no age is it more important to get hold of them. I dont want to shut our doors to the blessed little ones, and pray almost without ceasing for the means to put up that model building, which we could fill at once and make pay its way. Marion, Ala.Thanksgiving was a great day with us. All the colored people united at the Second Baptist Church. I was appointed preacher; many said after- ward it was the first time they had heard a Thanksgiving sermonhad been accustomed to go on a hunt or have a frolic. Several said they had never learned before why Northeners should have meetings in the church or what the day was for anyway. Thursday night we had a very large union Thanksgiving prayer- meeting at the M. E. Church, led by a former slaveholder, and well led, too. Williamsburg, KyI share fully with Mr. Myers in a feeling of reluctance in taking money from a treasury which is supplied so often by great sacrifice, but it seems there is no other way, and I trust we may so use the money given us that the donors as well as ourselves may see at the great settlement that it has been wisely appropriated. We go to Pleasant View every Tuesday evening to teach the young people the gospel songs, and intend going to State Line every Friday evening for the same and for a sort of Sabbath School service, as we cannot get there on the Sabbath. I wish you could have looked in on my Sunday-school yesterday afternoon. All the seats were full; two rails, which had been brought in, were full; a long table full, and then a row of men and boys standing or sitting on the floor at the side and one end of the room. Allow me to give you an example of their progress in Scripture knowledge, and see if you do not think I am accomplishing something. In the review of the whole school yesterday I asked what the Lord wanted them to do with the stones which he commanded them to pick up from the bed of the River Jordan as they passed over. A young man, probably twenty-three years of age, answered promptly: He wanted them to make graven images of them. The C~hinese. 53 THE CHiNESE. ITEMS FROM THE FIELD. BY REV. W. C. POND. 1. The annual report of the California Chinese Mission (auxiliary to the Ameri- can Missionary Association) came from the press Nov. 1st. The total receipts for the year were $5,201.40, an increase of $798.75 over those of any preceding year. Of that amount $1,355 came from churches in California, and $1,100 (much of it included in the offerings of the churches) from the Chinese brethren. As much more was contributcd by the Chinese through the treasuries of their own Associa- tion; so that their offerings in aid of Christian work have not been less than $2,250. Besides this they have given to the American Board, out of the accumu- lations of preceding years, $500 for the South China Mission. Some other items of interest contained in the report were given, in advance of its publication, in the November 3ilissionary. 2. Rev. C. R. Hager, the missionary of the American Board in South China has been reinforced by fourteen of our Christian Chinese, who have returned to their old homes fully purposed to work for the Master, under His direction, so long as they remain in their native land. Of this number, five had been Helpers in our mission, and had received sufficient training to make them efficient here, and, I trust, there also. One of them writes me on his arrival at Hong Kong: It seems to me we found quite a long time on steamer and a hard time, too. You cannot imagine how it is; because the heathen contribute for offering of sacrifice for the idols and the Death-man. A steamer sunk some time ago near Japan; therefore they worship those who are buried in the sea. We refuse to contribute; so every one had something against us; some say, pull us up to the deck, tie us up to the top of the mast, and many make fun of us. I am not able to hear them; they make such a noise. We feel dismay and discouraged because three against seven hundred people. So instantly I felt the Lord will be on our side while I pray: Oh, God, stop this noise, and close their mouths. Give Thy spirit. Open their blind hearts that they may understand Thy truth, and help us, standing firm in Thy truth, and that we may not be discouraged in Thy salvation. After this Cod answered my prayer, so they all keep still and quite silent their noise. ~3. Answers to prayer are vouchsafed to us also. We must be content to do a smaller work this year than last; but we have been earnestly praying that it may be a better one: more spiritual and more fruitful. Already God is beginning to fulfill our request. Wong Ock writes me from Santa Cruz: Glory to God that our brother Chung Long will receive the Lords baptism next Sunday; and another became a brother and joined our Association last Sabbath. And Gin Foo King writes from Petaluma: I try to lead two boys to become joined to our Christianity. But one did not make up his mind yet; other one is willing. I am so glad to have even one. 1 think our school getting on nicely. Yong Jin reports street preaching in Stockton, and earnest but rather unsuccessful efforts to bring the indifferent and the hostile among his countrymen to come in and see the school; but is cheered because one of the pupils has confessed Christ as his Master and Saviour, and joined the Association. Miss Carrington writes from Sacramento: Three young converts have very recently joined the Association, and we feel that we have great cause for thankfulness. The attendance, both in our Sunday-school and through the week, has considerably. increased, and, though it

Rev. W. C. Pond Pond, W. C., Rev. Items from the Field The Chinese 53-54

The C~hinese. 53 THE CHiNESE. ITEMS FROM THE FIELD. BY REV. W. C. POND. 1. The annual report of the California Chinese Mission (auxiliary to the Ameri- can Missionary Association) came from the press Nov. 1st. The total receipts for the year were $5,201.40, an increase of $798.75 over those of any preceding year. Of that amount $1,355 came from churches in California, and $1,100 (much of it included in the offerings of the churches) from the Chinese brethren. As much more was contributcd by the Chinese through the treasuries of their own Associa- tion; so that their offerings in aid of Christian work have not been less than $2,250. Besides this they have given to the American Board, out of the accumu- lations of preceding years, $500 for the South China Mission. Some other items of interest contained in the report were given, in advance of its publication, in the November 3ilissionary. 2. Rev. C. R. Hager, the missionary of the American Board in South China has been reinforced by fourteen of our Christian Chinese, who have returned to their old homes fully purposed to work for the Master, under His direction, so long as they remain in their native land. Of this number, five had been Helpers in our mission, and had received sufficient training to make them efficient here, and, I trust, there also. One of them writes me on his arrival at Hong Kong: It seems to me we found quite a long time on steamer and a hard time, too. You cannot imagine how it is; because the heathen contribute for offering of sacrifice for the idols and the Death-man. A steamer sunk some time ago near Japan; therefore they worship those who are buried in the sea. We refuse to contribute; so every one had something against us; some say, pull us up to the deck, tie us up to the top of the mast, and many make fun of us. I am not able to hear them; they make such a noise. We feel dismay and discouraged because three against seven hundred people. So instantly I felt the Lord will be on our side while I pray: Oh, God, stop this noise, and close their mouths. Give Thy spirit. Open their blind hearts that they may understand Thy truth, and help us, standing firm in Thy truth, and that we may not be discouraged in Thy salvation. After this Cod answered my prayer, so they all keep still and quite silent their noise. ~3. Answers to prayer are vouchsafed to us also. We must be content to do a smaller work this year than last; but we have been earnestly praying that it may be a better one: more spiritual and more fruitful. Already God is beginning to fulfill our request. Wong Ock writes me from Santa Cruz: Glory to God that our brother Chung Long will receive the Lords baptism next Sunday; and another became a brother and joined our Association last Sabbath. And Gin Foo King writes from Petaluma: I try to lead two boys to become joined to our Christianity. But one did not make up his mind yet; other one is willing. I am so glad to have even one. 1 think our school getting on nicely. Yong Jin reports street preaching in Stockton, and earnest but rather unsuccessful efforts to bring the indifferent and the hostile among his countrymen to come in and see the school; but is cheered because one of the pupils has confessed Christ as his Master and Saviour, and joined the Association. Miss Carrington writes from Sacramento: Three young converts have very recently joined the Association, and we feel that we have great cause for thankfulness. The attendance, both in our Sunday-school and through the week, has considerably. increased, and, though it ~tj4 Bureau of Woman 8 Work. is still far too small, we are working with freshened zeal and courage. Chin Tay proves a valuable helper, a devoted and humble Christian, and very earnest in trying to bring his people to Christ. In our Central School in this city, Mr. Griffiths finds a goodly number of pupils who are glad to remain on three evenings of each week from 9:30 till 10:15 for special Bible study. They have taken up the Book of Acts, and are making good progress. Finally, at the last communion of Bethany Church four were baptized, and three others are already proposed for baptism at our next communion. 4. The newspaper reports of a statement made at the annual meeting of the American Missionary Association give the collection of Bethany Church in aid of our mission at $300, of which its Chinese members gave $130. The fact is thaf the contribution of this church last year amounted to $654.55, of which the Chinese gave $454.05. BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. MISS D. E. EMERSON. SECRETARY. PLEDGES FOR MISSIONARIES. in connection with the new appointments as given in this number we pub- lish below the pledges of support of missionaries which we have received at this date: congregational church, Cambridge, Mass. Miss E. P. Hayes, Raleigh, N. C. Ladies of Maine. A. E. Farrington, Wilmington, N. c. M. K. Lunt, Selma, Ala. Vermont. Elizabeth Plimpton, McIntosh, Ga. Illinois. Lizzie A. Pingree, Mobile, Ala. R. M. Kinney, Little Rock, Ark. Iowa. A. D. Gerrish. New Orleans, La. Ladles Society, Columbus, 0. M. H. Clary. Ladies Island, S. C. Ladies of Cong. Churches, Chelsea, Mass. Mrs. A. S. Steele, Chattanooga, Tenn. We have had to anticipate additional aid, and send forth other missionaries, in the hope that the funds for their support will be paid into our treasury. From recent communications it appears that some Sunday-scheols and Ladies Societies contributing for Student Aid suppose that they thereby add to the income of the Association and help in the support of missionaries. This is a mistake. Student Aid helps the colored youth to avail themselves of the instruction of missionaries and teachers, and such aid judiciously applied is very desirable, but it does not in any degree help to send the missionaries to instruct, and this is the essential and. urgent need. We have been much cheered by letters of sympathy and help from our Northern friends, and give below a few extracts which are suggestive, and we believe will prove of interest to our readers: I write to ask you what about the Womans Bureau ~ Can you put us in communication with any teacher whom we can help? Our first meeting for this year will be held in about ten days, and I would like to suggest something prac- tical. (Later.) The letter came just in time for our monthly meeting, which takes place on the second Tuesday of each month. The letter was listened to with

Pledges for Missionaries Bureau of Woman's Work 54-55

~tj4 Bureau of Woman 8 Work. is still far too small, we are working with freshened zeal and courage. Chin Tay proves a valuable helper, a devoted and humble Christian, and very earnest in trying to bring his people to Christ. In our Central School in this city, Mr. Griffiths finds a goodly number of pupils who are glad to remain on three evenings of each week from 9:30 till 10:15 for special Bible study. They have taken up the Book of Acts, and are making good progress. Finally, at the last communion of Bethany Church four were baptized, and three others are already proposed for baptism at our next communion. 4. The newspaper reports of a statement made at the annual meeting of the American Missionary Association give the collection of Bethany Church in aid of our mission at $300, of which its Chinese members gave $130. The fact is thaf the contribution of this church last year amounted to $654.55, of which the Chinese gave $454.05. BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. MISS D. E. EMERSON. SECRETARY. PLEDGES FOR MISSIONARIES. in connection with the new appointments as given in this number we pub- lish below the pledges of support of missionaries which we have received at this date: congregational church, Cambridge, Mass. Miss E. P. Hayes, Raleigh, N. C. Ladies of Maine. A. E. Farrington, Wilmington, N. c. M. K. Lunt, Selma, Ala. Vermont. Elizabeth Plimpton, McIntosh, Ga. Illinois. Lizzie A. Pingree, Mobile, Ala. R. M. Kinney, Little Rock, Ark. Iowa. A. D. Gerrish. New Orleans, La. Ladles Society, Columbus, 0. M. H. Clary. Ladies Island, S. C. Ladies of Cong. Churches, Chelsea, Mass. Mrs. A. S. Steele, Chattanooga, Tenn. We have had to anticipate additional aid, and send forth other missionaries, in the hope that the funds for their support will be paid into our treasury. From recent communications it appears that some Sunday-scheols and Ladies Societies contributing for Student Aid suppose that they thereby add to the income of the Association and help in the support of missionaries. This is a mistake. Student Aid helps the colored youth to avail themselves of the instruction of missionaries and teachers, and such aid judiciously applied is very desirable, but it does not in any degree help to send the missionaries to instruct, and this is the essential and. urgent need. We have been much cheered by letters of sympathy and help from our Northern friends, and give below a few extracts which are suggestive, and we believe will prove of interest to our readers: I write to ask you what about the Womans Bureau ~ Can you put us in communication with any teacher whom we can help? Our first meeting for this year will be held in about ten days, and I would like to suggest something prac- tical. (Later.) The letter came just in time for our monthly meeting, which takes place on the second Tuesday of each month. The letter was listened to with Tuo Pictures from Life. 55 interest and did very much to strengthen the feeling that there is a work at the South, as well as across the seas. We have divided the year, and report at our meetings on the Home Field until January 1st; after that we shall give our thoughts to the Foreign Work. We have over $80 raised toward Mis3 support, and will send, I hope, the whole amount pledged about the 1st of January. I hope we shall hear from her often. We have in our church a little missionary society made up of young ladies. I am writing to you for information as to the best way for them to work the com- ing year. We can do quite a good deal, only we want to help some one person, and we would like to send clothing for missionary purposes, hut we wish to be put in direct communication with the person helped. I am interested personally in Home Missions, and I think our young girls would be if they could he encour- aged. (Later.) Your good letter came in just the right time, as we had a meeting the same day it came, and I read it to the girls. They were enthusiastic, and we have decided to take a scholarship and to pack a barrel. Now we all feel that we are fairly in the field, and busy are the fingers of every member of our little soci- ety. We cannot do very great things, but are determined to do something. We have already $30 in our treasury, and our fair will help very niuch. Hope to hear from you by the time we meet again. Yours was received and read to a few ladies of our church who had met to consult with reference to the formation of a Missionary Society. We finally took your form of constitution, and re-arranged so as to take in foreign work also, and thus do all in one society. We are a weak and feeble church, so ours will have to be mostly the labor of our hands. I think in that we shall do good service wherever we find such need. We are now the Womans Co-operative Society of Congregational Church. I think we can so harmonize the dif- ferent departments that we shall find it better than to try to sustain two soci- eties. We have thus taken a long step in advance. That you may be abundantly blessed in all your labor of love is the prayer of yours in Christian fellowship. In reply to your circular, I beg to say that our hearts are beating in truest sympathy with you in the grand and important work of elevating the neglected women of our laud; but at present it seems that is all we can do. We are on the frontier, where two-thirds of our people are battling with poverty. Their homes are very bare and their tables very scantily laid; they have inirdships that are unknown among most of our Eastern people. We hope and pray that God will so direct our future that we may be able to respond in a more helpful manner than by our mere sympathies. CIIILDIRENS PAGE. TWO PICTURES FROM LIFE. FIRST PicTURE. Pet dogs are the latest hobby in the fashionable world of New York and other large cities. A certain costly species of bull-terrier, grown exceedingly small by in-breeding and doses of gin, is the favorite of women wealthy enough to afford in- dulgence in such pets. They are hideously mis-shapen little monsters, but the

Two Pictures from Life Children's Page 55-57

Tuo Pictures from Life. 55 interest and did very much to strengthen the feeling that there is a work at the South, as well as across the seas. We have divided the year, and report at our meetings on the Home Field until January 1st; after that we shall give our thoughts to the Foreign Work. We have over $80 raised toward Mis3 support, and will send, I hope, the whole amount pledged about the 1st of January. I hope we shall hear from her often. We have in our church a little missionary society made up of young ladies. I am writing to you for information as to the best way for them to work the com- ing year. We can do quite a good deal, only we want to help some one person, and we would like to send clothing for missionary purposes, hut we wish to be put in direct communication with the person helped. I am interested personally in Home Missions, and I think our young girls would be if they could he encour- aged. (Later.) Your good letter came in just the right time, as we had a meeting the same day it came, and I read it to the girls. They were enthusiastic, and we have decided to take a scholarship and to pack a barrel. Now we all feel that we are fairly in the field, and busy are the fingers of every member of our little soci- ety. We cannot do very great things, but are determined to do something. We have already $30 in our treasury, and our fair will help very niuch. Hope to hear from you by the time we meet again. Yours was received and read to a few ladies of our church who had met to consult with reference to the formation of a Missionary Society. We finally took your form of constitution, and re-arranged so as to take in foreign work also, and thus do all in one society. We are a weak and feeble church, so ours will have to be mostly the labor of our hands. I think in that we shall do good service wherever we find such need. We are now the Womans Co-operative Society of Congregational Church. I think we can so harmonize the dif- ferent departments that we shall find it better than to try to sustain two soci- eties. We have thus taken a long step in advance. That you may be abundantly blessed in all your labor of love is the prayer of yours in Christian fellowship. In reply to your circular, I beg to say that our hearts are beating in truest sympathy with you in the grand and important work of elevating the neglected women of our laud; but at present it seems that is all we can do. We are on the frontier, where two-thirds of our people are battling with poverty. Their homes are very bare and their tables very scantily laid; they have inirdships that are unknown among most of our Eastern people. We hope and pray that God will so direct our future that we may be able to respond in a more helpful manner than by our mere sympathies. CIIILDIRENS PAGE. TWO PICTURES FROM LIFE. FIRST PicTURE. Pet dogs are the latest hobby in the fashionable world of New York and other large cities. A certain costly species of bull-terrier, grown exceedingly small by in-breeding and doses of gin, is the favorite of women wealthy enough to afford in- dulgence in such pets. They are hideously mis-shapen little monsters, but the 56 Two Pictures from Lffe. uglier they are the more they are valued. They are taken out every day by their mistresses or footmen for an airing wearing embroidered coats and gold collars, on which their names are engraved or set in jewels. One of these dogs died in Philadelphia lately, and formal notice of the funeral was given to the friends of its mistress, who sent their dogs in carriages with livened footmen, etc., etc. The dead dog was laid in a satin-lined, silver-mounted coffin; offerings of flowers were sent, and a costly monument was raised over its grave. Beppo, the pet of a wealthy young lady, lately sent out cards for a reception, which was attended by all the haut-ton of dogdom. The homely little beasts sent to the reception were served on dainty china with all the delicacies of the caterers art. The feast, floral decorations, etc., cost more than $200. SECOND PIcTURE. On the week in which Bepp~ held his reception an entertainment of another kind was given by a young girl who lived near to Beppos mistress. She had spent the last summer in a little village in one of the hill counties of Pennsylvania. The cler- gyman of this parish was a scholarly man of much intellectual force. His wife was a refined, sensitive woman. They had five children. The clergyman had given up a profession in which he might have grown rich, to serve the Master he loved, in ministering to his fellowmen. His salary was $400 a year, and that often was not paid when it was needed. In other words, here was a man who had the education, tastes, and habits of the very highest class; who naturally wished to educate his children; who was obliged to appear and live as a gentleman and to exercise hospitality and charity upon the wages of a day laborer. Miss Dash guessed something of the privations of the good man and his family during her stay in the village. Last winter, out of her allowance (which was a Liberal one) from her rich father, she made up a box for the pastors family in which she declared there should be nothing absolutely necessary. Let them, for once in their lives, have a taste of indulgence, she said. It will be like water to a thirsty soul. The great box arrived late in the evening of a raw November day, just as the clergyman and his family rose up from their scanty supper. For a month there had been no meat or butter on that table. The family grew red with excitement as they gathered round the box. The lid was knocked off. Out came warm winter cloaks and caps for the three girls, an overcoat for the minister and a pretty, soft dress for his wife, all new. Why, said their donor, should we give the man who leads us to God our cast-off clothes? There were books and magazines for the clergyman, and an engraving of a noble picture to hang upon the wall. There were toys for little Mollie and pack- ages of flower seeds, and a huge box of candy for everybody; and then there was a letter inclosing a check which would send the boys to a good school for two years. When they all kneeled together that night, and the clergyman tried to thank God and to pray for their kind friend, his voice choked so that he could not speak. These are two companion pictures for our readers to hang in their memory. Both axe taken fr~rn the life.Selected. 57 ]?eceipts. RECEIPTS FOR DECEMBER, 1333. MAINE, $403.95. Brewer M. Hardy, 50, to coust. Rirv. B. B. MERRILL, L. M.; First Cong. Oh., 10.35, and Sab. Sch., 15 Brownsville. Cong. Oh. and Soc Bucksfleld. C. H. Prince, for Student Aid,Atlanta U Ellsworth. Cong. Oh. and Soc Fryeburg. Cong. Oh. and Soc Gorham. Miss E. B. Emery, for Work- shop, Lewis High Sch., Macon, Ga.... Halloweil. Mrs. H. K. Baker, 5; A Friend, 50c Hallowell. Friends, 2 Bbls. of C., S for Freight, for Birmingham, Ala Limington. A. B. Litchileld Corners. Cong. Ch Portland. Second Parish Cli., 43.50; T. B. Percy, S Skowliegan. ~ ~ of Cong. Oh Skowbegan. Mrs. L. W. Weston, Bbl. of Papers and C., for Lewis High Sch., Macon, Ga. South Paris. Cong. Cli Waterford. Home Sch., by H. E. Doug- lass, BbI. of C., 5 f~. Freight. for Sa- vannah, Ga Brunswick. ,11; Mrs. Lincoln. 1. Falmouth. 2 Bbls. of 0Gor- ham. Bbl. of C., 5 for Freight. New Gloucester. Bbl of C 3 for FreightUnion. Bbl. of ~., 2.75 for Freight,for Selma, Ala NEW HAMPSHIRE, $707.98. Aistead Center. Cong. Cli. and Soc Alstead East. Cong. Ch. and Soc Atkinson. Cong. Cli. and Soc Claremont. Cong. Oh. and Soc Colebrook. Cong. Cli., 7.64, and Sab. Sch., 11 19 Exeter. A Friend Greenland. Cong. Cli. and Soc Hampton. Infant S. S. Class Hilisborough. Cong. Cli., 2.50; 0. Crosby, 1 Hinidale. Cong. Cli. and Soc Keene. First Cong. Sab. Sch Marlborough. Ladies Freedmens Aid Soc., for Theo. Dept., Talladega C ... Marlborough. Friends, Bbl. of C.. for McIntosh, Ga. Milford. First Cong. Cli., to coust. Miss ADALINE A. CROSBY, Mus. GEoRcIA E. STICKNEY, MRS. H. LIzzIE FOSTER and MISS NELLIE S. FITCH, L. Ms Nashua. ~A Friend, for Student Aid, Straight U North Hampton. E. Gove Pelham. Cong. Cli. and Soc Penacook. Cong. Oh. and Soc Pittsfield. Cong. Oh. and Soc Riudge. Cong. Cli. and Soc Sanbornton. Cong. Cli. and Soc South Newmarket. Ladies of Cong. Cli., 2 Bbls. C.,for Wilmington. NC. Stratham. Cong. Oh. and Soc. (adi).... Swanzey. Cong. Cli. and Soc., Blil. of C., val 25; 3for Freight, for Talla- dega C West Lebanon. Mission Band, Freight Wilton. Miss Emma Abbott, Dud- ley,N. C A Friend (25 of which for chinese M.) $75 35 110 00 5 00 89 00 10 00 3 00 5 50 5 00 1 50 12 00 4850 585 5 50 5 00 2275 10 00 10 00 2800 41 83 18 83 31 00 11 7~ 1 00 3 50 10 00 8468 10 00 138 05 75 00 10 00 57 78 10 00 3676 3 53 10 00 2440 3 00 1 90 2 00 75 00 VERMONT, $335.16. Bellows Falls. Cong. Oh. and Soc.... $23 00 Bennington Center. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. (10 of which for Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Jennings) 25 50 Bradforo. Cong. ~h. and Soc 27 00 Burlington. Third Cong. Cli. Sab. Seli 25 00 Cabot. Cong. Cli 38 00 Cornwall. Cong. Cli. and Soc .34 43 Coventry. M. C. Pearson 5 00 Fairlee. M. W. Smith, 2; A Friend, 1 3 00 Lyndon. S. B. Martocks 50 Marshfield Lyman Clark 20 00 Middlebury. on . Sab. Sch 15 35 Montpelier. Bethany ~:ab. Sch 13 03 Newbury. Ladies Benev. Soc., 2 RhIs. C.; Individuals, 1 Bhl., for Chatta- nooqa, Tenn. Norwich. John Dutton 5 00 Peacliam. Cong. Cli. and Soc 24 85 Shoreham. Misses Elizabeth and Susan Hand 10 00 Stowe. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to const. JO. PORTER L.M 5600 Westminster. Cong. Cli. and Soc 13 00 Williston. Cong. Cli. and Soc 16 50 MASSACHUSETTS, $7,791.82. Acton. Evan. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (25 of which for Atlanta U.) to const. WIL LIAM W. DAVIS L. M 52 50 Andover. Ladies U. H: Missy Soc., for Student Aid, Talladega C 70 00 Andover. Mrs. Rebecca B. Mills 50 00 Andover. West Parish Cong. Cli 29 83 Ashby. Cong. Cli and Soc 16 96 Asliburnham. First Cong. Oh. and Soc.. 24 00 Auburadale. Cong. Cli. and Soc 164 17 Boston. Union Cli. and Soc., 159.20; Rev. F. R. Abbe, 100 ; Suffolk, 100; (South) Phillips Cong. Cli. and Soc., 122.12 ; (R()xbury) Imman nel Cli. and Soc., 80; Union Cong. Oh. (adI), 5; A Friend, 4; illonation, 1.50 571 82 Boston, Jamaica Plain. Central Cong. Cli (adl). 100 00 Boston. Jamaica Plain. Central Con Cli. Sab. Sch., forStzldent Aid, Fisk ~.T 50 00 Boston (South). Francis C. Hersey, for Sch. Kittrelt. N. C 10 00 Boston. Miss S. R., 20; Miss E. E. Backup, 10; Miss Ellen E;ancroft, 2; Miss Louisa Rice, 1, for Sch., Kittrell, NC 3300 Boston Highlands. Miss Elizabeth Davis, 25; Mrs. George Curtis, 20; Misses M. and H. Bartlett, S; Miss F. Ferguson, 1; Mrs. B. F. Hamilton. 1; for Sch . Kitfrell, N. C 52 00 Boston. 0. Doltlirop & Co., 4 vols. for Lewis High Sch., Library. Bradford. Ladies of Adamsville 2 Blils. 0., 1.20 for l~reight, for Wilmington, N.C 120 Braintree. First Cong. Oh. and Soc., 8.50; South Cong. Oh. and Soc., 7 15 50 Bridgewarer. Central Sq. Sab. Sch. for Oh Building, Jackson, Miss 20 00 Brighton. Evan. Cong. Oh. and Soc 58 00 Cambridire. Ladies Soc of Sliepard Cli. Box of Bedding. for Straight U. Cambridgeport. Pilgrim Oh. and Soc.; M.C. Coil 1638 Chelsea. C. H. Frost, :300; Central Cong. Oh. and Sec., 200. for Chattanooga Student Aid; Mrs. L. A. Meyo, 2S, for LYhottanooga, Tenn S2S 00

Receipts for December, 1883 57-64

57 ]?eceipts. RECEIPTS FOR DECEMBER, 1333. MAINE, $403.95. Brewer M. Hardy, 50, to coust. Rirv. B. B. MERRILL, L. M.; First Cong. Oh., 10.35, and Sab. Sch., 15 Brownsville. Cong. Oh. and Soc Bucksfleld. C. H. Prince, for Student Aid,Atlanta U Ellsworth. Cong. Oh. and Soc Fryeburg. Cong. Oh. and Soc Gorham. Miss E. B. Emery, for Work- shop, Lewis High Sch., Macon, Ga.... Halloweil. Mrs. H. K. Baker, 5; A Friend, 50c Hallowell. Friends, 2 Bbls. of C., S for Freight, for Birmingham, Ala Limington. A. B. Litchileld Corners. Cong. Ch Portland. Second Parish Cli., 43.50; T. B. Percy, S Skowliegan. ~ ~ of Cong. Oh Skowbegan. Mrs. L. W. Weston, Bbl. of Papers and C., for Lewis High Sch., Macon, Ga. South Paris. Cong. Cli Waterford. Home Sch., by H. E. Doug- lass, BbI. of C., 5 f~. Freight. for Sa- vannah, Ga Brunswick. ,11; Mrs. Lincoln. 1. Falmouth. 2 Bbls. of 0Gor- ham. Bbl. of C., 5 for Freight. New Gloucester. Bbl of C 3 for FreightUnion. Bbl. of ~., 2.75 for Freight,for Selma, Ala NEW HAMPSHIRE, $707.98. Aistead Center. Cong. Cli. and Soc Alstead East. Cong. Ch. and Soc Atkinson. Cong. Cli. and Soc Claremont. Cong. Oh. and Soc Colebrook. Cong. Cli., 7.64, and Sab. Sch., 11 19 Exeter. A Friend Greenland. Cong. Cli. and Soc Hampton. Infant S. S. Class Hilisborough. Cong. Cli., 2.50; 0. Crosby, 1 Hinidale. Cong. Cli. and Soc Keene. First Cong. Sab. Sch Marlborough. Ladies Freedmens Aid Soc., for Theo. Dept., Talladega C ... Marlborough. Friends, Bbl. of C.. for McIntosh, Ga. Milford. First Cong. Cli., to coust. Miss ADALINE A. CROSBY, Mus. GEoRcIA E. STICKNEY, MRS. H. LIzzIE FOSTER and MISS NELLIE S. FITCH, L. Ms Nashua. ~A Friend, for Student Aid, Straight U North Hampton. E. Gove Pelham. Cong. Cli. and Soc Penacook. Cong. Oh. and Soc Pittsfield. Cong. Oh. and Soc Riudge. Cong. Cli. and Soc Sanbornton. Cong. Cli. and Soc South Newmarket. Ladies of Cong. Cli., 2 Bbls. C.,for Wilmington. NC. Stratham. Cong. Oh. and Soc. (adi).... Swanzey. Cong. Cli. and Soc., Blil. of C., val 25; 3for Freight, for Talla- dega C West Lebanon. Mission Band, Freight Wilton. Miss Emma Abbott, Dud- ley,N. C A Friend (25 of which for chinese M.) $75 35 110 00 5 00 89 00 10 00 3 00 5 50 5 00 1 50 12 00 4850 585 5 50 5 00 2275 10 00 10 00 2800 41 83 18 83 31 00 11 7~ 1 00 3 50 10 00 8468 10 00 138 05 75 00 10 00 57 78 10 00 3676 3 53 10 00 2440 3 00 1 90 2 00 75 00 VERMONT, $335.16. Bellows Falls. Cong. Oh. and Soc.... $23 00 Bennington Center. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. (10 of which for Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Jennings) 25 50 Bradforo. Cong. ~h. and Soc 27 00 Burlington. Third Cong. Cli. Sab. Seli 25 00 Cabot. Cong. Cli 38 00 Cornwall. Cong. Cli. and Soc .34 43 Coventry. M. C. Pearson 5 00 Fairlee. M. W. Smith, 2; A Friend, 1 3 00 Lyndon. S. B. Martocks 50 Marshfield Lyman Clark 20 00 Middlebury. on . Sab. Sch 15 35 Montpelier. Bethany ~:ab. Sch 13 03 Newbury. Ladies Benev. Soc., 2 RhIs. C.; Individuals, 1 Bhl., for Chatta- nooqa, Tenn. Norwich. John Dutton 5 00 Peacliam. Cong. Cli. and Soc 24 85 Shoreham. Misses Elizabeth and Susan Hand 10 00 Stowe. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to const. JO. PORTER L.M 5600 Westminster. Cong. Cli. and Soc 13 00 Williston. Cong. Cli. and Soc 16 50 MASSACHUSETTS, $7,791.82. Acton. Evan. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (25 of which for Atlanta U.) to const. WIL LIAM W. DAVIS L. M 52 50 Andover. Ladies U. H: Missy Soc., for Student Aid, Talladega C 70 00 Andover. Mrs. Rebecca B. Mills 50 00 Andover. West Parish Cong. Cli 29 83 Ashby. Cong. Cli and Soc 16 96 Asliburnham. First Cong. Oh. and Soc.. 24 00 Auburadale. Cong. Cli. and Soc 164 17 Boston. Union Cli. and Soc., 159.20; Rev. F. R. Abbe, 100 ; Suffolk, 100; (South) Phillips Cong. Cli. and Soc., 122.12 ; (R()xbury) Imman nel Cli. and Soc., 80; Union Cong. Oh. (adI), 5; A Friend, 4; illonation, 1.50 571 82 Boston, Jamaica Plain. Central Cong. Cli (adl). 100 00 Boston. Jamaica Plain. Central Con Cli. Sab. Sch., forStzldent Aid, Fisk ~.T 50 00 Boston (South). Francis C. Hersey, for Sch. Kittrelt. N. C 10 00 Boston. Miss S. R., 20; Miss E. E. Backup, 10; Miss Ellen E;ancroft, 2; Miss Louisa Rice, 1, for Sch., Kittrell, NC 3300 Boston Highlands. Miss Elizabeth Davis, 25; Mrs. George Curtis, 20; Misses M. and H. Bartlett, S; Miss F. Ferguson, 1; Mrs. B. F. Hamilton. 1; for Sch . Kitfrell, N. C 52 00 Boston. 0. Doltlirop & Co., 4 vols. for Lewis High Sch., Library. Bradford. Ladies of Adamsville 2 Blils. 0., 1.20 for l~reight, for Wilmington, N.C 120 Braintree. First Cong. Oh. and Soc., 8.50; South Cong. Oh. and Soc., 7 15 50 Bridgewarer. Central Sq. Sab. Sch. for Oh Building, Jackson, Miss 20 00 Brighton. Evan. Cong. Oh. and Soc 58 00 Cambridire. Ladies Soc of Sliepard Cli. Box of Bedding. for Straight U. Cambridgeport. Pilgrim Oh. and Soc.; M.C. Coil 1638 Chelsea. C. H. Frost, :300; Central Cong. Oh. and Sec., 200. for Chattanooga Student Aid; Mrs. L. A. Meyo, 2S, for LYhottanooga, Tenn S2S 00 Receipts. Chelsea. Central Cong. Ch. and Soc., 23.46; Third Cong. Ch. and Soc. (adi), 1.50 Chicopee. Third Cong. Ch Clinton. First Evan.,Ch. and Soc Clinton. Ladies Soc.. Bbl. of C.. for Kit trell, N. C. Coha~set. Cong. Ch. and Soc., 12.10; Cong. Sab. Scn., 3.82 Conway. ~Conway Deerfield. Cong. Ch., Blil. of C., 2.25 for Freight, Jor Atlanta U Dorchester. Village Ch. and Soc Duxbury. Friends, for Freight East Hampton. First Cong. Sab. Scli.. East Hampton. Ladies Sec. of Payson Ch., 2 Boxes of C. val. 95. Easton. Cong.Sab. Sch Edgecomb. Cong. tab. Sch Everett. Cong. Ch. and Soc Fi:chburg. Rolistone Cli., for Student Aid, Talladega C Fitchburg. Ladie8 Benev. Soc. of Roll. stone Cli.. 28, and Bb1. of Goods, for Furnishing Room. Straight U Florence. Miss S. Wilders S. S. Class, Cong. Ch., for Washington, D. C.... Framiugham. Ladies of Plymouth Ch.. 2Bbls of C.; val., 138.98. Globe Village. Evan. Free Cli. and Soc.. Greenfield. First. Cong. Cli. and Soo.. Greenwicli Village. Daniel Parker ... Hadley. First C hand Soc Harwich. Cong. Cli., M. C. Coil Harwich Port. Leonard Itobhins Holbrook. Ladifs Sewing Circle of Winthrop Ch.. Box of Bedding, 2, for Freight Holden. Cong. Cli. and Soc Holliston. Bible Christians of Dis- trict No. 4, 25; Mrs. J. Leland, 1.... Huntington. Cong. Cli. and Soc., 8; Rev. A. G. Beebee, 5 Lakeville. Miss Betsey Kinsley, for Da- kota M Lawrence. Ladies Jenev. Soc. of Lawrence St. Cli., Blil. of C Lenox. Con~. Cli. Lincoln. 1~ riends, for Student Aid, Atlanta U Lowell. Eliot Cli., 30; Geo. F. Willey, 10 Ludlow. Mrs. M. E. Jones, Blil. of C., 4, for Freight, for Macon, Ga Lynn. First Cong. Cli. and Soc Malden. First Cong. Cli.and Soc Marblehead. Hon. J. J. H. Gregory, for Wilmington, N. C Marblehead. First Cong. Cli. and Soc.. Marshfiuld. Mrs. J. H. Bourne, Box of Books, 1,for.hreight, for Atlanta U... Medford. A Friend, for Orphan Scholarship, Chattanooga, Tenn Medford. Cong. Cli., 2 Blils. C., for Washington, D. C. Meirose. Or. Cong. Cli., M. C. Coll Merrimac. John K. Sargent Middleborough. First Parish Sab. Sch.. Micidleton. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adl)... New Bedford. North. Cong. Cli New Bedt.rd. Alma Walker, for Talla- dega C . Newburyport. Freedmens Aid and Friends, 3 Blils. of C.; Friends, 22.84, for Washington, D. C Newburyport. Whitefleld Cong. Ch. and Soc Newton. , for Student Aid. S. U.. Newton. Childrens Circle of Eliot Cli, liblof C.,for Tuskegee N. Sch.,Ala. North Adams. First Cong. Cli Northampton. Wm K. Wright North Billerica. Mrs. J. D. Gould, for Macon. Ga $24 96 10 48 60 00 15 92 50 2 25 32 83 1 26 2500 60 00 5 00 7 15 50 00 28 00 10 82 3500 1325 2 00 11 60 14 10 10 00 2 00 15 00 26 00 13 00 4 50 20 00 4 00 40 00 4 00 22 17 39 51 3.q4 45 10 00 1 00 25 00 4 39 2 t)0 22 00 8 00 38 66 5 00 22 84 tO 78 50 37 33 30 00 3 00 North Brooktleld. Union Cong. Cli. and Soc., to const. Mas. EMILY P. WALKEa L. M North Leominster. Cong. Sab. Sob.. 25; Leonard Burrage, 10, for Student Aid, Atlanta U.. .. North Weymouth. Pilgrim Cli. and Soc. Oakham. Mrs. Dea. James Packard... Oakham. By S. F. Fairbanks, Blil. of C. Oxford. Loriston Sbumway Paxton. Cong. Cli. and Soc Peabody. Girls Soc., 10, and Bbl. of C. for Atlanta, Ga Peabody. Prof. J. K. Cole, S Vols. for Lewis H. Sch, Library. Phillipston. Box and Bundle of C. for Chattanooga, Tenn. Pittsfield. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., 60; South Cong. Cli., 32.03 Plainfield. Cong. Cli. and Soc Raynham. First Cong. Cii. and Soc.... Reading. Bethesda Cli. and Soc Readville. Mrs. E. F. Stetson, for Sch., Kittrell, N. C Rockport. Pastors Class, for Dakota M Roxliury. Walnut Ave. Cli. and Soc... Royalstcn. First Cong. Cli. and Soc... Royalaton. Mrs. Geo. Woodhury, Bbl. of C. Rutland. Cong. Cli. and Soc Somerville. Winter Hill Cli. and Soc.. Somerville. Lower Light Soc. of Pros- pect Hill Cli., Box Christmas Gifts, for Little Colored Children. Somerville. Ladies Soc. of Winter Hill Cli.. 2 Blils. of C., for Talladega C. South Deerfield. Cong. Cli. and Sab. Sob. South Dennis. Cong. Cli. and Soc South Framingliam. Miss Clara Barton. Spencer. G. E. Manleys S. S. Class, Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Tatla. dega C Springfield. Mrs. Merrill Stoneham. Cong. Cli., for Chattanooga, Tenn Sudliury. Mrs. George A. Oviati, Pkg. Christmas Cards. Tewksbury. Cong. Cli. and Soc Townsend. Cong. Cli Upton. Friends, 2 Blils. of C. and 3.50,for Mobile, Ala Ware. Sab. Sob. Class, for Lady Mis- sionary, Ladies Island, S. C Warren. First Cong. Cli Watertown. PhiUips Mission Band, for Womans Work Watertown. Phillips Nission Band, Blil. Christmas Gifts, for McIntosh, Ga. Watertown. Ladies of Phillips (.h., 2 Blils. of C. Waverley. Cong. Cli., M. C. Coil Westliorougli. Cong. Cli. and Soc West Boylsion. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. Westhampton. Miss I. G. Jewett West Newbury. First Cong. Cli., 1 Blils. of C., val. 75, 2 for Freight, for Atlanta U West Somerville. Young Peoples Mis- sion Band, 2 Blils. of Christmas Gifts, val. 60, for Mcintosh, Ga. West Springfield. Park St. Cong. Cli., 19.72; First Cong. Cli., 16 Whitinsville. Cong. Cli. and Soc Willinmstown. First Cong. Cli Woburn. First Cong. Cli. and Soc Worcester. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adl)... . A Friend. for Lewis H. Sch. Workshop, Macon, Ga: Nortliboro Bbl. of C. Fitchburg; Friends, box of C. ; Cash, 5.Pepporell, Blil. of C. Cash, 1.55; Den. Chins. Crosby, Set of Chapel LampsGraf- ton, 2 Blils. of C., for Dudley, N. C.... $41. 75. 33 00 19 00 10 00 5 00 15 00. 10 00- 93 03. 15 18 16 00 50 46 5 00 1 00 2~.7 81 120 50 3 81 6 69 17 SI 15 00. 5 00 2 SlY 5 00 16 10 3412 17 60 3 50 7 00 125 00 li 00 6 1~ 34 2~ 62 68 1 50 2 00 35 72 969 40. 15 36 260 62 2 48.. 3 00 6 5S. Receipts. Special Donations for Fisk UBos- ton. Individuals, 571.05; W. H. M. Assn, 25.Ladies, by Mrs. Spence, 38.Andover, Individuals, 184.50: Free Cli. Sab. Sch~., 18.51.~jorth Andover, Individuals, 28.Lawrence, Individuals, 120; Merry Workers, Lawrence St. Cli., 5: Pine Needle Soc., Arlington Ch., 5.Haverhull, Algernon P. Nichols, 100.Lowell, in- dividuals, 75.Newburyport, Lodivid- uals, 52.Springfield. ~Ten times one i~ ten Club. North Cong. Cli., 50. Newuon Center, vliss Loring and Sister, 50.Westford, Cong. Cli., 12 Stock- bridge, Rev. A. G. Beebe, 5.Reading, MissE. A. White, 3 1.342 06 $6,746 82 LEGAcIEs. Holbrook. Estate of Mrs. Relief Hol- brook, by E. N. Holbrook, Ex 1,000 00 Topsfl eld. Estate of Mary Towne, by Jacob P. Towne, Ex 45 00 $7,791 82 RHODE ISLAND, $164.98. Ashaway. Wells Mfg. Co. Automatic Boring Machine, Val. 6 .,for Lewis H. Sch., Workshop. Barrington. Cong. Cli., 63.40, and Sab. Sch., 36.60 100 00 East Providence. Cong. Cli., to const. DEA. JOSEPH BROWN L. M 30 00 Pawtucket. Cong. Cli. and Soc 11 26 Peacedale. Cong. Sab. Sch 5 00 Providence. W. P. Hale 50 Westerly. Cong. Cli. and Soc 18 22 CONNECTICUT, $2,152.96. Ansonia. J. H. Bartholomew, for Til lotson C. ~ N. Inst 25 00 Bridgeport. Second Cong. Soc., 100.57: Park St. Cli., 18., bal. to coust. PHILO M. BEERS L. H 118 57 !Buckingharn. Cong. Cli. and Soc 2 71 Canaan. A Friend 3 00 Che4er. Cong. Cli 77 69 Colchester. C. B. M., for Chinese M 5 00 Coichester. Ladies, 2 Bbls. of C., for Washington, D. C. Danbury. First Cong. Cli. to const. AN- DREW LrrrLE, DAVID McL& N and WILLIAM H. RIDER L. Ms 115 00 Danbury. 0. M. Crosby, Patent Plane, Val. 6, for Leans H. Sch., W~e,rkshop. Danielsonville. Ladies. 3 B bls. of C.,4 far Freight, for Washington, D. C 4 00 Dee p River. Cong. Cli 25 46 Durham. Ladies Missy Assn, Bbl. of C. and Freight, for McLeansvslle, NC. Eastford. Cong. Cli 14 60 Falls Village. Cong. Cli 5 32 Glastonbury. First Cong. Cli 75 00 Griswold. Cong. Cli. (adl) to coust. JOsEPH 0. Caoss L. M 5 00 Hartford. M. F. Stevens. for Indian M 4 00 Harwinton. Cong. Sab. Sch., for John Brown Steamer 5 75 Higganum. Cong. Cli 17 00 Lyme (Grassy Hill). Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Madison. Cong. Cli 9 88 Meriden E. K. Breckenridge 10 00 Middle Haddam. Second Cong. Cli 6 86 Milford. First Cong. Cli 22 00 Morris. A Friend of Missions 1 00 New Britain. First Cli. of Christ, 311.07; H. L. Andrews. 1.50 312 57 New Britain. Mrs. Louisa Nichols, 25.: John B. Smith, 10., for New Dormi- tory. Tillotson C. ~ N. Inst 35 00 New Canaan. Cong. Cli. and Soc .. 27 40 New Harttord. North Cong. Cli., Sam- uel Couch, bal. to const. Ray. F. H. ADAMS L. M 10 00 I New Haven. Humphrey St. Cong. Cli. to const. DEA. ANDREW BRYDEN, RUFUS I JOHNSON and ALFRED H. HAVES L. Ms. I for Tillotson C. k N. Inst., Land and Building $100 00 Newllaven. Davenport Cong. Cli., 67.55: I Third Cong. Cli., 42; ~ Friend, 5; W. E. Chandler, 30, to const. Miss BRa- THA AUGUSTA CHANDLER L. M 144 55 Newington. Cong. Cli 62 86 New Milford. First Cong. Cli. (25 of which from pulpit supply) 129 44 North Cornwall. Cong Cli 21 44 North Greenwieli. Cong. Cli ol 28 North Stamford. A Friend 2 00 Norwich. Broadway Cong. Cli 200 00 Norwich. Mrs. L. F. S. Foster, for .Sch. at Kittrell. N. C 20 00 Norwich. Broadway Cli., for Student Aid. Atlanta U 15 00 Plantsville. Cong. Sab. 5db., for At- lanta liT 40 34 Plantsville. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Stu- dent Aid, Atlanta U 10 60 Plymouth. Cong. Cli 11 50 Poquonock. Cong. Cli 100 00 Rockville. Second Cong. Cli 9 40 Roxbury. Friend 2 50 Saybrook. Cong. Cli 10 65 Somers. Cong. Cli. and Soc 17 95 South Canaan. Cong. Cli 8 74 Stratford. Cong. Cli 26 50 Suffield. Cong. Cli 5 40 Taftville. Cong. Cli 22 01 Thomaston. Cong. Cli 24 03 Unionville. Ripley Mfg. Co., Pkg Tools, Val 9; Cowles Hardware Co.. Pkg Tools, for Lewis H. Sch., Workshop. Washington. F. A. Frisbie - Waterbury. Mrs. M. L. Mitchell, for 1 00 Lewis H. Sch. Workshop 10 00 Waterbury. Miss A. C. Benedict, 2 Pkgs Patchwork for Macon, Ga. Westbrook. Cong. eli. and Soc., to const. REV. E. B. SANFORD L. M 35 30 West Hartford. Cong. Cli 43 24 Westvllle. Rev. J. L. Willard 25 00 Westville. H. A. Brown & Co., Bitts and Screw drivers, for Workshop, Macon, Ga. Woodstock. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., tocons.Mas. JOANNA BOUTELLE L.M 2192 ____- A Friend io 00 Woodbury. Ladies Missy Soc., 13.75; Sab.Scli. of Conw. Cli.. 4; Friends. by Mrs. J. E. Smith, 4.75, for Fzsk U 22 50 NEW YORK, $1,401.80. Albany. Clias. Croissant & Bro., 3 Saw Sits, for Lewis High Sch. Workshop, Macon, Ga. Alfred Center. Mrs. I. F. Kenyon 5 00 Brooklyn. Freedmans ~{elpers, for Lewis H. Sch.. Workshop 15 00 Brooklyn. A Friend 1 00 Berkshire. Hattie B. Johnson 5 03 Chatenugay. Joseph Shaw 5 00 Copenhagen. Lucian Clark 15 00 Dansville. Mrs. D. W. Noyes 50 Eden. Mrs. H. McNett, for Student Aid, Talladega C 2 00 Elizabetlitown. Rev. W. T. Herrick..-. 5 00 Gloversville. Cong Cli. (adl) 2 00 Gouverneur. Milo Shattuck 5 00 Honeoye. A Friend.. .10 00 Keeseville. Mrs. L. H. Elliot 5 00 Kingsborouah. Joseph Wood 50 Lebanon. 0. A. Benedict 1 00 Lima. Clias. D. MIner, 10; Geo. Thayer, 10; Geo. W. Thayer, 5; Horace C. Gilbert, 5 . 30 00 Livonia. Young Ladies Missy Soc., for Student Aid, StorrsSch., Atlanta, Ga. . 16 00 Locust Valley. I: Sar& .i Palmer.... 6 00 6o }?ece~pts. Marion. Mrs. Ruth Negus . Mexico. Rev. Geo. G. French Newark Valley. Cone. Cli New York. ~A Friend, 200; Box 781, 3 New York. Dodd, Mead & Co.. 14 vols Chas. Schailbach, 6 vols., for Library; Asa Farr, Pkg. Tools, for Workshop, Lewis H. Sch. Palniyra. Rev. L. H. Foster 2 00 Paris. Cong Cli 1 00 Penn Yan. A. Hamlin 100 00 Pouglikeepsie. Mrs. Burton Gilbert 10 00 Port Leyden. Cong. Cli 3 00 Ransoruville. John Powley 5 00 Sag Harbor. Chas N. Brown to const. Miss A. JULIA KING L. M 30 00 Saratoga Springs. Nathan Hickok 1 50 Smyrna. ISab. Sch. hlissy Sec. of First Cong. Cli 50 00 Spencerport. Rev. B. T. Stafford. 2 Blils., Books and Papers, for Macon, (Ia. Tarrytowi. Dr. A. Smith 5 00 West Brook. Cong. Ch. and Sab. Sch, for Indian Student Aid, Hampton N. ckA.Inst 500 West Farms. DanielMapes, .for Tillot- son C. ck N. Inst. Building 100 00 Special Donations for Fisk U: New York, Gen. C. B. Fisk. 100, also Re- casting Jubilee Bell; Mrs. Gen. C. B. Fisk, 389.70 and one Steinway Sq. Grand Pianol; C. L. M., 50.Delphi, 0. F. Moore, 100. Waterville, Ladies Benev. Soc., 31.; Mrs. J. S. Hitchcock and daughter, 5 Hamilton Cong. Cli., 2O.Poughkeepsie, Mrs. M. Van Valkenburg, 6.Homer, Friends, 2. 703 70 NEW JERSEY, $197.30. Colts Neck. Reformed Cli 6 90 Jersey City. First Cong. Cli 67 40 Perth Amboy. A Friend, for Student Aid, Fisk U 100 00 Upper Montclair. Christian Union Cong. Cli. (adl) 4 00 Woodbridge. First Cong. Cli 19 00 PENNSYLVANIA, $78.25. Canton. H. Sheldon, Bbl. of C., 1.25, ,for Freight, for Macon, Ga 1 25 Pittsburg. B. Preston 50 00 Summersville. Horace Summers 5 00 West Alexander. Thomas McCleery.... 10 00 A Friend, for Lewis H. Sch. Workshop, Macon, Ga 12 00 OHIO, $~54.85. Brownhelm. 0. H. Perry 10 00 Cleveland. The Poys and Girls Mission, First Cong. Cli, for Tougaloo U 8 05 Claridon. L. T. ~Vilmot, 10; D. B. Ladd, 3; Cong. Cli., 3 16 00 Chagrin Falls. Cong. Cli 15 30 Cincinnati. Columbia Cong. Cli 24 40 Edinburg. Cong. Cli .. 15 50 Hudson. Conr. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Lindenville. Ellen Jones 5 00 Mallet Creek. J. A. Bingliam.... 5 00 Oberlin. Rev. Samuel F. Porter and wife, 50; J. B. Clarke, 10 60 00 Oberlin. becond Cong. Sab. Sch. for Student Aid, Atlanta U 64 00 Oberlin. Rev. H. W. Logan, for Lewis H.Sch., Workshop, Macon, Ga 5 00 Mrs. Un Oviatt, 5: Dea. T. E. Ellsworth, 2; ~. R. Oviatt 2; Rev. J. A. McKinstry, I 10 00 Rochester. Cong. Cli 5 30 Saint Clnirsville. XVm. Lee, Sen 5 00 Savannah. James Lawscn 5 00 Sicily. S. W. Hugcins 10 00 South Ridge. U. H 50 SteubenviUe. First Cong. Cli 10 00 $5 00 Wakeman. Cong Cli $20 80 10 (.0 Wakeman. ~Wilhng Workers, for 38 60 Fisk U . 50 00 203 ~ $354 85 Cleveland. Estate of Abigail Brooks, by H. E., H. M. and S. E. Brooks, ~x ecutors 100 00 $4s4 85 $5 00 INDIANA, $5.00. Fort Wayne. A. B. Allen, for Fisk U.. ILLINOIS. $1,793.93. Aurora. New Eng. Cong. Cli $49 27 Chicago. First Cong. Cli., 163.56; N. E. Cong. Cli., 48.06 211 62 Chicago. Mrs. E. C. Stanley, for Lewis H. Sch., Workshop 12 00 Chicago. C. C. Griggs & Co., 4 Vols., for Lewis High Sch. Library. Cobden. E. W.Towne 2 00 Danville. Mrs. Anna M. Swan 5 00 Geneseo. First Cong. Cli., 100; Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch.. 20.58 120 58 Granville. Ladies of Cong. Cli., for Lady Misssonary 10 40 Hamlet. L. Cooper 50 Ivanhoe. Cong. Cli 17 24 Kewanee. Cong. Cli. to const. Rsv. E. A. LEaPER, Mas. ELLA M. LEaPER and MILo DoTv L. Ms 150 00 Lombard. Ladies of Cong. Cli 13 50 Lowell. V. (I. L 3 00 Maiden. Cong. Cli 12 00 Oak Park. Cong. Cli., 97.49 to const. Ray. E. D. EATON, E. W. LYMAN and S. W. PACKARD, L. Ms; Mrs. Julia Higging, 50 147 49 Oak Park. Cong. Cli. (adl.), for Lady Missionary. Little Rock, Ark 3 00 Ottawa. Ladies of Cong. Cli., for Lady Missionary. Paxton.. A Friend, for Student ~ 20 35 Atlanta U 10 00 Payson. Cong. Cli 11 84 Pittsfield. Missy Soc. of Cong. Cli . 10 00 Ravenswood. Cong. Cli 11 80 Rockford. Second Cung. Cli., for Stu- dent Aid, Fisk U 2500 Rockford. Thomes D. Robertson or Fisk U 2500 Rocktord. MISS M E.Brigrs, for Bell, Flatonia, Texas . 15 00 Rockford. John Barnes, Scroll Saw, val. 20, for lewis H. Sch. Workshop. Roscoe. Sirs. Tuttle 5 00 Shirland. Mrs. E. (I. Lyon 50 Streator. W. H. M. Soc., for Student Aid, Fisk U nO 00 Ttsrner. Mrs. R. Curijer 5 00 Waukegan. Y. P. Missy Soc., for Lady Missionaries 23 30 Wilmette. Arthur B. Smiih. 2500 Special Donations for Fisk U.: Rock- ford. Mrs. David Penfleld, 100; Ralph Emerson, 100; Young Ladies Missy Soc.. 50; First Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch., 25: T. L. Robertson, 10; Hon. Wait Talcott, 10. Friends, by Mrs. E. Spence, 70.Rochelle, W. H. Hol- comb. 50.Peoria. Mr. and Mrs. John L. Griswold. 50.Princeton. Friends, 35.79.Mendon. Mrs. J. Fowler, 26. Moline. Box 0693 25 Buda, J. B. Stewart. 25: J. F. hyde, 25.Winne- bago, N. F. Parsons, 25.Peoria. Mr. Reynolds, 25: Mr. Day, 25; Friends, 25.ChicagoFir t Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db., 25Sycamore. D. A. Lyme, 20. Quincy. Friends, 19.75 Highland Park, Mr. Pronty. 15,Geneseo. Zan- ana Soc., 12; Band of Sisters, 5... 798 54 Receipts. MICHIGAN, $868.97. Battle Creek. S. A. Gould Beuzonia. Cong. Cii Charlotte. Christmas Offering Covert. Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Packard,for Christmas Presents, Tiflotson C. wed N. Institute Detroit. First Cong. Cli Detroit. E. C. Walker, for Fisk U Galesburg. Cong. Ch Grand Rapids First Cong. Ch. Sab. Seli., for Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke.... Hillsdale. J. XV. Ford Hopkins. Second Cong. Cli Hubbardston. Cong. Cli Jackson. Mrs. H. M. Bennett Kalamazoo. First Cong. Cii Kalamazoo. Plymouth Cong. Cli.. Sab. Sch.. for Fisk U Olivet. Cong. Ch.. to const. EnWIN N. ELY and Fim L. Rzsn L. Ms Pontiac. Cong Sab. Sch Stanton. First Cong Cli Traverse City. Sab. 8db. Class, by Mrs. E. A. Clark, for Talladega Students... Ypsilanti. Rev. E. P. Goodrich, 10, and lIon of Books, for Lewis HSch Special Donations for Fisk U.: Covert Cong. Cli., 111.10.Grand Rapids, 92 Ladies Missy Soc., 50.Greenville, Friends, 88.50.Ann Arbor Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch., 50.Portland, Ladies Missy Soc., 25.First Cong. Cli.. 20.72.- Saint Johns, Ladies Missy Soc., 25.Allegan, Mrs. Elizabeth Booth, 20.Jackson Cong. Cli. Sab. Scb., 15.Grand Haven, Mr. Cutter, 10 Charlotte, Hon. E. S. Lacey, 10 Friends in Micli., 8.10. Eaton Rapids, Dr. A. C. Dutton, 5 IOWA, $292.86. Blairstown. Mrs. J. H. French Davenport. A Friend Denmark. Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch Des Moines. Rev. M. N. Miles Genoa Bluffs. Cong. Cii Grinnell. Cong. Ch Hillsborough. John W. Hammond Keokuk. Mrs. Elizabeth M, Wilson.. Lyons. Con g.Ch McGregor. Womans Miesy Soc., Bhl. of C., val. 22.50. for Straight U. New Hampton. Cong. Cli Newton. Cong Ch Grinnell. S. F. Coopvr, 100.Davenport, Cong. Cli., 15 Burlington, Friends, 25,for Fisk U WISCONSIN. $347.97. Beloit. Second Cong. Cli Clinton. Cong. Cli Cumoerland. W. B. Hopkins, M. D. Janesville. Misssion Soc., forMacon, Ga. La Crosse. First Cong. Cli Platteville. Cong. Cli., (adl) .... Rosendale. First Cong. Sab. Sch., 3 Bus. of C., (ash 3. for Macon. Ga For Lewis High School Workshop, Ma. con. Ga.: Oslikosh, Individuals, 75; Cong. Sab. Sch, 60.Fiiend in Wis.. by A. J. S., 20.New London, Ira Millard. Sr., 15; ArtliurW. Millard, 2.Fond du Lac, Individuals, 16. Ripon, Individuals, 15 85.Rosendale, Church, 3.89; Individuals, 2 Viro qua, First Cong. Sab. Sch., 3.Sheboy- gan, First Cong. Bali. Sch.. Set of Carpenters Tools, 3. for Freight; Pea. Daniel Brown, Chest for Tools For Lewis High School: Ripon, Miss Min- nie S. Cook, 30 Vols, for Library. New London, A. J. Burger, Bbl. of C. and 1 Large framed Engraving, for Library.--hlieboygan, Mrs. H. Stokes, Pkg. of C.Flintville, B ome Mis~y sO Soc., Box Papers. Beloit, Second $4 05 Cong. Cli., Box Books, etc.West 1 00 Rosendale, Friends, Box of C. MINNESOTA, $145.37. 10 00 Faribault. Cong. Ch 94 56 Hawley. Union Cli 5 00 Bendrum. A Friend 6 00 Minneapolis. Plymouth Cli Minneapolis. Mrs. W. W. Harrison, for 20 00 Lewis High Sch. Workshop 1 50 Nortlifield. First Cong. Cli 8 00 Plainview. Cong. Cli 4 40 Stillwater. Grace Cong. Cli. 1 50 Saint Charles. Mrs. B. N. Cravath, for 61 27 Fisk U 25 00 KANSAS, $20.71. Manhattan. First Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch. 68 51 Meriden. J. Rutty 3 76 NEBRASKA, $1.00. 9 50 Waverly. Cong. Sab. Sh., far Student 4 00 Aid Emerson Inst., Mobile, Ala ARKANSAS, $22.50. 10 00 Little Rock. Tuition DAKOTA, $10.00. Jamestown. Mrs. M. S. Wells WASHINGTON TER., $51.00 New Tacoma. Mrs. Eliza Taylor Seattle. P. Bresee, for Student Aid, Fisk U CALIFORNIA. Berkeley. Miss L. Penrcey,Ekg. Patch- work, for Mo con, Ga. 530 ~ DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, $38.00. Washington. Rev. J. G. Craighead, 30.; 9 00 First Cong. Cli., 8 10 00 MARYLAND. 36 00 Baltimore. John luer & Sons, Sot 5 00 Chisels, val. 4, for Lewis High Sch. 7 00 16 26 Workshop. 5 00 KENTUCKY, $135.75. 5 00 Lexington. Tuition 27 00 Versailles. Mrs. Geo. W. Cliapin, for ~Sch., Kittrell, N. C 12 00 Williamsburg. Tuition 20 60 TENNESSEE, $856.00. Jonesborougli. Tuition Knoxville. Second Cong. Cli 140 00 Memphis. La Moyne Scli.,.Tuition Nashville. Fisk U., Tuition, 78.25; Prof. F. A. Chase, 10 33 37 Special Donations for Fisk U.: Nash- 33 00 villa. Individuals. 342 Thomas Rut- 10 00 tiing, 50.Faculty Fisk U., 36.70. 5 00 Pupils of Fisk U., 24 40 (0 NORTH CAROLINA, $243.15. 7 86 Wilmington. Normal Sch., Tuition.... 3 00 Wilmington. Cong. Cli SOUTH CAROLINAv 692.20. Charleston. Avery Inst., Tuition Charleston. Plymouth Cli GEORGIA, $1,091.60. Atlanta. Storra Scli, Tuition, 247.70; Rent, 3; Cong. Cli., 30 Atlanta. A. E. Seifit, 6 Vols., for Lewis H. Sch. Library Macon. Lewis High 5db., Tuition, 215 74 405.65; Cong. Ch, 6 Macon. Citizens, 202; Prof. E. H. Link, 1 Scroll Saw for Lewis High Sch. Workshop; Mrs. J. P. Jones, 25 Vols., for Library 61 $23 13 8 00 5 00 33 22 5 00 47 53 9 49 4 00 10 00 10 71 10 00 1 CO 22 50 10 00 1 00 50 00 38 00 77 50 15 00 4323 35 85 2400 255 20 88 23 452 70 232 15 11 00 672 20 20 00 280 70 411 65 202 00 ]?eceipts. McIntosh. Tuition . Savannah. Beach Inst., Tuition, 159.75; Rent, 10 ALABAMA, $461.35. Athens. Trinity Sch.~ Tuition Marion. Cong. Cli Mobile. Emerson Inst., Tuition, 245.70; Tuition and Sales, 1.65 Selina. First Cong. Cli Talladega. Tatladega C., Tuition, 141.25; Cong. Ch., 10 LOUISIANA, $255.50. New Orleans. Straight U., Tuition TEXAS, $307.80. Austin. Tillotson C. and N. Inst., Tu- ition Goliad. Cong. Cli FLOIIIDA, $2.00. Miss Tyler. for Washington, D. C. INCOMES, $1,477.50. Avery Fund, for Mendi M De Forest Fund, for Presidents Chair, Talladega C $27 50 C. F. Dike Fund, for Straight U $30 03 General Endowment Fund .. 50 01) 169 73 Graves Scholarship Fund, for Talkrdega 125 ~ C Haley Scholarship Fund, for Fisk U.. 51) (IA) 46 00 Le 1~1oyne Fund, for Le Moyne Sch., 10 00 Memphis, Tenn 100 00 Theolorical Endowment Fund, for How- 247 35 ard U 425 00 6 75 Tuthill King Fund3 125, for Atlanta U., 25 for Berea, C 150 00 151 25 GERMANY, $5000. 255 50 Leipsic. Prof. and Mrs. C. M. Mead. .... 50 00 Total for December $22,859.21 Total from Oct. 1, to Dec.31 $52,830.30 304 80 3 00 2 00 190 00 337 50 FOR AMERICAN MISSIONARY. Subscriptions for December 122 26 Previously acknowledged 76 07 Total $t98 33 H. W. HUBBARD, Treasurer, 56 Reads St., N. Y. SEEDS WORTH GROWING NOVELTIES FOR 1884. Peas Until Frost. Blisss Abundance Pea, 00 pods counted on a single piant.Very productive, 15 to 18 inches high, re- quires no in-taking. Second Early. Excellent quality. 25 cents per packet, I packets $1.55. Illisss Everhearing Pcn.A perpetual bearer yield- ing a full crap until frost; an excellent late varIety, to to 21 Incites high, reqttires no brttotting. Pena 1 1.2 inches in circumference. lnttstensely productive. 25 cettis per packet, 6 packrts Sitts. Illissa American Wander.The beot and earliest variety growit. very dwarf, exceilettt havoc. 20 cents per pkt., 40 cents perpint, 15 rents per cittart, lost-laid. N. BThese ti~ee-varietico will give you pt.ao through ths entire aeooott until frost. American Champian Watermelan...Tke beot eotiitg sod best sttippiitg otelon grown. More productive Ibon any other sort. 25 cents per packet, 6 packets $t.to. Cardinni Tu.nata.llandoosnest variety grown; brit- itant catdinal rotor ittoide ttttd ottt, no green core, and few seeds; enrtv oolid. ettod keeper. 25re;ttoperpacket, 1 packets $t.oa. ~Vhite Plume Celery.Ttte osoot ornamental and esairot voriety grown, rcsisstrtnsr nobattking to blanch. crisp, solid atti nttity. 55 cento perpacket. Goiden Heart Lettuce.Heads large, firm att,l solid, with golden yellow r itesri; stands tot weatiter wonderfully; very bttndosttte, crisp ~ sod brittle. Ii rents per pocket, 1 Totekets *1.00. Orange Creama Muskmelan.Deep saltoon color, of excett ni itavor, very aromatic; 25 cettis per packet, I packets ~t.so. Early Genesee Sweet Carn.Exirx early, soperior qostity ; roes large ; very productive, 23 cents icr packet, 5 p eketo $1.00. ~One packet af each of the above, scesootiog to Su.42. and Gardeners iland hook tcllltsg how to pisut them, for $1.ios Order NO~V std bars ott hood witen yott w~t is pient. For cotstplele Lot, see ~Bilsss Illustrated Naweity List fur 5S84. which cotstains description of all the ns~s~est sod chaiccat Fluwers, Vs~grt4les, Cereals, Fr,sits, Plants, & c.. & c. Mailed to alt free. ~Blisss Gardeners hand Itank far 1884. eon tstt,s 158 paces, 555 itlsstratisns, sttd a Itesoutiful col. aced plate of flowers, it tells WIIAf, WHEN, ottd tIOW to pia,tt, and is futi of i,tfsrmstisn ttsol,txhte ts alt interested it gsrdening. Stalled for 0 cettlo to cover postage. B. K. BLISS & SONS, 34 Barclay Street, New York. 4 PEARLS WIE MOUTH (63) EUROPE EDUCATIONAL J. & iR. LAMB, EXCURBIONS ~D Carmilie Street. 22A Cenddning nt~eqnsllcd advantages Sixth Ave. cars pass the door. ~JU Scpd 1c~ T)~ ~erirtire Ciicrlrr, Free. Fmsfcr early. F. TOUBJEE, Franklin Sq., Boston B A N N E R S IN SILK, NEW DESIGNS. CHURCH F URN ITURE SEND FOR HAND BOOK BY MAIL. SKIN HUMORS CAN BE CURED BY ULENNS SULPHUR SOAP. SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 1(3, 1883. Mr. C. N. Grittenton: DEAR Sm: I wish to call your attention to the good your Sulphur Soap has done me. For nearly fourteen years I have been trounled with a skin humor resembling salt rheum. I have spent nearly a small fortune for doctors and medicine, but with only tempcrary relief. I commenced using your Glenns Sulphur Soap nearly two years agoused It In baths and as a toilet soap daily. My skin is now as clear as an infants~ and no one would be able to tell that I ever had a skin complaint. I would not he Beauty and Fragance without the soap if it cost five times the amount. Yours respectfully. M. H. MORRIS. Are communicated to the mouth by Lica HOUSE. San Francieco. Cal. The above testimonial is indisputable evidence SOZ ODONT that Gl.~nns Sulphur Soap will eliminate poison- ous Skin Diseases WHEN ALL OTHER MEAN5 HAVE FAILED. To this fact thousands have testified; and toat it will banisb lesser afflictions, such as which renders the teeth pearly white, the gums common PIMPLEs, ERUPTION5 and 5OREs, and rosy, and the breath sweet. By those who have keep the skin clear and beautiful. is abso- used it, it is regarded as an indispensable adjunct lutely certain. For this reason ladies whose complexions have been improved by the use of of the toilet. It thoroughly removes tartar from this soap ~csw MAKE IT A CONSTANT TOILST AP- the teeth, without injuring the enamel. pENPAOE. The genuine always beaus the name of C. N. CRITTENTON, 115 Fulton street, New York, sole proprietor. For sale by all druggists S 0 L D B Y D R U G G I S T S~ or mailed to any address on receipt of 30 cents I in stamps, or three cakes for 75 cents. For 1881 Is an Elegant Book of 150 Pages. 3 Colored Plates of FLOWER ~ and Vegetables, and more than 1000 Illustra- tions of the choicest Flowers, Plants and VEGETABl~E~, and Directiotus for Growing. it is hassdsouoe enouTh for the Center Table or a Holiday Present. Send on your usame ansi Postoffice address, ~vith 10 cents, and we will send you a copy, post-paid. This is not a quarter of its cost. It is printed in boIls English and German. If you afterwards order seeds deduct the 10 cents. VIIIKS SEEDS ARE THE BEST IN THE WORLD. The Fu.oaALGuIDE will tell how 10 get and grow thesst. VICKS Illustrated Monthly Magozine, 12 Pages, a Colored Plate in every number an(l ussany fine Engravistgs. Price $1.23 a ear; Five Copies for $3. Specimen nusn- bers sent for 10 cents; I trial copies 23 cts. Address, JAMES VICK, Rochester, N. Y. (64) Among the many family papers of the land. we do not believe one can be found better suited for general reading than this. It has twelve pages weekly, filled with the finest cuts and most attractive reading matter, printed on nice paper. In a single year it makes a volume of over 600 pages, with 400 cuts, giving able editorials on current topics, best original matter, notes on the Sunday School Lessons, together with stories from the best English and American authors. $2 50 ?E1~ yErn~, ~O~Th~ID. Send for Sample Copy free, if you wish to see it. * IIIustr~.ted Ohristi& r~ hWPCC1~Iy, ~

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The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 3 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York Mar 1884 0038 003
The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 3, miscellaneous front pages 64A-64B

MAJ~CJ{, 1884. 7 6) __ nhaip 3 & t,~e ~ I ___________ PAGE. E1)ITORIAL. jOUR MONTHS OUR SUNDAY-SCHO~L WORK.. ... ONE WAY TO DC) ITPARAGRAPHS 66 AN OPEN LETTER 67 MRS. VALERIA G. STONF 69 J3ENEFACTIONS 70 GENERAL NOTE~. AFRICA, INDIANS, CIII NESE 71 SUNDAY-SCHOOL FLOWER MISSION (cut)... 73 THE SOUTH. SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK IX ALABAMA 74 FISK UNIVERSITYTHE SABBATH-SCHOOL. 75 SUNDAY-SCHOOLS IN THE MOUNTAINS OF KENTUCKY 76 PHASE-S OF SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK IN LEXAS . 78 PAGE. Vi i:W NEAR PALESTINE, TEXAS (cut). .. . 79 BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. REPORT OF SPNDAY-ScHooL WORK BY LADY MwsIoNAUES So THE INDIANS. StTNI)Ay..Sc~IoOI. Woiu~ AMONG THE DA KOTAS 83 THE CHINESE. CHINESE CHILD REX 1)RESSEJ) lN WINTER CLOTHING (Cut). - 84 CHINESE SUNDAY-Sc-IoOLS 84 CHILDRENS PAGE. THEN AND Now 86 RECEIPTS NEW YORK: PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. Rooms, 56 Reade Street. Price ~oCents a Year, in Advance. Entered at the Post-Oftice at New York, N. Y.. as second-class matter. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. PRESIDENT. Hon. WM. B. WASHBURN, LL.D., Mass. CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.- -REV. M. E. STRIEMY. D. D., 56 Reade Street, W~ Y. ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COLLECTION.REV. JAMES POWELL, 56 Reade Street, N. Y. TREASURERH. W. HUBBARD, Esq., 56 Reade Street~ N. Y~ AUDITORS.WM. A. NASH, W. H. ROGERS. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. JOHN H. WASHBURN, Chairman; A. P. FOSTER, Secretary; L~i~ ABBOTT, A. S. BARNES, J. U. DANFORTE, CLINTON B. FISK, S. B. HALLIDAY, EDWARD HAWES~SAMUEL HOLMES. CHARLES A. HULL, SAMUEL S. MARPLE5, CISARLES L. MEAD, S. H. VIAGIN, WM. H. WARD, J. L. WITHROW. DISTRICT SECRETARIES. Rev. C. L. WOODWORTE. D.D., Boston. Rev. G. D. PIKE, D.D., New York. ChiCOgo. COMMUNICATIONS relating to the work of the ASSociation may be addressed to the Corresponding Secretary; those relating to the collecting fields, to the District Secretaries; letters for the Editor of the 4mkrican ittissionary. to ReV. G. D. Pike, D. D., at the New York Office; letters for the Bureau o~oman s Work, to Miss D. E. Emerron, at the New York Office. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Ireasurer, 56 Reade Street, New York, or, when more con- Veuient, to either of the Branch 0 tffoes, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street, Chicago, Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constituees a Life Member. FORM OF A BEQUEST. 1 BEQUATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay the same In days after my decease to the person who, when the same is payarde, shall act as Treasuret~ of the American Missionary Associ .tion, of New York City. to be applied, under the direction of the Executive Committee of the Association, to its charitable uses and purposes. The Will should be attested by three wItnesses PLAIN FACTS FOR PLAIN FOLKS. ii HORSFORDS ACID PHOSPHATE. (LIQUID.) FOR DYSPEPSIA, MENTAL AND PH~SICAL EXRAUe~TION. NERVOUSt~EQS. DI- MINISHED VITALITY, URINARY DTFFICULT[ES, ETJ. PREPARED AccORDING TO THE DIRECTION OF Prof. N. N. Uorstord, of Cambridge, Mass. We propose in the coming issues of this journal to - talk svith the readers in plain ever~day style about the i\tanhattan Life Insurance Company with a vita Lu business. Perhaps the language of our statement, coinmer- cial as it is, needs simplifying for a large cinas of practical men who are not familiar ~vith financial iitcrature and lore, but are still good risks, aswe say These talks svith you svill he short, and, we truat, sharp. We will not tire you. Please look for them There seems to be no difference of opiuilon In in each lame and read them, and, as preparatory, ~ high medical authority of the value of phos would suggest that you send for our statement iiii ohoric acid, and no preparation ha~ever been affered to the public which seems ta so happily mediately. meet the general want as this. It Is not uauseous, but agreeable to the taste. AKIIJArFUi9Atd No danger can attend its use. M ~ I-;r P uirr Its action will harmomEe with such stImulants ss are necessary to take. It makes a delicious drink with water and Insurance New sugar only. Co., York. Prices reasonable. Pamphlet gIving further particulars mailed free on application. MANUFACTURED BY THE RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I., AND ~OR SALi BY ALL IGI$T8. 156 & 158 Broadwy. HENRY STOKES, President. I J. L. HALSEY, ist Vice-P. H. V. WEMPLE, Sec v. H. B. STOKES, 2d Vice-PD S. N. STEBsINS, Acty

Four Months Editorial 65

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. XOL. XXXVIII. MARCH, 1884. No. 3. fAmcvic~ux ~tissii~ixir~ s~yci~dityn, FOUR MONTHS. During the four months of the fiscal year, closing Jan. 31, our receipts from collections and donations have amounted to $69,941.52. The collec- tions and donations for the same months last year were $60,413.28, show- mug an increase for this year of $9,528.24. The legacies for these months last year were 25,141.83, while for this year they have been $9,809.35 a decrease of 15,332.48. The total receipts thus far this year in collec- tions, donations and legacies have been $79,750.87, against $85,555.11 for the same perioda decrease of $5,804.24. We urge the friends of this Association to study these figures, in view of the enlarged work upon which we have entered for the present year. We were saved last year from a heavy debt by an unusually large legacy. We have no reason to .exl)ect such help to our treasury this year, and must depend upon larger rcceipts from the living. May we not hope for increased endeavors on the l)alt of. churches, Sabbath-schools, missionary societies and individ- ual~ to render such proIfl~)t and efficient assistance as will enable us to complete tIme years work without financia.l embarrassment? OUR SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK. The most fruitful work in the Lords vineyard is among the children. The A. M. A. reports 12,813 Sabbath-school scholars connected with its missions among the Indians, the Chinese and the poor of the South. These pupils were in charge of missionaries and received such benefits as accrued from association with our church and school work. In this re- spect they have had great advantages over pupils gathered hastily, cared for temporarily, and then given over to such local assistance as is found available. Sabbath-school work is a part of the A. M. A. system of building up Christian character. We have lady missionaries going from house to

Our Sunday-School Work Editorial 65-66

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. XOL. XXXVIII. MARCH, 1884. No. 3. fAmcvic~ux ~tissii~ixir~ s~yci~dityn, FOUR MONTHS. During the four months of the fiscal year, closing Jan. 31, our receipts from collections and donations have amounted to $69,941.52. The collec- tions and donations for the same months last year were $60,413.28, show- mug an increase for this year of $9,528.24. The legacies for these months last year were 25,141.83, while for this year they have been $9,809.35 a decrease of 15,332.48. The total receipts thus far this year in collec- tions, donations and legacies have been $79,750.87, against $85,555.11 for the same perioda decrease of $5,804.24. We urge the friends of this Association to study these figures, in view of the enlarged work upon which we have entered for the present year. We were saved last year from a heavy debt by an unusually large legacy. We have no reason to .exl)ect such help to our treasury this year, and must depend upon larger rcceipts from the living. May we not hope for increased endeavors on the l)alt of. churches, Sabbath-schools, missionary societies and individ- ual~ to render such proIfl~)t and efficient assistance as will enable us to complete tIme years work without financia.l embarrassment? OUR SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK. The most fruitful work in the Lords vineyard is among the children. The A. M. A. reports 12,813 Sabbath-school scholars connected with its missions among the Indians, the Chinese and the poor of the South. These pupils were in charge of missionaries and received such benefits as accrued from association with our church and school work. In this re- spect they have had great advantages over pupils gathered hastily, cared for temporarily, and then given over to such local assistance as is found available. Sabbath-school work is a part of the A. M. A. system of building up Christian character. We have lady missionaries going from house to One Way to Do itParagraphs. house, day-schools, industrial schools, prayer meetings, missionary meet- ings, theological schools, churches and Sunday-schools. We deem all these branch~s of our work of vital importance for mind-building and soul-culture. We leave no essential part of religious training to be sup- plied by the possibilities of other agencies. We try to make our work complete, and believe that our success justifies our methods. We give, in this number of the MISSIONARY, communications relating to Sunday-school work from the wide field we occupy, and invite attention to the facts and suggestions they contain. We trust these reports will stimulate the Sabbath-schools of the North connected with the Congre- gational churches to make at least one contribution annually to aid us in enlarging and maintaining our efforts in this direction. ONE WAY TO DO IT. Pastors often ask, How can the claims of our benevolent societies be best l)rOught before the churches? A prominent minister in Ohio has had the following notice prepared, a copy of which he proposes to send each life member in his parish. You are a life member in the American Missionary Association. Our next church collection for this object will be taken on the third Sunday of March. The prayer meeting which follows the first Sunday of March will have this work for its topic, and will, as you see, precede the collection. You doubtless keep informed of this work from the pamphlets you receive, and also from the frequent notices in the weekly Congregational papers. Please circulate judiciously among members of our congregation any reading matter which you may find bearing upon the cause. Will you please, also, give some items of information at that prayer meeting, and endeavor to increase the interest in, and our contributions for, this branch of the Masters work ? OUR Treasurer informs us that the subscriptions received in the month of January for the AMERICAN MISSIONARY exceed in amount the receipts of any previous month for the same purpose. This is a move in the right direction. We thank our friends for it, and trust that the number of subscribers may multiply until the amount received will cover the cost of publication. The price of the MISSIONARY is fifty cents. A NEW Concert Exercise has just been printed at the Boston office. It can be obtained without charge by applying to Rev. C. L. Woodworth, 21 Congregational House, Boston, or to any of the A. M. A. offices. In ~ ~r~]ying, call for New Series, No. 1.

One Way to do It Editorial 66

One Way to Do itParagraphs. house, day-schools, industrial schools, prayer meetings, missionary meet- ings, theological schools, churches and Sunday-schools. We deem all these branch~s of our work of vital importance for mind-building and soul-culture. We leave no essential part of religious training to be sup- plied by the possibilities of other agencies. We try to make our work complete, and believe that our success justifies our methods. We give, in this number of the MISSIONARY, communications relating to Sunday-school work from the wide field we occupy, and invite attention to the facts and suggestions they contain. We trust these reports will stimulate the Sabbath-schools of the North connected with the Congre- gational churches to make at least one contribution annually to aid us in enlarging and maintaining our efforts in this direction. ONE WAY TO DO IT. Pastors often ask, How can the claims of our benevolent societies be best l)rOught before the churches? A prominent minister in Ohio has had the following notice prepared, a copy of which he proposes to send each life member in his parish. You are a life member in the American Missionary Association. Our next church collection for this object will be taken on the third Sunday of March. The prayer meeting which follows the first Sunday of March will have this work for its topic, and will, as you see, precede the collection. You doubtless keep informed of this work from the pamphlets you receive, and also from the frequent notices in the weekly Congregational papers. Please circulate judiciously among members of our congregation any reading matter which you may find bearing upon the cause. Will you please, also, give some items of information at that prayer meeting, and endeavor to increase the interest in, and our contributions for, this branch of the Masters work ? OUR Treasurer informs us that the subscriptions received in the month of January for the AMERICAN MISSIONARY exceed in amount the receipts of any previous month for the same purpose. This is a move in the right direction. We thank our friends for it, and trust that the number of subscribers may multiply until the amount received will cover the cost of publication. The price of the MISSIONARY is fifty cents. A NEW Concert Exercise has just been printed at the Boston office. It can be obtained without charge by applying to Rev. C. L. Woodworth, 21 Congregational House, Boston, or to any of the A. M. A. offices. In ~ ~r~]ying, call for New Series, No. 1.

Paragraphs Editorial 66-67

One Way to Do itParagraphs. house, day-schools, industrial schools, prayer meetings, missionary meet- ings, theological schools, churches and Sunday-schools. We deem all these branch~s of our work of vital importance for mind-building and soul-culture. We leave no essential part of religious training to be sup- plied by the possibilities of other agencies. We try to make our work complete, and believe that our success justifies our methods. We give, in this number of the MISSIONARY, communications relating to Sunday-school work from the wide field we occupy, and invite attention to the facts and suggestions they contain. We trust these reports will stimulate the Sabbath-schools of the North connected with the Congre- gational churches to make at least one contribution annually to aid us in enlarging and maintaining our efforts in this direction. ONE WAY TO DO IT. Pastors often ask, How can the claims of our benevolent societies be best l)rOught before the churches? A prominent minister in Ohio has had the following notice prepared, a copy of which he proposes to send each life member in his parish. You are a life member in the American Missionary Association. Our next church collection for this object will be taken on the third Sunday of March. The prayer meeting which follows the first Sunday of March will have this work for its topic, and will, as you see, precede the collection. You doubtless keep informed of this work from the pamphlets you receive, and also from the frequent notices in the weekly Congregational papers. Please circulate judiciously among members of our congregation any reading matter which you may find bearing upon the cause. Will you please, also, give some items of information at that prayer meeting, and endeavor to increase the interest in, and our contributions for, this branch of the Masters work ? OUR Treasurer informs us that the subscriptions received in the month of January for the AMERICAN MISSIONARY exceed in amount the receipts of any previous month for the same purpose. This is a move in the right direction. We thank our friends for it, and trust that the number of subscribers may multiply until the amount received will cover the cost of publication. The price of the MISSIONARY is fifty cents. A NEW Concert Exercise has just been printed at the Boston office. It can be obtained without charge by applying to Rev. C. L. Woodworth, 21 Congregational House, Boston, or to any of the A. M. A. offices. In ~ ~r~]ying, call for New Series, No. 1. An Open Letter. 67 AN OPEN LETrER. To the Irzenas of ~ne American Aks8ionary Assocjat~o~. GREETING: The Executive Committee have called me from the Chicago office to the New York office, and assigned me to such service promotive of our cause on the collecting field as I may be able to render. In response to that call I have come, and now beg leave to report myself for duty. I take up the work with a profound conviction that unless I have the co-operation of the pastors and the churches it will be a failure. My definition of co-operation includes criticism. Three things just now are among the meces8ities.~ 1. First, and perhaps most important, is the necessity of getting fuller information respecting our work before the people. What is the American iMissionarv Association? What is it doing? What ought it to be doing? How few can answer! Sermons are preached, special appeals are made in the papers, pamphlets and circulars are issued. We send out monthly over twenty thousand copies of THE AMER WAN MISSIONARY, and still there is a dearth of knowledge. Mis- sionary news is not popular. How to make it popular is confessed to be a hard problem by all who have tried to solve it. Yet it will not do to cease printing. It has been computed that for every man killed in war twenty tons of lead have been used, but on this account there is no thought of giving up the use of lead. On the con- trary, such improvement in gunnery is sought that more can be used. Breech-loaders, repeaters and mitrailleuses supersede the old arms, for this, among other reasons, because they use more ammunition. I have noticed, that during political campaigns, documents are not only sent through the mails, but passed round by those receiving them to be read by others. Nor is this so much because the documents are interesting as because of a purpose to reach and influence a large number of peo. pie. Should not such a cause as ours be as dear to the hearts of Christians as the mere success of party is to the politician? Lack of interest in the work is the reason why our treasury runs low, a;jd lack of interest is, in the vast majority of cases, based on lack of knowledge. I earnestly request your co-operation in getting information respecting our work more widely diffused among the people. 2. The necessity of keeping constantly before our friends the object that as an organization we have set out to accomplish. Salvation of the lost, rescue of the perishing, elevation of the degraded, enlightenment of the ignorant, the establishment of righteous- ness and truth and justice in the landthese are our aims. Evermore they should be held where, amid all perturbations, they shall be seen and their claim felt. When a vessel is in a storm, there is special need of

An Open Letter Editorial 67-69

An Open Letter. 67 AN OPEN LETrER. To the Irzenas of ~ne American Aks8ionary Assocjat~o~. GREETING: The Executive Committee have called me from the Chicago office to the New York office, and assigned me to such service promotive of our cause on the collecting field as I may be able to render. In response to that call I have come, and now beg leave to report myself for duty. I take up the work with a profound conviction that unless I have the co-operation of the pastors and the churches it will be a failure. My definition of co-operation includes criticism. Three things just now are among the meces8ities.~ 1. First, and perhaps most important, is the necessity of getting fuller information respecting our work before the people. What is the American iMissionarv Association? What is it doing? What ought it to be doing? How few can answer! Sermons are preached, special appeals are made in the papers, pamphlets and circulars are issued. We send out monthly over twenty thousand copies of THE AMER WAN MISSIONARY, and still there is a dearth of knowledge. Mis- sionary news is not popular. How to make it popular is confessed to be a hard problem by all who have tried to solve it. Yet it will not do to cease printing. It has been computed that for every man killed in war twenty tons of lead have been used, but on this account there is no thought of giving up the use of lead. On the con- trary, such improvement in gunnery is sought that more can be used. Breech-loaders, repeaters and mitrailleuses supersede the old arms, for this, among other reasons, because they use more ammunition. I have noticed, that during political campaigns, documents are not only sent through the mails, but passed round by those receiving them to be read by others. Nor is this so much because the documents are interesting as because of a purpose to reach and influence a large number of peo. pie. Should not such a cause as ours be as dear to the hearts of Christians as the mere success of party is to the politician? Lack of interest in the work is the reason why our treasury runs low, a;jd lack of interest is, in the vast majority of cases, based on lack of knowledge. I earnestly request your co-operation in getting information respecting our work more widely diffused among the people. 2. The necessity of keeping constantly before our friends the object that as an organization we have set out to accomplish. Salvation of the lost, rescue of the perishing, elevation of the degraded, enlightenment of the ignorant, the establishment of righteous- ness and truth and justice in the landthese are our aims. Evermore they should be held where, amid all perturbations, they shall be seen and their claim felt. When a vessel is in a storm, there is special need of 68 An Open Letter. steadiness at the helm and watchfulness at the compass. Careless steering will not only Jose the course ; it may at such a time cause the destruction of the ship and the loss of all on board. Storms are always dangerous; but they clarify, purify and cleanse the atmosphere. Just here is the danger public confidence in benevolent societies is sensitive. A little thing may disturb it, especially in time of controversy. Disturbance is followed by a withholding of contributions ; and then what? Violations of contracts solemnly made, abandonment of mission stations, discharge of missionaries without pecuniary means to meet their obligations; in other words, the organization is compelled to do a mons- trous wrong because controversy has been allowed to obscure the aims and conceal the actual necessities of the work. What I have in mind is to indicate this danger, and to beg of our friends that they guard most carefully against it. Let us have confidence in the truth, and, while we freely discuss questions pertaining to mere polity, let us see to it that during the pendency of such discussions no abatement is suffered in the ardor or efficiency with which we support the work and the workers on the field. I do most earnestly seek your co-operation to secure this. 3. The necessity of steadfastly standing by work to which we are already committed. Our Lord, in singling out the man unfit for the kingdom of heaven, portrays him as having put his hand to the plow and turned back. The truth embodied applies to institutions as well as individuals. Work begun, if a needed work, should be carried through. To launch an enter- prise and then leave it unsupported, is an absolute waste of power. It is a poor excuse to say that the energy has been given to an equally worthy object. God does not call us to do all the work there is to be done. He calls us to do our part. Worthy objectspressingly worthy objectsare as numerous as human wants. To help another man pay his debts, while I leave my own unpaid, may make me appear generous in the eyes of him whom I have helped, but it will be very difficult to make my unpaid creditor see that I am just. Claims that are unquestionably worthy come along and ask our churches to take them up, or, finding their way to the sympathies of individuals, appeal for relief. They are heard and responded to, and, if no detriment is done ability to care for work already on hand, it is well and praiseworthy ; but if, when the time comes to make offerings for existing work, the drafts made to help specials cut into the contributions, the specials may indeed have reason to thank us, but the regular work must suffer. It is with great reluctance I dwell on this point, for I know how urgent and worthy some of these claims are ; but the evil is so far-reaching and so serious when a great missionary organization has to face retrenchment or debt, that I feel justified in asking our friends to give it a special thought. Jfrs. Valeria 6~. Stone. 69 In conclusion, the exigent demands of the work intensify my appeal for your co-operatiou. These demands are simply bewildering, they are so many and so urgent. r1~l~e Finance Committee at our last annual meeting reported that this year the work already in hand called for not less than $365,000 ! A thousand dollars a day! This report was made after a. careful survey of the whole field as at present occupied. But enlargement is called for. We should have not less than $10,00o for our Chinese missions; not less than $50,000 for our Indian missions; not less than $50,000 for special missions among the negroes; not less than $50,000 for work among the poor whites; not less than $100,000 for new churches and schools at various points where magnificent openings invite us to enter. Each year brings additional demands. There are more people whom we can reach. We need increased agencies with which to reach them. The Christian alumni of our schools, nearly all of them teachers or preachers, are every year becoming a stronger force. Imbued with the missionary spirit, they are sending back others in ever-increasing numbers to the institutions whence they went forth. Our churches multiply and new fields open for occupancy. Calls for enlargement pour in from all directions, and many of them are such ~s cannot well be refused. May I not rely upon you for co-operation? It is the Macedonian cry. Your servant for the works sake, _________________ JAMES POWELL. MRS. VALERIA G. STONE. We have made frequent mention of our indebtedness to Mrs. Stone in these pages, and now she is gone, a tribute to her memory is a grateful privilege. She died at Malden, Mass., Jan. 15, in the 82d year ~of her age. At the death of her husband, which occurred in the summer of 1878, she was left with a fortune amounting to about two million dollars. Her will had been made. She was upward of seventy-five, and if shehad been like most people would have spent her days in rest and quiet. With rare wisdom and liberality, however, she determined to be her own executor and distributed the greater part of her wealth for educational purposes in a few months after it came into her possession. This use of her property was a voluntary act on her part. The bene- factions of Mrs. Stone in some particulars have placed her in the front rank, if not at the front, of American philanthropists. But few, if any, possessing such vast wealth have given away so large a proportion of it during such brief period. By disposing of her property in this way rather than by bequests, the money was put to immediate use for Christ. The wisdom of Mrs. Stone in this respect is worthy of the imita- tion of all who desire that their wealth shall do the utmost for charitable objects.

Mrs. Valeria G. Stone Editorial 69-70

Jfrs. Valeria 6~. Stone. 69 In conclusion, the exigent demands of the work intensify my appeal for your co-operatiou. These demands are simply bewildering, they are so many and so urgent. r1~l~e Finance Committee at our last annual meeting reported that this year the work already in hand called for not less than $365,000 ! A thousand dollars a day! This report was made after a. careful survey of the whole field as at present occupied. But enlargement is called for. We should have not less than $10,00o for our Chinese missions; not less than $50,000 for our Indian missions; not less than $50,000 for special missions among the negroes; not less than $50,000 for work among the poor whites; not less than $100,000 for new churches and schools at various points where magnificent openings invite us to enter. Each year brings additional demands. There are more people whom we can reach. We need increased agencies with which to reach them. The Christian alumni of our schools, nearly all of them teachers or preachers, are every year becoming a stronger force. Imbued with the missionary spirit, they are sending back others in ever-increasing numbers to the institutions whence they went forth. Our churches multiply and new fields open for occupancy. Calls for enlargement pour in from all directions, and many of them are such ~s cannot well be refused. May I not rely upon you for co-operation? It is the Macedonian cry. Your servant for the works sake, _________________ JAMES POWELL. MRS. VALERIA G. STONE. We have made frequent mention of our indebtedness to Mrs. Stone in these pages, and now she is gone, a tribute to her memory is a grateful privilege. She died at Malden, Mass., Jan. 15, in the 82d year ~of her age. At the death of her husband, which occurred in the summer of 1878, she was left with a fortune amounting to about two million dollars. Her will had been made. She was upward of seventy-five, and if shehad been like most people would have spent her days in rest and quiet. With rare wisdom and liberality, however, she determined to be her own executor and distributed the greater part of her wealth for educational purposes in a few months after it came into her possession. This use of her property was a voluntary act on her part. The bene- factions of Mrs. Stone in some particulars have placed her in the front rank, if not at the front, of American philanthropists. But few, if any, possessing such vast wealth have given away so large a proportion of it during such brief period. By disposing of her property in this way rather than by bequests, the money was put to immediate use for Christ. The wisdom of Mrs. Stone in this respect is worthy of the imita- tion of all who desire that their wealth shall do the utmost for charitable objects. 70 Benefit etions. Mrs. Stone was also distinguished for the comprehensiveness of her plans for rendering permanent assistance to needy institutions and needy people. She did not dispose of her wealth by dividing it among a few objects. Through the advice and help of her relative, Rev. W. W Wilicox, D.D., the wants of a large number were carefully and prayer- fully considered, and her gifts made not only with rare discernment, but placed where their influence will be felt for many years. We do not recall another instance where one person rendered so substantial assist- ance to so many schools and colleges and other useful institutions in the same length of time in the history of our country. To this may be added the singularity of her gifts, to poor ministers, to widows in want, and t~ persons liable to lose their houses by foreclosure of mortgage. Her devotion to the colored people was attested by her gifts to Fisk, Atlanta, Howard and Straight Universities as well as to Hampton, Berea and Talladega. She has gone, but her name will not perish or her example cease to exert a helpful influence for generations. May the Lord raise up many others like her ai~d her chief adviser. BENEFACTION S. The will of Charles W. Freeland bequeathed $25,000 to the city of Worcester, in trust for the Worcester Public Library. W. 0. Grover, of Boston, who had before given $2,000 to Roanoke College, Va., recently sent his check for $3,000 to be applied to the en- dowment. The will of Ralph Sallen bequeaths $80,000 to St. Louis institutions, $40,000 of which is to the Manual Training School of Washington Uni.~ versity. Mr. A. E. Kent, of San Francisco, who three years ago presented Yale with $50,000 for the erection of a chemical laboratory for the Academical Department, has added $25,000 to his original gift. The Treasurer of Boston University has received the sum of forty thou- sand dollars, a gift from the lion. Alden Speare, for the endowment of a chair in the College of Liberal Arts, to be called, in memory of a beloved daughter, the Emma Speare Huntington Professorship. At a meeting of the corporators and trustees of the new Western The ological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal church, which is to be built in Chicago, the gifts of land on Washington Boulevard and $200,000 in money by Dr. Tolman Wheeler were formally accepted. There et~ no kinds of gifts for Educational institutions not needfalfor the development of christian civilization at the South; and appeals for help to make such institutions jflcient and permanent, are of urgent and supreme importan ee.

Benefactions Editorial 70-71

70 Benefit etions. Mrs. Stone was also distinguished for the comprehensiveness of her plans for rendering permanent assistance to needy institutions and needy people. She did not dispose of her wealth by dividing it among a few objects. Through the advice and help of her relative, Rev. W. W Wilicox, D.D., the wants of a large number were carefully and prayer- fully considered, and her gifts made not only with rare discernment, but placed where their influence will be felt for many years. We do not recall another instance where one person rendered so substantial assist- ance to so many schools and colleges and other useful institutions in the same length of time in the history of our country. To this may be added the singularity of her gifts, to poor ministers, to widows in want, and t~ persons liable to lose their houses by foreclosure of mortgage. Her devotion to the colored people was attested by her gifts to Fisk, Atlanta, Howard and Straight Universities as well as to Hampton, Berea and Talladega. She has gone, but her name will not perish or her example cease to exert a helpful influence for generations. May the Lord raise up many others like her ai~d her chief adviser. BENEFACTION S. The will of Charles W. Freeland bequeathed $25,000 to the city of Worcester, in trust for the Worcester Public Library. W. 0. Grover, of Boston, who had before given $2,000 to Roanoke College, Va., recently sent his check for $3,000 to be applied to the en- dowment. The will of Ralph Sallen bequeaths $80,000 to St. Louis institutions, $40,000 of which is to the Manual Training School of Washington Uni.~ versity. Mr. A. E. Kent, of San Francisco, who three years ago presented Yale with $50,000 for the erection of a chemical laboratory for the Academical Department, has added $25,000 to his original gift. The Treasurer of Boston University has received the sum of forty thou- sand dollars, a gift from the lion. Alden Speare, for the endowment of a chair in the College of Liberal Arts, to be called, in memory of a beloved daughter, the Emma Speare Huntington Professorship. At a meeting of the corporators and trustees of the new Western The ological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal church, which is to be built in Chicago, the gifts of land on Washington Boulevard and $200,000 in money by Dr. Tolman Wheeler were formally accepted. There et~ no kinds of gifts for Educational institutions not needfalfor the development of christian civilization at the South; and appeals for help to make such institutions jflcient and permanent, are of urgent and supreme importan ee. General Notes. 71 GENERAL NOTES. AFRICA. The medical missionaries Jacques and Morin will soon start for St. Louis. Nubar Pacha, an Armenian Christian, became Prime Minister of Egypt on January 8. He is fifty-four years of age and was educated in Eng- land. Captain Vincent Ferrario,who started with the expedition of Matteucci into Abyssinia, will return with Captain Martini, the old companion of Antinori, to the Choa. The affairs of the Committee of Labor of the Upper Congo have taken on such development that the administration has resolved upon sending out a new expedition each month. H. H. Johnston is preparing to return to the Congo,whence he will pro- ceed to the mouth of the Arouimi. From thence he will explore this great river and the neighboring territory of the great lake, newly discovered, as far as the basin of the Upper Nile. Some villages of Foutah, having at their head Chief Abdoul, sought to oppose the passage of the boats for supplies for the Upper Senegal, but this attempt did not succeed. Missionary societies, philanthropic associations and the Chambers of Commerce of London and Manchester and the Chamber of Commerce of Glasgow, have demanded from the Foreign Office the institution of an international commission to assure the free navigation of the Congo for all nations. At the same time that Dr. Holub left Vienna to visit Southern Africa, Dr. J. Chavanne, well-known by his learned st udies upon the African waters and mountains, went to Brussels to enter the service o f the Com- mittee of Labor of the Upper Congo. THE INDIANS. Four hundred Winnebago Indians, now upon their reservation in Ne- vada, have petitioned the Secretary of the Interior to allot to them lands in severalty so that they may acquire the rights of citizenship. Accounts published by the Government of Canada state that there are at the present time, 105,000 Indians still living within the Dominion. Quebec contains 11,000 ; Ontario,17,ooo; British Columbia, 35,000 ; and Manitoba and the Great Northwest, 3~,000. There are living on reserved land 81,633 Indians, peacefully cultivating 67,500 acres of land, and own- ing a stock of 14,955 horses, 5,768 cows, 1,552 oxen, 2,000 shcep, 6,813 pigs and other animals.

General Notes: Africa, Indians, Chinese Editorial 71-74

General Notes. 71 GENERAL NOTES. AFRICA. The medical missionaries Jacques and Morin will soon start for St. Louis. Nubar Pacha, an Armenian Christian, became Prime Minister of Egypt on January 8. He is fifty-four years of age and was educated in Eng- land. Captain Vincent Ferrario,who started with the expedition of Matteucci into Abyssinia, will return with Captain Martini, the old companion of Antinori, to the Choa. The affairs of the Committee of Labor of the Upper Congo have taken on such development that the administration has resolved upon sending out a new expedition each month. H. H. Johnston is preparing to return to the Congo,whence he will pro- ceed to the mouth of the Arouimi. From thence he will explore this great river and the neighboring territory of the great lake, newly discovered, as far as the basin of the Upper Nile. Some villages of Foutah, having at their head Chief Abdoul, sought to oppose the passage of the boats for supplies for the Upper Senegal, but this attempt did not succeed. Missionary societies, philanthropic associations and the Chambers of Commerce of London and Manchester and the Chamber of Commerce of Glasgow, have demanded from the Foreign Office the institution of an international commission to assure the free navigation of the Congo for all nations. At the same time that Dr. Holub left Vienna to visit Southern Africa, Dr. J. Chavanne, well-known by his learned st udies upon the African waters and mountains, went to Brussels to enter the service o f the Com- mittee of Labor of the Upper Congo. THE INDIANS. Four hundred Winnebago Indians, now upon their reservation in Ne- vada, have petitioned the Secretary of the Interior to allot to them lands in severalty so that they may acquire the rights of citizenship. Accounts published by the Government of Canada state that there are at the present time, 105,000 Indians still living within the Dominion. Quebec contains 11,000 ; Ontario,17,ooo; British Columbia, 35,000 ; and Manitoba and the Great Northwest, 3~,000. There are living on reserved land 81,633 Indians, peacefully cultivating 67,500 acres of land, and own- ing a stock of 14,955 horses, 5,768 cows, 1,552 oxen, 2,000 shcep, 6,813 pigs and other animals. 72 Gei~eral Notes. Forty Chippewa Indian Children from D. T. have been placed by the Roman Catholics in school ; the girls in the convent school of the Good Shepherj at Milwaukee, and the boys in the industrial school of the Christian Brothers at Desplaines, 15 miles northwest from Chicago. According to Secretary Teller, a perfect indifference has been main- tained about pa~ ing debts under Indian treaties, and altogether the debts on that score will aggregate $5,000,000, over $1,oO,OOo of that amount being owed to the Sioux. The Government agreed to support a school for every thirty children, to give every family a yoke of oxen, a cow and $100 worth of tools, all of which has been neglected though they are clearly entitled to it. The family of Indian girls at the Lincoln Institution in Philadelphia has been increased to fifty by the arrival of twenty-seven girls from the training school at Carlisle, Penn. They will be joined by twenty-five more, and this will fill the Philadelphia quota. Among the tribes repre- sented are the Pawnees, Sioux, Cheyennes, Comanches, Diggers, Os ages, Omahas and Delawares. THE CHINESE. Out of the forty-two Chinese girls in Miss Cushmans school at Pekin, thirteen recently joined the church on probation. According to Rev. S. I. Woodbridge, many of the Chinese believe that the sun and moon are husband and wife and that the stars are their children. A missionary of the China Inland Mission, in the province of Kan- suh, says that in Thibetan families every other son is given up to the gods, and is supported by the family. A principal temple has 300 priests; an- other has 100. Rev. G. L. Mackay, of the Canada Presbyterian Mission in For- mosa, has married a Chinese wife and devoted his life to the work of Christianizing the island. In North Formosa there has been, he reports, a remarkable revolt fi-om heathenism. He writes that he is below the mark when he says that upward of 2,000 have thrown their idols away and express a desire to worship the one true God. The teachers of the Chinese Mission Sunday-school of Mount Vernon Church, Boston, gave their sixth annual reception to the pupils and friends of the school, Jan. 14. There were 325 persons present, 104 of whom were Chinainen. For three years past, the numbei- of Chinamen in Boston has been about 400; but the school has gained an average mern- bership of eighty-seven. Sunday, Jan. 4, the attendance was 124. Sunday-School Plower iJfiss ion. 73 PREPARING FOR SUNDAY~SCHOOL FLOWER MISSION. 74 Sunday-School Work in Alabama. TIlE SOUTIIT. REV. JOSEPH E. Roy, D.D., FIELD SUPERINTENDENT. PROF. ALBERT SALISBURY, SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK IN ALABAMA. MISS REBECCA G. JILLSON. The Sunday-school work done by the American Missionary Association through- out the State of Alabama, presents a subject of great interest and importance. The future of the colored race rests with those who are being educated to-day, and along with the training of the mind must go that of the heart and soul. As Talladega College is the centre of education for the colored people in the State, let us see what her influence is, and also something of what has grown out of efforts put forth here. The church at Tailadega has a present membership of one hundred and fifty-six; from her have gone out those who have planted nine other churches in different parts of the State. In connection with all of these are flourishing Sunday-schools, those at Anniston, Shelby Iron Works, Alabama Furnace and Birmingham being especially fruitful fields; at Anniston and Alabama Furnace the school sometimes numbering one hundred and twenty-five. These are as well organized and conducted as any Northern schools, and their superin- tendents have won the respect of the proprietors of the iron furnaces, in the vicinity of which these churches and schools have sprung up. The Sunday-school at Talladega averages one hundred and fifty-nine. The students at the college are obliged to attend its exercises, and the number is. increased by many from outside. There are two childrens classes, each number- ing nearly fifty, while the adult classes average twelve. The monthly concerts are among the most interesting exercises given in the College Chapel. The Class Prayer Meetings, held every Sunday afternoon, give the teacher a hold upon her class that nothing else does. From the Theological Department have graduated thirty students whose work is largely in the State, all of whom are engaged in Sunday-school work. There are at present ten in the Theological Department who are engaged in Sunday-school work in various ways, two of the three who graduate this year having now churches under their care. The third labored during the summer at Mobile. The Sunday-school there increased from 85 to 75 in number, and the church member- ship also increaseda good work was done. Another was at Savannah during the summer. A great deal has been done by the students in the way of mission work, many of the churches and schools which are now self-supporting having grown out of such endeavors. Let us glance for a moment at the work of one of our students as he goes out to take charge of his summer school. He finds himself, perhaps, in a remote country township. and about him fifty or seventy-five children who look up to him for enlightenment on every subject. The week passes by; he finds there is to be no Sunday-school on the Sabbath, and so feels that his work of teaching must go on through the seventh day as well as through the week. He tells the children to come to the school-house on Sunday lnorning, and they come, walking three miles, some of them, blue-back speller~ in hand, havingjittle idea of what the Bible is, or of Sunday other than as a day when there is usually no school. In some places he finds the parents glad to send the children, often coming themselves, for there is preaching service only once a month; other students

Miss Rebecca G. Jillison Jillison, Rebecca G., Miss Sunday-School Work in Alabama The South 74-75

74 Sunday-School Work in Alabama. TIlE SOUTIIT. REV. JOSEPH E. Roy, D.D., FIELD SUPERINTENDENT. PROF. ALBERT SALISBURY, SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK IN ALABAMA. MISS REBECCA G. JILLSON. The Sunday-school work done by the American Missionary Association through- out the State of Alabama, presents a subject of great interest and importance. The future of the colored race rests with those who are being educated to-day, and along with the training of the mind must go that of the heart and soul. As Talladega College is the centre of education for the colored people in the State, let us see what her influence is, and also something of what has grown out of efforts put forth here. The church at Tailadega has a present membership of one hundred and fifty-six; from her have gone out those who have planted nine other churches in different parts of the State. In connection with all of these are flourishing Sunday-schools, those at Anniston, Shelby Iron Works, Alabama Furnace and Birmingham being especially fruitful fields; at Anniston and Alabama Furnace the school sometimes numbering one hundred and twenty-five. These are as well organized and conducted as any Northern schools, and their superin- tendents have won the respect of the proprietors of the iron furnaces, in the vicinity of which these churches and schools have sprung up. The Sunday-school at Talladega averages one hundred and fifty-nine. The students at the college are obliged to attend its exercises, and the number is. increased by many from outside. There are two childrens classes, each number- ing nearly fifty, while the adult classes average twelve. The monthly concerts are among the most interesting exercises given in the College Chapel. The Class Prayer Meetings, held every Sunday afternoon, give the teacher a hold upon her class that nothing else does. From the Theological Department have graduated thirty students whose work is largely in the State, all of whom are engaged in Sunday-school work. There are at present ten in the Theological Department who are engaged in Sunday-school work in various ways, two of the three who graduate this year having now churches under their care. The third labored during the summer at Mobile. The Sunday-school there increased from 85 to 75 in number, and the church member- ship also increaseda good work was done. Another was at Savannah during the summer. A great deal has been done by the students in the way of mission work, many of the churches and schools which are now self-supporting having grown out of such endeavors. Let us glance for a moment at the work of one of our students as he goes out to take charge of his summer school. He finds himself, perhaps, in a remote country township. and about him fifty or seventy-five children who look up to him for enlightenment on every subject. The week passes by; he finds there is to be no Sunday-school on the Sabbath, and so feels that his work of teaching must go on through the seventh day as well as through the week. He tells the children to come to the school-house on Sunday lnorning, and they come, walking three miles, some of them, blue-back speller~ in hand, havingjittle idea of what the Bible is, or of Sunday other than as a day when there is usually no school. In some places he finds the parents glad to send the children, often coming themselves, for there is preaching service only once a month; other students Fisk University The & tbbath-& hool. 75 meet with opposition from those belonging to other churches, and, as one young teacher answered me, because the people dont kiiow what the Bible is, I reckon. One of our pupils reported as his summers work the forming of several Sunday- schools in places i~here there were none. Another held each week a meeting for singing, which was greatly enjoyed by the people. Nearly all of our students who teach, report work done in Sunday-schools, either themselves organizing or leading the school or engaging with those who are already at work. About three years ago a careful estimate was made of the number of former students of the college, who were then engaged in the work of teaching in the State; it was three hundred and eighteen. Not in this State alone, but in Texas, Arkansas, Kentucky, Mississippi and Georgia may be found the outgrowths of work begun at Talla- dega. Of the churches at Montgomery, Mobile, Selma, Marion and Talladega, to which the A. M. A. sends pastors from the North, the Sunday-school work is reported as doing well. What may be said of one is true in great measure of all. At Mont- gomery there are over two hundred in the school, with an attendance in fair weather of one hundred and forty. The collection for December amounted to ten dollars. There was a tree at Christmas with presents for over two hundred. The collection from the Sunday-school at Talladega for the quarter closing the year 1883 amounted to $6.77, which was expended in the purchase of temperance literature, to be distributed in the surrounding country churches; the collection for Jan uary and February is to be sent to the New Morning Star. When we think of the number of those engaged in teaching throughout the State, some estimate can be made of the influence that must be exerted in the cause of temperance and in Sundays-chools. FISK UNIVERSITYTHE SABBATH-SCHOOL. BY PROF. H. S. BENNETT. A visitor to Fisk University would naturally expect to find the Sabbath-school equal in excellence to the other departments of the University. In this expec- tation he will not be disappointedthe Sabbath-school is an important factor in the work of education which is going on. The school is composed of two hun- dred young people of both sexes, intelligent, wide-awake students who have before their minds the purpose of doing something in the world and are reso- lutely preparing themselves for active life. The school is under the manage- inent of Prof. Spence, which is in itself a guarantee that it is ably conducted. He is assisted by a corps of thirteen teacher~~, the faculty of the University. I visited every room in which instruction was going on last Sabbath and found an attentive throng, eagerly asking and answering questions which naturally arose from the consideration of the international lesson of January 27. It is to be remembered that the pupils of this school are almost all engaged in teaching. The University sends out every year more than one hundred and fifty teachers. These go all over the South, teaching their people during vacation. They are taught to work for Christ, that they are only partially educated if they do not become Christians while in school, and that the noblest work a person can engage in is to labor for Christ; hence all, or nearly all, have caught the idea that they must make themselves felt in the Sabbath-schools in the neigh- borhoods to which they go. If they find a school in operation they enter in and teach or superintend a s occasion may require. If there be none, so much the better for them, as they have

Prof. H. S. Bennett Bennett, H. S., Prof. Fisk University--The Sabbath-School The South 75-76

Fisk University The & tbbath-& hool. 75 meet with opposition from those belonging to other churches, and, as one young teacher answered me, because the people dont kiiow what the Bible is, I reckon. One of our pupils reported as his summers work the forming of several Sunday- schools in places i~here there were none. Another held each week a meeting for singing, which was greatly enjoyed by the people. Nearly all of our students who teach, report work done in Sunday-schools, either themselves organizing or leading the school or engaging with those who are already at work. About three years ago a careful estimate was made of the number of former students of the college, who were then engaged in the work of teaching in the State; it was three hundred and eighteen. Not in this State alone, but in Texas, Arkansas, Kentucky, Mississippi and Georgia may be found the outgrowths of work begun at Talla- dega. Of the churches at Montgomery, Mobile, Selma, Marion and Talladega, to which the A. M. A. sends pastors from the North, the Sunday-school work is reported as doing well. What may be said of one is true in great measure of all. At Mont- gomery there are over two hundred in the school, with an attendance in fair weather of one hundred and forty. The collection for December amounted to ten dollars. There was a tree at Christmas with presents for over two hundred. The collection from the Sunday-school at Talladega for the quarter closing the year 1883 amounted to $6.77, which was expended in the purchase of temperance literature, to be distributed in the surrounding country churches; the collection for Jan uary and February is to be sent to the New Morning Star. When we think of the number of those engaged in teaching throughout the State, some estimate can be made of the influence that must be exerted in the cause of temperance and in Sundays-chools. FISK UNIVERSITYTHE SABBATH-SCHOOL. BY PROF. H. S. BENNETT. A visitor to Fisk University would naturally expect to find the Sabbath-school equal in excellence to the other departments of the University. In this expec- tation he will not be disappointedthe Sabbath-school is an important factor in the work of education which is going on. The school is composed of two hun- dred young people of both sexes, intelligent, wide-awake students who have before their minds the purpose of doing something in the world and are reso- lutely preparing themselves for active life. The school is under the manage- inent of Prof. Spence, which is in itself a guarantee that it is ably conducted. He is assisted by a corps of thirteen teacher~~, the faculty of the University. I visited every room in which instruction was going on last Sabbath and found an attentive throng, eagerly asking and answering questions which naturally arose from the consideration of the international lesson of January 27. It is to be remembered that the pupils of this school are almost all engaged in teaching. The University sends out every year more than one hundred and fifty teachers. These go all over the South, teaching their people during vacation. They are taught to work for Christ, that they are only partially educated if they do not become Christians while in school, and that the noblest work a person can engage in is to labor for Christ; hence all, or nearly all, have caught the idea that they must make themselves felt in the Sabbath-schools in the neigh- borhoods to which they go. If they find a school in operation they enter in and teach or superintend a s occasion may require. If there be none, so much the better for them, as they have 76 ASuflday-SChOOlS a fine opportunity to organize one on their own plan and carry out their own ideas. A few days ago, in furtherance of this article, I asked, through the teachers, how many had taught in Sabbath-schoo1~ and under what circumstances. I received a flood of answers, some very brief and others containing an excellent account of the work done. Of the letters written me I inclose one to you that you may have an illustration of the work done. In many of the schools thus taught, revivals of greater or less power frequently occur. Direct appeals to the pupils to become Christians are made, and the way of salvation is wisely and tenderly pointed out. The different denominations among the colored people have felt the quickening power of this new infusion of life blood into their veins. It has been our observa- tion for years that the students of our school are the responsible officersthe secretaries, the librarians, if not the superintendents of the Sabbath schools in which they labor. Not infrequently it has been the case that very few could read or write except those whom we have given them. Fisk University, it is known, is an institution for higher culture, thus when our students go out they carry with them a knowledge which easily puts them even ahead of the minister over the church. With this superior education comes a degree of respect among both white and colored people which is an essential element in their success in teaching both in day and Sabbath-school. By every means the work of educating the colored people goes bravely on. Mr. Bennett. Dear Sir. I conducted Sunday-school in connection with my day- school; taught four months. I began May 1 with 25 pupils, but soon increased to about 50. Had only three Bibles, two Testaments and three song-books to begin with, and no Sunday-school papers. I superintended the work and instructed the Bible class, 10 in number. I soon woke up a good school, and succeeded in securing the attendance of many parents and others who formerly took no interest in Sunday-school work. During the term our library received an addition of five Bibles, eight Testaments and four song-books. We made collections regularly, and had a treasury of $2 when I gave up the work. I held weekly prayer meetings in the day-school. This had a. good effect, as was soon noticeable in the deportment of the entire school. I visited the homes of most of my scholars and the people of my district generally, and was grieved to find so few families with Bibles, or even Testaments, in their houses. I tried to impress the importance of having at least one Bible in a family. I left many of my scholars seeking the Saviour when I came away. The work on the whole was encourag- ing. I have had several letters, from which I learn that the work is still going on, and all want me to come back and serve theni this year. Respectfully, J. P. H. SUNDAY-SCHOOLS IN THE MOUNTAINS OF KENTUCKY. BY PROF. L. V. DODGE. One-third of the State of Kentuckythe eastern partis a mountain region. It embraces about fortycounties, lying upon the upper waters of the Cumberland, Kentucky, Licking and~Big Sandy rivers. The student of our common maps would not suspect that soextensive a district in Kentucky is a succession of moun- tains. This section of country is generally regarded as a poor one, and its inhabi- tants are slightingly spoken of. As regards the land, the valleys often are of extreme fertility, and some of the mountains are productive to the very summits. The

Prof. L. V. Dodge Dodge, L. V., Prof. Sunday-Schools in the Mountains of Kentucky The South 76-78

76 ASuflday-SChOOlS a fine opportunity to organize one on their own plan and carry out their own ideas. A few days ago, in furtherance of this article, I asked, through the teachers, how many had taught in Sabbath-schoo1~ and under what circumstances. I received a flood of answers, some very brief and others containing an excellent account of the work done. Of the letters written me I inclose one to you that you may have an illustration of the work done. In many of the schools thus taught, revivals of greater or less power frequently occur. Direct appeals to the pupils to become Christians are made, and the way of salvation is wisely and tenderly pointed out. The different denominations among the colored people have felt the quickening power of this new infusion of life blood into their veins. It has been our observa- tion for years that the students of our school are the responsible officersthe secretaries, the librarians, if not the superintendents of the Sabbath schools in which they labor. Not infrequently it has been the case that very few could read or write except those whom we have given them. Fisk University, it is known, is an institution for higher culture, thus when our students go out they carry with them a knowledge which easily puts them even ahead of the minister over the church. With this superior education comes a degree of respect among both white and colored people which is an essential element in their success in teaching both in day and Sabbath-school. By every means the work of educating the colored people goes bravely on. Mr. Bennett. Dear Sir. I conducted Sunday-school in connection with my day- school; taught four months. I began May 1 with 25 pupils, but soon increased to about 50. Had only three Bibles, two Testaments and three song-books to begin with, and no Sunday-school papers. I superintended the work and instructed the Bible class, 10 in number. I soon woke up a good school, and succeeded in securing the attendance of many parents and others who formerly took no interest in Sunday-school work. During the term our library received an addition of five Bibles, eight Testaments and four song-books. We made collections regularly, and had a treasury of $2 when I gave up the work. I held weekly prayer meetings in the day-school. This had a. good effect, as was soon noticeable in the deportment of the entire school. I visited the homes of most of my scholars and the people of my district generally, and was grieved to find so few families with Bibles, or even Testaments, in their houses. I tried to impress the importance of having at least one Bible in a family. I left many of my scholars seeking the Saviour when I came away. The work on the whole was encourag- ing. I have had several letters, from which I learn that the work is still going on, and all want me to come back and serve theni this year. Respectfully, J. P. H. SUNDAY-SCHOOLS IN THE MOUNTAINS OF KENTUCKY. BY PROF. L. V. DODGE. One-third of the State of Kentuckythe eastern partis a mountain region. It embraces about fortycounties, lying upon the upper waters of the Cumberland, Kentucky, Licking and~Big Sandy rivers. The student of our common maps would not suspect that soextensive a district in Kentucky is a succession of moun- tains. This section of country is generally regarded as a poor one, and its inhabi- tants are slightingly spoken of. As regards the land, the valleys often are of extreme fertility, and some of the mountains are productive to the very summits. The In the Mountains of Kentucky. 77 vast amount of timber, coal, etc., to be found, gives great intrinsic value to the land; and it is safe to say that no portion of the United States, of equal extent, is now more strongly attracting the attention of capitalists. Since his first coiThection with Berea College the writer has traveled extensively in the mountains, the aggregate of time thus employed being nearly a year. The fall of 1883 was occupied in a lecturing tour through some twenty-five counties. The attainments of the people and the condition of religious and educational in- stitutions have been found to varygreatly in different localities. In a few of the county seats and along two or three leading lines of travel the casual observer will find but little to excite especial remark; though a careful study of the habits of thought and the customs of the people, even then, will reveal a wide difference between them and the people of the most favored parts of our country. But away from these restricted districts the typical mountaineer is found in all his glory. In the extensive region of which we now speak there is little affiliation among The several denominations. The fight is not between the hosts of Satan and the followers of Christ, but among the different regiments of the Messiahs army. Most persons, Christians or otherwise, are ready to take sides with some sect. Whenever any one reaches the point of taking part in meeting, by praying or speaking, he is considered a preacher. At the log churches, remote from one another, preaching may be expected once a month. In the country generally, Sunday-schools are substantially unknown. The few that exist are devoted chiefly to teaching reading. The lesson text is generally read in a more or less stumbling manner, and a few songs are sung. If questions are asked at all they are limited to such as are directly answered in the words of the lesson. Prayer is not an exercise which is expected unless a preacher is present. Many a time when my vocation was perfectly well known, have I been asked, in a diffident and apologetic way, if I offered prayer. However short the exercises of the Sunday-school may be, an hour or two before the time of opening is usually devoted to visiting, and the remainder of the day is usually spent in the same way. The idea of Sabbath, as a day of spiritual work, of religious activity, is a stranger. On no day (except county court day) is there so much travel, and that even if there be not a meeting for miles around. Merchants (church members) having occasion to send teams on a journey of several days to bring goods from the railroad, rarely fail so to plan as to make Sunday one of the days spent in traveling. I do not suppose that one-tenth of the children in the mountain counties attend any sort of a Sunday-school. Of the schools which do exist at least half are devoted to purely secular matters. In not a few of the others the leading aim seems to be the establishment of sectarian principles in the minds of the young. And yet the people of whom we speak are capable of rapid advancement. Given a generous supply of material things and opportunity for a liberal culture, and they make rapid strides. The next few years will witness a wonderful transformation in the section of country referred to. We find all the conditions for rapid material, intellectual and religious development, lacking only a little help from the outside. Among the instances of really satisfactory, rightly-directed Sunday-school work, may be instanced the schools at Williamsburg and Pleasant View in Whitley County, largely directed by Rev, and Mrs. A. A. Myers, and of which the readers of the MISSIONARY have already heard. May such Sunday-schools in the mountains of Kentucky speedily be numbered by the hundred! 78 ~S1unday-School Work in Texas. PHASES OF SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK IN TEXAS. PRES. WM. E. BROOKS. One who attempts to give a clear outline of The Phases of Sunday-school Work in Texas, in one short article has a task on his hands which few can properly appreciate. The territory is vast, the workers few, the population changing. and accurate information not easy to obtain. One sign, of promise is that a very large part of- the schools use the Interna- tional Series of Lessons. A few do not, but in most schools, white and colored, they are found. I cannot forbear saying that these lessons have done, and are now doing, more to unite all parts of our land in a kindly and even loving brotherhood than any one other agency. This is manifest here in Texas. Perhaps nothing will indicate this more clearly than the treatment accorded me by the Sunday- school workers of this State. Known to be connected with Tillotson Institute, established chiefly for the uplifting of the colored people, I am urged to engage in the Sunday-school organization of the county and State, to attend conventions, and was appointed a delegate to the International Convention of 1881. That the quality of the work done here is inferior as compared with much in the older and more highly-favored portions of our land, cannot be qiestioned; yet I have been both pleased and surprised to learn how many schools are holding teachers meetings. It has seemed to me, judging from the replies to my circular, that our colored friends are fully abreast in this respect of the whites. In the direction of county and State organization there has been great progress. Dr. Storey, of Dallas, Secretary of the Texas Sunday-School Association, writes me that when, five years ago, he was called to his present position, there was but one county organized and only a nominal State organization. Now the State is well organizA, and more than forty counties, and still the work goes on. The meetings, which are the result of these organizations, are increasing in number and interest. So great has this become that, at some points, the largest churches are not sufficient to accommodate those desiring to attend. There is more in this than will appear to the careless reader, or to one living where these meetings are common. Such cannot readily understand the strong and too often bitter sectarian spirit which is wont to exist in new States, or where the intellectual standard is low. But, notwithstanding obstacles, the true workers are coming together more and more. Realizing the impossibility of doing the work alone they are reaching forth and clasping the ontstretched hands of other toilers, and thus both are being blessed. It is here that the A. S. S. Union is doing a good work, which was begun by Father Paxton years ago. The Union has five missionaries in Texas. This seems a goodly number, but when we pause and call to mind the fact that each of these on an average has a field larger than the entire State of New York, we cannot but feel that far more laborers are needed to save the thousands yet unreached. But it cannot be questioned that much of the progress made in the Sunday-school work of Texas is due to the labors of these noble men. They establish new schools, cheer the fainting, and sometimes call to life the dead. They plan conventions, marshal the workers, and in many ways are doing much to break down the false barriers which separate the various churches. But, true as these men are, I can find no evidence that they are doing anything for the colored people. It seems to me a mistake that this noble society should so lose sight of the more than 400,000 of African descent who are now living in this State. They are a too important factor in the present and future of Texas, and the country even, to be ignored. If the Union continues to stand aloof, how would

Pres. Wm. E. Brooks Brooks, Wm. E., Pres. Phases of Sunday-School Work in Texas The South 78-80

78 ~S1unday-School Work in Texas. PHASES OF SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK IN TEXAS. PRES. WM. E. BROOKS. One who attempts to give a clear outline of The Phases of Sunday-school Work in Texas, in one short article has a task on his hands which few can properly appreciate. The territory is vast, the workers few, the population changing. and accurate information not easy to obtain. One sign, of promise is that a very large part of- the schools use the Interna- tional Series of Lessons. A few do not, but in most schools, white and colored, they are found. I cannot forbear saying that these lessons have done, and are now doing, more to unite all parts of our land in a kindly and even loving brotherhood than any one other agency. This is manifest here in Texas. Perhaps nothing will indicate this more clearly than the treatment accorded me by the Sunday- school workers of this State. Known to be connected with Tillotson Institute, established chiefly for the uplifting of the colored people, I am urged to engage in the Sunday-school organization of the county and State, to attend conventions, and was appointed a delegate to the International Convention of 1881. That the quality of the work done here is inferior as compared with much in the older and more highly-favored portions of our land, cannot be qiestioned; yet I have been both pleased and surprised to learn how many schools are holding teachers meetings. It has seemed to me, judging from the replies to my circular, that our colored friends are fully abreast in this respect of the whites. In the direction of county and State organization there has been great progress. Dr. Storey, of Dallas, Secretary of the Texas Sunday-School Association, writes me that when, five years ago, he was called to his present position, there was but one county organized and only a nominal State organization. Now the State is well organizA, and more than forty counties, and still the work goes on. The meetings, which are the result of these organizations, are increasing in number and interest. So great has this become that, at some points, the largest churches are not sufficient to accommodate those desiring to attend. There is more in this than will appear to the careless reader, or to one living where these meetings are common. Such cannot readily understand the strong and too often bitter sectarian spirit which is wont to exist in new States, or where the intellectual standard is low. But, notwithstanding obstacles, the true workers are coming together more and more. Realizing the impossibility of doing the work alone they are reaching forth and clasping the ontstretched hands of other toilers, and thus both are being blessed. It is here that the A. S. S. Union is doing a good work, which was begun by Father Paxton years ago. The Union has five missionaries in Texas. This seems a goodly number, but when we pause and call to mind the fact that each of these on an average has a field larger than the entire State of New York, we cannot but feel that far more laborers are needed to save the thousands yet unreached. But it cannot be questioned that much of the progress made in the Sunday-school work of Texas is due to the labors of these noble men. They establish new schools, cheer the fainting, and sometimes call to life the dead. They plan conventions, marshal the workers, and in many ways are doing much to break down the false barriers which separate the various churches. But, true as these men are, I can find no evidence that they are doing anything for the colored people. It seems to me a mistake that this noble society should so lose sight of the more than 400,000 of African descent who are now living in this State. They are a too important factor in the present and future of Texas, and the country even, to be ignored. If the Union continues to stand aloof, how would View near Pa stTh~e, Texas. 80 Sunday-& hool Work it do for the American Missionary Association to send a few earnest, devoted, loving workers to care for the Sunday-school interests of the colored people? Some- thing ought to bQ done by somebody. We are trying, in connection with our work here, to do what we can in this direction, but it is little, very little, compared with what should be done. But despite the apathy of the many who find the Bible a dry book, despite sectarianism gone to seed and the consequent unwillingness of different churches to unite in co-operative effort for the increase of Bible study, in spite of ignorance in the pulpit and still greater ignorance in the pew, as is all too common, especially among our colored friends; despite the strong, clinging prejudices born of the past, which sadly fetter any free, aggressive effort, and must for some time to come; despite one and all of these combined, the work advances. As one, writing to me, well puts it: The young themselves are becoming more and more interested in Bible study, and not long and they will arise in their strength and take the work into their own hands. BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. Miss D. E. EMERSON. SECRETARY. REPORT OF SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK BY LADY MISSIONARIES. WILMINGTON, N. ~.MI5S A. E. FARRINGTON. My class has always been the little ones, and usually the mission class~~ is composed of children outside of our church and day-school. It is large, number- ing sometimes seventy. As they grow older they are promoted to classes in the school proper. The last Sabbath in December a Sunday-school concert was held in the church,a11 the classes being present and taking part in the exercises, which were very interesting, as it was something newa missionary concert, subject, The Morning Star and the Micronesian Mission, illustrated by drawings on the blackboard, and a boy and girl dressed in the costumes of the natives of the islands. I think our Sunday-school has had a great influence in the city in raising the standard of teaching. The quarterlies used by us have been introduced into other schools, and, inone instance, a school kept their lessons one week behind us, that the teachers, many of whom were pupils in our school, might have the advantage of preparing here for the lesson. Young people who have gone from us to teach in the country are actively engaged in Sunday-school work, carrying out the plan adopted here, in the schools under their care. We hear that one colored Methodist Sunday-school in town has changed the time of meeting recently to prevent the scholars from coming here after their school closes. This is not the first instance of the kind since I came here. On the other hand, a Baptist minister advises his people to attend our school. He is a pupil in our day-school, and a model scholar, too, seeming to appreciate the advantages it gives him, and is noble enough to desire that his people may be benefited alsoa rare instance. MOBILE, ALA.MI5S L. A. PINGREE. In our Sunday-school the average attendance is about seventy-five; the average offering, eighty cents. One of our oldest church members is Supt., another member is Asst Supt. He does the blackboard work and gives a review

Miss D. E. Emerson, Secretary Emerson, D. E., Miss, Secretary Report of Sunday-School Work by Lady Missions Bureau of Woman's Work 80-83

80 Sunday-& hool Work it do for the American Missionary Association to send a few earnest, devoted, loving workers to care for the Sunday-school interests of the colored people? Some- thing ought to bQ done by somebody. We are trying, in connection with our work here, to do what we can in this direction, but it is little, very little, compared with what should be done. But despite the apathy of the many who find the Bible a dry book, despite sectarianism gone to seed and the consequent unwillingness of different churches to unite in co-operative effort for the increase of Bible study, in spite of ignorance in the pulpit and still greater ignorance in the pew, as is all too common, especially among our colored friends; despite the strong, clinging prejudices born of the past, which sadly fetter any free, aggressive effort, and must for some time to come; despite one and all of these combined, the work advances. As one, writing to me, well puts it: The young themselves are becoming more and more interested in Bible study, and not long and they will arise in their strength and take the work into their own hands. BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. Miss D. E. EMERSON. SECRETARY. REPORT OF SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK BY LADY MISSIONARIES. WILMINGTON, N. ~.MI5S A. E. FARRINGTON. My class has always been the little ones, and usually the mission class~~ is composed of children outside of our church and day-school. It is large, number- ing sometimes seventy. As they grow older they are promoted to classes in the school proper. The last Sabbath in December a Sunday-school concert was held in the church,a11 the classes being present and taking part in the exercises, which were very interesting, as it was something newa missionary concert, subject, The Morning Star and the Micronesian Mission, illustrated by drawings on the blackboard, and a boy and girl dressed in the costumes of the natives of the islands. I think our Sunday-school has had a great influence in the city in raising the standard of teaching. The quarterlies used by us have been introduced into other schools, and, inone instance, a school kept their lessons one week behind us, that the teachers, many of whom were pupils in our school, might have the advantage of preparing here for the lesson. Young people who have gone from us to teach in the country are actively engaged in Sunday-school work, carrying out the plan adopted here, in the schools under their care. We hear that one colored Methodist Sunday-school in town has changed the time of meeting recently to prevent the scholars from coming here after their school closes. This is not the first instance of the kind since I came here. On the other hand, a Baptist minister advises his people to attend our school. He is a pupil in our day-school, and a model scholar, too, seeming to appreciate the advantages it gives him, and is noble enough to desire that his people may be benefited alsoa rare instance. MOBILE, ALA.MI5S L. A. PINGREE. In our Sunday-school the average attendance is about seventy-five; the average offering, eighty cents. One of our oldest church members is Supt., another member is Asst Supt. He does the blackboard work and gives a review By Lady ilfissionaries. bi of the lesson, besides teaching a class of boys; his wife also teache and is organist for the school. Most of our day-school teachers have classes also, and it is Lhe custom for alPworkers not needed in our own school to help in others. One has a Bible class in a Baptist school, another, with myself, goes to a Metho- dist school. While calling in a part of the city where vice and poverty go hand in band, and endeavoring to persuade the children to attend Sunday-school, I was almost invariably answered, They have no clothing, and the other children will laugh at them. Two fellow-workers and myself decided to establish a Sunday-school there. We found we should be obliged to rent a room. Just then my sister sent me money to use in my work; we thought it would be wise to use it in this Sunday-school work, and did so. Our first session was December 10, and we have averaged thirty-two, though each Sabbath, with one exception, it has been cold or cloudy. I am in hopes to draw them to our Sunday-school in time. The A. M. A. workers have about one hundred and fifty scholars in their classes aside from other S. S. work, such as giving the review of lesson, as those that attend other schools are often called to do. I have noticed in visiting the other schools that the best workers are those who have been in our A. M. A. schools. CHATTANOOGA, TENN.MES. A. S. STEELE. I think our Sunday-school really a model one with regard to order and system. I have the Bible class in the colored M. E. Sunday-school each Sabbath morning at nine oclock ; then I go to ours at half-past ten. The Superintendent of the Nor- thern Presbyterian S. S. has just called with his wife and invited me to go to their school, which meets at a quarter after twelve. I did have a class there the first year I was here, and I expect to go again since it is~ on my way home. Then I have had a mission Sunday-school of sixty members (with no helper) down by the river, at 5 P. M. It was held on the wide porch of a tenement house; I hope to resume it later, after the weather is settled somewhat. RALEIGH, N. C.MISS E. P. HAYES. It is so much easier to work than to tell what we have done. This month our school has numbered 125 and is divided into ten classes. The session commences at half-past nine. We sing, read the responsive exercises in the Pilgrim Quar- terly, our pastor leads in prayer, the school uniting in the Lords Prayer; we read the lesson responsively, sing again and the classes are sent to their several places at five minutes before ten. The Bible class is taught in the pastors house; the class of smallest children come to my house at the rear of the church; all the other classes are taught in the church. While the classes are reciting I go from one to the other, except the Bible class, and see that everything is right; take my book in which names are enrolled, go around again and mark those present, then take the money boxes and papers to each class, and at half-past ten ring the bell for papers to be given out and collec- tion taken. When it is quiet I call on all who have learned verses in the lesson to rise, they recite, and one of our deacons goes to the front where the lesson scroll is banging, explains it, asks questions on the lesson, and the school recite the golden text. In the meantime a young man has been at work counting the schol- ars and money. He makes his report, the pastor gives his notices, if he has any, I give mine, and talk a little about the next lesson, reading their books and papers going to church or something similar, then we rise and sing and the pupils go out, those who take library books stopping at a table near the door, where the librarian is sitting to change them. 82 Work by Lady Miss io~aries. We have a teachers meeting every Friday night. This winter we have it at the houses. It has becn an unusually cold winter, but our scholars have been very regular in their attendance, and the school was never more interesting. SELMA. ALAMISS M. K. LUNT. I have always taught in the Sunday-school and still have the same class of boys, or young men now, to which I was transferred by the Superintendent, from a class of little girls. Four of the class have united with the church since my connection with them as a teacher. The members of my industrial classes are nearly all members of our Sunday-school. Some belong to the Baptist and Methodist schools. I have every year in my mission work brought scholars into the Sunday- school and have, as far as possible, looked after them when absent by visiting them at their homes, and, if girls, interesting them in industrial work, using other plans for boys. Our Sunday-school scholars ha4e gone into the country to teach day-school and as soon as practicable have organized Sunday-schools. attending them regularly every Sabbath and not forgetting their temperance l)rinciples. I have supplied them with papers, books, quarterlies, and leaflets, and they have repeatedly told me how much help they were to them in their teaching and have begged for more. I have also supplied members of other denominations with the same, having distributed hundreds of papers and books in this way; some have found their way into the jail, and as much as I could I have scattered tem- perance literature. Some of our young people have been subjected to many unpleasant occurrences in their work because they were Congregationalists, but I believe none have been obliged to desert their posts. SAVANNAH, GA.MISS J. S~ HARDY. The Congregational Sunday-school of Savannah was organized in 1869, with only a small number; it has grown in numbers and prosperity till in these fifteen years it has enrolled hundreds as members of the school. At the present time the number in attendance is 150, with twelve teachers. Seven of these are from the corps of teachers in Beach Institute. The twelve classes embrace all ages, from the grown-up men and women to the wee bits of four years. Many of the children and youth have given themselves up to serving Jesus. Two boys some weeks ago were persuaded to give up their cigarettes and to think of things higher and nobler. Soon they expressed a readiness to become Christians. but said they did not know how. When the way was pointed out to them they gave their young hearts to Christ, and now are singing with Christians; Where he leads we will follow. Of the adult membersthe fathers and mothersthere is a goodly number, and their presence is doing much to break down the very common notion that the Sunday-school is only for children. There is special interest centering in this school for several reasons. It was, when started, something new, and it still stands alone. It brought in the grown people as well as the children for Bible study. It is known to emphasize Bible truth and to bring it before the people in such a plain, direct way that they feel its force and are led to practice it in their lives. It teaches that religion must be something more than mere emotionthat they must be doers of the Word and not hearers only. It is known to advocate strict temperance principles, and to exert a constant influence in putting away the habit of smoking as well as the use of strong drink. That this school has been in all its past history a power for good and a light in the surrounding darkness, cannot be disputed. In the Sunday- schools of the Baptist and Methodist (colored) churches may be found many Sunday-School Work Among lb e Dakotas. 83 teachers who vent out from the Congregational Sunday-school, carrying with them a preparation to teach which they could not otherwise have obtained. Various reforms in the old-time churches may be traced to the same influences. TIlE INDIANS. SABBATH-SCHOOL WORK AMONG THE DAKOTAS, BY REV. A. L. RIGG~. In our Indian missions among the Dakotas the Sabbath-school lasts all the week. To those Indians who have in any way come under the influence of our missions the Bible is THE BOOK, and to be able to read it is considered the entrance to a higher realm. So that those converts from paganism who are not able to read the Holy Book often speak of themselves as inferior to those who can read it. Wher- cver our missionary teacher goes he gathers a circle around him, whether it be in lent or cabin, and there sets up the Bible School. And to be able to read ~the book is the main incentive that spurs on those blanketed young warriors and shame-faced maidens to worry through the pages of primer and reader until they come to the Bible story book, precept upon precept, translated into Dakota, and thence into the Bible itself. In these primary schools there is also attention given to the mysteries of numbers, and oral lessons are given on many other things, but Bible study is the central object and power in all. In our Christian communities, with their regularly organized churches, the work of Bible study and Sabbath-school instruction is more after the pattern of the white peoples way. In our Congregational and Presbyterian churches, which are the offspring of the original Dakota mission, there are regular Sabbath-schools connected with almost every church, which, in several cases, are superintended 2nd taught entirely by Indians. Sometimes the public Sabbath service of the church is a Bible school of the whole congregation. We are also making progress in raising the grade of Sabbath-school teaching. We have now for several years published the International Sunday-school Lessons in Dakota, in our monthly paper, The Word Carrier. At first the lessons, with their questions and references, were like enigmas to them, but now they are much appreciated and quite generally studied. In connection with the Annual Conference of our native churches we have institute exercises for several days, adapted to help those who teach the Word. At the conferences and institutes we have all the pastors, elders, deacons and Sab- bath.schoo] teachers who can attend, usually over one hundred members, besides as many more who come to hear and see. In the schools connected with our central mission stations the English Bible comes into use alongside of the Dakota Bible, both to make them familiar with it and to give them the help furnished by comparison. Bible verses are frequently recited both in English and Dakota, the one following the other. But the mother tongue is the language of the heart, 2nd the Dakota Bible is the sword of the Spirit which is to reach the hearts of this Sioux nation. It has taken the work of one generation to make ready the leaven and introduce it. But the age of preparation is past, both in regard to the minds of the people and the means of regenerating them. We have now the Word of God in the ver- nacular. We have a band of native disciples to publish it. And we have the help of the press, of convocations, institu~ and schools. Large results cannot fail to

Rev. A. L. Riggs Riggs, A. L., Rev. Sabbath-School Work Among the Dakotas The Indians 83-84

Sunday-School Work Among lb e Dakotas. 83 teachers who vent out from the Congregational Sunday-school, carrying with them a preparation to teach which they could not otherwise have obtained. Various reforms in the old-time churches may be traced to the same influences. TIlE INDIANS. SABBATH-SCHOOL WORK AMONG THE DAKOTAS, BY REV. A. L. RIGG~. In our Indian missions among the Dakotas the Sabbath-school lasts all the week. To those Indians who have in any way come under the influence of our missions the Bible is THE BOOK, and to be able to read it is considered the entrance to a higher realm. So that those converts from paganism who are not able to read the Holy Book often speak of themselves as inferior to those who can read it. Wher- cver our missionary teacher goes he gathers a circle around him, whether it be in lent or cabin, and there sets up the Bible School. And to be able to read ~the book is the main incentive that spurs on those blanketed young warriors and shame-faced maidens to worry through the pages of primer and reader until they come to the Bible story book, precept upon precept, translated into Dakota, and thence into the Bible itself. In these primary schools there is also attention given to the mysteries of numbers, and oral lessons are given on many other things, but Bible study is the central object and power in all. In our Christian communities, with their regularly organized churches, the work of Bible study and Sabbath-school instruction is more after the pattern of the white peoples way. In our Congregational and Presbyterian churches, which are the offspring of the original Dakota mission, there are regular Sabbath-schools connected with almost every church, which, in several cases, are superintended 2nd taught entirely by Indians. Sometimes the public Sabbath service of the church is a Bible school of the whole congregation. We are also making progress in raising the grade of Sabbath-school teaching. We have now for several years published the International Sunday-school Lessons in Dakota, in our monthly paper, The Word Carrier. At first the lessons, with their questions and references, were like enigmas to them, but now they are much appreciated and quite generally studied. In connection with the Annual Conference of our native churches we have institute exercises for several days, adapted to help those who teach the Word. At the conferences and institutes we have all the pastors, elders, deacons and Sab- bath.schoo] teachers who can attend, usually over one hundred members, besides as many more who come to hear and see. In the schools connected with our central mission stations the English Bible comes into use alongside of the Dakota Bible, both to make them familiar with it and to give them the help furnished by comparison. Bible verses are frequently recited both in English and Dakota, the one following the other. But the mother tongue is the language of the heart, 2nd the Dakota Bible is the sword of the Spirit which is to reach the hearts of this Sioux nation. It has taken the work of one generation to make ready the leaven and introduce it. But the age of preparation is past, both in regard to the minds of the people and the means of regenerating them. We have now the Word of God in the ver- nacular. We have a band of native disciples to publish it. And we have the help of the press, of convocations, institu~ and schools. Large results cannot fail to Chinese Sa?tdc~y-~ chools. come, But they may come sooner and be very much larger if these instrumental- ities are only used as they might be. The pin e to strike the telling blow is on ~he en ered wAge. TE[E CI-IINESE. CHINESE SUNDAY-SCHOOLS. I. FROM THE TEACHE S STA D-POINr. B MISS B SSIE S. WO LET The one aim of both the Sunday-School and the Evening Mission School is to lead he pupils to Thrist. Their methods differ somewhat. In the evening school the teacher ha a large number of pupils, and to each one can devote but little time, bile at the Sabbath-school the teacher has fewersometimes only oneand thus has a better opportunit to influence his thoughts and heart. The scholars having few American friends, and no direc home influence, the teacher becomes their greatest and most respected friend. Each Su day-school is managed in a ~ay peculiar to itself; and that Sunday- school is the most prosperous which can obtain the greatest nnaiber o entl usiastic eachers and t ie co-operation of the church with vhich it is connected. The greate t drawback to success in Chinese Sunday-schools is the cold feeling id caJe prejudice ~nanifested by the ~members of the c urches. TI e Chinese CHINESE CHILDREN DRESSED IN WINTER CLOTHING.

Miss Jessie S. Worley Worley, Jessie S., Miss Chinese Sunday-Schools The Chinese 84-86

Chinese Sa?tdc~y-~ chools. come, But they may come sooner and be very much larger if these instrumental- ities are only used as they might be. The pin e to strike the telling blow is on ~he en ered wAge. TE[E CI-IINESE. CHINESE SUNDAY-SCHOOLS. I. FROM THE TEACHE S STA D-POINr. B MISS B SSIE S. WO LET The one aim of both the Sunday-School and the Evening Mission School is to lead he pupils to Thrist. Their methods differ somewhat. In the evening school the teacher ha a large number of pupils, and to each one can devote but little time, bile at the Sabbath-school the teacher has fewersometimes only oneand thus has a better opportunit to influence his thoughts and heart. The scholars having few American friends, and no direc home influence, the teacher becomes their greatest and most respected friend. Each Su day-school is managed in a ~ay peculiar to itself; and that Sunday- school is the most prosperous which can obtain the greatest nnaiber o entl usiastic eachers and t ie co-operation of the church with vhich it is connected. The greate t drawback to success in Chinese Sunday-schools is the cold feeling id caJe prejudice ~nanifested by the ~members of the c urches. TI e Chinese CHINESE CHILDREN DRESSED IN WINTER CLOTHING. (Jhinese Sunday-Schools. 85 are a self-respecting and independent people, and would rather stay away than go where they are not wanted or where they are taught with a patronizing spirit. There are in San Francisco three Congregational Sunday-schoolsthe Bethany, the Barnes and the Fii:st. The last is the largest of the three. It has had ener- getic superintendents. Mr. Clements, who has lately resigned, has had charge for many years, and has won the respect and friendship of every scholar. The majority of the teachers are not connected with the mission in any other way, and come merely for the love of the work. We have three officers, superin- tendent, assistant superintendent and secretary. The church is centrally located and within walking distance of Chinatown. Imagine yourself in a carpeted and well-lighted room with intelligent looking and well-dressed Chinese sitting with their teachers in their respective classes. At six oclock the school is opened with singing in English, which will compare favor- ably with that of any Sunday-school. This is followed by prayer, with the Lords Prayer in concert, after which a chapter is read; then comes the teaching of the le~son. Perhaps the most interesting part to strangers is the recitation of Scrip- ture verses, participated in sometimes by six or seven and sometimes by thirty or forty. We sing after the verses and close with the doxology, and all join in saying, In all thy ways acknowledge God, and He shall direct thy paths. This is a specimen Sunday-school. In San Francisco there are other large Sunday-schools, maintained by the other denominations, which are all doing good work. There is a flourishing school connected with the First Church in Oakland, and there are many more in other parts of the State. II. FROM THE CHINESE PUPIL S STAND-POINT. BY HR. JEE GAM. In San Francisco there are seven Sunday-schools for the Chinese. The aggre- gate average attendance of scholars in these schools is about 300. with an average attendance of 70 teachers. These schools are carried on somewhat similar to our evening schools, for they teach reading as well as the Holy Book. An unchris- tianized Chinaman cares nothing about the teaching of the Bible, but he is anxious to learn the English language. Perhaps he does not know even the alpha- bet. If this is the case the best way of teaching is to take three letters at a time, tbe teacher repeating ABC, the scholar following. The reason for this is that in learning the Chinese language in the primer or the first book used, the words are arranged in this waythree in a group. As this is the way to which they are accustomed, it is the way in which they learn most readily. Some pupils are brighter than others, some can master the letters in 15 minutes, some in 20, some in half an hour and some in a hour. In all our Sunday-schools you will find scholars of all grades. Some in the latter part of the primer, some in the second reader and some in the third. As soon as a scholar is sufficiently advanced the teacher recommends the Bible as a text book, for the one aim is to teach Christianity. They are also urged to commit passages to memory, and recite them. They are pleased to do this, for they think they have made considerable advancement when they can repeat a long passage correctly. Perhaps thcy are presented with a Bible or a Testament, and by the time they can read in the Bible they have learned to have so much confidence in their teachers and so much respect for their feelings that they are unwilling to offend them. Little by little the precious truth gets a place in tIme memory and a hold upon the heart. They soon learn that the Sunday-school is a Christian institution, and that the people who belong to it are Christian people and are their true friends; for they not only care for them, but love to do them good without compensation. 86 Then and Kow. This kindness is not known by all the Chinese, for many have the impression that both the Sunday and evening schools are sustained by the American Govern- ment, and th~it the teachers all receive pay for their work; but when the con- trary is explained they always say, that is an exceeding kindness on the part of the Christians, and they are truly our friends and are not like those who stone us. And, again, the teacher that has been teaching a scholar for six months or a year has a great influence over that scholar, and, in many instances, the Sunday- school teacher can do more than the preacher can. Lately one of our own young men who was led away, and for more than a year was not with us, has been led to repentance by his faithful Sunday-school teacher. He is now one of our most active and efficient workers. Eternity alone can reveal the good that these schools are doing. They work in harmony with the evening schools, both using the English language as only a step toward the teaching of Gods truth that will save their immortal souls. CIIILDIRENS PAGE. THEN AND NOW. BY MRS. THOMAS N. cHASE. A most inspiring and picturesque sight is the country Sunday-school, taught by student teachers of the A. M. A. schools. Some of these have tragic histories. Ten years ago one of our Atlanta University students, whom we will call Edward, went, as our scholars usually do, to spend the long hot summer vacation in teach- ing. Edward had the mettle in him to eat drumsticks, so went away down into M County, Ga., to gather up a school. As usual at that time, there was no place for the children to meet except in the parents cabins. Some of the most anxious a~d devoted mothers would give up their little home to the noisy crowd which often swelled to unmanageable dimensions, when they would repair to natures temple if a forest or grove were near; if not, would drive down stakes and make a brush arbor which would protect from the fiery darts of a Georgia sun till the leaves dropped, when a fresh supply of thatch was applied. But Edward wanted something better and larger, especially for his Sunday-school, so he got the people to help him put up a rough school-house. This roused the opposition of jealous whites, so that it was soon burned. His life, too, was often threatened, but his faith in God and love for his people made him fearless, and he lett them at the close of his summer school promising to return his next vacation. The next spring he received the following letter: Your return here will be at the risk of your life. K. K. K. But Edward felt God was on his side, and those poor people he had begun to love so well must not be deserted, so he got excused from school a few days and went immediately to the most ferocious of his enemies, who, he suspected, wrote the letter, and said Ive had a Ku Klux letter and wish youd help me to find the man who wrote it. There are a plenty of Yankee soldiers in Atlanta, and this man ought to be dealt with. He and his crew quailed before Edwards courage, and never troubled him seriously again. Many prayers went up for Edward in his absence, and a teacher persQaded him to sit for his picture before leaving. He had a warm welcome on his return, and the fact that one of his classmates who had been to another county to arrange for a school the next summer and had returned the day before with his hat riddled with bullets in his escape for his life through the woods, added to our joy in seeing Edwards face once more.

Mrs. Thomas N. Chase Chase, Thomas N., Mrs. Then and Now Children's Page 86-88

86 Then and Kow. This kindness is not known by all the Chinese, for many have the impression that both the Sunday and evening schools are sustained by the American Govern- ment, and th~it the teachers all receive pay for their work; but when the con- trary is explained they always say, that is an exceeding kindness on the part of the Christians, and they are truly our friends and are not like those who stone us. And, again, the teacher that has been teaching a scholar for six months or a year has a great influence over that scholar, and, in many instances, the Sunday- school teacher can do more than the preacher can. Lately one of our own young men who was led away, and for more than a year was not with us, has been led to repentance by his faithful Sunday-school teacher. He is now one of our most active and efficient workers. Eternity alone can reveal the good that these schools are doing. They work in harmony with the evening schools, both using the English language as only a step toward the teaching of Gods truth that will save their immortal souls. CIIILDIRENS PAGE. THEN AND NOW. BY MRS. THOMAS N. cHASE. A most inspiring and picturesque sight is the country Sunday-school, taught by student teachers of the A. M. A. schools. Some of these have tragic histories. Ten years ago one of our Atlanta University students, whom we will call Edward, went, as our scholars usually do, to spend the long hot summer vacation in teach- ing. Edward had the mettle in him to eat drumsticks, so went away down into M County, Ga., to gather up a school. As usual at that time, there was no place for the children to meet except in the parents cabins. Some of the most anxious a~d devoted mothers would give up their little home to the noisy crowd which often swelled to unmanageable dimensions, when they would repair to natures temple if a forest or grove were near; if not, would drive down stakes and make a brush arbor which would protect from the fiery darts of a Georgia sun till the leaves dropped, when a fresh supply of thatch was applied. But Edward wanted something better and larger, especially for his Sunday-school, so he got the people to help him put up a rough school-house. This roused the opposition of jealous whites, so that it was soon burned. His life, too, was often threatened, but his faith in God and love for his people made him fearless, and he lett them at the close of his summer school promising to return his next vacation. The next spring he received the following letter: Your return here will be at the risk of your life. K. K. K. But Edward felt God was on his side, and those poor people he had begun to love so well must not be deserted, so he got excused from school a few days and went immediately to the most ferocious of his enemies, who, he suspected, wrote the letter, and said Ive had a Ku Klux letter and wish youd help me to find the man who wrote it. There are a plenty of Yankee soldiers in Atlanta, and this man ought to be dealt with. He and his crew quailed before Edwards courage, and never troubled him seriously again. Many prayers went up for Edward in his absence, and a teacher persQaded him to sit for his picture before leaving. He had a warm welcome on his return, and the fact that one of his classmates who had been to another county to arrange for a school the next summer and had returned the day before with his hat riddled with bullets in his escape for his life through the woods, added to our joy in seeing Edwards face once more. Then and Now. 87 The third summer the A. M. A. called Edward to fill a pastors place in Savan- nah. How he did hate to leave his old school, but he felt the A. M. A. had been more than a mother to him. and he could not disregard her wish, so he xvent to 5 and stood at his post all through those dreadful months when the yellow fever struck down its thousands, and another young man went to M- County and held the whites at bay only by assuring them the Yankees sent him, and it would not be safe for them to harm him; but when he left town, ruffians with pistols followed him to the train, telling him he must never come back. The next summer a third teacher went and ventured to rebuild the burnt school-house. He wisely attempted only the rudest structure possible, the cracks between the logs and the opening for the door being the only entrances for light. As there was no floor the children sat upon the log sleepers, their feet resting upon natures green carpet, if the red clay was rich enough to own one. Add to this building one or two openings made in the logs, with a sliding shutter to keep out rain and cold, and a door made in the same way to save hinges, and you have the exterior of a typical Sunday-school-room for country colored people. Inside are long slabs with the smooth side up and slanting holes underneath to receive the sticks that serve as legs. These seats have no backs and are called puncheons, possiI)ly because of the punching propensities promoted by the packed-in children. Of course the towns have better buildings, but they are often some dilapidated frame house bought from the whites. Most of our scholars teach in the country. Our almost unbroken term of eight and a half months leaves three and a half for practice work in the public schools of Georgia. They never know till Christmas how much pay they will receive. Sometimes it is enough to take them nearly through the school year; sometimes but a trifle more than to pay board and car- fare hut such as they get th~y joyfully bring back to their old school home, when sick or aged parents do not take it. They go out feeling their Sunday-school and temperance work are the most important, but the obstacles they meet are very disheartening. There is no longer any opposition from the whites, but often sympathy and help. Perhaps the chief obstacle is big meeting and big Sun- day. The churches are so small that one pastor often has charge of four, and at whatever church he preaches there it is big Sunday, and there the old must flock, leaving the young people home in charge of premi~es. Big meet- ing is camp meeting, lasting but two or three days but the State is so satu- rated with them, as one man said, that often four in one summer are within (iriving distance of each settlement. These meetings, in the main, are .~ big froi~cs, and greatty dreaded by the faithful teacher. Another trial is ignorant teachers. A few can ask questions from the Catechism, so that the children learn who is the oldest, the strongest, the wisest man, etc., but often neither the children nor teacher have any idea from what book the Catechism is taken. Then the Snnday-school can be kept up only in warm weather, as tIme house is too cold in winter; and if a fire were in it, with the board window and door shut, it would be too dark. There is, however, a bright side to the l)icture. Our wise and faithful teachers have learned to say to their little flock, ~ I shall always be here for Sunday-school. I shall never go to big meeting, and never be off on big Sunday; whether you come or not, I shall be here with my picture papers and Bible. And then, for miles around, they come; little ones often walking marvelously long distances, and old people feasting their hungry souls upon Gods word as it is intelligently brought to them. Few can realize how much these student-teachers need our sympathy and prayers. Receipts. RECEIPTS FOR JANUARy, 1~S4. Exeter. Mary E. Shute $22 31 Farmington. Cong. Cli. and Soc Fitzwilliam. Mrs. L. Hill 4 10 Francestown. Cong. Ch. and Soc 2 so Franklin. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Student Aid, Tallad.ga C 6 00 Goffstown. BliL of C., by Rev. S. L. 51 ~, Qerould, for Marion. Ala Hampstead. Cong. Sab. Sch 13 00 Harrisville. Mrs. L. B. Richardson, 10; Darius Farwell, 3 13 00 10 00 Hilisborough Bridge. Mrs. N. Taylor, 1; John Gerry, I 2 00 6 50 Hillsborough Center. Rev. A. B. Peffers. 5 00 Hopkinton. Rev Daniel Sawyer 1 00 Keene. Ladies Benev. Soc. of Second 83 52 Ch. Bbl. of C., for Mcintosh, Ga. val., 40. Lebanon. Cong. Cli. and Soc 78 50 .30 00 Lyme. Cong. Ch. and Soc. (adl) 15 65 s 00 Mason. Friends, Bbl. of C., 1.50, for 8 9(1 Freight, 60c. for Church, Dudley, NC 2 10 2 00 Meriden. H. P. Rand 2 50 2 00 Nashua. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., 25; 755 G.H.,50c 2550 5 00 New Ipawich. John S. Cummings, for 6 so Indian Children 50 New Ipawicli. Leavitt Lincoln, 10; 10 00 Cong. Ch., 4.60 14 60 Newmarket. Cong. Cli. and Soc 9 60 Orford. Cong. Sab.Sch 1000 Pembroke. Mrs. Mary W. Thompson.. 5 00 Randolph. Mountain Cli 3 34 Salisbury. Cong. Cli 2 50 South Newmarket. C ng. Cli and Soc. 5 76 Wentwortli. Epliraim Cook, 11 Cong. 4100 Ch.andSoc., 9 .... 2000 ~7P 87 1 00 38 00 2 00 50 35 00 136 90 25 00 :3 00 20 00 iS 00 13 50 12 82 30 00 10 00 1 24 2 62 5 00 3 00 15 00 15 00 164 84 10 00 20 00 LROAcv. Candia. Estate of Freeman Parker, by Mrs. Nan~y Parker, Ex $961 71 $1,541 58 VERMONT, $760.30. Alburgh. Cong. Ch. and Soc 9 00 Brattleborougli. Ladies of Center Cong. Cli., 5 libls. of C., 5 for Freight; Center Cong. Sab. Sch., Box of hooks, for Talladega C s 00 Brattleborough. Ladies Missy Soc. of First Cong. Cli., Bb]. and Box of C. for Macon, Ga. Brownington. S. S Tinkliam 4 50 ~urlinguon. S. Parker 1 00 Cornwall. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adI) 3 00 Dorset.. Ladies Home SIlas. Soc.. Bhl. of C.,4forFreight,foi.Raleigh,.y~ 400 East Eoultney. A Friend 10 00 Hartford. Second Cong. Cli. (100 of which from Epliraim Morris) 134 88 Jamaica. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Johnson. First Cong. Sab. 5db 11 78 Mclndoes Falls. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 00 Montgomery Center. Pea. Heman Hop- kins 700 Norwich. Rev. 1~Ir. and Mrs. N., 3; 500 Pittsfield. Mrs. Caroline Lewis 10 00 Pittsford. Mrs. Nancy P. Humphrey 10 00 Pittsford. D St. Johnsbury. Mrs. Franklin Fairbanks, 1 00 for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Swanton. Friend in Cong. Cli 25 Waitafield. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Mu- dent Aid, Talladega C 10 00 West Brattleborougli. Cong. Cli. and Soc., to const. HENRy WARRI.SER L. SI 3625 MAINE, $614.18. Alfred. Cong. Cli. and Soc Andover. Friends.~ for Lady Mission- cry, Wilrn iogton, N. C ~.uburn. , for Selnic, Ala Bangor. Cen. Oh. and Soc.. 4. adi; Sab. 5db. 2. for Dakota Indian 51 Bath. Central Cli. and Soc.... Brunswick. Blil. of C.. val. 20 for ~el- nsa, Ala. Castine. Trin. Cong. Cli., 5, and Sab. Sch., 5 Cornish. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Freight and Student Aid, Mobile. Ala Cumberland Mills. Warren Cli. and Soc. to const. FRANK H. CLOUDMAN and EnwIN AvER L. Ms Cumberland Mills. Young Ladies Mis sion Circle of Warren Cli., for ..4tlan- ta U Denmark. Friend, for ~llobile, Ala. Dennyaville. Cong. Cli. and Soc Dover. N. F. Sam p son Ellsworth. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adi). Farmington Falls. Cong. Cli. and Soc.. Foxcroft. Mrs. D. Blanchard Garland. Cong. Cli. and Soc Hampden. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Wilmington, N C Lebanon Center. Rev. B. Dodge, 5; Noah B. Lord, 5; Den. Samuel Snap- leigh and family, S Miss Rebecca Weld. 5: Dea. John Moody, 5; Phehe Moo(ly. 3; Mrs. Olive A. Moody (5 of which for Indian 111), 7; Henry Porter, 2; Mrs. Hannah A. Lord. 2; to const. DEA. SAMUEL SHAPLEIGH L. SI New Gloucester. Books and pictures, val. 12, for Selmo, Ala. Newport. Mrs. M. S. Nickerson Norridgewock. Ceng. Cli. and Soc..... North Bridgeton. Miss Proctors 5db., for Student Aid. Wilmington, NC Norway. Mary K. Frost Orland. Mrs. S. T. Buck and daughters Portland. High St. Oh. nod Soc Portland. Brown Thurstons Sab. 8db. Class, High St. Cli.. for Student Aid, Hampton N d~ A. Inst Portland. Lndies of St. Lawrence St. Cli., Bbl. of C., for Wilininqton. N C. Searsport. Freight, for Seln~a, Ala ... South Berwick. Ladies of Cong. Parish, Bbl. of C.. for Wilini ton, N. C. Wells. B. Maxwell Windliam. Cong. Cli. and Soc Woolwich. Cong. Cli. aud Soc NEW HAMPSHIRE, $1,541.58. Amherst. Cong. Cli Antrim. Friends, by John E. Hast- ings Auburn. Cong. Cli. and Soc Bath. Cong. Ch. and Soc Bristol. Cong. Cli. and Soc Brookline. Cong. Cli Campton. Ladies of Cong. Cli., Blil. of C., val. 31; 3for Freight Candia. Cong. Cli. and Soc Chester. Cong. Cli. and Soc Concord. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., 103.16, to coust. CHARLES T. PAnE. MARK H. HOLT and Mas. ANDREw BUNKER L. Ms.: South Cong. Cli. and Soc., 58.68; Friend of Missions 3.. Concord. First Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Talladega C Epping. Miss Hannah Pearson, for Chinese. Indians and Freedmen $10 00 9 77 10 00 21 00 10 00 88

Receipts for January, 1884 88-96

Receipts. RECEIPTS FOR JANUARy, 1~S4. Exeter. Mary E. Shute $22 31 Farmington. Cong. Cli. and Soc Fitzwilliam. Mrs. L. Hill 4 10 Francestown. Cong. Ch. and Soc 2 so Franklin. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Student Aid, Tallad.ga C 6 00 Goffstown. BliL of C., by Rev. S. L. 51 ~, Qerould, for Marion. Ala Hampstead. Cong. Sab. Sch 13 00 Harrisville. Mrs. L. B. Richardson, 10; Darius Farwell, 3 13 00 10 00 Hilisborough Bridge. Mrs. N. Taylor, 1; John Gerry, I 2 00 6 50 Hillsborough Center. Rev. A. B. Peffers. 5 00 Hopkinton. Rev Daniel Sawyer 1 00 Keene. Ladies Benev. Soc. of Second 83 52 Ch. Bbl. of C., for Mcintosh, Ga. val., 40. Lebanon. Cong. Cli. and Soc 78 50 .30 00 Lyme. Cong. Ch. and Soc. (adl) 15 65 s 00 Mason. Friends, Bbl. of C., 1.50, for 8 9(1 Freight, 60c. for Church, Dudley, NC 2 10 2 00 Meriden. H. P. Rand 2 50 2 00 Nashua. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., 25; 755 G.H.,50c 2550 5 00 New Ipawich. John S. Cummings, for 6 so Indian Children 50 New Ipawicli. Leavitt Lincoln, 10; 10 00 Cong. Ch., 4.60 14 60 Newmarket. Cong. Cli. and Soc 9 60 Orford. Cong. Sab.Sch 1000 Pembroke. Mrs. Mary W. Thompson.. 5 00 Randolph. Mountain Cli 3 34 Salisbury. Cong. Cli 2 50 South Newmarket. C ng. Cli and Soc. 5 76 Wentwortli. Epliraim Cook, 11 Cong. 4100 Ch.andSoc., 9 .... 2000 ~7P 87 1 00 38 00 2 00 50 35 00 136 90 25 00 :3 00 20 00 iS 00 13 50 12 82 30 00 10 00 1 24 2 62 5 00 3 00 15 00 15 00 164 84 10 00 20 00 LROAcv. Candia. Estate of Freeman Parker, by Mrs. Nan~y Parker, Ex $961 71 $1,541 58 VERMONT, $760.30. Alburgh. Cong. Ch. and Soc 9 00 Brattleborougli. Ladies of Center Cong. Cli., 5 libls. of C., 5 for Freight; Center Cong. Sab. Sch., Box of hooks, for Talladega C s 00 Brattleborough. Ladies Missy Soc. of First Cong. Cli., Bb]. and Box of C. for Macon, Ga. Brownington. S. S Tinkliam 4 50 ~urlinguon. S. Parker 1 00 Cornwall. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adI) 3 00 Dorset.. Ladies Home SIlas. Soc.. Bhl. of C.,4forFreight,foi.Raleigh,.y~ 400 East Eoultney. A Friend 10 00 Hartford. Second Cong. Cli. (100 of which from Epliraim Morris) 134 88 Jamaica. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Johnson. First Cong. Sab. 5db 11 78 Mclndoes Falls. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 00 Montgomery Center. Pea. Heman Hop- kins 700 Norwich. Rev. 1~Ir. and Mrs. N., 3; 500 Pittsfield. Mrs. Caroline Lewis 10 00 Pittsford. Mrs. Nancy P. Humphrey 10 00 Pittsford. D St. Johnsbury. Mrs. Franklin Fairbanks, 1 00 for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Swanton. Friend in Cong. Cli 25 Waitafield. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Mu- dent Aid, Talladega C 10 00 West Brattleborougli. Cong. Cli. and Soc., to const. HENRy WARRI.SER L. SI 3625 MAINE, $614.18. Alfred. Cong. Cli. and Soc Andover. Friends.~ for Lady Mission- cry, Wilrn iogton, N. C ~.uburn. , for Selnic, Ala Bangor. Cen. Oh. and Soc.. 4. adi; Sab. 5db. 2. for Dakota Indian 51 Bath. Central Cli. and Soc.... Brunswick. Blil. of C.. val. 20 for ~el- nsa, Ala. Castine. Trin. Cong. Cli., 5, and Sab. Sch., 5 Cornish. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Freight and Student Aid, Mobile. Ala Cumberland Mills. Warren Cli. and Soc. to const. FRANK H. CLOUDMAN and EnwIN AvER L. Ms Cumberland Mills. Young Ladies Mis sion Circle of Warren Cli., for ..4tlan- ta U Denmark. Friend, for ~llobile, Ala. Dennyaville. Cong. Cli. and Soc Dover. N. F. Sam p son Ellsworth. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adi). Farmington Falls. Cong. Cli. and Soc.. Foxcroft. Mrs. D. Blanchard Garland. Cong. Cli. and Soc Hampden. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Wilmington, N C Lebanon Center. Rev. B. Dodge, 5; Noah B. Lord, 5; Den. Samuel Snap- leigh and family, S Miss Rebecca Weld. 5: Dea. John Moody, 5; Phehe Moo(ly. 3; Mrs. Olive A. Moody (5 of which for Indian 111), 7; Henry Porter, 2; Mrs. Hannah A. Lord. 2; to const. DEA. SAMUEL SHAPLEIGH L. SI New Gloucester. Books and pictures, val. 12, for Selmo, Ala. Newport. Mrs. M. S. Nickerson Norridgewock. Ceng. Cli. and Soc..... North Bridgeton. Miss Proctors 5db., for Student Aid. Wilmington, NC Norway. Mary K. Frost Orland. Mrs. S. T. Buck and daughters Portland. High St. Oh. nod Soc Portland. Brown Thurstons Sab. 8db. Class, High St. Cli.. for Student Aid, Hampton N d~ A. Inst Portland. Lndies of St. Lawrence St. Cli., Bbl. of C., for Wilininqton. N C. Searsport. Freight, for Seln~a, Ala ... South Berwick. Ladies of Cong. Parish, Bbl. of C.. for Wilini ton, N. C. Wells. B. Maxwell Windliam. Cong. Cli. and Soc Woolwich. Cong. Cli. aud Soc NEW HAMPSHIRE, $1,541.58. Amherst. Cong. Cli Antrim. Friends, by John E. Hast- ings Auburn. Cong. Cli. and Soc Bath. Cong. Ch. and Soc Bristol. Cong. Cli. and Soc Brookline. Cong. Cli Campton. Ladies of Cong. Cli., Blil. of C., val. 31; 3for Freight Candia. Cong. Cli. and Soc Chester. Cong. Cli. and Soc Concord. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., 103.16, to coust. CHARLES T. PAnE. MARK H. HOLT and Mas. ANDREw BUNKER L. Ms.: South Cong. Cli. and Soc., 58.68; Friend of Missions 3.. Concord. First Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Talladega C Epping. Miss Hannah Pearson, for Chinese. Indians and Freedmen $10 00 9 77 10 00 21 00 10 00 88 Receipts. West Brattleborough. Ladies. Bbl. of C., for McIntosh, Go. $3 for Freight.. $3 00 West Fairlee. Mrs. E. J. May, Bag of C., for McIntosh, Ga. West Randolph. Cong. Cli. and Soc.... 13 14 Windham. C on g.Ch. an~ Soc 23 00 Woodstock. First Cong. Ch. and Soc 16 60 Women of Vt., by Mrs. A. XV Wild, for Lady Missionary, McIntosh, Ga.: Charlotte. 46; Middlebury. 33.50; New- port, 31.30; Burlington, Winooski Av. Ch., 25.; Castleton, 3.10 140 90 $539 30 LEGACIES. Uraf ton. Estate of Caroline B. Akin, by Win. Hastings, Ex... Jericho. Estate of HoseaSpaulding Cyrus M. Spaulding. 10; A. C. Spaul. ding, 5; Nellie M. Percival, 3; Ernest J. Spaulding, 3 MASSACHUSETTS, $7,331.50. Amesbury and Salisbury. Union Evan. Amherst. Cong. Cli ,40.22; Alonzo Duttons Sab. Sca. Class, No. Cong. Cli., 30, to const. Mrs. .JAKE E. SMiTH L. M Amherst. Rev. W. H. Beaman, 3; Mrs. Eliza Ayres, 2: Miss Sabra Ayres, 1, for Student Aid, Atlanta. U Andover. Mrs. Charles L. Mills, for Stu- dent Aid. Fisk U Andover. Friend Arlington. Cong. Cli. and Soc Ashburnham. First Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Fisk U Asliby. Cong. Sab. ~ch. and Friends, for Student Aid, Atlanta, U Aslifleld. Ladies of Cong. Cli. Bbl. of C ., for Chattanooga. Tenn. Auburndale. Rev. J. F. Clarke Auburndale. Mrs. Mary Johnson, Box of C. Beverly. Dane St. Ch. Sals. Sch., for Student Aid, Fisk U Boston. Mount Vernon Cli and Soc 366.28; HarrietN. Kirk, 10;, 10... Boston. S. D. Smith, 3 Organs Boston. Old South Sab 5db., 20, for Student Aid, Fisk U.: W. H. M. A., 10, for Kittrell, NC.; Old South Sab. Sch., 20, for Chattanooga Stude t Aid; Samuel Eliot, LL.D., 10, for Reading Rooms; Mrs. D. C. Holder, Box of C. and Books, for Chattanooga Teun.; Cong. Pub. Soc., Box S. S. Supplies, for Talladega C Boston. Jamaica Plain, Centrat Cong. Cli.. 50, for Kittrell, N. C.; Cong. Sab. lich., 50,forStudentAid,Atlanta U.. Braintree. South Cong. Cli. and Soc., 19.40 (adl) to const REV. EDWARD 0. DvERL.M.; AFriend, 15 Brockton. Mrs. T. C. Perkins Brookline. Harvard Cli. and Soc Brookline. S. A. C. Cambridgeport. Prospect St. Cli. and Soc Chariton. Cong. Cli., 18.79 and Sab. 5db., 7.53 adl. to const. M. DANIEL WOODBURY L.M Chelsea. Ladies Un. Home Missy Assn, for Lady Missionary, Chattanooga, Tenn Chester. Second Cong. Cli Chesterfield. Con C . and Soc Conway. Cong. Cli. and Soc Curtisville. F M. C. Dalton. Hon. Z. M. Crane. 100; Mrs. James B. Crane, 100 . . .. . Dorchester. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc.. 312.86; Rev. Charles Nichols, 30. to const. Rev. GEORGE L. WELLS, L. M... 200 00 21 00 $760 30 6 21 70 22 6 00 25 00 15 00 25 00 57 00 81 00 10 00 50 00 .386 28 300 00 60 00 100 00 34 40 50 105 70 5 00 79 22 26 32 136 88 5 25 3 00 6 79 3 00 200 00 342 80 89 East Hamptcm. Payson Cli $376 18 East Hampton. Ladies Benev. Soc. of Payson Cli., 2 Boxes of C., Sfor Freight for Tallageda C 5 00 East Long Meadow. Cong. Cli 31 00 East Nedw,ay. Cong. Ch. and Soc 9 00 East Somerville. E. Stone, for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 East Templeton. Joel Fairbanks 1 50 Edgartown. Cong. Cli 10 00 Enfleld. Cong. Cli. and Soc 31 10 Fall River. First Cong. Cli., 70; Third Cong Cli. and Soc., 19.78 89 78 Fitchburg. Friends, Bhl. of C., 2 for Freight, for Dudley, N. C 2 00 Florence. Ciass 21, Cong. Sab. 5db., 7.59: Rev E. G. Cobbs Bible Class, 5, for Student Aid, Fisk U 12 59 Framingliam. Plymouth Cli. and Soc... 165 15 Framingliam. Ladles of Plymouth Cli., 2 Blils. of C., val. 138.98, for Student Aid New Orleans, La. Gnrdrer. Ladies Soc., by Mrs. F. H. Whittemore, Sec., for Scholarship, Indian M 50 00 Gardner. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 25 00 Gloucester. Ryan. Cong. Cli. and Soc 75 00 Granby. Cong. Cli. and Soc 50 00 Granville. A Friend and Wife 10 00 Great Barrington. Member of Cong. Cli 100 Greenfleld. Second Cong. Cli., 90.36; Jeanette Thompson, S 95 36 Greenfield. Box of C. for Raleigh, N. C. Greenwich. Cong. Sab. 5db 14 29 Greenwich Village. A Friend 5 00 Hadley. First Cli. Sab. 5db 12 06 Hardwick. E. B. Foster 5 00 Hatcliville. Mrs. V. Hatch 1 00 Haverhill. E. Websters S. S. Class, West Cong. Cli., 10.52; West Cong. Cli. andSoc.,9 1952 Haydenville. Cong. Cli. and Soc 19 41 Ho p kinton. First Cong. Sab. 5db 48 55 Hubbardston. Lizzie B. Pollard, for Chinese M 1 00 Hyde Park. Cong. Sab Sch., 40; First Cong. Cli. and Soc., 17 57 CO Ipswich. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 1 35 Lancaster. Evan. Sab. Sch 10 00 Lav~ rence. Lawrence St. Cong. Cli. and Soc 136 47 Leeds. E. L. Clark 5 00 Lexington. Hancock Cli. and Soc 18 95 Linebrook. Cong. Cli. and Soc ~ 00 Lowell. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 72 67 MaIden. Sab. Sch. of Trinity Cong. Ch. for Student Aid, Fisk U 25 00 Malden. A Friend 1 00 Ma p lewood. Miss Johnsons S. S. Class, Jor Student Aid, Wilmington, N.C 300 Medford. A Friend 3 25 Middleborougli. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 1485 Milford. Ladies Benev. 8oc. of Cong. Cli., 2 Bhls. Bedding and C., 3.75 for fresght,for Talladega C 3 75 Nillbury. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., 69.20; M. D. Garfield, 5 74 20 Natick. song. Cli. and Soc 25 00 New Bedford. North Cong. Cli., (adi) 5 00 Newton. Eliot Cli. and Soc 136 00 Newton. Miss Ellen D. Jacksoii, Bhl. of C., for Macon, Ga. Newton Center. First Cong Cli. and Soc 8813 Newton Center. Rev. D. L. Furber. 50, Miss Hannah Loring. 25, Miss Mary Loring, 25, for Student Aid, Atlanfa U 100 00 Newton Center. Maria B. Furlier, Missy Soc.. Blil. and Box of C., for Chatta- nooqa, Teun. North Amherst. Jonathan Cowls 20 00 Nortlibridge. Cong. Cli. and Soc 5 00 Receipts. North Brookfleld. First Cong. Ch. and Socto const. MRS. GEo. W. BLISS, Mas. WM. 11. HOLT and H. J. LAWRENCE L. M.s $134 00 Oxford. First Cong. Chand Soc.,18.44; Cong. Sab. Sch, 17.33 35 77 Oxford. Ladies Missy Soc. of First Cong. Ch.,5, and Bbl. of C.. for Topeka, Palmer. Con . Ch ~ 00. Second g 2500 Pittsfield. James H. Dunham 50 00 Randolph. Miss Abby W. Turner, 50., Misses Alice M.Turner and EJosephine Turner, 50., for Student Aid, Atlanta U 100 00 Rockland. Cong. Ch. and Soc 50 00 Roxhury. Mrs. E. R. C., for Kittrell, N.C dOO Roxhury. A Friend~ 10, for Kittrell. 79. C. Incorrectly ack. in Feb. number. Salem. South Cong.Ch.and Soc.,142.40. George Driver, 1.50 143 90 Shelburne Falls. E. Maynard 6 00 Sherborn. Cong. Ch. and Sab. Sch 35 00 Somerville. I~~ew Years Offering of a Member, Franklin St. Ch., 5.00; Miss M. C. Sawyer, 1.50 6 50 South Attlehoro. First Cong. Ch. andSoc 946 South Attlehoro. Miss Mathias Sab.Sch. Class, Bbl. of C., 1.36 for Freight, for Raleigh, N. C 1 36 South Framingham. Ladies Assn, Bdl. of C. South Hadley Falls. Cong. Ch. and Soc. 10 00 South Weymouth. Second Cong. Ch. and Soc. to const. EMMONs DERIIY L. M 48 00 Spencer. Cong. Cb. and Soc., 190.55; Primary Dept Cong. Ch. 8ab. Sch., 6.87; Friends, 15 .. 212 42 Springfield. South Cong. Ch.. 72.39; First Ch., 24.37; J. Merrill, 10 106 76 Stockhridge. Cong. Ch . 45 19 Stockbridge. Box and 2 Bbls. C., 2, for Freight, for Raleigh, N. C 2 00 Stoneham. Cong. Ch., for Freight, for Tallodego C o 09 Stoughton. Betsey E. Capen 1 00 Swampscott. First Cong. Ch. and Soc 10 00 Taunton. Union Cn 12 12 Wakefield. Cong. Ch. and Soc 74 75 Ware. Chas. C. Hitchcock, for Student Aid, Straight U 25 00 Webster. Cong. Ch. and Soc 8 26j Wellesley. Cong. Ch. and Soc 83 13 Wellesley Hills. Grantville Ch. and Soc. 81 21 Westborough. Ladies Freedmens Mis. sion Assn, Bbl. of C., 1.50 for Freight, for Talladega C. (Lost on steamer City of Columbus) 1 50 West Brookfleld. Cong. Ch. and Soc... 16 32 West Duxbury. Mrs. Angelina P. Holmes, for Lady Missionaries a 00 Westfield. First Cong. Ch. for Scholar- ship, Hampton N. and A. Inst 70 00 Westfield. James Noble, for Attanta U 15 00 Westford. C. F. Keyes, 5; William Tay- lor SOc ~ West Medway. Mrs. Patience Shum. way . 00 West Newbury. J. C. Carr 1 50 West Newbury. Ladies of First Cong. Cb., 2 Bbls. of C. for Atlanta U. West Newton. Charity Circle for Fur- nishing a Room. 35 ea., in Fisk and Straight Universities 70 00 West Newt on. Second Cong. Ch. and Soc 40 11 Westport. Pacific Un. Sab. Sch 1 91 West Roxhury. S. D. Smith 50 00 West Roxbury. So. Evan. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Fisk U 25 00 West Springfield. Second Cong. Ch., 37.87; Park St. Cong. Ch., 15 52 87 Whitinsville. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Stu. dent Aid, Talladega C 48 00 Williamsburg. Cong. Ch. and Soc $100 00 Wilmington. Mrs. Susan Bancroft 6 00 Woburn. William Temple 5 00 Worcester. Union Ch. and Soc., 309.49, to const. Miss ANNIE S[NcLAIR MRS. JUL14 SI. BAKER, MRs. MARIA G. ~IoEN. EPHRAIM A. HARwoon. Miss CLARA WILLIS, CHARLES C. WOODMAN, MRS. Gao. H. KENnALL, MATHEW DOUGARES, SAMUEL G. CURTIS, L.Ms.; Old South Church and Soc., 67.10; to coust. DEA. EDWARD JEROME and MRs. A. L. SMITH L. Ms.; Union Ch. Sab. Sch., 50; Rev. Henry T. Cheever, 30; to const. RICHARD T. GROENER L. M., Win. J. White, 3; Mrs. C. W. Kent SOc.... .. 460 09 Worcester. Piyrnouth Cong. Ch. for Student Aid. Talladega C 10 00 . A Friend 20 00 $6,527 46 LEGACIES. Boston. Estate of Rev. Henry B. Hook- er, D. D., by A. W. Tufts, Ex 200 00 Easthaumpton. Bequest of Jennie A. Lyman, by Lemuel D. Lyman. Ex 50 00 Groton. Estate of Elizabeth B. Torrey by Nelson N. Torrey, Ex 100 00 Lancaster. Estate of Miss Sophia Stearns by Win. W. Wyman, Ex 4 04 Medfield. Estate of Mrs. Elizabeth L. Daniels by Mary B. Lovell, Ex 450 00 RHODE ISLAND, $484.49. $7,331 50 Central Falls. Cong. Ch 62 00 I~~ewport. Mrs. Sophia L. Little 5 00 Providence. Union Cong. Ch. and Soc.. 413 74 Westerly. Ladies Benev. Soc., Box of C.; 3.75 for Freight, for Raleigh, N. C 3 75 CONNECTICUT, $5,995.66. Ashford. First Cong. Ch 6 42 Barkhamstead. Cong. Cli 2 00 Berlin. Second Cong. CIs 9 27 Bethel. Cong. Ch 85 00 Bethlehem. Cong. Ch., for Student Aid, Tillotson C. # N. Inst 10 (10 BlackRock. Cong.Ch 1325 Branford. Cong. Cli 10 63 Bristol. Cong. Sab. Sch 20 00 Broad Brook. Cong. Ch 10 00 Chaplin. Mrs. J. W. Crosby 50 Chester. Cong. Sab. 5db., New Years Offering for Student Aid, Tougaloo U., and to const. EDWIN G. SMITH, L. M 33 70 Clinton. Cong. Ch. and Soc., to const. HORATIO KELSEY L. M 33 25 Collinsville. Cong. Ch 17 60 Cornwall Bridge. Geo. A. Swift 10 00 Cromwell. Cong. Cli 53 30 East Hartford. Edward A. Williams.. 38 87 East Wallingford. Mrs. Benjamin HaIl. 4 50 East Windsor. David 0. Bancroft, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 10 00 East Windsor. Miss Semantha Wells 2 00 Farmington. Cong. Cli 45 09 Gilead. Mrs. Thomas L. Brown 5 00 Greeneville. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Straight U 30 54 Guilford. First Cong. Cli 34 00 Guilford. Member Cong. Ch.. for Stu. dent Aid, Tilloison C. ~ N. Inst 2 00 Hadlyme. H. E. Hungerford, 100; Jos. W. Hungerford, 100; Cong. Ch., 8.40.. 208 40 Hartford. Asylum Hill Cong. Cli., 371.10 (10 of which for Indian M.); Second Ch. of Christ, 100; Mrs. Mary C. Bemis, 2S Hartford. Mrs. Julia ~ ~~ 496 10 Workshop, Lewis High School, Macon, Ga 300 Kensington. Cong. Cli 7 40 Killingworth. Cong. Sab. 5db 15 00 Lebanon. LRdies Aid Soc., Bbl. of C., 3 for li~reigh t, for Macon, Ga 3 00 ]?ecei.pts. Middlefleld. Cong. Cli. and Soc., to const. HENRY B. WILcox L. 111 $39 00 Middletown. Third Cong. Cli 21 00 Montville. First Cong. Cl? 6 00 Mount Carmel. Cong. Ch 12 92 Mystic Bridge. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Stu- dent Aid. Atlanta U 25 78 Mystic Bridge. Cong. Cli 15 91 New Britain. South Cong. Cli., to const. CHAS. E. HART, EDWARD N. STANLEY and S. H. BEARD L. Ms., 282.69; .30 to const. NoAH C. ROGERS L. M. by Win. H. Hart, Treas 312 69 New HaYen. R S. Fellowes, 100; 0. A. Dorman, 100; R. J. Miner, SOc 200 50 New Haven. H. E. Hart, for Student Aid. Talladega C 50 00 New Haven. North Cli. Mission Circle. by Carrie E. Richardson, Treas., for ~Scholarship, Dakota Home 50 00 New London. Second Cong. Cli 602 00 Newington. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Stu- dent Aid, Atlanta U 20 00 North Branford. Cong. Cli., 4.63; J. A. Palmer 2 6 63 Nortliford. Cong. Cli 10 00 North Guilford. A. E. Bartlett 10 00 North Woodstock. Cong. Cli 18 00 Norwalk. First Cong. Cli 24 59 Norwich. Second Cong. Sab. 5db., 25 Mrs. Chas. Lee, by Sarah M. Lee, 25.: 50 00 Norwich Town. ~ First Cong. Cli 31 50 Orange. Cong. Cli 8 00 Plantsville. T. Higgins, for new Build ing, Tillotson C. and N. Inst 100 00 PlantsYule. Young Ladies Soc.. Box of Bedding; Miss Smith, 2, for Freight for Little Rock, Ark 2 00 Plymouth. Cong. Sab. 5db.. for Student Aid, Talladega C 32 54 Pomfret. First Cong, Cli 60 00 Prospect. B. B. Brown 20 20 Putnam. Ladies of Cong. Cli., for Stu dent Aid, New Orleans, La 20 00 Rideefield. First Cong. Sab. 5db., for Student Aid, Fisk U 10 00 Salisbury. Cong. Cli 54 07 Soutliport. Friend 30 00 Tliompson. Cong. Cli. and Soc 15 60 ThompsonYule. Dennis Pease 50 UnionYule. Bbl. of C., D. A. Keyes, 2, for Freight, for Little Rock, Ark 2 00 Wapping. Cong. Cli 21 54 West Cliester. Cong. Cli 22 07 West Hartford. Mrs. M. 0. Richards. for Missionary, Fort Berf hold, Dak 30 00 West Hartford. Mrs. Harriet N. Chappell 10 00 West Winsted. Thomas C. Davis 5 00 Wilton. Cong. Cli 50 00 Windsor Locks. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Tillotson C. ~ N. Inst. - 50 00 Winsted. Mrs. M. A. Mitchefl, 20; Ellas E. Gilman. 10; Mrs. EmilyW. Case, 10 40 00 Wolcott. Cong. Cli 7 50 Woodbridge. Cong. Cli 12 50 Woodbury. Mrs. E. L. Curtiss 10 00 Woodbury. Mrs. C. P. Churchill (1 of which for Indian M. and 1 for Moun tam White Work) 2 50 Two Friends, for Theo. Dept Tolladega C 120 00 LEGACIES. $3,482.36 Guilford. Estate of Mrs. Lucy E Tuttle by Miss Clara I. Sage, Ex :2,000 00 Norwich. Estate of Mary A. Baker, by Frank J. Leavens, Ex 513 30 $5,995 66 NEW YORK, $1,98L87. Albany. First Cong. Cli 86 48 Raldwinsville. Howard Carter 25 00 Brooklyn. Clinton Av. Cong. Cli., 1,080.02; South Cong. Cn., 55; Mrs. Mary E. Whiton, 20; Mrs. M. L. Hol- us. 3; ~A Friend. 3; Misses Hutta- meyer, 2 Boxes of Books 1,159 02 91 Canastota. Enoch B. Northrup, 5; Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Childs, 5 $10 00 Churchville. Union Cong. Cli. and Soc 22 00 Cincinnatiis. Rev. E. Rogers 10 00 Coventry. Samuel A. Beardslee 5 00 Crown Point. Young Ladies Endeavor Soc. Box of material for sewing class, for Little Rock, Ark. Ellinglon. Mis. H. B. Rice, 5; Mrs. EIIER Rice, 4; A. C. Rice, 1 10 00 Elmira. Mrs. A. D. Stowell 10 00 Fulton. Mrs. C. G. Case and Miss J. hi. Porter. 5; J. C. Galispie, 5; A. Bristol, 5; T. W. Chesebro. 5 20 00 Gaines. Cong. Cli. and Soc. 25.71, and Sab. 5db. 6.03 31 74 Galway. Delia C. Davis, for Atlonta U 5 00 Gloversville. Cong. Cli. (100 of which from A. Judsou, and 50 from Mrs. SaraliB. Place) 24416 Granby Center. J. C. Harrington 5 00 Greenville. F. H. W 50 Homer. Mrs. Augusta Arnold, S; F. F. Pratt, 2 7 OG Hudson. Mrs. D. A. Jones 20 00 Jamestown. Emery Davis, Box of Med- vine, for Talladeqa C. Lockport. First Free Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db., to const. MISS LILLIE SIMMONS and MIss MAY REED L. Ms 75 00 LudlowYule. Sidney S. Todd 5 00 Marcellus. Mrs. L. Hemenway 2 00 Mexico. Catherine and A. Wheeler 2 00 Middlesex. Mrs. E. J. Adams and Les- ter Adams: 20 00 Newtonville. Mary anti Margaret J. Cusliman 4 00 New York. Thank offering from a Friend 15 00 New York. A. S. Barnes, 5 Boxes School Books. Perry Center. Cong. Sab. 5db., 12.50; Ladies Benev. Soc.. 11 23 50 Plattsburgh. G. W. Dodd 5 00 Pouglikeepsie. First Reformed Cli... 22 26 Rochester. Abraham Rubregise 1 50 Sherburn. Friends, Bhl. of C. for Tal- ladega C. Tompkinsville. Mrs. Maria Snyder 3 00 Vernon Centre. Rev. G. C. Juoson 3 00 Volney. Sab. Sch. of First Cong.Ch.. 25 50 Warsaw. Cong. Soc., 23.20; Cong. Sab. 5db., 21.28 44 48 Waterville. Mrs. Winchell, 5.; Mrs. J. Candee. 5. for Fisk U 10 00 West Bloomfield. Cong. Cli. and 30 57 Westinoreland. First Cong.Ch.Sab.Sch 2 16 Whitestown. James Symonds 5 00 Yaphank. A Friend 7 00 . A Friend 5 00 NEW JERSEY, $55.00. Bound Brook. Ladies Soc., Blilof C , 3 for Freight, for Little Rock, Ark 3 00 Chester. J. H. Cramer 20 00 New Brunswick. Mrs. S. L Chester 5 00 Newton. A Friend, for Santee Agency, Neb 2 00 Salem. W. Graham Tyler 25 00 PENNSYLVANiA, $19.00. Center Road. J. A. Scovel 2 50 East Springfield. Mrs. C. J. Cowles, 4.50 and ~ox of Books, for Macon, Ga 4 50 Mercersburg. Thomas C. Johnston, for Chinese and Indian M 4 00 North East. Miss C. A. Talcolt 1 00 Sewickley. E. H. Tite 2 00 West Alexander. John McCoy and wife 5 00 OHIO, $841.73. Alliance. Thank offering 2S 00 Ashland. Mrs. EliER Thompson 2 28 Belden. Cong. Cli 6 00 Bellefontaine. Mr. and Mrs. John Lind- say 1000 Berea, James S. Smedley . 5 00 92 Receipts. Birmingham. Cong. Ch 2 00 Brownhelm. Cong. Cli 13 00 Bucyrus Rev. Israel Lust, for Chris- tian Ed. of Indians 100 00 Cincinnati. Mrs. B. E. Aydelott .. 5 00 Cleveland. Franklin Av. Cong. Cli. and Sab. ScIe., 15.90; Bhl. of Books by B. Green is ~ Lidies Benev. Soc. of Ply- mouth Ch., Bbl. of C.. for Fisk U. Columbus. Ladies Soc. of Cong. Ch., for Missioisory Teacher, Ladies Island, S. C 100 00 Delaware. Win. bevan 5 00 Florence. Cong. Cli 1 00 Freedom. Cong. Ch 1:3 00 Grafton. Cong. Ch 4 00 Gustavus. Friends, Blil. and Pkg. of C., 2.75 for Freight, for Talladeqa C 2 75 Harmer. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid,Talladega C 13 00 Huntsburg. Cong. Cli. to const. L. D. Cs~.aa, L.M 3500 Kingsville. N. Whiting, 200; Rev. E. J. Comings, 10 210 00 Lindenville. Wayne Cong. Ch dl 00 Lodi. Miss Bertie Burr, 1; Mrs. Haynes, SOc 150 Lyme. Cong. Cli 20 40 Madison. H. S. Wilcox a 00 Mansfield. Anna L. and Susan W. Stur- gess, for Missionary, Meridian, Miss.. 50 00 Mansfield. Womans Beneficent Soc. of First Cong. Cli 12 00 Marietta. Miss M. B. Dimmond, Box of C., for Macon, Ga. Marysville. First Cong. Sali. Sch., for Student Aid, Talladega C 10 00 Newark. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Jones.... 5 00 New London. Cong. Ch 3 50 North Benton. Margret J. Hartzell 2 30 Oberlin. First Cong. Cli., 54.40; Dr. Dudley Allen, 30, to coust. Da. D. P. ALLEN L. M.; Rev. E. P. Ba Harris Lewis rrows, 10; 9940 Painesville. .~ W. Pierson 5 00 Paineaville. E. E. Johnson, for Indian M 450 Painesvill2. Woman;~ Home Missy Soc. of First Cong. Cli Box of valua- ble Bedding, Clothing and Table Linen, for Atlanta U. Radnor. Edward D. Jones 5 00 Salem. A. W. Allen 1 00 South Toledo. Mrs. John H. North.... 1 00 Strongsville. Con~ Cli Pk-~ Fisk U. of C..for Toledo. Laura Whiting, for Scholarship Fund. Beach Inst 8 00 Unionville. Rev. J. C. Burnell 2 00 Windliam. Win. A. Peikius 5 00 ILLINOIS, S921.38. Batavia. Cong. Ch 41 00 Bone Gap. Mrs. Martha G. Rice 2 00 Chicago. N. E. Cong. Cli. 13.5.14; N. E. Cong. Sab. 5db., Ot.6C; Re7. E. N. Andrews, 5: Mrs. J. H. M.Ar~hir, 5; Mrs. L. N. Cliapin, S 216 80 Chicago. XV. McGregor & 1 o., for Port- able Engine, Tougaloo U 100 00 Chicago. Ladies Missy Soc. of N. E. Cong. Cli., 22.30; for Lady Missy Mo- bile, Ala; Young Ladies Mission Cir- cle of N. E. Cb, 12.50, for Lady Missy IndiaaM 34 80 Chicago. Y. L. Missy Soc. of U. P. Cong. Cli., for Lady Miss~y, Indian if 17 35 Earlville. ..J A. D 100 00 Elgin. Bbl. of C. and 4, for Motile, Ala 4 00 Elgin. Mrs. E. E. C. Borden 1 50 Evanston. Young Ladies Missionary Soc. of First Cong. Cli., 2 Blue. tapers and Magazines. for Atlanta U. Geneseo. First Cong. Cli 73 93 Highland Park. L. S. Bingliam Hinsdale. J. W. Bushnell Buntly Grove. Cong. Cli Kankakee. ~Vesleyan Methodist Cir- cuit Kewanee. Womans Missy Soc., for Lady Missy, Little Rock, Ark Marshall. Two Friends Mason. Blil. of C., for MobUe, Ala. Mendon. Cong. Sal. Sch Moline. Thomas Jewett, for Portable Engine, Tougaloo, Miss Morrison. Cong. Cli, to const. SAMUEL W.ELYL.M Onargo. Mrs. L. C. Foster, for Lady Missy, Mobile, Ala Paxtun. A Friend Princeton. Mrs. P. B. Corss Wilmette. Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Fisk U Winnebago. N. F. Parsons MiCHIGAN, $142. 98. Bay City. Mrs. A. P. Lyon Chelsea. Dea. John C. Winans Churchs Corners. Mrs. John Williams. Detroit. Mrs. Martha D. Wells Dexter. Dennis Warner Four Towns. Rev. E. C. Herrington, for Student Aid, Atlanta U Grand Rapids. First Cong. Sal. Sch., for Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke Ida. T. D. Schafers Class, long. Cli., for Student Aid, Fisk U Kalamazoo. Plymouth Cong. Cli Laingsburg. Cong. Cli Milford. Ansley A. Arms, 5: Mrs. Win. A. Arms, 5; Mrs. Eliza Greacen, I Somerset. Cong. Cli Summit. Missy Soc , by Mrs. A. Van- sickle Vermontville. Mrs. C. M. Sprague... White Lake. Robert Garner IOWA, $997.06. Burlington. Cong. Cli Castalia. Mrs. Pamelia W. Baker. for Lady Missionary, New Orleans, La... Cedar Falls. Cong. Cli., Coin. Service, 2.75,for Freight,for Talladega C. Clay. Cong. Cli Council Bluffs. Womans Missy Soc., for Lady Missloisary, New Orleans, La Davenport. Edwards Cli. Sal - Sch., 10; G. ~V. Cable, 10, for Student Aid, Tal- ladega C Duhuque. Cong. Sal. Sch Fairfield. ltev. A. S. Wells Grinnell. Mrs. J. B. Grinnell, 10: Miss Lombard 5 for Student Aid. Talla- dega C do~ig. Sab. Sch., Box of Christ- mas Gilts, for Tolladega C Urinnell. F. P. B., for Raleigh., N.C. McGregor. Womans Missy Soc Newton. Wittemherg Cong. Sali Sch... Osage. Cong. Cli., 11: Cheerful Givers Mission Circle of Cong. Cli., 16 Shenandoah. Cong. Cli Sherrills Mount. Jacob Reuth Washington. BII. of C. ,for Talladega C. Decorali $5 03 7 00 10 00 17 00 25 00 1 00 17 50 100 00 30 00 20 00. 50 00. 15 0l~ 12 50 20 00 5 00 50 00 50 5 00 10 00 5 00 10 00 2 23. 10 00 5 50 11 00 13 00 2 73. 1 00 10 00 54 71 20 00 2 73. 12 00 15 00 20 00 8 41 4 38 15 00 6 73. 3 86 12 22 27 00 12 30 2 00 1000 - $226 38 LEnAcY. Danville. Estate of Mrs. Harriet Hunt- ington, by G. H. Mix, Ex 770 68 $997 06 WISCONSIN, $397.19. Appleton. Cong. Cli 46 30 Beloit. First Cong. Cli., 150.71 ; L. Meacliain, 1.50 152 21 Bloomington. Cong. Cli 4 56 Darlington. Cong. Ch 6 63. Delavan. Rev. S. R. Wells 5 00 East Troy. Ladies of Cong. Cli., for Lady Missy, Texas 6 7 Fond duLac. Cong. Cli 10 0 Receipts. Green Bay. Young Peoples Soc. of First Preeb. Cli for Workshop, Lewis High Sc/i., Macon. Ga $12 00 Janesville. Miss Jeffrie~ for Student Aid, Macon, Ga 5 00 Lake Geneva. First Cong. Ch 19 2 Madison. First Cong. Ch ~ 00 Menasha. First Cong. Cli 30 00 New Richmond. Cong. Cli 13 54 Racine. Mrs. D. D. Nichols 50 Sheboygan. A. Dyke, SOc.; Daniel Brown, SOc 1 00 Sparta. Cong. Cli..... 2424 Waupun. Cong. Ch., 1750, and Sab. Sch., 15 32 50 LECAcY. $395 08 Darien. Estate of Lydia L. Sheldon, hy Charles Allen, Ex 2 11 ~:397 19 3 00 27 33 15 00 17 80 12 50 52 76 50 00 MINNESOTA, $631. 02. Alexandria. A Friend Austin. Union Cong. Cli Excelsior. Cong. Cli Mantorville First Cong. Cli Marshall. Womans Missionary Soc.... Minneapolis Plymouth Ch Minneapolis. First. Cong. Sali. 5db., for Student Aid, Atlanta U Minneapolis. Ladies of First Cli.. 9 50; Plymouth Cli.. 17.50; Saint Paul, Ply. month Ch, 8.50; Friends. 6 98: by Mrs. C.A Huntington, forMissio cry, Fort Sully, Dak Minneapolis, E. D. First Cong. Cli Nortlifield. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Stu. dent Aid, Talladeqa C Nortlifleld. Mrs. J. Stowell, deceased, for Talladega C Saint Paul. Plymouth Cong. Cli Zumbrota. A Friend. for Student Aid, Wilmington. N. C . Friends, for Furnishing Chapel in Stone Hall, Atlanta U KANSAS, $62.20. Atchison. Cong. Cli Manhattan. Mrs. Mary Parker of Cong. Cli .. .. Topeka. Tuition MISSOURI. $64.74. Laclede. Rev. E. D. Seward St. Louis. First Cong. Ch NEBRASKA, $78.39. Bradshaw. Cong. Cli Exeter. Ladies Missy Soc., 15; Clill. drens Soc., 2; First Cong. CL, 7.45... Lincoln. Cong. Cli., 31.64; K. & C., 5 Nebraska City:~ A Friend CALIFORNIA. $415.00. Arcata. Books and Pictures, vat. 12, for Selrna, Ala. Oakland. Mrs. N. Gray, foi~ School- house, Hillsborough, N. C Santa Cruz. Pliny Fay San Francisco. The California Chinese Mission MARYLAND, $10 00. Baltimore. W. K. Carson KENTUCKY. $78.50. Lexington. Tuition VIRGINIA, $25.00. Buckners Station. George Clendon. TENNESSEE, $485.40. Jonesliorough. Warner Inst., Tuition... Memphis. Le Moyne Sch., Tuition Nashville. Fisk U., Tuition NORTH CAItOLINA, $283.68. Hillsborough. Warren 5db Kittrell. Tuition Raleigh. Miss E. P. Hayes, for Student Aid. Atlanta U Wilmington. Tuition, 240.05; Win. Her- bert Thrall, 10.; Cong. Cli., 8 42 49 21 00 45 60 2 40 87 14 4 00 250 00 iS 00 1000 37 20 1 50 6324 2 30 2445 36 64 15 00 125 00 10 00 280 00 10 00 78 50 25 00 a to 216 70 262 95 7 63 8 00 10 00 258 05 SOUTH CAROLINA, $15.00. Charleston. Plymouth Cli. $15 00 GEORGIA. $626.93. Atlanta. Storrs Sch., Tuition, 213.58; Rent, 3,: First Cong. Cli, 30.; Mr. Catlins little daughter, for the Poor, 10 2S6 58 Alantii. Womans Missy Soc. of First Cong. Cli., for Hampton N. rh A. Inst 6 00 Atlanbi. Friends, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 2 00 Macon. Lewis High 5db., Tuition 150 50 McIntosh. Dorchester Academy, Tui- tion 33 00 Savannah. Beach Inst., Tuition, 140.35; Rent, 18.50; Cong. Cli., 20 178 85 ALABAMA, $611.62. Athens. Lizzie McCombs, for African M.. 200 Marion. Cong. Cli., 42.07; Rent, 10 52 07 Mobile. Emerson Inst., Tuition 206 30 Montgomery. Cong. Cli 20 00 Selma. First Cong. Cli 20 40 Talladega. Talladega C., Tuition, 300.85; Cong. Cli., 10 310 83 FLORIDA, $10.00. Daytona. First Cong. Cli 10 00 LOUISIANA, $223.50. New Orleans. Straight U., Tuition 223 50 Austin. TEXAS. $258.13 Tillotson C. & N. Inst., Taition, 256 13 Helena. Rev. Mitchell Thompson ii 00 CANADA, $18.00. Montreal. Emmanuel Cli 8 00 Toronto. Rev. Edward Ebbs 10 00 INCOMES, $933.54. Avery Fund, for Mendi M 580 86 Gen. Clinton B. Fisk, Scholarship Fund, for Fisk U 15 00 Fisa Theological Endowment Fund... 2 4~ Graves Library Fund, for Atlanta U 150 00 Greenwich, N. Y., Scholarship Fund, for Straight U... 3500 Hammond Fund, i Straight U 1 30 Hastings Scholarship Fund, for Atlanta U . . ........ 708 Le Moyne Fund. forMemph;s, Tenn 38 25 Plumb Scholarship Fund, for Fisk U 50 00 Theological Endowment Fund, for How- ard U 53 61. Total for January $26914 57 Total from Oct. 1 to Jan. 31 79,730 87 FOR AMERICAN MISSIONARY. Subscriptions for January $193 66 Previously acknowledged 198 33 Total $393 93 ENDOWMENT FUND. Boston, Mass., W. 0 Grover, 2.500; John H. Dennison, 500; Stewart, Noyes & Co., for Geo. E. Noyes, 100; W3rcester, Mass., S. E. Hildreth, 100; Bristol. B. I., Mrs. M. De W. Rogers, 250; Pawtucket, R. I.. Darius Gaff. 250; Providence, R. I., Geo. H. Cerliss, 1,000; W. R. Talbot, 20: Norwich, Coun., H. B Norton, 50; Friends. by 15ev. C. A. Harvey, D. D., 88.92: for Stone Endowment Fund for Chair of Revealed Thea., Howard U REcEIPTs OF THE CALIFoaNIA CHINESE MIssioN from Oct. 1, 1883, to Jan. 23, 1884. E. Palache, Treas. Faoai AUXILIARY MIsSIONs: Marysville, Anniversary Coil. (10 o! which from Hon. J. H. Jewett), 19.10: One Annual Member. 2. Chinese Monthly Offerings Marysville, 32; Orovills, 16.30: Peta. luma, 9.6 ; Placerville, 3.50: Sacra mento. 2S.SO; Santa Barbara, 14; Santa Crnz. 34.2S: Stockton. 8 164 45 Fame CHuacHEs: GrassValley, Cong. Cli. 94 Receipts. 18: San Francisco. First Ch.. a Japan- ese~ 25c.; Bethany, B. A. W.,5. Chi- nese Monthly OfferingsCentral fich., 28.80: West Sch.1 24.50; Bethany Sch., 16 FROM INOIVInUALs: Vacaville, Mrs. H. Scott. 2: Honolulu, Oahu., Rev. W. C. Merritt, 2 FROM EASTERN FasENus: Bangor, Me., Almost Home, 12; .~ A ~ew Hamp- shire Friend, 5; Chicago, Ill., Lee Haim., 2 9253 4 00 19 00 Total $280 00 H. W. HUBBARD, Treas., 56 Reade St.. N. Y. DR. JOHN HALLS NEWEST BOOK. A CHRISTIAN HOME: How to Make and How to Maintain it. l2mo. cloth, beautifully hound. 250 pp. Price 1.00. i-pecial Edition for wedding presents, $1.50. The American Sunday-School Union, 1,122 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, 10 Bible House, New York. PEARLS TNE ]4OUTH Beauty and Fragance Are communicated to the mouth by SOZODONT which renders the teeth peony white, the gums rosy, and the breath eet. By those who have used it, it is regarded as an indispensable adjunct of the toilet. It thoroughly remoces tartar from the teeth, without injuring the enamel. SOLD BY DRUGGISTS SKIN HUMORS CAN BE CURED BY GLENNS SULPIIIJR SOAP. SAN FaAacssco, Feb lb 1883 Mr C N. Crcttenton: DEAR SIR: I wish to call your attention to the good your Sulphur Soap Las done me. For nearly fourteen years I have been troubled with a skin humor resembling salt rheum-. I have spent nearly a small fortune for doctors and medicine, but with only temporary relief. I commenced using your Glenns Sulphur Soap nearly two yenrs agoused it in baths and as a toilet soap daily. My skin is now as clear as an Infants, and 110 one would be able to tell that I ever had a skin complaint. I would not be without the soap if It cost five times the amount. Yours respectfully. M. H. MORRIS. LICE HousE. San Francisco, Cal. The above testimonial is indisputable evidence that Glenns Sulphur Soap will eliminate poison- ous Skin Diseases WHEN ALL OTHER MEAN5 IIAVE FAILED. To this fact thousands have testified; and that it will banish lesser afflictions, such as common PIMPLES, ERUPTIONS and soaas, nud keep the skin clear and beautiful, is abso- lutely certain. For this reason ladies whose complexions have been improved by the use of this soap NOW MAKE IT A CONSTANT TOILET AP- PENDAGE. The genuine always beais the name of C. N. CRITTENTON, 115 Fulton street, New York, sole proprietor. For sale by all druggists or mailed to any address on receipt of 30 cents in stamps, or three cakes for 75 cents. J. & JR. LAMB, 59 CarmIne St. Sixth Ave. cars pass the door. BANNERS IN SILK, NEW DESIGNS. CHURCH FURNITURE SEND FOR HAND BOOK av MAIL. The Great FIIINKS Patent Reflectors give the Most Powerful, the Softest, Cheapest and theIletLightk00~~ for Cliorches Stores Show Windows. ~ Parlors, Banl~s. Offices, Picture Galler- ies. Theatres, Depots, etc. New and ele. gantdesigns. Send aiceof room. Get circn1arandestima~ A liberal di to ch,,rchcs md the trade I. P. FRINK, 551 Iearl St. N. Y. TO INVE~TO1~. $925 and accrued interest will buy a $1,000 6 per cent. gold coupon bond of the EAST aM WEST R.R. f~OI OF ALABAMA This Is a strictly first class investment bond, se- cured by a first mortgage on an old rood, fully built and equipped, that has always p aid its interest, and earns a dividend on its stock besides. This bond every six months. No taxes, no wlH~ay you $30 safe investment. For sale by the EAST AND WEST R. R. CO. OF ALA., 502 Bway, or AMERICAN LOAN AND TRUST CO., 113 Bway, N.Y. (~9r)) CONSUMPTION AND CATARRH! Many thousands fully believe they or their friends are being hurried toward [2 the grave by that terrible disease CONSUMPTION and are being treated for that disease, when they have only CATARRH in some of Its macv evnes~ the svmn- toms in many forms of these diseases are quite sim liar and can easily be mistaken. Catarrh, unalaim TIIUQTIR ing in its character and beginnings, neglected d velops and spreads, and in time poisons the x ital I rgans. until it finally is no longer CATARRH, hut some disease that gives but little hope of health or life. We do not claim to cure Consumption, but are fully convinced from the re suits of oar daily practice that we can save and ie store to health many who now feel their case to be hopeless. Danger Signals ~~IYOU take 55155 LOLOf Have you a cold in the head that does not get bet siave yoila nacaing cough? Is your throat affected? Are you tmoubled hoarseness? Soreness of throat? Difficulty in breathing? Have you a pain - in the head, between and above the eyes? A sense of tallness in the head? Are ~- ONLY CA TA RRU Ihe passages of the nose stopped up? Is your breath foul? Have you lost all seis~ 01 siliesi? Are 3 troubled by hawking? Spitting? Weak, infiansed eyes? Dullness or dizziness (If the head? Dryness or heat of the nose? Is your volceh ars ho r rough? Have you difficulty in talkiiig? Have you an excessive secierion of mucus oi matter in th~ nasci passages, which must either he blown from the nose or drop hack behind ehe p date, or hasvked or so uffed~ack~~ard to the throat? Ringing or roaring or other noise in the ais more oi less impairment (If the hearing? IF SO, YOU HA VE (A TA RRH. IOu long continued corruption of the air that Is Some B ad ~y m pto fli S breathed, passing over the foul matter in the nasal pas- sages, poisuns the lungs and from thence the 1)100(1. The morbid matter that I ~e-~ is ssvaliowe(l duriiig sleep passes Into the stcunacli, eiifeebles the digestion, I I vitiates the secretions ann pollutes the very fountains of life. The pailent be- co irs feverlsh, occasionally there is less buoyancy of snirits. the apoetite is oftmn fickle the head tess clear; It Is difficult to Z heep the eneigies up to the old standard, and ofteii ((It ass~ell (lithe timeasheusedtohe. ss ith InC knoss leoge why be is conscious that he is We Can Cure You:~e~4~Y K y med mt Irefully and critically, and the whole ~e tr atni ut eonpIun(ied to meet the wants of each mndis duo I (this fact alone much of our success dw 1(1(1 sse think iio ease is incurable svieii our is it CessuMerioe questions sic properly answered. The of Others Childs Treatnient for Experience catarrh and all cases of time head, throat and lungs Is not new and untried, hut a positive an(i certain remedy. We, above all things, desire to establsh confidence In our treauncot, so tiia every ferer f room (atarrh, Bronchitis and their effects oii the Luiigs and other Vital Organs, may feel certain success In its use. We have thousaiids of letters from patients we have cured. I am glad to say that I found your medicine all I have been permanently cured of Catarrh in the that can be claimel for It. I am fully restored, head by the use of your Catarrh Specific. I will an J. H. SIGFRIED, Pottsvllie, Pa. swer all letters addressed to moe in regard to this I have used y,~ur Catarrh treatment and am subject. Yours with thauuks. E. POWELL. Heath, Burke Co.. N. C. cured- A thousand thanks to you for so sure a rem- Aug. 18, 1882. edy FANNIE DEMENT, Dyer Station, Teun. It has not only cuired my wife of Catarrh in the I ani much pleased to say that I have used the head and throat, but has cured her of dyspepsia. treatnmentfaithfumliy, with the happiest and best re- B. S. DUNKIN, Carrol, Ind. suits. JOHN A. PRATT, Goffs Falls, S. H. Aug. 8, 1852. I am so far recovered that I am able to attend You may use uumy name, also that of my wife; we church, can walk half a mile. Have a good appe- have both been cured by your treatment. We rec- tite, am gaining all the time. ommend your remedies to all we hear saying they MRS. A. N. MUNGE R, Detroit, Rich. have Catarrh. We can (10 it wIth pleasure aiid conscientiously, for we know of what we speak. About one year ago 1 ordered your Bronchial L. Vv - SPAYD, Colorado Springs. Col. treatment for my father. The benefits to him have I was thought to have had consumption. aimd had been magical, and far beyond our most sanguine suffered many years with what was really Catarrh, expectations, as this has been the only winter for - fore I rocured several years that he has not passed most of the be p your treatment. I have had no time In bed, all the time in the house, return oc the disease. MISS LOUISE JAMES, Crab Orchard, Ky. Very truly, C. S. SHERWOOD, Portsmouth, Va. When I received your treatummeuut I could hardly Between nine and ten years ago, being afflicted move about, but before I had used It six weeks I with Catamrh, I obtained your course of treatment, could work all the tIme, amud have been attending to and after persisting In Its use some omnIuths was com- my business ever since. leletely cured, sod have had no return of the disease. I shall always recommend your treatment in the A. J. STILL, Pattenburg, N. J. highest terms. Yours respectfully. Mr. Z. Z. LEE, of Grangevilie, St. Helena Par., La., IRVING C. GLISSON, Mobleys Pouid, Ga. svrites: I cannot speak too highly In praIse of your Your omedicines were duly received, and effected a valuable remedies, which act like a charm In re- perfect cure. Thanks for your promapt attention lieving the loathsome disease for which they are and for the thorough cure of my husband. recouim amended. Respectfully, You may use my nanme as a reference, as I have MRS. A. L. FORELAND. Centreville, Texas. been cured by your treatmeust. 1 shall be pleased to Your ureatment has cured my daughter of Catarrh amiswer any mci nines In regard to your remedies. liuduced by a severe attack of measles. ~RRY TRUESDELL, Rock Dale Mills. Mass. JOHN W. RILEY, U. S. Express Ageuit, Troy, 0. H. Childs Treatment for Catarrh, and all diseases of the Head. H me Treatm e nt Throat and Lummgs, can be taken at lmome with perfect ease and safety by the patient. We especially desire tIm treat those who have Iried other lem dies without success. A full statemeust of method of ho me treatment and cost will he sent oum application Address, Rev. T. P. CHILDS, Troy, Ohio. Say you saw this advertiseIssemut In AsuxaucAN MussuoNAav. (9eY) The ~~ew only Con ~treet, ~.1II LANTERN ror $12 Lantern. iu n~u easily made ham EVERY NIGHT. Worid ~Iallfg nassau ~LIuOL, ~ York We wifl give thie ~antern Free to any person who will send 1(8 an order for ~czmerican Dictionaries. Send $1.00 for a Dictionary and get ~ club.

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The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 4 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York Apr 1884 0038 004
The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 4, miscellaneous front pages 96A-96B

~XFJ~I~, 1884. _ VOL. XXXVIII // NO.4. WI _ 0.0 I !IrnlitIgut __ lIft j EWI I _________________________________________________________________ ~ ________ PAGE. THE JNI)IANS. 1A(;E. EDITORIAL. THE NEW GARRISON AND How n GOT T1j~RE 112 SAVING SOULS THE CHINESE. PARAGRAPHSREVIVAL WORKSIGNIFI CANT FACTS 9~ PERSONAL OBSERVATION OF A. M. A. THE DANGER LINE 100 \VOI~K AMONG CHINESE 114 How IT STRIKES THE SECT A~ CRESS 102 J3UREAU OF WOMANS WORK. BENEFACTIONSGENERAL N& ~ , 103 PARAGRAPHA PLAN WITH THE REA- ARAB MERCHANT AND SLAVES (cu ~.IO4 SONS. ii6 CONVERSATION ON HOME MISSIONS .6 IMPRESSIONS OF A NEW TEACHER..... . 117 THE SOUTH CHILDRENS PAGE. hi TH~ MOUNTAINS NE~vs FROM HAMPTON 107 WEDD~.NG PARTY (cut) TENNESSEE RIVER AT CHATTANOOGA (cut) log ECHOES FROM THE TREASURY.. 120 NEWS FROM NASHVILLE . 109 LETTER FROM CHARLESTON III RECEIPTS 120 NEW YORK: PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. Rooms, 56 Reade Street ?rice ~o Cents a Vear, in Advance. 1~ntered nt the Post-Oflicc at Nesv Vork, N. V., as second-class niatter. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. PRESIDENT. Hon. WM. B. WASESuRE, LL.D., Mass. CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.- -REV. M. E. STRIERY. D. D., 56 Reade Street, N. Y. ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COLLECTIONREV. JAMES POWELL, 56 Reade Street, N. Y. TREASURERH. W. HUBBARD, Esq., 56 Reade Street, N. Y. AUDITORS.WM. A. NASH, W. H. ROGERS. EXECUTIYB COMMITTEE. Joint H. WASHBURN, Chairman; A. P. FOSTER, Secretary; LYMAN ABBoTT, A. S. BARNES, J. R. DANFOETH, CLINTON B. FISK, S. B. HALLIDAY, EDWARD HAWES, SAMUEL HOLMES, CHARLES A. HULL, SAMUEL S. MARPLES, CHARLES L. MEAD, S. H. VIRGIN, WM. H. WARD, J. L. WITHEOW. DISTRICT SECRETARIES. Rev. C. L. WOODWORTH, D.D., Boston. Rev. G. D. PIKE, D.D4 New York. , Chicago. COMMUNICATIONS relating to ti~se work of the Association may be addressed to the Corresponding Secretary; those relatingto4se colleCting fields, to the Di~trict Secretaries; letters for the Editor of the American Missionary.1 to Rev. G. D. Pike, D. D., at the New York Office; letters for the Bureau of Womans Work. ~to Ml~s D. E. Emerson, at the New York Office. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New York, or, when more con- venient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street, Chicago, 111. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a Life Member. FORM OF A BEQUEST. I BEQEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay the sam in of ~ after my decease to the person who, when the same is payarile, shall act as Treasurer American Missionary Assoclition, of New York City. to be applied, under the direction of the Executive Commitrec of the Association, to itscharitablc uses and purposes. The Will should be attested by three witnesscs. (CHAPTER 1,) AGE: ~. YEARS. The first words that appear on our annual state ment are, in substance, the above. Age, in the realm of finance, almost always im- plies strength, and when you consider the perilous times of the past, and the heavy seas which swept so many companies away, you must admit that our timbers arc staunch anti our seaworthiness first-rate. We are surely old enough to know how to carry on a Life Insurance businees. Please remember, then, that we have age and experience to our credit, and Chapter First closes. MANHA11~AN LVIF~ IN5URANOE~ GO., 15b & 158 l3roadw y. New York. 1IORSFORDS ACID PHOSPHATE. (LIQUID.) ROR DYSPEPSIA, MENTAL AND PHYSICAL EXRAU?.TION, NERVOUsnESS. DI- MINISHED VITALITY, URINARY DIFFICULTIES, ETU. PtIEPARED ACCORDtNG TO THE DIRECTION OF Prof. E. N. iloraford, of Cambridge, ItIass. There seems to be no difference of opinion in high medical authority of the value of phos- phoric acid, and no preparation has ever been offered to the public which seems to so happily meet the general want as this. It is not nauseous, but agreeable to the taste. No danger can attend its use. Its action will harm6nize with such stimulants es are necessary to take. It rrakes a delicious drink with water and sugat only. Prices reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free on application. MANUFAcTURED BY THE RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, R. I., AND FOR SALS BY ALL DRUGGIST9,

Saving Souls Editorial 97-98

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL. XXXVIII. APRIL, 1884. No. 4. ~4~mAwic~in ~ti$4~iLY1EU4J ~ssi~ici~diLrn. SAVING SOULS. The supreme object of a missionary society is to save souls. The mere mention of a missionary suggests the thought. Whoever enters mission- ary service from any church or locality emphasizes and magnifies the work of saving souls in that community, and takes rank at once as a prayerful, pious and consecrated Christian believer. The churches most constant and liberal in their gifts for missions, the most observant of monthly concerts and mission circles, are keenly alive to the work of saving souls, and it is to be expected that such churches will be blest with precious revivals. The heart that loves God and His kingdom gives till the sacrifice is felt, and the gift is accompanied with prayers for Gods blessing upon it in the salvation of souls. A continuous current of prayers and alms is going up before God from the vast body of believers, that all mankind may have the offer of, and participate iii, the blessings of salvation. It is noteworthy, also, that this current is continually increasing in volume, and we think we are warranted by Gods word and His provi- denees to believe it will continue to increase steadily till the knowledge of the Lord fills the whole earth. There is no work so rich in blessings to those who give and those who receive as that of saving souls. It brings one into fellowship with Christ and provides an inheritance for the world to come. When God makes up his jewels, the souls we have brought to him will be as stars in the crown of our rejoicing throughout eternity. What better can one do for the Master, for the world, for himself, than to promote this work? And apart from personal effort what agencies are more serviceable than great mis- sionary organizations? Should they not receive the utmost we can give of labor, Irayer and benefaction ? 98 Revival WoricSignaficant Facts. PERSONS wishing their donations to a particular institution applied for specific wQrk, such as aid to a student or help in furnishing rooms, etc., will please mention the same when forwarding their gifts, as otherwise we credit the amount to the general work of the institution. Rev. Islay Walden, missionary of this Association, died February 2. He was educated at the 1-Joward University and the American Reformed Semi- nary, and entered our service in his native county in North Carolina. The locality was destitute. lie rallied the people, developed a village with school-house and church, secured a post-office and became postmaster. Here he labored four years, blessed with revivals, and was honored by the people, black and white. his wife, an educated and judicious missionary teacher, was of great assistance to him in all his work. He died of acute bronchitis. REVIVAL WORK. It gives us great pleasure to report that quite a number of our institu- tions have been blessed with precious revivals during the winter. Rev. Mr. Fields, the colored evangelist, with his wife, has rendered efficient service at some points. We shall give an account of this revival work, as it has been carried on at the different institutions, in the next number of the MIssIoxAay. SIGNIFICANT FACTS, PROF. R. C. HITCHCOCK. In the city of New Orleans not many churches have been built, but in fact there was no need. The multiplication of little churches was not an indication of great religious activity, but rather of a lack of unity of feel- ing. The present disposition seems to be to give better support to those already existing, to keep buildings in better repair, to concentrate rather than disperse force. The St. James A. M. E. peol)le have lately expended 1,200 in repair and rearrangement, and there has been quite a general fixing up in most of the colored churches. In the parishes about, many new churches have been built and, as in the city, revivals have been numerous and marked by less of excitement and nonsense and more of earnest feeling. ~his change may be largely attributed to the presence in so many communities of those who have learned more intelligent and better ways in the universities. A few missionary societies have been organized, the work being as yet confined to home needs, but the thoughts of many are turning toward Africa and I think the burden is growing on their minds that to them ought to belong the mission of the enlightenment of the home land. All the schools are full. At Straight we have been obliged to turn

Paragraphs Editorial 98

98 Revival WoricSignaficant Facts. PERSONS wishing their donations to a particular institution applied for specific wQrk, such as aid to a student or help in furnishing rooms, etc., will please mention the same when forwarding their gifts, as otherwise we credit the amount to the general work of the institution. Rev. Islay Walden, missionary of this Association, died February 2. He was educated at the 1-Joward University and the American Reformed Semi- nary, and entered our service in his native county in North Carolina. The locality was destitute. lie rallied the people, developed a village with school-house and church, secured a post-office and became postmaster. Here he labored four years, blessed with revivals, and was honored by the people, black and white. his wife, an educated and judicious missionary teacher, was of great assistance to him in all his work. He died of acute bronchitis. REVIVAL WORK. It gives us great pleasure to report that quite a number of our institu- tions have been blessed with precious revivals during the winter. Rev. Mr. Fields, the colored evangelist, with his wife, has rendered efficient service at some points. We shall give an account of this revival work, as it has been carried on at the different institutions, in the next number of the MIssIoxAay. SIGNIFICANT FACTS, PROF. R. C. HITCHCOCK. In the city of New Orleans not many churches have been built, but in fact there was no need. The multiplication of little churches was not an indication of great religious activity, but rather of a lack of unity of feel- ing. The present disposition seems to be to give better support to those already existing, to keep buildings in better repair, to concentrate rather than disperse force. The St. James A. M. E. peol)le have lately expended 1,200 in repair and rearrangement, and there has been quite a general fixing up in most of the colored churches. In the parishes about, many new churches have been built and, as in the city, revivals have been numerous and marked by less of excitement and nonsense and more of earnest feeling. ~his change may be largely attributed to the presence in so many communities of those who have learned more intelligent and better ways in the universities. A few missionary societies have been organized, the work being as yet confined to home needs, but the thoughts of many are turning toward Africa and I think the burden is growing on their minds that to them ought to belong the mission of the enlightenment of the home land. All the schools are full. At Straight we have been obliged to turn

Revival Work Editorial 98

98 Revival WoricSignaficant Facts. PERSONS wishing their donations to a particular institution applied for specific wQrk, such as aid to a student or help in furnishing rooms, etc., will please mention the same when forwarding their gifts, as otherwise we credit the amount to the general work of the institution. Rev. Islay Walden, missionary of this Association, died February 2. He was educated at the 1-Joward University and the American Reformed Semi- nary, and entered our service in his native county in North Carolina. The locality was destitute. lie rallied the people, developed a village with school-house and church, secured a post-office and became postmaster. Here he labored four years, blessed with revivals, and was honored by the people, black and white. his wife, an educated and judicious missionary teacher, was of great assistance to him in all his work. He died of acute bronchitis. REVIVAL WORK. It gives us great pleasure to report that quite a number of our institu- tions have been blessed with precious revivals during the winter. Rev. Mr. Fields, the colored evangelist, with his wife, has rendered efficient service at some points. We shall give an account of this revival work, as it has been carried on at the different institutions, in the next number of the MIssIoxAay. SIGNIFICANT FACTS, PROF. R. C. HITCHCOCK. In the city of New Orleans not many churches have been built, but in fact there was no need. The multiplication of little churches was not an indication of great religious activity, but rather of a lack of unity of feel- ing. The present disposition seems to be to give better support to those already existing, to keep buildings in better repair, to concentrate rather than disperse force. The St. James A. M. E. peol)le have lately expended 1,200 in repair and rearrangement, and there has been quite a general fixing up in most of the colored churches. In the parishes about, many new churches have been built and, as in the city, revivals have been numerous and marked by less of excitement and nonsense and more of earnest feeling. ~his change may be largely attributed to the presence in so many communities of those who have learned more intelligent and better ways in the universities. A few missionary societies have been organized, the work being as yet confined to home needs, but the thoughts of many are turning toward Africa and I think the burden is growing on their minds that to them ought to belong the mission of the enlightenment of the home land. All the schools are full. At Straight we have been obliged to turn

Prof. R. C. Hitchcock Hitchcock, R. C., Prof. Significant Facts Editorial 98-100

98 Revival WoricSignaficant Facts. PERSONS wishing their donations to a particular institution applied for specific wQrk, such as aid to a student or help in furnishing rooms, etc., will please mention the same when forwarding their gifts, as otherwise we credit the amount to the general work of the institution. Rev. Islay Walden, missionary of this Association, died February 2. He was educated at the 1-Joward University and the American Reformed Semi- nary, and entered our service in his native county in North Carolina. The locality was destitute. lie rallied the people, developed a village with school-house and church, secured a post-office and became postmaster. Here he labored four years, blessed with revivals, and was honored by the people, black and white. his wife, an educated and judicious missionary teacher, was of great assistance to him in all his work. He died of acute bronchitis. REVIVAL WORK. It gives us great pleasure to report that quite a number of our institu- tions have been blessed with precious revivals during the winter. Rev. Mr. Fields, the colored evangelist, with his wife, has rendered efficient service at some points. We shall give an account of this revival work, as it has been carried on at the different institutions, in the next number of the MIssIoxAay. SIGNIFICANT FACTS, PROF. R. C. HITCHCOCK. In the city of New Orleans not many churches have been built, but in fact there was no need. The multiplication of little churches was not an indication of great religious activity, but rather of a lack of unity of feel- ing. The present disposition seems to be to give better support to those already existing, to keep buildings in better repair, to concentrate rather than disperse force. The St. James A. M. E. peol)le have lately expended 1,200 in repair and rearrangement, and there has been quite a general fixing up in most of the colored churches. In the parishes about, many new churches have been built and, as in the city, revivals have been numerous and marked by less of excitement and nonsense and more of earnest feeling. ~his change may be largely attributed to the presence in so many communities of those who have learned more intelligent and better ways in the universities. A few missionary societies have been organized, the work being as yet confined to home needs, but the thoughts of many are turning toward Africa and I think the burden is growing on their minds that to them ought to belong the mission of the enlightenment of the home land. All the schools are full. At Straight we have been obliged to turn Si,qnift card Facts. away many who would come to us, and it is hard work to say no when the mothers plead, Oji, for Gods sake do take just one more. There is evident an eagerness for education which is full of encouragement. In all branches of mechanical industry white and colored men work side by side, doing equal work and getting equal wages. Among carpenters, masons, etc., are many colored foremen and contractors, and in all lines of business the colored man is stealily earning and taking a better place. As yet the number who are in trade is small, but steadily increasing, and some are acquiring wealth by business tact and energy. Geo. D. Geddes has lately erected a fine public hall at a cost of $30,000. He owns a large undertaking business, keeps 32 horses, and is probably worth $60,000. Two newspapers, the Louisiana Standard and the American Citizen, have been established within a year, both owned and conducted entirely by colored men, and both, I believe, are now self-supporting. Rev. A. E. P. Albert, a graduate of the theological department of Straight, is associate editor of the Southwestern Advocate, published by the Methodist Book Concern. Mr. Albert is also a presiding elder in the M. E. Church. Both in New Orleans and other towns there are many colored men suc- cessfully practicing law, all, I believe, except Gen. R. B. Elliott, gradu- ates of Straight.. There are two colored physicians in the city. Dr. Rodinez has a very fine practice. Dr. J. F. Newman, for ten years visiting surgeon to the great Charity Hospital, and eight years member of New Orleans Board of Health, is at present Sanitary Physician at Large of the city. Both these are received in medical society on the same basis as other regular physicians, and I believe the same is true of colored men in other profes- sions. Many important offices are held by colored men; Hon. A. J. Dumont has been naval officer of the port for three years; Col. Jas. Lewis, for- mer naval officer, has lately been confirmed by the Senate for four years as United States Surveyor General for the District of Louisiai~a ; Hon. P. B. S. Pinchbeck is Surveyor of Customs; nearly all inspectors of customs, deputy internal revenue collectors, many employ6s in Post-office and United States Mint are colored men, some holding important clerk- ships, and all working harmoniously side by side with white men. A very few are police officers. In the cotton presses many colored men hold important places, have the same rights and privileges as white men, and in processions of workingmens associations companies of colored and white men march the streets alternately and unmolested. Some of the best bands of music are colored. In street cars no distinctior~ is made ; on steamboats there is yet a Texas cabin, but on many of the boats well-known colored men are accorded the same privileges as white. At the late convention of sugar planters, held in this city, white and colored men took part in discussions, and no distinction was made. lot) The Danger Line. In St. Charles parish every justice and constable except one is colored. The parish teasurer, elected by a democratic police jury and under heavy bonds, is a colored man; he discharges his duty with fidelity and ability. In St. John Baptiste, John Weber, colored, has been for three successive years elected sheriff by unanimous vote of white and colored of both political parties. In Plaquemines and other parishes, sheriff, recorder, and all important officers are colored men, and these are among the most orderly parishes in the State. They are accumulating property. There is no neater or better con- ducted plantation on the river than the Soulowque of Hon. T. T. Allain, and many growing villages are entirely owned by the colored people. In the State Senate there are sixteen colored members, thirty representa- tives in the House. Assuredly in Louisiana the negro is no longer asleep on a cotton bale, and if he is not yet all he might be lie is not an inactive Micawber, waiting for something to turn up. THE DANGER LINE. BY REV. HORACE BUMSTEAD, D.D.-ATLANTA UNIVERSITY. There is always a danger line imperilling the success of every good enterprise. Efforts can be made in certain directions and up to certain points in safety; then we are confronted with the warning Thus far and no farther. In missionary work the danger line most to be dreaded is that which lies along the territory of certain principles which cannot be in Cringed upon with impunity. This is especially the case in the work of the American Missionary Association, and it is the purpose oC this article to indicate where the danger line lies in two different directions first, with the workers in the field ; second, with the churches whose servants these workers are. There is a danger line in the field. It is connected intimately with the peculiarities of the people among whom the Association finds its work. These people are pre-eminently the poor and ignorant classes. Many degrading influences springing from their past history are at work among them, greatly to the hindrance of the missionaries. To resist these influences requires much firmness, and, when it involves temporary failure of the work, much faith. Sometimes these evil tendencies may seem to be comparatively harmless or to be so inseparably connected with some form of good that opposition to them would be unwise.. Just here the danger becomes especially insidious. Take for illus- tration the conduct of religious services. Boisterous preaching and praying, accompanied by groans and shouts, patting of the hands and stamping of the feet, are conimon in some of the regions where the Associa- tion labors. So are revival meetings lasting into the small hours of the night, anxious inquirers throwing themselves into contorted postures like

Rev. Horace Bumstead, D.D. Bumstead, Horace, Rev., D.D. The Danger Line Editorial 100-102

lot) The Danger Line. In St. Charles parish every justice and constable except one is colored. The parish teasurer, elected by a democratic police jury and under heavy bonds, is a colored man; he discharges his duty with fidelity and ability. In St. John Baptiste, John Weber, colored, has been for three successive years elected sheriff by unanimous vote of white and colored of both political parties. In Plaquemines and other parishes, sheriff, recorder, and all important officers are colored men, and these are among the most orderly parishes in the State. They are accumulating property. There is no neater or better con- ducted plantation on the river than the Soulowque of Hon. T. T. Allain, and many growing villages are entirely owned by the colored people. In the State Senate there are sixteen colored members, thirty representa- tives in the House. Assuredly in Louisiana the negro is no longer asleep on a cotton bale, and if he is not yet all he might be lie is not an inactive Micawber, waiting for something to turn up. THE DANGER LINE. BY REV. HORACE BUMSTEAD, D.D.-ATLANTA UNIVERSITY. There is always a danger line imperilling the success of every good enterprise. Efforts can be made in certain directions and up to certain points in safety; then we are confronted with the warning Thus far and no farther. In missionary work the danger line most to be dreaded is that which lies along the territory of certain principles which cannot be in Cringed upon with impunity. This is especially the case in the work of the American Missionary Association, and it is the purpose oC this article to indicate where the danger line lies in two different directions first, with the workers in the field ; second, with the churches whose servants these workers are. There is a danger line in the field. It is connected intimately with the peculiarities of the people among whom the Association finds its work. These people are pre-eminently the poor and ignorant classes. Many degrading influences springing from their past history are at work among them, greatly to the hindrance of the missionaries. To resist these influences requires much firmness, and, when it involves temporary failure of the work, much faith. Sometimes these evil tendencies may seem to be comparatively harmless or to be so inseparably connected with some form of good that opposition to them would be unwise.. Just here the danger becomes especially insidious. Take for illus- tration the conduct of religious services. Boisterous preaching and praying, accompanied by groans and shouts, patting of the hands and stamping of the feet, are conimon in some of the regions where the Associa- tion labors. So are revival meetings lasting into the small hours of the night, anxious inquirers throwing themselves into contorted postures like The Danger Line. 101 demoniacs, or rushing. out into the street with wild yells, or lying for hours in a trance upon the floor waiting to be brought through, and finally carried borne on a dray. Such things do not constitute merely a harmless indulgence of a more emotional race instinct ; they are relics of heathenism, as utterly demoralizing to soul and body in the Christiau worship of America as in the idolatrous worship of any foreign land. Now it is one great object of our missionary work to supplant these heathenish extravagances with an orderly and reverent worship. But the piocess is necessarily a slow one. May it not be best, then, to yield somewhat to the popular demand, and, for the sake of a wider and more rapid success, admit for a time a little of the spice of heathenism into the purer Chris- tian worship which we bring to these people? This question is almost as old as Christianity itself. It was constantly suggesting itself in the early conflicts of the Church with heathenism ; and, if it had been rightly answered then, the corrupt Church of the Middle Ages would not have been known, and Luthers Reformation would not have been needed. The warning which history gives to our missionaries in the field plainly is Do not cross the danger line by any compromise with evils that you are seeking to remove. There is also a danger line among the churches which support these missionaries of the A. M. A. It is closely allied with the one already described. Upon its avoidance by the churches depends largely the avoidance of the other by the missionaries. I refer to the scope of the work which the churches shall be ready to support the Association in carrying on. Choice must be made between practicaPy confining its operations to the classes mostly reached at present, or leaving it untram- meled in its efforts to reach all classes in its territory who need missionary aid. In the former case, the missionaries will find their conflict with evil a harder and longer one, and will be under stronger temptation to lower their religious standard and make compromises with evil. In the latter ~ase, they will be encouraged by the gradual accession of other elements Lo their churches and schools which will make the maintenance of a high 4andard more easy. In the former case, the prejudices now separating the different classes of people in the South will be crystallized into more per manent barriers with an apparent sanction of religion thrown around them. In the latter case, we shall be more likely to secure churches free prom this reproach. In the former case, a more immediate present sue- less will inevitably require much of the work to be done over again. In Ic latter case, a slower and safer progress will lay foundations that will iced no repair. It is the attitude of the home churches on this question hat must largely determine the course of the Association. It is a popular impression that the Association was specially organized o labor among people with dark skins. This is a mistake. It was organ- zed to do Christian work among the needy; and the special inspiration 1o~ How it Strikes the Secular Press. of its organization was a desire to do this work without complicity with slavery or with prejudices begotten of slavery. Organized in this way it was natural that it should, in course of time, find itself doing much for those classes of people against whom slavery had fostered feelings of prejudice. Thus, too, it became easy for the public to regard it as organ- ized especially to reach these classes, and sometimes to deny the propriety of its attempting to reach any others. In the social chaos immediately following the emancipation of the slaves it was a comparatively harmless thing for the Association to make distinct appeals for the colored people, and even, coupling these with the Indians and Chinese, to speak of its work as among the despised races of America. But these desig- nations cannot be continued indefinitely without great hazard. When they are interpreted as limitations of the Associations work they cease to be useful. As the uplifting process of our work goes on such epithets become a hindrance and a snare. To secure the most wholesome influence over the subjects of missionary work they should be led as rapidly as possible to forget their peculiarities of race and condition and to remem- ber only their manhood. This can be accomplished most readily by so ordering missionary work as to secure the freest association of different classes with each other, and by limiting as far as possible the indulgence of clannish instincts that have their roots in degradation or in caste. In all its history the Association has never labored for dark-skinned people exclusively, nor would anything be more foreign to the spirit of its founders than that it should begin to do so now. The question is a most important one. Will the churches avoid their danger line, and so help the missionaries to avoid theirs? HOW IT STRIKES THE SECULAR PRESS. FROM THE NEW YORK TRIBUNE. During the last few weeks Harrison, the boy preacher, has been working up a tremendous revival in St. Louis, in which all have been in- vited to come forward and be saved. It appears, however, that this invi- tation was not intended to be taken literally, for the colored people who attend the meetings are told that on no account must they come forward, but take seats in the gallery or by the door. The excuse offered for this course is that the white people who come to be converted would be offended if negroes were allowed to come forward. The colored people of St. Louis need not feel anxious at their exclusion from the front seats in Brother Harrisons revival. They can obtain salvation in the gallery or at the door quite as quickly as those who would exclude them from the privileges of a common Christian brotherhood.

How it Strikes the Secular Press Editorial 102-103

1o~ How it Strikes the Secular Press. of its organization was a desire to do this work without complicity with slavery or with prejudices begotten of slavery. Organized in this way it was natural that it should, in course of time, find itself doing much for those classes of people against whom slavery had fostered feelings of prejudice. Thus, too, it became easy for the public to regard it as organ- ized especially to reach these classes, and sometimes to deny the propriety of its attempting to reach any others. In the social chaos immediately following the emancipation of the slaves it was a comparatively harmless thing for the Association to make distinct appeals for the colored people, and even, coupling these with the Indians and Chinese, to speak of its work as among the despised races of America. But these desig- nations cannot be continued indefinitely without great hazard. When they are interpreted as limitations of the Associations work they cease to be useful. As the uplifting process of our work goes on such epithets become a hindrance and a snare. To secure the most wholesome influence over the subjects of missionary work they should be led as rapidly as possible to forget their peculiarities of race and condition and to remem- ber only their manhood. This can be accomplished most readily by so ordering missionary work as to secure the freest association of different classes with each other, and by limiting as far as possible the indulgence of clannish instincts that have their roots in degradation or in caste. In all its history the Association has never labored for dark-skinned people exclusively, nor would anything be more foreign to the spirit of its founders than that it should begin to do so now. The question is a most important one. Will the churches avoid their danger line, and so help the missionaries to avoid theirs? HOW IT STRIKES THE SECULAR PRESS. FROM THE NEW YORK TRIBUNE. During the last few weeks Harrison, the boy preacher, has been working up a tremendous revival in St. Louis, in which all have been in- vited to come forward and be saved. It appears, however, that this invi- tation was not intended to be taken literally, for the colored people who attend the meetings are told that on no account must they come forward, but take seats in the gallery or by the door. The excuse offered for this course is that the white people who come to be converted would be offended if negroes were allowed to come forward. The colored people of St. Louis need not feel anxious at their exclusion from the front seats in Brother Harrisons revival. They can obtain salvation in the gallery or at the door quite as quickly as those who would exclude them from the privileges of a common Christian brotherhood. BenefactionsGeneral Notes. 103 BEN E FAOTIO N S. By the will of the late Dr. Calvin Ellis the estate is left in trust for the benefit of his sister, and upon her decease $50,000 goes to Harvard Col- lege. In accordance with the will of the late Lewis Morgan $100,000 will go to Rochester University, to be used for the education of women. Illinois College received a Christmas gift of $1,000 from W. C. Carter, of Jacksonville, toward an endowment for that institution. Columbia College has been preserted by Mr. Lewis M. Rutherford, one of the trustees, with a set of astronomical instruments, valued at $12,000, and a further sum to cover cost of moving and setting them up. Mrs. Abigail Lamson, of Cleveland, 0., has lately given to Abbott Acad- emy $1,000 as a mcmorial of her daughter, Lillian E. Holbrook, deceased, formerly a member of the school. Oberlin College is to receive $24,000 from the estate of the late James F. Clarke, of Cleveland, and $5,700 from the estate of Dr. John R. Lee, of Hartford. By the will of the late Stephen Williams, of Roxbury, Mass., the Nor- mal school at Hampton, Va., r3ceives $20,000. By the will of the late Dr. Lee, of Hartford, Berea College, Fisk University, and the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute are to receive $2,000 each. The A. JI. A. is in need of $30,000 for two boarding-halls, one for boys and one for girls, at Wilmington, N (7. On account of the proximity of this city to South Carolina it is a favorable locality for boarding students from the Carolinas who may wish to fit themselves for teachers and preachcrs of the Gospel. GENERAL NOTES. AFRICA. The Portuguese government has concluded with Mr. MacMurdo a contract for the construction of a railroad from Lorenzo-Marquez to the frontier of Transvaal. Dispatches from Haut-Senegal report that the portion of the railroad constructed in 1882-3 has perfectly resisted the rains of winter, and is in excellent condition. The English missionaries from Kaguei near Victoria-Nyanza have received from Lakongu6, king of the island of Ou-K6r6w~, a cordial invitation, which they will accept when their baggage arrives from On-Ganda. Mirambo is attempting to make one people of the diverse elements of the tribes which inhabit his states. Persuaded that instruction will

Benefactions Editorial 103

BenefactionsGeneral Notes. 103 BEN E FAOTIO N S. By the will of the late Dr. Calvin Ellis the estate is left in trust for the benefit of his sister, and upon her decease $50,000 goes to Harvard Col- lege. In accordance with the will of the late Lewis Morgan $100,000 will go to Rochester University, to be used for the education of women. Illinois College received a Christmas gift of $1,000 from W. C. Carter, of Jacksonville, toward an endowment for that institution. Columbia College has been preserted by Mr. Lewis M. Rutherford, one of the trustees, with a set of astronomical instruments, valued at $12,000, and a further sum to cover cost of moving and setting them up. Mrs. Abigail Lamson, of Cleveland, 0., has lately given to Abbott Acad- emy $1,000 as a mcmorial of her daughter, Lillian E. Holbrook, deceased, formerly a member of the school. Oberlin College is to receive $24,000 from the estate of the late James F. Clarke, of Cleveland, and $5,700 from the estate of Dr. John R. Lee, of Hartford. By the will of the late Stephen Williams, of Roxbury, Mass., the Nor- mal school at Hampton, Va., r3ceives $20,000. By the will of the late Dr. Lee, of Hartford, Berea College, Fisk University, and the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute are to receive $2,000 each. The A. JI. A. is in need of $30,000 for two boarding-halls, one for boys and one for girls, at Wilmington, N (7. On account of the proximity of this city to South Carolina it is a favorable locality for boarding students from the Carolinas who may wish to fit themselves for teachers and preachcrs of the Gospel. GENERAL NOTES. AFRICA. The Portuguese government has concluded with Mr. MacMurdo a contract for the construction of a railroad from Lorenzo-Marquez to the frontier of Transvaal. Dispatches from Haut-Senegal report that the portion of the railroad constructed in 1882-3 has perfectly resisted the rains of winter, and is in excellent condition. The English missionaries from Kaguei near Victoria-Nyanza have received from Lakongu6, king of the island of Ou-K6r6w~, a cordial invitation, which they will accept when their baggage arrives from On-Ganda. Mirambo is attempting to make one people of the diverse elements of the tribes which inhabit his states. Persuaded that instruction will

General Notes Editorial 103-106

BenefactionsGeneral Notes. 103 BEN E FAOTIO N S. By the will of the late Dr. Calvin Ellis the estate is left in trust for the benefit of his sister, and upon her decease $50,000 goes to Harvard Col- lege. In accordance with the will of the late Lewis Morgan $100,000 will go to Rochester University, to be used for the education of women. Illinois College received a Christmas gift of $1,000 from W. C. Carter, of Jacksonville, toward an endowment for that institution. Columbia College has been preserted by Mr. Lewis M. Rutherford, one of the trustees, with a set of astronomical instruments, valued at $12,000, and a further sum to cover cost of moving and setting them up. Mrs. Abigail Lamson, of Cleveland, 0., has lately given to Abbott Acad- emy $1,000 as a mcmorial of her daughter, Lillian E. Holbrook, deceased, formerly a member of the school. Oberlin College is to receive $24,000 from the estate of the late James F. Clarke, of Cleveland, and $5,700 from the estate of Dr. John R. Lee, of Hartford. By the will of the late Stephen Williams, of Roxbury, Mass., the Nor- mal school at Hampton, Va., r3ceives $20,000. By the will of the late Dr. Lee, of Hartford, Berea College, Fisk University, and the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute are to receive $2,000 each. The A. JI. A. is in need of $30,000 for two boarding-halls, one for boys and one for girls, at Wilmington, N (7. On account of the proximity of this city to South Carolina it is a favorable locality for boarding students from the Carolinas who may wish to fit themselves for teachers and preachcrs of the Gospel. GENERAL NOTES. AFRICA. The Portuguese government has concluded with Mr. MacMurdo a contract for the construction of a railroad from Lorenzo-Marquez to the frontier of Transvaal. Dispatches from Haut-Senegal report that the portion of the railroad constructed in 1882-3 has perfectly resisted the rains of winter, and is in excellent condition. The English missionaries from Kaguei near Victoria-Nyanza have received from Lakongu6, king of the island of Ou-K6r6w~, a cordial invitation, which they will accept when their baggage arrives from On-Ganda. Mirambo is attempting to make one people of the diverse elements of the tribes which inhabit his states. Persuaded that instruction will 1Q4 Arab Mere/~ id and Siae~e~, cI~ LiJ -J C,) z H z I 0 LU an H z w z H 4 4~c,terai Notes. lob ive an element of grandeur and life to his nation he insists that the london Society send bun a greater number of nlissionaries, and especially medical missionary. Dr. Stecker reports from his journey in Abyssinia and the neighbor - ng country a precious collection of 2,000 plants, many pertaining to the 4odjam, a province whose flora has been little known, and an anthropo- 9gical collection of great value which will enrich the ethnographical inseam of Berlin. Dr. Passavant expected to start the last of J anuary for the Cameroon. leaving Monrovia he will ascend the river Camneroon, going beyond the ham of mountains which run parallel with its shore. There he will pass he rainy season and then advance with the greatest speed possible in the irection of the East. The Committee of the Anti-Slavery Society has protested before Lord ranville against the nomination by the Khedive, of Siber-Pacha, the old amous chief in the traffic of slaves during the administration of Gordon nd of Gessi, to the command of th~ Egyptian army, designing to secure ccc travel from Souakim to Berber. The National African Company of London declared, in April, an ad retcrO)t dividend on its shares at the rate of ten per cent. per annum. A Ant stock company has been incorporated at Brussels, to be known as he Belgian Company of African Merchants, with a capital of 10,000. )f this sum aboat 2,000 was used in the purchase of the ship Akassa. Several of the West African Gold Mining Companies have passed from Iearino~ the forest, and building and tunnelling, to catting auriferous dcs, and erecting improved machinery and stamping. The first proceeds f crashing at the mines of the African Gold Coast Companythe ionecr organizationconsisting of one hundred ounces of fine gold, has i~ached Liverpool. The yield is stated to have been 5 per ton. Con- guments of gold of a superior quality have followed from the mines of w Wassaw Company. THE INDIANS. A substantial pledge of peace has been offered by the Apaches at an Carlos Agency, in the persons of fifty-five of their childreii, whom Icy have sent to the Carlisle training school. They were accompanied y the school physician, Agent Wilcox and four chiefs, who desired to camine the methods of instruction at Carlisle and also at Hampton. Standing Bear, a Sioux Indian, who has a son in school at Carlisle, as obtained permission from Secretary Teller to keep a store at the gency where the tribe to which he belongs is located. While at Wash- gton he heartily commended the system of Indian education maintained v the government at Carlisle. 103 Conversation on Home iJfiseions. New Hope Seminary, a boarding-school in the Jiidian Territory for Indian girls, is supported by the Choctaw Nation and the Mission Board of the M. E. Church, South. The latter controls its management and furnishes superintendent and teachers. There are one hundred pupils attending it. A plan is in progress to build a memorial chapel in honor of Bishop Pierce near the school. THE CHINESE. A Chinaman has abandoned a lucrative business in Boston and gone to Chicago to do missionary work among his countrymen. A telegraph line is being extended from Tientsiu to Peking, and a Mr. Young has obtained permission to run a steamer from Tientsin to Fungch ow. Three Coreans have lately been admitted to the new Southern Meth- odist College at Shanghai, China. One of them is a nephew of the king, one a son of the prime minister, and the other the son of a military man- darin. On the occasion of the birth of a Chinese girl in one of the families belonging to a Presbyterian Church in Kapa, California, gifts of brace- lets, and other womens gear, together with a purse of $200 in gold were made for the wellbeing and education of the child. The church is com- posed of 16 Chinese members, and the honor bestowed on this girl at her birth is in striking contrast with treatment received by female children born in heathendom, many of whom are said to be destroyed. A movement is in progress to provide an immense home for the aged at Lu Hing, in the Province of Kwong Ting, China, and subscription lists have been opened at different points in this country. The Chinese on the Pacific coast have raised $40,000 and those in Boston $2,000 for this object. A CONVERSATION ON HOME MISSIONS. We have received a pamphlet with the above title, written by Mrs. C. A. Richardson, of Chelsea, the wife of the Managing Editor of the Gon gregationalist. The title is an exact description of the contents of the paper. It is an attempt to set forth, in the form of a colloquy, the work of the Home Missionary Societies as they are represented in the West, the Southwest and the South. We can easily conceive that a monthly concert or a home missionary meeting of any kind might be made intensely interesting by this colloquy, spoken by six or eight intelli- gent, devoted young women. To those in want of such an exercise, we heartily commend this. It can be had on application to the Boston Sec., C. L. Woodworth.

Conversation on Home Missions Editorial 106-107

103 Conversation on Home iJfiseions. New Hope Seminary, a boarding-school in the Jiidian Territory for Indian girls, is supported by the Choctaw Nation and the Mission Board of the M. E. Church, South. The latter controls its management and furnishes superintendent and teachers. There are one hundred pupils attending it. A plan is in progress to build a memorial chapel in honor of Bishop Pierce near the school. THE CHINESE. A Chinaman has abandoned a lucrative business in Boston and gone to Chicago to do missionary work among his countrymen. A telegraph line is being extended from Tientsiu to Peking, and a Mr. Young has obtained permission to run a steamer from Tientsin to Fungch ow. Three Coreans have lately been admitted to the new Southern Meth- odist College at Shanghai, China. One of them is a nephew of the king, one a son of the prime minister, and the other the son of a military man- darin. On the occasion of the birth of a Chinese girl in one of the families belonging to a Presbyterian Church in Kapa, California, gifts of brace- lets, and other womens gear, together with a purse of $200 in gold were made for the wellbeing and education of the child. The church is com- posed of 16 Chinese members, and the honor bestowed on this girl at her birth is in striking contrast with treatment received by female children born in heathendom, many of whom are said to be destroyed. A movement is in progress to provide an immense home for the aged at Lu Hing, in the Province of Kwong Ting, China, and subscription lists have been opened at different points in this country. The Chinese on the Pacific coast have raised $40,000 and those in Boston $2,000 for this object. A CONVERSATION ON HOME MISSIONS. We have received a pamphlet with the above title, written by Mrs. C. A. Richardson, of Chelsea, the wife of the Managing Editor of the Gon gregationalist. The title is an exact description of the contents of the paper. It is an attempt to set forth, in the form of a colloquy, the work of the Home Missionary Societies as they are represented in the West, the Southwest and the South. We can easily conceive that a monthly concert or a home missionary meeting of any kind might be made intensely interesting by this colloquy, spoken by six or eight intelli- gent, devoted young women. To those in want of such an exercise, we heartily commend this. It can be had on application to the Boston Sec., C. L. Woodworth. News from Hampton. 107 TIlE SOUTII. REV. JOSEPH E. Roy, D.D., FIELD SUPERINTENDENT. PROF. ALBERT SALISBURY, SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION. NEWS FROM HAMPTON. GEN. J. F. B. MARSHALL. The thriving town of Hampton owes its present prosperity mainly to the busi- ness created by the National Soldiers Home, Fort Monroe, The Hygeia Hotel, the Normal School, the extension of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway from Newport News to Old Point Comfort, and to the two canning and fish factories established here. Its great drawback is the large number of dram shops which meet one at every turn, and which absorb much of the pensions of the veterans of the Home and the earnings of the rest of this industrious community. The advocates of temperance are having an up-bill work of it here, and are almost disheartened. The negro voters are in the majority, and mostly belong to the Readjuster or Mahone party, which claims to be their best friend and has accomplished much in their behalf. The member of Congress from this district, a shop-keeper and liquor-seller, was elected by their votes. The colored people of this section, notwithstanding some unthrifty ways and their too liberal patronage of the whisky shops, are rapidly acquiring property. Improved homes, better furniture, better churches, etc., attest this. The marked improvement in dress, both of the three hundred and forty children who attend the Butler School, connected with the Hampton Institute, and their parents, indi- cates their better circumstances. In an adjoining county the number of colored landholders has increased in ten years from ten to two thousand. In that same county the most successful merchant is a Hampton graduate. Several colored men own from one hundred and fifty to two hundred and fifty acres of land. There is a real improvement in the morals of the colored people, and a large and growing class now bring up their children carefully and live decent, respectable lives. Of the Hampton officials, the Sheriff Commissioner of Revenue and three constables are colored. The Assistant Postmaster is a Hampton graduate and ex-West Point cadet, whose duties are performed to the general satisfaction. The colored clergy of Hampton and vicinity are evincing an earnest desire for more knowledge. Last year a pastors class was formed at the Normal School to meet this need. It has been regularly attended by the six colored pastors of Hampton and by ten others whose churches are at a distance, some of them walk- ing six miles every day to attend the lectures and recitations. One of these clergy- men said the other day: This is what Ive been praying for all these years, and it has come at last. A more earnest class of students than these sixteen Baptist and Methodist pastors, who meet every afternoon for the study of Gods word, it would be hard to find. Four of them, whose homes are at a distance, earn their board by working all the morning with the other work-students. This instruction is already bearing fruit in better sermons to their people, in improved relations to each other, and in a better understanding and appreciation of the Normal School and its methods. Of the one hundred and twenty Indian students at the Hampton Institute one hundred are sent by the Government, which, however, only pays about two-thirds of the actual cost of their support and tuition. For the remaining one-third, as well as for the buildings found necessary for their accommodation, the school has

Gen. J. F. B. Marshall Marshall, J. F. B., Gen. News from Hampton The South 107-109

News from Hampton. 107 TIlE SOUTII. REV. JOSEPH E. Roy, D.D., FIELD SUPERINTENDENT. PROF. ALBERT SALISBURY, SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION. NEWS FROM HAMPTON. GEN. J. F. B. MARSHALL. The thriving town of Hampton owes its present prosperity mainly to the busi- ness created by the National Soldiers Home, Fort Monroe, The Hygeia Hotel, the Normal School, the extension of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway from Newport News to Old Point Comfort, and to the two canning and fish factories established here. Its great drawback is the large number of dram shops which meet one at every turn, and which absorb much of the pensions of the veterans of the Home and the earnings of the rest of this industrious community. The advocates of temperance are having an up-bill work of it here, and are almost disheartened. The negro voters are in the majority, and mostly belong to the Readjuster or Mahone party, which claims to be their best friend and has accomplished much in their behalf. The member of Congress from this district, a shop-keeper and liquor-seller, was elected by their votes. The colored people of this section, notwithstanding some unthrifty ways and their too liberal patronage of the whisky shops, are rapidly acquiring property. Improved homes, better furniture, better churches, etc., attest this. The marked improvement in dress, both of the three hundred and forty children who attend the Butler School, connected with the Hampton Institute, and their parents, indi- cates their better circumstances. In an adjoining county the number of colored landholders has increased in ten years from ten to two thousand. In that same county the most successful merchant is a Hampton graduate. Several colored men own from one hundred and fifty to two hundred and fifty acres of land. There is a real improvement in the morals of the colored people, and a large and growing class now bring up their children carefully and live decent, respectable lives. Of the Hampton officials, the Sheriff Commissioner of Revenue and three constables are colored. The Assistant Postmaster is a Hampton graduate and ex-West Point cadet, whose duties are performed to the general satisfaction. The colored clergy of Hampton and vicinity are evincing an earnest desire for more knowledge. Last year a pastors class was formed at the Normal School to meet this need. It has been regularly attended by the six colored pastors of Hampton and by ten others whose churches are at a distance, some of them walk- ing six miles every day to attend the lectures and recitations. One of these clergy- men said the other day: This is what Ive been praying for all these years, and it has come at last. A more earnest class of students than these sixteen Baptist and Methodist pastors, who meet every afternoon for the study of Gods word, it would be hard to find. Four of them, whose homes are at a distance, earn their board by working all the morning with the other work-students. This instruction is already bearing fruit in better sermons to their people, in improved relations to each other, and in a better understanding and appreciation of the Normal School and its methods. Of the one hundred and twenty Indian students at the Hampton Institute one hundred are sent by the Government, which, however, only pays about two-thirds of the actual cost of their support and tuition. For the remaining one-third, as well as for the buildings found necessary for their accommodation, the school has 108 Ncw~ from hampton. had to look to the friends of Indian education and to the American Missionary Association, which makes an annual appropriation of $1,270 in aid of this work. Among these Indian students are three married couples and two babies. By the kindness of friends two snug cottages are being built by the Indian carpenters (among whom is the father of one of these papooses), where these two families will learn how to keep house in civilized fashion. It is hoped that on their return to their tribes they will not only build similar houses for themselves, but will influence their brethren to follow their example. All the Hamptor~ clergy are in cordial sympathy with the mission work of The Normal School Christian Association, composed of students, graduates and teachers, which every Sabbath sends out seventy Bible readers and visitors to the Sunday-schools, and to the needy sick and decrepit poor colored people in the community. This association has a membership of 350, and within the past two years has raised, in cash, by contributions, entertainments, etc., $397.81, which has been judiciously expended in food, clothing, repairs of cabins, etc., for the aged and indigent colored people of the vicinity. Every case is carefully investi- gated by a committee before relief is granted, that laziness and pauperism may not be encouraged. For the organization of this admirable association, whose Christian ministra- tions are twice blessed, the community is indebted to Rev. H. B. Frissell, the school pastor, whose experience as a city missionary in New York in connection with the Memorial Church of Dr. Robinson has admirably fitted him for such true practical Christian work. Of the sixty-four teachers, officers and employt~s of the Normal School, sixteen are its own graduates. They are exerting a strong influence for good in this com- munity. Two of them are already married (to graduates), and others are contem- plating matrimony. Several of these young men own house lots in the vicinity of the school, and four have already built tasteful and convenient houses, costing from $800 to 1,500 each, which are nearly paid for. Most of them are active in the work of the N. S. C. A., and are a credit to their race and to the school. The white Baptist Society of Hampton has recently erected a commodious brick church, which is an ornament to the town. Their brethren of the First Colored Baptist Church, not to be outdone, are building a still larger brick church, which will seat 1,100 persons and be the largest church in town. The Third Colored Baptist Society (the fourth in number) has recently been organized, and has built a neat wooden church, costing, complete with furniture, $3,600, on which the debt is but $337. It has seats for 350. The pews and pulpit (the latter a gift) were made by the Huntington Industrial Works of the Normal School. This church was organized in 1881 with 16 members. It has now 124_members and an average Sunday-school attendance of 50. The attractions of the Hygeia Hotel, at Old Point Comfort, under the able man- agement of Mr. Phoebus, the proprietor, are continually increasing, and it is a favorite resort for tourists, invalids, bridal couples, and that numerous class of wealthy Northerners who are at odds with the east winds and variable spring weather of their own section, while in summer it is crowded by Southern guests who flock there for its sea bathing and ocean breezes. The Normal School print- ing-office shares in the business which this mammoth caravansary brings to the community, in the pamphlets, circulars, bills of fare, etc., which are printed by its Afnkan, Indian and Southern student employ6s; while shell roads, comfortable and elegant carriages, and omnibus lines, whose moderate charges bring them within reach of all, are among the results of the establishment of this popular watering-place which add to the general prosperity. News from Nashz~ille. 109 TENNESSEE RIVER AT CHATTANOOGA. NEWS FROM NASHVILLE. PROF. II. S. BENNETT. The progress of the colored people, as manifested in the acquisition of property and in increased intelligence since the war, has been gradual but steady. When I first came to Nashville, seventeen years ago, the colored people as a rule lived in old government buildings, broken down sheds of all descriptions, stables and out houses. Hardly one owned a foot of land: their condition was indeed pitiable. As one looks at their coiAition to-day he is struck by the change for the better Hundreds and even thousands own homes of their own. Good substantial houses of frame or brick have taken the place of the buildings they used to stay in. Many of. the homes of the colored people are quite ele6ant, ranging from $3,000 to $5,000 in ost. The style of furniture is much .better than it was some years ago. It is quite common to find in homes among the colored population sewing machines, fine furniture and even pianos; neatness and taste are exercised by the housewives in making the home look as attractive as possible. Many colored men are engaged in business with every prospect of success. I know of several who have from ten to twenty thousand dollars capital invested in their business, who are enjoying the patronage of both white and colored customers, because they have won public confidence. I have observed within the past few months that others have begun to try their fortunes in business. The ventures are too recent to enable any one to predict as to the outcome. The colored people in their churches have done wonders. When I first came to ~ashviile, the churches were of the most shabby description. Since then one and another of the denominations have arisen and have built churches, which are at once commodious and elegant in their architectural finish within and without.

Prof. H. S. Bennett Bennett, H. S., Prof. News from Nashville The South 109-111

News from Nashz~ille. 109 TENNESSEE RIVER AT CHATTANOOGA. NEWS FROM NASHVILLE. PROF. II. S. BENNETT. The progress of the colored people, as manifested in the acquisition of property and in increased intelligence since the war, has been gradual but steady. When I first came to Nashville, seventeen years ago, the colored people as a rule lived in old government buildings, broken down sheds of all descriptions, stables and out houses. Hardly one owned a foot of land: their condition was indeed pitiable. As one looks at their coiAition to-day he is struck by the change for the better Hundreds and even thousands own homes of their own. Good substantial houses of frame or brick have taken the place of the buildings they used to stay in. Many of. the homes of the colored people are quite ele6ant, ranging from $3,000 to $5,000 in ost. The style of furniture is much .better than it was some years ago. It is quite common to find in homes among the colored population sewing machines, fine furniture and even pianos; neatness and taste are exercised by the housewives in making the home look as attractive as possible. Many colored men are engaged in business with every prospect of success. I know of several who have from ten to twenty thousand dollars capital invested in their business, who are enjoying the patronage of both white and colored customers, because they have won public confidence. I have observed within the past few months that others have begun to try their fortunes in business. The ventures are too recent to enable any one to predict as to the outcome. The colored people in their churches have done wonders. When I first came to ~ashviile, the churches were of the most shabby description. Since then one and another of the denominations have arisen and have built churches, which are at once commodious and elegant in their architectural finish within and without. 110 Nea,s from Nashville. The following are the churches which have heen huilt and their approximate cos Missionary Baptist, $26,000; St. PaulAfrican Methodist, $25,000; St. John African 1~kthodist, $12,000; Christian Church, $15,tJOO. In addition to these t1~ M. E. Church have in their possession a good building worth $12,000, and oth~ smaller denominations have built houses of worship which are adequate to the wants, though less pretentious. Two of these churches, the Missionary Bapti: and the St. Paul, were injured by a tornado which swept over the city ten yea ago. The St. Paul was completely wrecked and had to be built over from t1 foundation. In speaking of the churches, it is to he noticed that a younger an better educated class of ministers are coming to the front in the city pulpits, ar are educating the people up to higher standards of Christian living. In almost a of the churches good choirs are elevating the standard of music. All, or neari all, have their own organists, who are in all cases pupils of the schools of the cit~ A higher type of worship is prevailing, not so much noise, more intelligence, better apprehension of what true religion is. In regard to negroes in politics, the palmy days of political preferment for th~ colored man seem to have gone by for the time. The city is decidedly Demo cratic in the election of its subordinate officers, yet there have been colored me in the city council for a number of years. At the last election an anomalou: thing occurred. that is, two negroes were taken up by the Democrats and electe to the city council. It was not done under the name of Democracy, but under th~ title of Reform. The city charter had heen amended and the reformers, the sup porters of the new charter, mostly Democrats, put upon their ticket two negroes Many an old Democrat told me that he had done a thing he had never before dor in his life, voted for a negro. One of these men is one of the leading men in th council and has won a good name by his manliness, his prudence and his agreeab manners. During the past few years an agitation has been kept up by the coloro people of the city, having for its end the putting of colored teachers in the colore city schools. From one point to another they have gone till now they have thro out of the four colored city schools in their possession. This position was nc gained till they had been tried and had been found abundantly qualified to teac according to the high requirements of the city standard. It is to be noticed with pride by the friends of the A. M. A. that out of sixtee teachers in the colored schools twelve of them are, or have been, students of Fis University. It is one of the noteworthy things that col6red society is hem divided into a higher and a lower class in the city. The basis of the distinction not wealth nor family, but intelligence. During the past twenty years the schooi among the colored people have been educating the youth. Those young peop who have gone out from the schools are now coming to the front and are makin themselves felt. They are the leading men and women in the churches, th Sunday-schools and all literary gatherings. They support the choirs and readin circles, and are fast coming to replace the old-time element which has for so br been recognized as representing the colored people of the city. The white peop have come to recognize this fact, and from time to time we are favored in tF papers with a notice of what is going on in colored high life. In all cases th colored high life is made up of the graduates from the schools of the city. One more fact. There are three schools in Nashville for the education of tV colored youthFisk University, Congregational; the Roger Williams UniversiL~ Baptist; and the Central Tennessee College, Methodist. These three institution; working in harmony and doing the same work, have molded public sentimer so that the work of educating the negro is regarded with great favor by the whip of the South. Dr. Gladden, in his able article before the last annual gathering ( Letter from Charleston. 111 the A. M. A., called attention to the fact that illiteracy was rapidly decreasing among the colored population around the centres of intelligence. It is very easy to see that that must be the case, inasmuch as Fisk University sends out every year one hundred and fifty teachers throughout the South. It is safe to say that the heroic days of the colored work, as well as the darkest ones, are over. The difficulties in the situation are sach as are inherent in the work itself, and not in the obstacles thrown in its way by the hostility or opposition of the whites. LETTER FROM CHARLESTON. REV. E. T. HOOKER. One evil which the colored churches and their pastors in Charleston have to con- tend with, is the Sunday meetings of the very numerous benevolent societies, so-called, of an endless variety of fanciful names, wnich are simply mutual aid or insurance companies on a small scale, against sickness or death. The most signifi- cant thing about this matter just now, and most instructive to an interested observer, was the holding recently of a convention~ of the Preachers Union, all but one heing colored pastors, together with the officers of their churches, to oppose said Sunday meetings of really secular societies. The law of the Sabhath was well stated hy the one white Methodist pastor, and no one seemed to have a thought of quibbling around it, or going hack of the Bible. And the ability manifested in the discussion afterward, the ability of the laymen to grasp and state, with not much looseness of grammar, the manifold aspects, Christian, practical, and diplomatic, of a matter intimately involved with the whole social, domestic and religious constitution of things among them, was cer- tainly phenomenal, and would have been an eye-opener to Dr. Tucker, or any other candid (?) investigator. The proper humanity in normal dimensions of the negro mind, the close validity of his reasoning processes, poise of judgment and balance of statementcool statement under difficulties, were surprisingly demon- strated. I would not have missed the sight for a great deal of other lore. Of course everything was parliamentary, as in the very formal proceedings of those same seven-by-nine Sunday legislatures and gossip clubs, which detract sadly from church attendance. The next onset, at a subsequent and larger meeting, with the more worldly society men, was more turbulent, and there was saucy, back-talk about preachers riding in their buggies Sunday. The battle is on for a great reformation for Sunday observance. The News and Courier has recently done a great service to inquisitive philan- thropy and patriotism, in publishing a minute description of the ~Industrial Life of South Carolina, actual and comparative, being answers from all the State, by counties, to a series of pertinent and searching questions furnished to prominent citizens in the counties, who have given the answers. Their statements may, in some cases, he prejudiced on the color question or temperance; for they are directly opposite in different localities; but even so would indicate drift of sym- pathies among whites. I quote, from Charleston County Colored labor fully as efficient as last year, and more so than five years ago, on James Island, as the negro is now settled and less changeable. On the Neck, i.e., the Charleston truck farming section, supply of colored labor is more than demand in summer and winter, less than demand in spring and fall. There, one-fifth of the labor is white, including farmer proprie- tors, who work themselves. Wages, on the Neck. 75 cents per day for men, 50

Rev. E. T. Hooker Hooker, E. T., Rev. Letter from Charleston The South 111-112

Letter from Charleston. 111 the A. M. A., called attention to the fact that illiteracy was rapidly decreasing among the colored population around the centres of intelligence. It is very easy to see that that must be the case, inasmuch as Fisk University sends out every year one hundred and fifty teachers throughout the South. It is safe to say that the heroic days of the colored work, as well as the darkest ones, are over. The difficulties in the situation are sach as are inherent in the work itself, and not in the obstacles thrown in its way by the hostility or opposition of the whites. LETTER FROM CHARLESTON. REV. E. T. HOOKER. One evil which the colored churches and their pastors in Charleston have to con- tend with, is the Sunday meetings of the very numerous benevolent societies, so-called, of an endless variety of fanciful names, wnich are simply mutual aid or insurance companies on a small scale, against sickness or death. The most signifi- cant thing about this matter just now, and most instructive to an interested observer, was the holding recently of a convention~ of the Preachers Union, all but one heing colored pastors, together with the officers of their churches, to oppose said Sunday meetings of really secular societies. The law of the Sabhath was well stated hy the one white Methodist pastor, and no one seemed to have a thought of quibbling around it, or going hack of the Bible. And the ability manifested in the discussion afterward, the ability of the laymen to grasp and state, with not much looseness of grammar, the manifold aspects, Christian, practical, and diplomatic, of a matter intimately involved with the whole social, domestic and religious constitution of things among them, was cer- tainly phenomenal, and would have been an eye-opener to Dr. Tucker, or any other candid (?) investigator. The proper humanity in normal dimensions of the negro mind, the close validity of his reasoning processes, poise of judgment and balance of statementcool statement under difficulties, were surprisingly demon- strated. I would not have missed the sight for a great deal of other lore. Of course everything was parliamentary, as in the very formal proceedings of those same seven-by-nine Sunday legislatures and gossip clubs, which detract sadly from church attendance. The next onset, at a subsequent and larger meeting, with the more worldly society men, was more turbulent, and there was saucy, back-talk about preachers riding in their buggies Sunday. The battle is on for a great reformation for Sunday observance. The News and Courier has recently done a great service to inquisitive philan- thropy and patriotism, in publishing a minute description of the ~Industrial Life of South Carolina, actual and comparative, being answers from all the State, by counties, to a series of pertinent and searching questions furnished to prominent citizens in the counties, who have given the answers. Their statements may, in some cases, he prejudiced on the color question or temperance; for they are directly opposite in different localities; but even so would indicate drift of sym- pathies among whites. I quote, from Charleston County Colored labor fully as efficient as last year, and more so than five years ago, on James Island, as the negro is now settled and less changeable. On the Neck, i.e., the Charleston truck farming section, supply of colored labor is more than demand in summer and winter, less than demand in spring and fall. There, one-fifth of the labor is white, including farmer proprie- tors, who work themselves. Wages, on the Neck. 75 cents per day for men, 50 1.12 Jhe New (larrison cents for women. On James Island,. 10 a month and rations. Females seldom hired by the month. On the Neck colored women and children work in fields, of strawberries, pQtatoes, etc. On James Island no farms are worked exclusively by white men. Twenty-one farms under white supervision. Of 157 farms on the Neck, 12 are worked exclusively by whites. Q. What is the number and what is the acreage of the farms worked exclu- sively by colored men, and how do they succeed? A. On James Island, 16, aggregating 5,500 acres in farms of 10 to 200 acres. They are increasing their home comforts. - On the Neck there are 19 farms, aggregating 396 acres, so worked, i. e., by colored men. They succeed admirably, especially in strawberries and early vege- tables. The Noisettes (colored) invariably win the prizes at the agricultural fairs for their berries. Q. What is the condition of the colored farmers as landowners and as tenants ~ A. On James Island they own about 1,200 acressay about 10 per cent. of the whole acreage. On the Neck there are few landowners, but many reliable ten- ants, and improving their financial condition. Q. Are colored farmers making progress, saving money and acquiring land? A. Both on the Neck and on James Island the answer to this question is, yes. The answers to these latter questions from Sumter, Greenville, Union and many other counties are in the negative and discouraging, or in the affirmative, with qualificationsas that the colored laborer is a failure without white supervision though there are exceptions everywhere, some acquiring property and managing well. It may be that there is more liberality and fairness of judgment in this county than in the back country. On temperance and the working of prohibition (local option) the testimony from the State is diverse. In Charleston. unfavorable, though the people favor a high license. In some counties prohibition works well; in others it does not exist, cr does not prohibit; though there is much new temperance sentiment and zeal. As to the eligibility and success of colored men for municipal or professional and business prominence: there are many dealers in meat, fish and vegetables,who are leaders of their craft; many skilled mechanics and journeymen; not many municipal officers or policemen; though I remember a remark in NevOrleans, that colored watchmen were more vigilant than foreigners. Their voting is simply nugatory for some time to come in this State, except to swell the handle of the jug. Colored lawyers, as I am informed by one whom I know to be able, clear and respected, are recognized by the courts, without much manifest prejudice. But if one is weak on his legs or in his case they will run over him with a little more zest than is necessary. This man has carried several cases against white lawyers. TiEIE INDIANS. THE NEW GARRISON AND HOW IT GOT THERE. BY REV. c. L. HALL. FORT aERTHOLD, DAKOTA. Were half the power that fills the world with terror, Were hair the wealth bestowed on camps and courts, Given to redeem the human mind from error There were no need of arsenals or forts. Thats the poetry of it! Now for the practice. It began at Carlisle when the

Rev. C. L. Hall Hall, C. L., Rev. The New Garrison and How it Got There The Indians 112-114

1.12 Jhe New (larrison cents for women. On James Island,. 10 a month and rations. Females seldom hired by the month. On the Neck colored women and children work in fields, of strawberries, pQtatoes, etc. On James Island no farms are worked exclusively by white men. Twenty-one farms under white supervision. Of 157 farms on the Neck, 12 are worked exclusively by whites. Q. What is the number and what is the acreage of the farms worked exclu- sively by colored men, and how do they succeed? A. On James Island, 16, aggregating 5,500 acres in farms of 10 to 200 acres. They are increasing their home comforts. - On the Neck there are 19 farms, aggregating 396 acres, so worked, i. e., by colored men. They succeed admirably, especially in strawberries and early vege- tables. The Noisettes (colored) invariably win the prizes at the agricultural fairs for their berries. Q. What is the condition of the colored farmers as landowners and as tenants ~ A. On James Island they own about 1,200 acressay about 10 per cent. of the whole acreage. On the Neck there are few landowners, but many reliable ten- ants, and improving their financial condition. Q. Are colored farmers making progress, saving money and acquiring land? A. Both on the Neck and on James Island the answer to this question is, yes. The answers to these latter questions from Sumter, Greenville, Union and many other counties are in the negative and discouraging, or in the affirmative, with qualificationsas that the colored laborer is a failure without white supervision though there are exceptions everywhere, some acquiring property and managing well. It may be that there is more liberality and fairness of judgment in this county than in the back country. On temperance and the working of prohibition (local option) the testimony from the State is diverse. In Charleston. unfavorable, though the people favor a high license. In some counties prohibition works well; in others it does not exist, cr does not prohibit; though there is much new temperance sentiment and zeal. As to the eligibility and success of colored men for municipal or professional and business prominence: there are many dealers in meat, fish and vegetables,who are leaders of their craft; many skilled mechanics and journeymen; not many municipal officers or policemen; though I remember a remark in NevOrleans, that colored watchmen were more vigilant than foreigners. Their voting is simply nugatory for some time to come in this State, except to swell the handle of the jug. Colored lawyers, as I am informed by one whom I know to be able, clear and respected, are recognized by the courts, without much manifest prejudice. But if one is weak on his legs or in his case they will run over him with a little more zest than is necessary. This man has carried several cases against white lawyers. TiEIE INDIANS. THE NEW GARRISON AND HOW IT GOT THERE. BY REV. c. L. HALL. FORT aERTHOLD, DAKOTA. Were half the power that fills the world with terror, Were hair the wealth bestowed on camps and courts, Given to redeem the human mind from error There were no need of arsenals or forts. Thats the poetry of it! Now for the practice. It began at Carlisle when the And 1kw it ~ot There. t1~s barracks there were obtained from the government by Capt. Pratt for an Indian school. Then a bill was passed by Congress allowing the military department to turn over to the Indian department such military posts on the frontier as might not be needed for its defense for use as boarding school buildings for Indian children. After working and waiting eighteen months the first benefits of the bill were realized on the eighteenth of December last, when the first detachment of the new regiment of Indian children was taken down 17 miles below us to garrison the abandoned post, Fort Stevenson, on the banks of the Missouri in Northern Dakota. Getting the post was only half the work, tedious as red-tape and selfish and prejudiced opposition made that; for getting the children to go there to school was as delicate and cautious work as catching trout. To send a child to school means to an Indian the giving up of all his distinctive national life, his ancestral customs, his religious superstitions, and the sinking himself in the vast unknown, the way of the white man. One Indian said, the other day: Since you have been here with your writing (i. e., your school) the place has become full of ghosts. Another said: Many of those who have gone to your school have been killed by it. Then the practical side is taken, and they reason as one did the other day about his attendance at church. I attended church, he said, expecting some benefit from it; but instead of that my wagon has broken down, one of my horses has died, and I havent even a pair of pants to go out in this cold weather. They are quick to reason from their standpoint and quick at repartee. The other day at school we were trying to get the name of a new scholar (a difficult task, as only after much exertion can you get one of the other scholars to mumble the new Indian name), and, following Indian custom, I had familiarly called the little stranger my daughter ; and when I inquired her name one of the small boys quickly said: How is it that you do not know your daughters name? With these difficulties to overcome you may imagine that to go to their school home with two sleigh loads of boys covered over with tent cloths and buffalo robes, to protect them from the cold, was a great satisfaction, though the thermometer stood 2O~ below zero and the distance was 17 miles. But how would it be at the end of the ride, when the scalp locks were to come off and the charms to be cut from their necks or wrists; and that passed safely, would they after the first novelty had worn off, be kept from running home? We held all misgivings to ourselves, trusted in the Lord, went on boldly and conquered. Afterward the report was circulated in the Indian camps that the desecrated scalp locks of the boys were lying strewn about the military post; but we assured the anxious parents that they had all either been sent upward to the spiritlandthrough the fire, or else carefully tied up with the dirty duds which the boys had cast off on their arrival at school, and were no doubt safe. One or two did run away, notwithstanding the severe cold, and one froze a foot trying to go through the snow with the thermometer at 4O~ below zero. This one has since begged to be taken back, and the others have returned with new ones with them, and we are only waiting for more help to take in new recruits. One of the fathers a day or two since pulled out the precious braided lock of his son s hair from the trunk, and said as he showed it: My son is a white man now, and I am going to send my little daughter, ten years old also; for I see that your ways are best for them a triumph of the truth after a hard inward struggle; for was he not slighting the bundle of sacred fetishes bequeathed to him by his ancestors, and the mysterious beings with the long tail and the long arm, and other dim visions of the night, and putting new spiritual forces in their place? 114 Personal Observations of So it is plain that educational work is a great factor in our endeavors to drive out the evil spirits and find an entrance for the Holy Spirit; and we mean to push the work till at least 150 are gathered to garrison the fort, and soldiers are trained for the peaceable campaign to subjugate Indians to the power of righteousness. Along with the educational work, at the fort, we are working up a day school at the agency, and gathering a company to hear the Gospel each Sabbath day at the chapel, and carrying it from house to house in their camps. We have also nineteen of the youth away at Santee, Neb., and Hampton, Va., under strong Christian influences, and we confidently hope for the salvation of many in due time. The leading man of the Gros Ventres is a steady attenc~nt, and is almost per- suaded to marry his wife according to Christian custom and civilized law. Visiting in the camps I see evidences of change for the better ; for instance, in one house a lot of chickens were roosting on a roof log overhead, so that I was driven from iuy seat below, and the annoying fowls were driven away by the lady of the house, whereat I commended them for having the white mans bird,~~ saying that when I first came their dogs chased and killed my chickens, but now all were so well acquainted that they lived like a happy family together. We are ever holding up the need of scattering from their camps and settling on individual claims of land held with an individual title, and we are rejoiced to hear by the last mail that Secretary Teller has adopted the recommendations of our agent, and asks Congress to appropriate $10,000 for the survey of sufficient land to give each head of a family 160 acres and each single person 80 acres, to be held in trust for 25 years for them; and $10,000 more to purchase oxen and implements, etc., for the improvement of the lands thus secured. THE CHINESE. PERSONAL OBSERVATION OF A. M. A. WORK AMONG CHINESE. BY REV. J. K. McLEAN, D. D., OAKLANn, CAL. I am asked for the result of my personal observation of the A. M. A. work among the Chinese in California. My observation has been confined entirely to Oakland, and chiefly to my own church, the First Congregational. Within those limits, however, it has been quite thorough and protracted, extending over the past twelve years. The first regularly organized school for teaching the Chinese in English was, so far as I can learn, that established by my own church, then under pastoral care of Rev. Dr. Mooar, in November, 1868. This school has con- tinued without interruption, meeting in our church premises until the present time, both on Sundays and week days. At one time it was quite large, its attend- ance reaching 150 and 175 per session. Of late years the other denominations in the city have all of them established schools, making, with other causes, the attendance at ours much smaller. In August, 1870, three Chinese converts united with our church on confession; being the first Chinamen to be received into any English-speaking church in Amer- ica. The Methodists, and I think the Presbyterians, had before this date Chinese mission churches in San Francisco; but no Chinese had, prior to this time, been received into white churches. Since that time thirty-seven others have been received by us, making forty in all. About the same number, converted in our school, have,

Rev. J. K. Mclean, D.D. Mclean, J. K., Rev., D.D. Personal Observation of A. M. A. Work Among the Chinese The Chinese 114-116

114 Personal Observations of So it is plain that educational work is a great factor in our endeavors to drive out the evil spirits and find an entrance for the Holy Spirit; and we mean to push the work till at least 150 are gathered to garrison the fort, and soldiers are trained for the peaceable campaign to subjugate Indians to the power of righteousness. Along with the educational work, at the fort, we are working up a day school at the agency, and gathering a company to hear the Gospel each Sabbath day at the chapel, and carrying it from house to house in their camps. We have also nineteen of the youth away at Santee, Neb., and Hampton, Va., under strong Christian influences, and we confidently hope for the salvation of many in due time. The leading man of the Gros Ventres is a steady attenc~nt, and is almost per- suaded to marry his wife according to Christian custom and civilized law. Visiting in the camps I see evidences of change for the better ; for instance, in one house a lot of chickens were roosting on a roof log overhead, so that I was driven from iuy seat below, and the annoying fowls were driven away by the lady of the house, whereat I commended them for having the white mans bird,~~ saying that when I first came their dogs chased and killed my chickens, but now all were so well acquainted that they lived like a happy family together. We are ever holding up the need of scattering from their camps and settling on individual claims of land held with an individual title, and we are rejoiced to hear by the last mail that Secretary Teller has adopted the recommendations of our agent, and asks Congress to appropriate $10,000 for the survey of sufficient land to give each head of a family 160 acres and each single person 80 acres, to be held in trust for 25 years for them; and $10,000 more to purchase oxen and implements, etc., for the improvement of the lands thus secured. THE CHINESE. PERSONAL OBSERVATION OF A. M. A. WORK AMONG CHINESE. BY REV. J. K. McLEAN, D. D., OAKLANn, CAL. I am asked for the result of my personal observation of the A. M. A. work among the Chinese in California. My observation has been confined entirely to Oakland, and chiefly to my own church, the First Congregational. Within those limits, however, it has been quite thorough and protracted, extending over the past twelve years. The first regularly organized school for teaching the Chinese in English was, so far as I can learn, that established by my own church, then under pastoral care of Rev. Dr. Mooar, in November, 1868. This school has con- tinued without interruption, meeting in our church premises until the present time, both on Sundays and week days. At one time it was quite large, its attend- ance reaching 150 and 175 per session. Of late years the other denominations in the city have all of them established schools, making, with other causes, the attendance at ours much smaller. In August, 1870, three Chinese converts united with our church on confession; being the first Chinamen to be received into any English-speaking church in Amer- ica. The Methodists, and I think the Presbyterians, had before this date Chinese mission churches in San Francisco; but no Chinese had, prior to this time, been received into white churches. Since that time thirty-seven others have been received by us, making forty in all. About the same number, converted in our school, have, A. Al. A. Woric among Chinese. 115 in the past fourteen years, joined other churches in Oakland and San Francisco. Of these forty, all but seven remain in our membership. Five of them have been members for over ten years seventeen for over eight years, thirty for over four years, while ten have come in within the four years past. The Christian char- acter and fidelity of most of them has, therefore, been subjected to the test of time. Thirty-three remain in good standing with us, and I have no hesitation in saying that they are, in all respects, as intelligent in their Christian hope, as con- sistent in their walk, as faithful in their covenant obligations, and as faithful in their Christian life as any other thirty-three who could be selected at randcm out of our eight hundred members. Of the seven who have gone out of membership two have been dismissed to other churches and five were subjected to discipline. The offences were various: in one or two instances, neglect of covenant obliga- tions together with Sabbath-breaking; these having been drawn into laundry co-partnership with unconverted Chinese, who would, naturally, be unwilling to suspend work on Sundays. In two instances discipline was administered for gambling, which is the great temptation of Chinamen; and in one instance for chronic refusal to attend the Christian Association meetings, growing out of some personal difficulties. Of the first three who joined us in 1870, one is Jee Gain, our intelligent, efficient and trusted Chinese helper; than whom no member of our church has made a better spiritual record during the past fourteen years, either in respect of personal growth or of Christian service. A second took letters six years ago to a Presbyterian mission church; was standing well and an excellent worker at last accounts. The third we reluctantly removed by discipline two years since. He had, like Demas, forsaken us, having loved this present world. The Sunday profits of a wash-house seemed to him of greater value than the riches in Heaven. When the peculiar temptations of these young men are taken into account, the disadvantage at which they stand from lack of those home and family influences which so help other Christians as also the fact that their offenses are of a nature more obvious to discipline than those of ordinary church members, it is not wonderful that on the scale of fourteen years test so large a percentage as one in eight should fail. It is fair to conclude that no forty American young men would, in the same circumstances, do better. It is doubtful if they would do as well. If to any reader the number, forty, gained for the church in thirteen years seems to l)e small in consideration of the numbers we have had access to, and the peculiar advantage we have had for dealing with them, it must be confessed that it is pitiably small. But the reasons for this lie palpably upon the side of the church, and not of the scholars. There can be no doubt whatever that with a. more earnest outmarch toward this work the number forty could have been easily quadrupled, just as the accessions to any church in the land could be. It is in both cases, of that fatal lukewarmness and inertia, of that weak faith and scant zeal which are acting like a paralysis upon the body of Christ, that so small returns of spiritual ingathering are had either in our alien or our home work. An obser- vation extending over twelve years leads me to unhesitatingly say that faith and courage and love and zeal are quite as hopefully directed toward the Chinese as toward any kind or class of people in California or the world. I believe the Chi- nese in California are as accessible to gospel influence as any other class we have, and that converts gained from them are quite as likely to prove stable and fruit- ful as those gained from any other quarter. 116 A Plan with the ]?eason,~. BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. Miss D. E. EMERSON, SECRETARY. Miss ANNA M. CAHILL, who did efficient service in addressing meetings at the West in behalf of this Bureau last autumn, was present at a missionary conven- tion recently held in Middletown, Conn., and spoke, with others, in the interests of the A. M. A. Reports from the meeting are favorable, and suggest that other gatherings, either of a mixed character or of ladies, might be interested and helped by the presentation of our work. Any persons desiring such assistance should apply to the Secretary of this Bureau. A PLAN WITH THE REASONS. Lack of missionary interest in a church, from the very nature of the case, is a m~trk of the absence of spiritual life. Mission organizations should be found in every church in number as many, in form as various, as are needed to include and interest all members both of the church and the Sunday-school. All departments and branches of the great missionary field, which is the world, should be studied, prayed for and helped. But these Mission Societies, Sewing Circles and Sabbath-school Bands must have the mission and missionaries in which to be interested. There is a mutual dependence. The bond, that connects missionary societies with the missionaries and their work, is information; it is more, it is a channel as well through which pass and re-pass those inspirations and enthusiasm so helpful in the development of strong, aggressive Christian character. Judging from the inquiries that frequently come to us, there is a wide-spread feeling that the mission circles in our churches ought to be doing more than they are to help us in the work we are attempting among the women and girls of the degraded classes in our land. We propose a plan, by the working of which we believe this may be accom- plished and continuous communication be maintained between these circles and the ~vorkers in the field. We will divide the expense of a lady missionary into 25 shares of $20 each. Any Ladies Missionary Society, or Sabbath-school or class in Sabbath-school, taking one or more shares in the support of a missionary, may have a field assigned for the year, and receive a monthly letter from the mi~sionary thus aided. It is well known that most interesting records of missionary experience are often withheld from the columns of a paper or magazine, and that in special correspondence one can obtain a far better knowledge of the needs, and the work accomplished. The above plan will enable us to bring valuable information regarding our work at the South and among the Indians directly and with regularity to the mission circle at the North. There are two objections that may readily present themselves to some minds. Some Ladies Societies are so small and poor that $20 would be more than they could or ought, in view of the claims of other causes, to raise. Other Ladies Societies are so large and strong, that 20, while a mere paltry nothing as corn-

Paragraph Bureau of Woman's Work 116

116 A Plan with the ]?eason,~. BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. Miss D. E. EMERSON, SECRETARY. Miss ANNA M. CAHILL, who did efficient service in addressing meetings at the West in behalf of this Bureau last autumn, was present at a missionary conven- tion recently held in Middletown, Conn., and spoke, with others, in the interests of the A. M. A. Reports from the meeting are favorable, and suggest that other gatherings, either of a mixed character or of ladies, might be interested and helped by the presentation of our work. Any persons desiring such assistance should apply to the Secretary of this Bureau. A PLAN WITH THE REASONS. Lack of missionary interest in a church, from the very nature of the case, is a m~trk of the absence of spiritual life. Mission organizations should be found in every church in number as many, in form as various, as are needed to include and interest all members both of the church and the Sunday-school. All departments and branches of the great missionary field, which is the world, should be studied, prayed for and helped. But these Mission Societies, Sewing Circles and Sabbath-school Bands must have the mission and missionaries in which to be interested. There is a mutual dependence. The bond, that connects missionary societies with the missionaries and their work, is information; it is more, it is a channel as well through which pass and re-pass those inspirations and enthusiasm so helpful in the development of strong, aggressive Christian character. Judging from the inquiries that frequently come to us, there is a wide-spread feeling that the mission circles in our churches ought to be doing more than they are to help us in the work we are attempting among the women and girls of the degraded classes in our land. We propose a plan, by the working of which we believe this may be accom- plished and continuous communication be maintained between these circles and the ~vorkers in the field. We will divide the expense of a lady missionary into 25 shares of $20 each. Any Ladies Missionary Society, or Sabbath-school or class in Sabbath-school, taking one or more shares in the support of a missionary, may have a field assigned for the year, and receive a monthly letter from the mi~sionary thus aided. It is well known that most interesting records of missionary experience are often withheld from the columns of a paper or magazine, and that in special correspondence one can obtain a far better knowledge of the needs, and the work accomplished. The above plan will enable us to bring valuable information regarding our work at the South and among the Indians directly and with regularity to the mission circle at the North. There are two objections that may readily present themselves to some minds. Some Ladies Societies are so small and poor that $20 would be more than they could or ought, in view of the claims of other causes, to raise. Other Ladies Societies are so large and strong, that 20, while a mere paltry nothing as corn-

A Plan with the Reasons Bureau of Woman's Work 116-117

116 A Plan with the ]?eason,~. BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. Miss D. E. EMERSON, SECRETARY. Miss ANNA M. CAHILL, who did efficient service in addressing meetings at the West in behalf of this Bureau last autumn, was present at a missionary conven- tion recently held in Middletown, Conn., and spoke, with others, in the interests of the A. M. A. Reports from the meeting are favorable, and suggest that other gatherings, either of a mixed character or of ladies, might be interested and helped by the presentation of our work. Any persons desiring such assistance should apply to the Secretary of this Bureau. A PLAN WITH THE REASONS. Lack of missionary interest in a church, from the very nature of the case, is a m~trk of the absence of spiritual life. Mission organizations should be found in every church in number as many, in form as various, as are needed to include and interest all members both of the church and the Sunday-school. All departments and branches of the great missionary field, which is the world, should be studied, prayed for and helped. But these Mission Societies, Sewing Circles and Sabbath-school Bands must have the mission and missionaries in which to be interested. There is a mutual dependence. The bond, that connects missionary societies with the missionaries and their work, is information; it is more, it is a channel as well through which pass and re-pass those inspirations and enthusiasm so helpful in the development of strong, aggressive Christian character. Judging from the inquiries that frequently come to us, there is a wide-spread feeling that the mission circles in our churches ought to be doing more than they are to help us in the work we are attempting among the women and girls of the degraded classes in our land. We propose a plan, by the working of which we believe this may be accom- plished and continuous communication be maintained between these circles and the ~vorkers in the field. We will divide the expense of a lady missionary into 25 shares of $20 each. Any Ladies Missionary Society, or Sabbath-school or class in Sabbath-school, taking one or more shares in the support of a missionary, may have a field assigned for the year, and receive a monthly letter from the mi~sionary thus aided. It is well known that most interesting records of missionary experience are often withheld from the columns of a paper or magazine, and that in special correspondence one can obtain a far better knowledge of the needs, and the work accomplished. The above plan will enable us to bring valuable information regarding our work at the South and among the Indians directly and with regularity to the mission circle at the North. There are two objections that may readily present themselves to some minds. Some Ladies Societies are so small and poor that $20 would be more than they could or ought, in view of the claims of other causes, to raise. Other Ladies Societies are so large and strong, that 20, while a mere paltry nothing as corn- Impre& sions of a New 1~acher. 117 pared with ability, yet some of them might, accepting the proposition, take only one share, and thus feel content with that and no more. To which we take the liberty of replying: The number of Ladies Societies not able to raise during the year $20 in perfect consistency with their duty to other claims is, we believe, not very large. At least, we will be satisfied if all who can consistently will aid us. We shall have a large increase to our receipts. Sisters, we ask your help who can; and if there are any who cannot raise the specific amount we ask, yet if they will do what they can we shall most cheerfully and gratefully send them information from the field as the others. In regard to the larger and stronger societies there is force in the objection. We must ask our friends to guard against the evil the objection refers to. The plan is to take one or more shares. The more the better both for us and you and the mis- sionary. We invite the attention of all Christian ladies and Sunday-school teachers to the above plan. Ladies Missionary Societies, Sabbath-schools and Sabbath-school classes can all have shares in this work. As this plan is exceedingly simple, may we not expectantly ask the reader to take upon herself the responsibility of bringing the substance of this article to the attention of the ladiss at their next missionary meeting, and to secure, if possible, their vote to become shareholders in support of a lady mission- ary, under the commission of the A. M. A., in accordance with the above plan. if the reader is a teacher in the Sabbath-school we make the same request as to the Sabbath-school. Pledges made now will secure prompt attention. IMPRESSIONS OF A NEW TEACHER. I would like to step into your office and make a short call, for the sake of com- municating to you the impressions I have received of the work as it is being car- ried on here, and as I am not within stepping distance, I will communicate just a few of these impressions by writing. People who do not hesitate to go through fire and water to accomplish their purpose would certainly stop to consider ere they sally forth to flounder through Ahbama mud. Mud is inevitable, of course, and there is no objection to the respectable kind, but when you get stuck at every step and extricate yourself only at loss of overshoes, and carry enough along on your feet to build a l~rick side- walk (land is cheap, fortunately), might it not be called impassable wading? The weather has been as severe during the past month as any Northern winter I ever experienced, and the suffering resulting to the inmates of these cabins, who live from hand to mouth, has to be seen to be realized. For the relief of the most des- titute we are daily looking for a box and barrel of clothing from friends in the North. There are certain colored persons here who must be helped by a little tem- porary aid from time to time, or perish. All labor is more or less at a standstill, waiting for the weather to break up, with the exception of the culture of prayer and faiththis goes on. It is true I have been here but a very short time, but it has been long enough to become thoroughly aroused to the grandeur and importance of the work that is being, and is to be, accomplished. Owing to my native activity, I am impelled to go out a great deal for exercise, which leads me to do more visiting than I would otherwise do, and this brings me into constant contact with the sin and woe, enhanced, if not propagated, by the mental darkness which enshrouds these unfor- tunate people. I dont dare imagine what it would :be if this school had not existed here so long, like an oasis in a dry and weary land. At my

Impressions of a New Teacher Bureau of Woman's Work 117-118

Impre& sions of a New 1~acher. 117 pared with ability, yet some of them might, accepting the proposition, take only one share, and thus feel content with that and no more. To which we take the liberty of replying: The number of Ladies Societies not able to raise during the year $20 in perfect consistency with their duty to other claims is, we believe, not very large. At least, we will be satisfied if all who can consistently will aid us. We shall have a large increase to our receipts. Sisters, we ask your help who can; and if there are any who cannot raise the specific amount we ask, yet if they will do what they can we shall most cheerfully and gratefully send them information from the field as the others. In regard to the larger and stronger societies there is force in the objection. We must ask our friends to guard against the evil the objection refers to. The plan is to take one or more shares. The more the better both for us and you and the mis- sionary. We invite the attention of all Christian ladies and Sunday-school teachers to the above plan. Ladies Missionary Societies, Sabbath-schools and Sabbath-school classes can all have shares in this work. As this plan is exceedingly simple, may we not expectantly ask the reader to take upon herself the responsibility of bringing the substance of this article to the attention of the ladiss at their next missionary meeting, and to secure, if possible, their vote to become shareholders in support of a lady mission- ary, under the commission of the A. M. A., in accordance with the above plan. if the reader is a teacher in the Sabbath-school we make the same request as to the Sabbath-school. Pledges made now will secure prompt attention. IMPRESSIONS OF A NEW TEACHER. I would like to step into your office and make a short call, for the sake of com- municating to you the impressions I have received of the work as it is being car- ried on here, and as I am not within stepping distance, I will communicate just a few of these impressions by writing. People who do not hesitate to go through fire and water to accomplish their purpose would certainly stop to consider ere they sally forth to flounder through Ahbama mud. Mud is inevitable, of course, and there is no objection to the respectable kind, but when you get stuck at every step and extricate yourself only at loss of overshoes, and carry enough along on your feet to build a l~rick side- walk (land is cheap, fortunately), might it not be called impassable wading? The weather has been as severe during the past month as any Northern winter I ever experienced, and the suffering resulting to the inmates of these cabins, who live from hand to mouth, has to be seen to be realized. For the relief of the most des- titute we are daily looking for a box and barrel of clothing from friends in the North. There are certain colored persons here who must be helped by a little tem- porary aid from time to time, or perish. All labor is more or less at a standstill, waiting for the weather to break up, with the exception of the culture of prayer and faiththis goes on. It is true I have been here but a very short time, but it has been long enough to become thoroughly aroused to the grandeur and importance of the work that is being, and is to be, accomplished. Owing to my native activity, I am impelled to go out a great deal for exercise, which leads me to do more visiting than I would otherwise do, and this brings me into constant contact with the sin and woe, enhanced, if not propagated, by the mental darkness which enshrouds these unfor- tunate people. I dont dare imagine what it would :be if this school had not existed here so long, like an oasis in a dry and weary land. At my 1118 lit the Aliounta ins. very first appearance among the people I separated them without difficulty into two classesthose who had enjoyed the privileges of the school culture, and those who had nor. To the first class belong the thinking, aspiring souls; to the second, the human animals, with no thought beyond their physical necessities, and not awakened intellect enough to secure even those. Both the school and church are in a Jive conditiontwo weekly prayer-meetings, two Sunday-Schools, both well attended. We have had, in spite of all drawbacks, three temperance meetings since the new year came in. We have reason to believe that the Prohibition movement is gaining popularity with the colored people. We teachers and scholars are alive on the subject and getting livelier are organizing for the first time a Woman~s Temperance Society in our church. The only way to defeat Satan is to be equally persistent with him. I shall not enjoy as I have hitherto worshiping in churches with velvet-carpeted floors and stained-glass windows. These costly things are a possible accessory to filling a church; but consider if the expense was put into the training of souls how much more rapidly Emanuels congregation might fill up. Every moment since I came here has been full of enjoyment. If I made a complaint it would be that the days are too short for their opportunities, and June is such a little way off. But I prom- ised to be brief and will hasten to the close. We are prospering. How can we do otherwise? The battle is the Lords. CIIILDIIRENS PAGE. IN THE MOUNTAINS, By z~s. HELEN H. WRIGHT. Where will you go to Sunday-school to-day? I can take you to any one you choose of half a dozen within our reach. We cannot go to Pine Grove, for to do that we must have started yesterday, as it is sixteen miles over the long hills. Besides, Pine Grove, with its excellent workers among the people themselves, its teachers of the A. NI. A., its organ and its growing efficiency, may be called the model mountain school, and I want you to go where there has not been so much intelligence and interest in the Bible. Let us go to the Old Mill, then. It is hard to leave the cool, shaded room, and the unopened Congregationalist for a seven-mile ride on horseback directly after dinner on a hot day, but remember our students frequently walk these dis- tances to their appointments on Sunday. You notice, as you approach the place, a good many horses hitched in the woods, and see groups of children here and there outside the house. The building is new and unfinished, and has been erected by several different denominations, who will hold services in it on successive Sabbaths. The roof is about half on, the upper part open to the sky except for the rafters, suggestingwe cannot say resemblingthe Pantheon, particularly as the win- dows are boarded up, making sky-light necessary. The floor boards are laid loosely, necessitating great care in stepping about, lest, treading on the end of a board, you might suddenly disappear. The room is full of grown people, who are listening intently to a preacher who is holding forth within. If you have any doubt as to the need of Gospel instruc- tion and a knowledge of the Bible in this region, listen to the close of the dis

Mrs. Helen M. Wright Wright, Helen M., Mrs. In the Mountains Children's Page 118-120

1118 lit the Aliounta ins. very first appearance among the people I separated them without difficulty into two classesthose who had enjoyed the privileges of the school culture, and those who had nor. To the first class belong the thinking, aspiring souls; to the second, the human animals, with no thought beyond their physical necessities, and not awakened intellect enough to secure even those. Both the school and church are in a Jive conditiontwo weekly prayer-meetings, two Sunday-Schools, both well attended. We have had, in spite of all drawbacks, three temperance meetings since the new year came in. We have reason to believe that the Prohibition movement is gaining popularity with the colored people. We teachers and scholars are alive on the subject and getting livelier are organizing for the first time a Woman~s Temperance Society in our church. The only way to defeat Satan is to be equally persistent with him. I shall not enjoy as I have hitherto worshiping in churches with velvet-carpeted floors and stained-glass windows. These costly things are a possible accessory to filling a church; but consider if the expense was put into the training of souls how much more rapidly Emanuels congregation might fill up. Every moment since I came here has been full of enjoyment. If I made a complaint it would be that the days are too short for their opportunities, and June is such a little way off. But I prom- ised to be brief and will hasten to the close. We are prospering. How can we do otherwise? The battle is the Lords. CIIILDIIRENS PAGE. IN THE MOUNTAINS, By z~s. HELEN H. WRIGHT. Where will you go to Sunday-school to-day? I can take you to any one you choose of half a dozen within our reach. We cannot go to Pine Grove, for to do that we must have started yesterday, as it is sixteen miles over the long hills. Besides, Pine Grove, with its excellent workers among the people themselves, its teachers of the A. NI. A., its organ and its growing efficiency, may be called the model mountain school, and I want you to go where there has not been so much intelligence and interest in the Bible. Let us go to the Old Mill, then. It is hard to leave the cool, shaded room, and the unopened Congregationalist for a seven-mile ride on horseback directly after dinner on a hot day, but remember our students frequently walk these dis- tances to their appointments on Sunday. You notice, as you approach the place, a good many horses hitched in the woods, and see groups of children here and there outside the house. The building is new and unfinished, and has been erected by several different denominations, who will hold services in it on successive Sabbaths. The roof is about half on, the upper part open to the sky except for the rafters, suggestingwe cannot say resemblingthe Pantheon, particularly as the win- dows are boarded up, making sky-light necessary. The floor boards are laid loosely, necessitating great care in stepping about, lest, treading on the end of a board, you might suddenly disappear. The room is full of grown people, who are listening intently to a preacher who is holding forth within. If you have any doubt as to the need of Gospel instruc- tion and a knowledge of the Bible in this region, listen to the close of the dis WEDDING PARTY AMONG MOUNTAIN WH1TES IN THE SOUTH In the Aliountains. course, which is no unfair sample of the nature of the spiritual food given by the native hard-shell preachers, who frown on Sunday-school work, feeling by instinct that it is iilimical to their power. As I told you in the beginnin, my dyin friends, I hednt no reglar appintment here to-day, and I hednt no reglar text; but Im givin you a few scatterin remarks on Herod, that great sarpint, that was more subtile than any beast of the field. When the old sarpint killed all the childurn, he killed Rachels childurn among the rest, and Rachel felt mighty bad about that. An the old sarpint is round yit, tryin to lam folks infidelity. Only last week there was a young feller at my house a-tryin to sell me a book. Now, I dont need no books, for I own a Bible and a Bible dictionary, my friends, and a piece of an old histry a pedlar left at our house one time, and I dont know what Im a-goin to say when I git up, but the Holy Ghost tells me what to say, and when I speak youre a-listenin to the Holy Ghost. An so then that young man tried to persuade me that this whole livin airth is round, he did. See here, young man, says I, Ive some boys a listenin to you and I wont have them hear no sich, an as for the Romish church that we was a namin a while ago, I know all about that from the time it was founded by Romulus. And I says young man, I want you to git, and to stay got, for I wont hey no infidels round my house. You do not laugh as you listen to this, but think sorrowfully what stones are offered to the people for bread, and say to yourself: Are the priest-ridden coun- tries much more to be pitied, especially when we remember that some of these men lead notoriously immoral lives ? You are more than ever sure that the hope of these mountain regions is in the young generation intelligently taught and trained in the Scriptures, in the Sunday-school. While you are thus thinking the congregation has (lispersed, and the children are filing in. Few of the adults stop for the Sunday-school, for they have an idea that they would appear foollsh learning with the children, though in some schools this feel- ing is being overcome. The teacher takes from his saddle-bags Gospel hymns, lesson papers and quar- terlies and distributes them to those who lack. The school opens with prayer and singing, and is divided into classes as well as the rude benches will permit. Every few minutes some one gets up and goes to the water bucket near the door for a drink; but no one seems to mind. You are assigned a class of young women, who look at you from the depths of their clean dark sun bonnets with as much curiosity as you can possibly have about them. You soon discover that not more than half of them can read, though they do not wish the fact exposed, and you save their feelings by being careful how you put your questions. You find they know really nothing about the lesson, and it will seem as if they knew little indeed of the Bible. So before you are aware you have gone back and are telling the story of the cross, which seems almost new to your listeners. Their faces brighten, you get a timid answer to a question and after a while a shy question is put to you. At last you say something like this: Suppose you saw a little child in the creek at high water, do you suppose you would have the courage to try to save him when you knew you might perhaps be drowned yourself ? The girl to whom you put the question does not answer, but her next neighbor flashes up unexpectedly and with a force you had not looked for, says Id be found tryin, anyhow. Then you see that you have come there to get as well as give a lesson. As you ride home in the long cool evening shadows it keeps repeating itself. Yes, after all, whether we succeed or fail, the great thing is to be found trying.

Echoes from the Treasury 120

In the Aliountains. course, which is no unfair sample of the nature of the spiritual food given by the native hard-shell preachers, who frown on Sunday-school work, feeling by instinct that it is iilimical to their power. As I told you in the beginnin, my dyin friends, I hednt no reglar appintment here to-day, and I hednt no reglar text; but Im givin you a few scatterin remarks on Herod, that great sarpint, that was more subtile than any beast of the field. When the old sarpint killed all the childurn, he killed Rachels childurn among the rest, and Rachel felt mighty bad about that. An the old sarpint is round yit, tryin to lam folks infidelity. Only last week there was a young feller at my house a-tryin to sell me a book. Now, I dont need no books, for I own a Bible and a Bible dictionary, my friends, and a piece of an old histry a pedlar left at our house one time, and I dont know what Im a-goin to say when I git up, but the Holy Ghost tells me what to say, and when I speak youre a-listenin to the Holy Ghost. An so then that young man tried to persuade me that this whole livin airth is round, he did. See here, young man, says I, Ive some boys a listenin to you and I wont have them hear no sich, an as for the Romish church that we was a namin a while ago, I know all about that from the time it was founded by Romulus. And I says young man, I want you to git, and to stay got, for I wont hey no infidels round my house. You do not laugh as you listen to this, but think sorrowfully what stones are offered to the people for bread, and say to yourself: Are the priest-ridden coun- tries much more to be pitied, especially when we remember that some of these men lead notoriously immoral lives ? You are more than ever sure that the hope of these mountain regions is in the young generation intelligently taught and trained in the Scriptures, in the Sunday-school. While you are thus thinking the congregation has (lispersed, and the children are filing in. Few of the adults stop for the Sunday-school, for they have an idea that they would appear foollsh learning with the children, though in some schools this feel- ing is being overcome. The teacher takes from his saddle-bags Gospel hymns, lesson papers and quar- terlies and distributes them to those who lack. The school opens with prayer and singing, and is divided into classes as well as the rude benches will permit. Every few minutes some one gets up and goes to the water bucket near the door for a drink; but no one seems to mind. You are assigned a class of young women, who look at you from the depths of their clean dark sun bonnets with as much curiosity as you can possibly have about them. You soon discover that not more than half of them can read, though they do not wish the fact exposed, and you save their feelings by being careful how you put your questions. You find they know really nothing about the lesson, and it will seem as if they knew little indeed of the Bible. So before you are aware you have gone back and are telling the story of the cross, which seems almost new to your listeners. Their faces brighten, you get a timid answer to a question and after a while a shy question is put to you. At last you say something like this: Suppose you saw a little child in the creek at high water, do you suppose you would have the courage to try to save him when you knew you might perhaps be drowned yourself ? The girl to whom you put the question does not answer, but her next neighbor flashes up unexpectedly and with a force you had not looked for, says Id be found tryin, anyhow. Then you see that you have come there to get as well as give a lesson. As you ride home in the long cool evening shadows it keeps repeating itself. Yes, after all, whether we succeed or fail, the great thing is to be found trying.

Receipts for February, 1884 120-128

In the Aliountains. course, which is no unfair sample of the nature of the spiritual food given by the native hard-shell preachers, who frown on Sunday-school work, feeling by instinct that it is iilimical to their power. As I told you in the beginnin, my dyin friends, I hednt no reglar appintment here to-day, and I hednt no reglar text; but Im givin you a few scatterin remarks on Herod, that great sarpint, that was more subtile than any beast of the field. When the old sarpint killed all the childurn, he killed Rachels childurn among the rest, and Rachel felt mighty bad about that. An the old sarpint is round yit, tryin to lam folks infidelity. Only last week there was a young feller at my house a-tryin to sell me a book. Now, I dont need no books, for I own a Bible and a Bible dictionary, my friends, and a piece of an old histry a pedlar left at our house one time, and I dont know what Im a-goin to say when I git up, but the Holy Ghost tells me what to say, and when I speak youre a-listenin to the Holy Ghost. An so then that young man tried to persuade me that this whole livin airth is round, he did. See here, young man, says I, Ive some boys a listenin to you and I wont have them hear no sich, an as for the Romish church that we was a namin a while ago, I know all about that from the time it was founded by Romulus. And I says young man, I want you to git, and to stay got, for I wont hey no infidels round my house. You do not laugh as you listen to this, but think sorrowfully what stones are offered to the people for bread, and say to yourself: Are the priest-ridden coun- tries much more to be pitied, especially when we remember that some of these men lead notoriously immoral lives ? You are more than ever sure that the hope of these mountain regions is in the young generation intelligently taught and trained in the Scriptures, in the Sunday-school. While you are thus thinking the congregation has (lispersed, and the children are filing in. Few of the adults stop for the Sunday-school, for they have an idea that they would appear foollsh learning with the children, though in some schools this feel- ing is being overcome. The teacher takes from his saddle-bags Gospel hymns, lesson papers and quar- terlies and distributes them to those who lack. The school opens with prayer and singing, and is divided into classes as well as the rude benches will permit. Every few minutes some one gets up and goes to the water bucket near the door for a drink; but no one seems to mind. You are assigned a class of young women, who look at you from the depths of their clean dark sun bonnets with as much curiosity as you can possibly have about them. You soon discover that not more than half of them can read, though they do not wish the fact exposed, and you save their feelings by being careful how you put your questions. You find they know really nothing about the lesson, and it will seem as if they knew little indeed of the Bible. So before you are aware you have gone back and are telling the story of the cross, which seems almost new to your listeners. Their faces brighten, you get a timid answer to a question and after a while a shy question is put to you. At last you say something like this: Suppose you saw a little child in the creek at high water, do you suppose you would have the courage to try to save him when you knew you might perhaps be drowned yourself ? The girl to whom you put the question does not answer, but her next neighbor flashes up unexpectedly and with a force you had not looked for, says Id be found tryin, anyhow. Then you see that you have come there to get as well as give a lesson. As you ride home in the long cool evening shadows it keeps repeating itself. Yes, after all, whether we succeed or fail, the great thing is to be found trying. Eohoe8 from ih~ TreasaryI?eceipt8. 121 ECHOES FROM THE TREASURY. Enclosed find ten dollars of the one thousand daily needed to sustain the great cause we have espoused. God bless all the work and the workers. Enclosed find five dollars from an aged lady, who will be 85 years old next August. She says she once gave $300 to the A. N. A. for the education of a young man who has since become very useful. Not being able herself to go to the post-office she asks me to send this money for her. Enclosed you have a check for $200. To-day is my 89th birthday. I thought it was a good time to send the check where I know it will do good. Enclosed is my contribution. Avoid debt, and instead of retrenchment make progress. [That is it. If all who urge us not to retrench will, like this friend, back up the advice with substantial aid, we will avoid the debt, and with the Divine help show our friends substantial fruitful progress. EnIToR.] We have been trying to do what we could for the American Missionary Association, and the result $41you will find enclosed Our church numbers but 30 resident members. We are in deep sympathy with your work and hope that all the Congregational churches in the United States feel as we do. A golden opportunity is before us for doing good, which if neglected must result dis- astrously to the mllhions whom the A. N. A, under the Great Shepherd, aims to bless. [If the Congregational churches iii the United States will follow the example of this little coun- try church in Maine, we shall receive into our treasury from church contribution alone $541,536 Are we asking too much when we ask $1,000 a day ?En.] Thckies Gold Dollar.The last year that the Milledgeville, Ga., schools were open, I was per- mitted to be one of the teachers. We had a very interesting class of scholars. Among mine was Richard Paine, a cunning, bright little boy. His father was a white man, his mother dead, and he lived with his grandmother, Mrs. Marlow. One time when she hadnt money enough to send him to school, she said, Dickie, do you want to go to school bad enough to give the gold dollar the white gentleman gave you when you were a baby ? Dickie came with his gold dollar. It seemed to me that I couldnt have it spent for tough beef or anything else to eat up, so I made an exchange of dollars with Miss Wells. When I was so miserable, I used to be afraid that if I died, little Dickies dollarwould be spent for some trivial thing. I hate to give it up, but it ought to be working for Dickies people. I send the precious dollar for the good cause. From the American Board: I have received from the children of the Free Reformed Church of Bohemia in Prague, ten forms for the black children of the United States of America, with request to forward the same. ]R~ECEIPTS FOR FEBRUARY, 1~3I. MAINE, $538.16. Portland. State St. Cong. Oh., to const. JOHN R. PRINCE, RANDALL JOHNSON, Auburn. Box of C., for Selma. Ala. EDWARD H. MERRILL, PRENTIss Loa- Blue Hill. Ladies of Cong. Oh., 2.30: INO, WARRHN SPARROW. JOHN W. MaN- Mrs. Mayos Class, 2 Bbls. of C. and GER and HOWARD E. SOULE, L. Ms.... $225 00 Papers, for Wilmington, N. C $2 30 Portland. Y. P. 5. C. E, Wilhston Castine. Mrs. Lucy S. Adams 30 00 Oh., Pkg. work for Sewinq Class; also Edgecomb. Cong. Sab. Sch., 5: Incor- Books and Papers, for Wilmington, rectly ack., from Mass., in Feb. num- N. C. ber. Searsport. Second Oh., Bbl. of C. and Falmouth. A Friend, for Student 3, for Selma. Ala 3 00 Aid, Selma, Ala 1 00 Skowhegan. Cong. Oh 21 10 Farmington. Cong. Oh 30 00 Warren. Cong. Oh. and Soc 12 50 Gardiner Bbl. of C , for Selma, Ala. Weld. T. 50 Hampden. Cong. Oh. and Soc 5 00 Yarmouth. Central Oh 7 76 Hiram. Ladies of Maine, for Lady NEW HAMPSHIRE, $310.51. Missionaries, at Selrna, Ala.. and Wil. ingfon, K C., by Mrs. I. G. Hubbard 200 00 Boscawen. Cong. Oh. and Soc 16 14 122 Receipts. Epping. Mrs. S. T. Bilison (of which 5.75 for Indian M. and 5.75 for Chi- nese M.) Francestown. Cong. Oh Gorham. Cong. Cli., for Indian M Greenfield. Cong. Cli. and Soc Hilisborough Center. Cong. Ch. and Soc Hollis. Cong. Cli Lancasuer. Mrs. A. M. Amsden Londonderry. (has. S. Pillsbury Manchester. First Cong. Ch. and Soc., to const. JAMES W. C. PIcKERING and WTLLIAM T. ROWELL L. Ms New Boston. Preshyterian Ch. and Soc New Jpswich. Cong. Sab. Sch., for kin- dent Aid Atlanta U Newport. Cong. Cli. and Soc Pennacook. Jeremiah C. Martin, 10; Mrs. M. A. W. Fiske. d Plymouth. Cong. Soc Portsmouth. Rev. W. W. Dow Stratham. Friend, 2; A. A. L.,2. Troy. Cong. Oh. and Soc VERMONT, $929.22. Bennington. Second Cong. Ch. and Soc., 46.55; and Sab. Sob.. 10 Berlin. First Cong. Cli. and Soc Brandon. L. 5., 50; Cong. Cli. aud Brattl~boro. S. E. Howard, for Student Aid. Tolladega C Clarendon. Rev. G. H. Mores, for In- Coichester. Cong. Cli. and Soc Coventry. Cong. Cli. and Soc East Hardwick Cong. Cli. and Soc. to const. SusAN LoussA Goonasca L. M.. Ludlow. Cong. Sab. Sob., for Indian M Lunenburg. Cong. Sab. 2db., 12.53: Chas. W. Kig, 10. Manchester. Ladies Missy Soc., 15.50; Miss Ellen Hawley. 10; Dea. S. G. Cone, 10, for Student Aid, Atlanta U Monkton. Henry Miles, for Mendi M... Molndoes Falls. Cong. Sab. Sob Newbury. Hon. P. W. Ladd New Haven. Cong. Cli Sab. Sob., for Student Aid, Fisk U Norwich. A. Buell Pittsford. Cong. Cli. and Soc Plymouth. Tyson Mission Sob., for 1w dma 11 Saint Johusbury. South Cong. Cli South Northfiefd. Mrs. Mary D. Smith.. South Wardsborougb. Friends Swanton. A Friend Towushend. Cong. Oh West Brattleboro. Dr. C. S. Clark. for Student Aid. Talladega C West Randolph. Miss Susan E. Albiu... Windsor. Cong. Ch. and Soc., 20; Mrs. S.H.F..s Woodstock. F. B. of Cong. Cli. and Soc. Women of Vt., by Mrs. A. W. Wild. for Lady Missionary, Mcintosh, Ga.: Bar- net. 10; Cabot. Mrs. H. A. Russell, 3; Cornwall, 33.10; Coventry, 30; East Berkshire. 5; Essex Center, 4; Mont- Gomery. 2; Newfane, 5.25; Nortlifield, 5; Plainfield, 2; Richmond, 9; Roch. oser, 3; Saint Jolinsliury, 153.20; Saint Jolinshury Center, 6.65; South Hero, 14: Stuwe, 3.70; Swanton, 22.35; Tray, 2.30; Westfeld, Mrs. Hitchcock, 1; XV eybridge. 7.85; West Brattleboro, 22; West Charleston. 8.50 MASSACHUSETTS, .4,132.12. Alford. Rev. J Jay Dana. for Indian M. and to const. LESTER T. Osaonse L. M $17 50 36 56 6 30 12 00 5 00 21 97 5 00 1 00 71 14 15 50 25 00 37 11 15 00 325 300 4 00 15 04 56 55 6 00 70 14 25 00 5 00 5 00 15 05 43 41 4 00 22 53 35 50 5 00 5 00 5 to 25 00 ii) 00 55 00 1 00 56 Ot 4 50 2 UO 1 00 12 60 25 00 6 00 25 00 50 00 352 90 30 CO Amherst. Win. M Graves, 20, Mrs. Mar- tha D. Church, ~ $25 00 Amherst. XXm. N. Scott, for Student Aid, Atlanta U :10 00 Ashliuruham. Mrs. Hosea Greene 5 00 Auburn. A Friend, to const CHARLES F. WRITE L. M . 30 00 Beverly. Cash Boston. L. M., $500; Park St. Church andSoc,20;W.N.T.,:1o 53000 Boston. Edward XV. Noyes, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 50 00 Boston. A. XV. Tufts, for Colored Or- phans, Chat tanooga, Teun 50 00 Boston. Union Cli. Sali. 5db., 40, for blinds o Mission Home; S. D. War- ren. 25,for Fencing Parsonage, Tope- kaKan 6500 Boston. Home Land Circle of Park St. Cli.. 2 Bbls of 0. for Straight U... Boston, Jamaica Piain. Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Boston, Roxhury. Eliot Ch. and Soc., 118.55; Walnut Av. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adl).50 168 55 Bradford. A Friend 13 00 Brackton. Ladies Circle, Bbl. of C., for Talladega, C. Cambridgeport. Pilgrim Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db.. for Student Aid, Fisk U 30 00 Canton. Elijah A. Morse, for Model School Building, Straight U 100 00 Chicopee. First Cong. Miss. Soc. for Stude t Aid Straight U 12 25 Clinton. W. ft. M. Assn, Bhl. of C., for Kittrell, N. C. Conway. Mrs. Win. Tilton 2 00 Cummington. Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Wil. bur, Mrs. S. R. Wilbur and Mrs. H. M. Porter 4 00 Pilgrim Cli. and Soc 20 00 Dorchester. Mrs R. W. Prouty, IldI, Congregationalists. East Braintree. A Friend 50 East Bridgewater. Union Sab. Sob., for Student Aid, Talladega C 21 (0 East Douglas. Cong. Cli. and Soc., to coust. GEORGE N. Buan, L. 11 37 35 East Kingston. Mrs. S. A. Sautliwortli.. 50 East Medway. Ladies Circle of Indus- try, Bbl. of C. Val. 30. Everett. Cong. Cli. and Soc 7 41 Gardner. First Cong Cli. and Soc 24 26 Greenfleld. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., for - Indiaa.M ~ 00 Haverhill. Friend s 00 Haverhuil. Miss May Merrill, Trunk of C.,forTalladegaC. Hollistan. Ladies Benny. Soc. of Cong. Cli.. Blil. of C., 2.40, for Freight, for Talladega C 2 40 ipswicb. South Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 00 Laneshorougli. Cong. Cli 9 00 Lawrence. A half dozen ladies in Lawrence St. Cli , Blil of C., Sfor Freight, for Chattanooga, Tenn.,Val. 6867 500 Littleton. Bbl. of C., for Atlanta. U. Lowell. L. Kimball 50 00 Maplewoad. Bbl of C. and freight 4 25, for Wilmington, N. C 4 25 Mansfield. Ladies Mission Soc., for Student Aid, Wilmington, N. C 12 00 Marlborough. T. B. Patch 1 00 Medway. Dorcas Home Mission Circle, fibi. of C., for Talladega C. Metbuen. Conr. Ch. Sab. 5db for Student Aid, Fisk U 33 21 Millbury. Second Cong. Cli . for ~tu- dent Aid, Atlanta U 25 00 Monson. Cong. Cli 50 00 New Bedford. A Widows Mite 2 00 Newburyport Freedmens Aid Soc., for .~tndent Aid. Fisk U 40 00 Newburyport. North Cong. Cli. Sab. Sob.. for .~tn.dent Aid, Fisk U 25 00 Keedham. Evan. Cong. Cli. and Soc., 8.64 andSab.Scli.,1 Newton Centre. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., for Indian M.. and to const. Rev. THEODORE J. HOLMES L. 31 Newton Centre. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., for Indian 31 Newton Centre. Ladies Benev. Soc. and Maria B. Furber Missy Soc., for Student Aid, Atlanta U 50 00 NOrili Cambridge. North Ar. Cong Ch. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid. Fisk U 25 00 North Falmouth. Cong. Cli. and Soc 23 00 Northampton. Miss H. C. Clapp, for Fisk U ~ 00 Norfolk. Cong. Sab. 5db 12 20 Oxford. Mr. Hydes Class. 4.23; Mis sion Circle, 2; Mission Soc.. 2.58; Friends. 4.17, for Kittrell, N. C 13 00 Peru. Cong. Sab. Sch 9 00 Phullipston. A. & T. Ward 6 00 Heading. Bethesda Cli. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Hoxhury. Mrs. Odlin, for Washington, D.C 400 Royalston. First dc~g Sab Sch .. .. 25, 00 Royalston. First Cong. Sab. Sch., 5; Mrs. H. 31. Estabrook, 5, for Stu- dent Aid, Atlanta U 10 00 Salem. Primary Dept. Tab. Sab. Scli., for Student Aid. Talladega C. . .. - 20 00 Salem. Friends, Bbl. of C.,for Wash- ington, D. C. Saxonville. Edwards Cli. and Soc... 11 50 Somerset. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 South Abington. Cong. Cli. and Soc 68 50 South Amherst. Cong. Cli. and Soc., for Indian M 10 00 South Dartmouth. Cong. Cli. and Soc. 10 00 South Framingliam. Li. M. Amsden... 5 00 South Framingliam. Ladies Benev. Soc. of Cong. Cli., 2 Bbls. of C., for Talla- deqa C. South Framingliam. Cong. Sab. 5db.. for Student Aid, Atlanta U 20 00 South Royalston. Seconi Cong. Cli. and Soc., 10; Rev. Win. Sewall, Box Goods and Bhl. Books 10 00 South Welfleet. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc 2 00 Springfield. H. 31., 1,000; Memorial Church, 32 1,032 00 Templeton. Cong. Cli. and Soc 22 85 Walpole. Cong. Cli. and Soc 33 00 Walpole. Bbl. of books, for Hampton N. k A. inst. Waltham. Trin. Cong. Sab. Scli 16 09 West Boxford. Cong. Cli 11 39 Westfield. Second Cong. Cli. (15 of whieb for Indian M.) 48 08 Westfield. H. Holland 6 00 Westfield. Bbl. of C., 1.35, for Freight, ~r Dudley, N. C 1 3o Williamsburg. Ladies of Cong. Cli., Blil. of bedding, 1.50,for Freight,for Talla- degaC 150 Williamstown. Rev. Mark Hopkins, D.D 25 00 Wilmington. Cong. Sab. Scli., for Stu- dent Aid. Tallad~ga C 29 CO Winchend~n. 0. Y. C., for Chat- tanooga, Tenn 20 00 Woburn. North Cong. Cli. and Soc 9 04 Worcester. Young Ladies Mission Circle, Plym. Cli.,for Student Aid, Fisk U 7000 Worcester. Salem St. Cong. Cli.. Sab. Sch. . ]or Savannah, Ga 25 00 Worcester. Piymoutli Cong.Cli., 25; Mrs. Abbie Days Sab. 5db. Class, Salem St. Cli., 4; for Student Aid, Talla- degaC 2900 Worcester. Young Ladies of Piyrn.Cong. Cli., Books, Toys and Papers, for Tal- ladega. West Newbury. First Cong. Sab., for Student Aid, Atlanta U 13 00 Receipts. 123 West Newton. Second Cong. Ch. and $9 04 Soc., for Student Aid, Fisk U $50 00 West Roxbury. Frhnds, for Dudley, 200 50 00 . Half Bbl. C., for Mcintosh, Ga. -_______ $3,532 12 50 00 LEGAcY. Honkinton. Estate of Lee Claflin, by Win. Claflin, Ex 600 00 $4,132 12 RHODE ISLAND, $387.05. Little Compton. United Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 ~i~ Providence Beneficent Cong. Cli., 194.98; Un. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adl), 121.52 316 50 Providence Central Cong. Sab. Scli.. for Student Aid, Talladega C 50 00 CONNECTICUT, $1,204.07. Bloomfield. Cong. Cli., 11; A Friend. 100; to const. ALBERT A. VIETS. En- WIN B. MALONEY and ALICE K. PLIMP- TON L. Ms Canton Center. Win. G. Hallock Cornwall. Cong. Sab. Sch., to const. MILo B. WILLIAMSON L. 31 Durham. 0. Leach Easton. Miss Clarissa Siliman East Lyme. Cong Cli Guilford. Third Cong. Cli. for Student Aid, Tillotson C. ck N. Inst Hartford. Park Cli. and Soc Hartford. Sab. 5db. of Asylum Hill Cli., 20; W. J. Wood, 25, for Theo. Dept., Talladega C Hartford. Rev. L. Pratt, or indian M. Hartford. Fourth Cong. h.,for Freed- me Chi ese and Indian M.... Hartford. Center Cli., 2 Bbls. C., for Taliadega C. Kensington. A Friend Kent. First Cong. Cli Lakeville. Mrs. 31. H. Williams Ledyard. Cong. Cli. and Sab. Scli Meriden. Edmund Tuttle, to const. Miss EvA C. TUTTLE L.M Middletown. A. B. C. Millbrook. Mrs. E. H. Allen New Britain. Ladies of Christ Cli., Blil of C. and Books, 5 for Freight, for Talladega C Newtown. Cong. Soc Norwich. First Cong. Cli Old Lyme. First Cong. Cli Plainfleld. Cong. Sab. 5db Putnam. Mission Workers of Second Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Talladega C Rockville. Mrs. Nellie Wilsons S. S. Class, Publications for Girls Readinq Room, Talladega 6. Somers. Mrs. Pease, for Savannah, Ga. Stamford. Win. L. Squire, for Atlanta U Stamford. First Cli Terryville. Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Talladega C Terryville. A. S. Gaylord, for Student Aid, Fisk U Thomaston. Cong. Cli Torrington. Ladies Berev. Soc. of Cong. Ch.,Cask of C.. 4for Freight, for Talla- dega C Trumbull. Cong. Cli. and Soc Unionville. ~ First Cli. of Christ Waterbury. First Cong Cli Watertown. Dr. Jelin DeForest, for Student Aid, Talladega C Warren. First Cong. Cli West Haven. Cong. Ch. and Soc 111 00 5 00 30 00 10 00 4 00 5 50 25 00 6907 45 00 20 00 13 00 9 50 3634 10 00 23 00 30 00 500 1 00 5 00 5 00 13 85 24 52 2 44 50 00 2 00 25 00 1 00 69 52 50 00 58 85 4 00 1023 62 13 209 46 100 00 40 00 18 10 Receipts. Weston. Cong. Cli. $10 00 Winthrop. Miss C. Rice, 1; Mrs. M. A. Jones, SOc 1 50 $1,215 01 LECACY. Ellington. Es1 ate of Maria Pitkin 49 06 $1,264 07 NEW YORK, $1,076.91. Amsterdam. S. L Bell Arcade. P. H. Parker Berkshire. Chas. T. Leonard Brooklyn. Central Cong. Ch. Sab. Sch., far Indian & hool, Santee Agency, Neb Brooklyn. Dr. E. P. Thwing, for Indian M Brooklyn. A Friend, 2; Mrs. G. A. Recknagel, Pkg. of Books Brooklyn. Mrs. F., 2; Friends, Bhl. of C., for Washington. D. C Buffalo. First Cong. Ch., 10 const. WIL. LIAR H. GRRIN. Da. R. S. H& MBLETON and FRANK N. HoAC L. Ms Canandaigua. First Cong. Ch. and Soc. Chenango Forks. Cong. Ch., 3; John B. Rogers, o Cohoes. Mrs. I. Terry Comstocks. Ru~ sell itanney Elizabetlitown. Cong. Cli Flushing. Cong. Ch Greigsville. Mrs. F. A. Gray Hamilton. Cong. Ch Leonardsviile. Bbl. of C., for Mobile, Ala. Lima. A Friend rttount Sinai. Cong. Cli. and Soc New Berlin. Presbyterian Sab. Sch.,for Student Aid, Tallageda C New York. S. T. Gordon (of which $100 each for Buildings. fat Little Rock, Wilmington.. Tougoloo and Austin, Texas) New York. Broadway Tabernacle Sab. Sch.,for Student Aid, Santee Agency, Neb New York. Broadway ~ Ch (adl), 10; Joseph S. Holt,10 North Walton. Cong. Sab. Sch., 15; Cong. Ch. Missy Soc., 14.50. Oriskany. MrsL ov~a Halsey, 5; Mrs. H. W. Porter, 1 Owego. Cong. Sab. Sch.. Box Toys, books, & c , for McLeansville, N. C. Penn Yan. W. M. Taylor Ricliford. Mrs. L. C. Allen ~tochester. Mrs. Anna Hathaway, for Atlanta. Ga Rome. John B. Jervis, 25; Rev W. B. Hammond, 10 Volney. Cong. Ch., for Student Aid, Storrs Sch Walton. Pirst Cong. Ch West Bboomfield. Mrs. Lydia Hendee.: West Camden. Nancy Curtiss Westmoreland. First Cong. Ch NEW JERSEY, $22.00. Jersey City. Miss S. E. Hawley, for Ton. galoo U Lodi. Miss M. Greig Montclair. Mrs. J. H. Pratts Sab. Sch. Class, for Student Aid, Talladega .... Montclair. Ladies Aid Soc. of Cong. Ch., 2 Blils. of C., for Tillotson C. k N. Inst. PENNSYLVANIA, $1,007.03. Minereville. Rev. D. T. Davies, far In- dian M Minersville. Rev. D. T. Davies Neatli. Cong. Ch 4 50 5 00 2 50 37 50 2 00 2 00 2 00 100 00 4668 8 00 5 00 5 00 19 50 38 20 1 00 15 50 2 00 20 00 1200 500 00 70 00 20 00 29 50 6 00 2 50 1 00 10 00 35 00 4 50 5728 5 00 150 7 25 1000 5 00 7 00 3 00 1 50 400 Providence. Welsh Cong. Ch. ... $2 041 Shire Oak. Jane Wilson 2 00 $12 50 LEaAcv. Pittsburg. Estate of Rev. Chas. Avery.. 994 53 $1,007 03 OHIO, $646.11. 900 1650 5 00 100 00 Aurora. Cong. Cli Austinbnrg. Cong. Ch Bryan. S. F. Blakeslee Cleveland. Jennings Ave. Cong. Cli.... Clevehnd. R. C. White, Sowing Machine, for Talladega C. Columbus .First Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch., for Furnishing Room, Livingston Boll, F,sk U Columbus. Mrs. James L. Bates Greenwich. Rev. A. H. Leonard, for In- dian M Madison. Mrs. H. B Fraser, for Chinese M Mansfield. A Friend New Lyme. A. J. Holman Ohei un. Ladies Soc. of Second Cong. Cli. (55.71 of which for Lady Mission- ary, Atlanta, Ga.) Oberlin. Ladies Aid Soc. of First Cong. Cli., for Lady Missionary~ Atlanta, Ga Oberlin. Rev. Geo. Thompson Painesvillo. First Cli., to coust. Bins. M. L. WARNER and MRs. L. C. PEASE L. Ms Saybrook. Member of Cong. Cli. South Newbury. Mrs. Ruth Watertown, for Student Aid, Tailadega C South Salem. Daniel S. Pricer Springfield. Cong. Cli. and Sab. Sch., to coust. DEA. MARCUS LENT L. M Sullivan. Tallmadge. Rev. L. Shaw. 9 Bibles. Wakeman. Second Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db., for Student Aid, Fisk U Wayne. First Cong. Cli Wiiloughhy. Mrs. C. A. Garlick INDIANA, $11. 00 Elkhart. Cong. Cli ILLINOIS, $1,105.59. Albion. Mrs. Martha Skeavington Batavia. Cong. Cli. (adl) Beecher. Cong Cli Belvidere. Mrs. H. C. Foote, Jor Touga loo U . Chicago. First Cong. Cli. (25 of which from Philo Carpenter), 104.50; E. Rathhone, 20: Good Shepherd Cong. Ch., 1.30 Chicago. Young~ Peoples Missy Soc. of N. E. Cong. Cli., for Printing Press, Santse Agency. Ne b Chicago. J. M. Williams, for Student Aid, Fisk U Chicago. C. S. and Geo. E. Halsey, Case of Medicine, for Talladega C. Vanvers. I. D. Jones Dover. Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch.,for Student Aid. Storrs Sch Elgin. Cong. Cli Elgin. Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db., for Student Aid. Emerson Inst Evanston. Ladies Aid Soc., for Lady Missionary, Little Rock, Ark Gaiesburg. Friend Gridley. Womans Missy Soc Hutsonville. C. V. Newton Jacksonville. H. L. and M. C. Melendy.. La Prairie Centre. John Crawford Lockport. Ladies of Cong. Ch., for Lady Missionary, Little Rock. Ark.... Lyonsville. Ladies of Cong. Cli., for Lady Missy, Mobile, Ala. 50 00 20 00 5 00 60 00 25 10 00 75 71 75 00 2 00 88 47 5 00 16 50 5 00 4000 1 00 3388 2580 2 00 11 00 500 50 11 00 2 50 12600 100 00 25 00 2 00 10 00 4703 5 00 2935 5 00 1000 500 20 00 1050 1 50 12 00 .Receipt8. Milburn. Cong. Cli $10 00 Moline. Ladies. for Lady Missionary, Little Rock, Ark 23 00 Oak Park. Mrs. Julia llugains, 50, In- correctly ack. in February number. Oak Park. E. W. Lyman 100 00 Payson. Cong. Sab. Sch 20 00 Pecatonica. Seward Cong. Ch., for In- diaa Al 24 00 Peoria. Mrs. John L. Griswold, ror Student Aid, Fisk U 100 00 Quincy. Mrs. H. B. Comstock 10 00 Rockford. First Cong. Cli 24 28 Rockford. Mrs. Gilbert Woodruff, for Student Aid, Fisk U 25 00 Rockton. Cong. Cli 36 00 Roscoe Cong Ch 11 43 Sandwich. Ladies of Cong. Ch., for Lady Missionary, Little Rock, Ark 7 00 Stiliman Valley. Merry Gleaners of Cong. Cli 5 00 Tolono. Mrs. L. Haskell 10 00 Wetherstleld. Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Kel- logg 5 00 Winnebago. Mrs. Gertrude F. Milton (?t) of which for Womans work for Woman) 50 00 Winnetka. Cong. Cli. ~ab. Sch., for Stu- dent Aid, Fisk U 15 50 9U5 59 LEGACY. Pittsfield. Estate of Rev. Win. Carter.. 200_00 ~i7ius ~ MICHIGAN, $232.81. Allendale. Cong. Cli. and Sab. Sch 5 75 Ann Arbor. First Cong. Cli 63 88 Caluinet. Cong. Sab. Scli., for Student Aid. Talladeqa C 48 00 Clinton. Cong. Ch 3 80 Detroit. Samuel Zug, for Nashville, Tean 5 00 Flint. Cong Cli 29 00 Frankfort. Cong. Cli 3 48 Grandville. Rev. Edwin Booth, for In. diar& M ... 100 Greenville. Ladies of Cong. Oh., by Miss Patton, for Student Aid, Talla degaC 2500 Alilford. Win. A. Arms, to conat. CLARK CRAwFORD L. M 30 00 Olivet. Mission Helpers, Cong. Cli., for Student Aid. Talladega C 5 00 Tbree Oaks. Cong. Cb 28 12 Union City. Andrew Lucas and family. 4 78 IOWA, $289.75. Burlington. Mrs. Luke Palmer 1 00 Chester Center. Ladies Sew. Soc. and Mission Circle, Blil. of Bedding, for Straight U Clear Lake. Rev. RH. Wood,for Indian M 150 Council Bluffs. A Friend, 8; Woman s Missy Soc., 7.90, for Student Aid,Tal ladegaC 1590 Davenport. Young~ issy Soc., Blil. of C., for Talladega C. Des Moines. Frienos, by Mrs. S. G. Otis, 3 Blils. of C., for Talladega C. Fairfax. Ladies, for lady Missy, New Orleans. La Fort Atkinson. Cong. Cli Fort Dodge. Ladies of Cong. Cli , for Lady Missy, New Orleans, La Garner. Win. C. Wells Grinnell. Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch., 104.82; Prof. S. .Jay Bucks Sab. Sch. Class, 8; for Student Aid. Talladega C 112 82 Grinnell Mrs. Barnes, 25: Friends, 13.61. for Library, Talladega u 38 61 (irinn~ll. Cong Cli 17 12 Iowa City. Womans Missy Soc. of Ply- mouth Cong Cli., for Lady Missy, Ye~i Orleans, La 20 00 Iowa City. Ladies Missy Soc. of Cong. Cli., Bbl. of Bedding, for Straight U. Iowa Falls. Mrs .Dea . Wright, for Lady Missy. New Orleans, La Hampton. Cong. Cli., for Indian M.... Lansing. Mrs. A. H. Houghton, for Lady Missy. New Orleans, La Montour. Ladies of Cong. Cli., for Lady Missy, New Orleans, La Sioux City. First Cong. Cli Webster t3ty. Sab. Sch. Mission Band of Cong. Cli., for New Orleans, La.... 1 2fi~ $5 00 12 50 1 00 5 00 27 10. 10 00 WISCONSIN, $262.92. Alderley. Mrs. Annie Reid, 2.50; Mrs. E. Hubbard. 2.50 5 00 Beloit. First Cong. Sab. 5db., for Stu- dent Aid, Talladega, C 27 05 Footville. Miss Kate Wiggins. 1; Rev. H. Fowle. 1 2 00 Fond du Lac. Mrs. H. Bryan 2 00 Fulton. Cong. Cli 13 00 Kenoslia. Thomas Gillespie, M. D 5 00 Koslikonong. Cong. Cli.... Lake Geneva. G. Montague, for Indian 5 65. M 400 Madison. First to const. HON. WILLARD if. CHANDLER and M. R. DEvON L. Ms aO 00 Milwaukee. Plymouth Cong. Cli 73 22 Plymouth. Mrs. G. Rindell 1 00 Salem. William Munson o3 00 Union Grove. Cong. Ch 13 00 Waukesha. VERNON TIcHEsOR, hal. to const. himself L. SI 5 00 $258 92 LEGACY. Fort Howard. Estate of Rev. D. C. Curtis 4 00 $262 92 3 40 25 00 50 00 17 96 9 90 MINNESOTA, $106.26. Hamilton. First Cong. Cli Leech Lake. Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. King Northuield. Rev. E. M. Williams, for Indian M Rochester. Cong. Cli Zumbrota. A Friend, 3; Forest Mill Sab. Sch., 6.90 KANSAS, $11.60. Great Bend. Cong. Ch Ottawa. Mrs. L. B. Perry, for indian M 1 60 10 00~ NEBRASKA, $7.00. Omaha. Saint Marys Av. Cli. (Mrs. Nancy M. Tracy), for Indian M .. 5 00 Waverly. Cong. Sab 5db., for Stndent Aid, Emerson Inst 2 00 DAKOTA, $101.00. Bon Horume. Rev. D. B. Nichols, for IndianA) 100 Sisseron Agency. Presh. Board of For- eign Missions, by Rev J. P. William- son, for Santee Agency, Neb 100 00 2 20 UTAH. SOc. s oo Salt Lake City. Anna Baker s 00 WYOMING TER.. $2.50. 10 00 Cheyenne. E. A. B. OREGON, $7.30. The Dalles. First Cong. Cli CALIFORNIA, $38.00. Oakland.. Rev. J. M. McPherron San Bei~h~tdino. Rev. James T. Ford, for Indian M 50 2 50 7 30 5 00 3 00 126 Receipts. San Francisco. Rev. j. Rowell $.~5 00 San Francisco. Clias A. Birchard 5 00 DISTRICT OF Cc~UMBIA, $2.00. Washington. Little RiBs of Lienamary 2 00 KENTUCKY, $85.20. Lexington. Tuition, 73.20; Rent, 12 85 20 TENNESSEE, $802.93. Jonesboro. Warner Inst.. Tuition 60 25 Knoxville. Second Cong Cli 12 00 Memphis. LeMoyne Inst., Tuition 205 50 Nashville. Fisk U., Tuition 519 20 NORTH CAROLINA, $292.00. McLeansvigle. First Cong. Cli., 22.99; Second Cong Cli., 3.56 26 55 Raleigh. Friends, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 20 00 Raleigh. Cong. Cli., for Kentucky Mt. Work 3 00 Wilmington. Tuition, 234 45; Cong. Cli.. S 242 45 SOUTH CAROLINA, $15.00. Charleston. Plymouth Cong. Cli 15 00 GEORGIA, $524.93. Atlanta. Storrs School, Tuition 219 15 Atlanta. First Cong. Cli 61 78 Atlr~nta. Henry A. Rucker, for Atlanta U 500 Macon. Cong. Cli 17 00 McIntosh. Dorchester . Academy, Tui- tion 36 00 Savannah. Beach Inst., Tuition, 172; Rent, 14 186 00 ALABAMA, $288.10. Marion. Cong. Cli 2 50 Mobile. Emerson Inst., Tuitioa $263 70 Selma. First Cong. Cli 7 90 Selma. ~ Missy Workers, for Indian M .. 400 Talladega. Cong. Cli 10 00 LOUISIANA, $286.00. New Orleans. Straight U., Tuition 286 00 ARKANSAS, $15.50. Little Rock. Tuition, 5.50; Ladies, by Mrs. Fitch, for Carpet, 10 15 50 TEXAS, $303.90. Austin. Tillotson C. & N. Inst., Tuition 303 90 INCOMES, $65.00. Avery Fund, for Mendi M 35 00 Belden Scholarship Fund, for Talladega C 3000 CANADA, $10.00. Sherbrooke. Thomas S. Morey 10 00 BOHEMIA, $4.14. Prague. Children of Free Reformed Cli., for Black Children in U. S. A., ten forms t it. Total for February $15,204 13 Total from Oct. 1 to Feb. 29 94,955 00 FOR AMERICAN MISSIONARY. Subscriptions for February $90 54 Previously acknowledged 393 99 Total $484 53 H. W. HUBBARD, Treasurer, 56 Reade St., N. Y. SKIN HUMORS CAN BE CURED BY GLENNS SULPIL1JR SOAP. SAN FaANclsco, Feb. 16, 1883. Mr. C. N. Crittenton: DEAR Sin: I wish to call your attention to the good your Snlphur Soap Las done me. For nearly fourteen years I have been ~rouoled with a skin humor resembling salt rheum. I have spent nearly a small fortune for doctors and medicine, hut with only temporary relief. I commenced using your ~Glenns Sulphur Soap nearly two yenrs agoused it in baths and as a toilet soap daily, IVIy skin is now as clear as an lnfant~s, and no one would be able to tell that I ever had a skin complaint. I would not be without the soap if It cost five limes the amount. Yours respectfully. M. H. MORRIS. Lica HoUSE. San Francisco. Cal. The above testimonial is indisputable evidence that Glenns Sulphur Soap will eliminate poison- ous Skin Diseases WHEN ALL OTHER MEANS HAVE FAILED. To this fact thousands have testified; and that it will banish lesser afflictiens, such as common PIMPLES, ERUPTIONS and SORES, and keep the skin clear and beautiful, is abso- lutely certain. For this reason ladies whose complexions have been improved hy the use of this soap ~ow MAKE IT A CONSTANT TOILET AP- PENDAGE. The genuine always hears the name of C. N. CRITTENTON, 1k. Fulton street, New York, sole proprietor. For sale by all druggists or mailed to any address on receipt of 30 cents in stamps, or three cakes for 75 cent:3. i19 Carmine St. Ji#~Th LAMB, Sixth Ave. cars pass the door. t BANNERS IN SILK, 1 NEW DESIGNS. CHURCH ~ FURNITURE SEND FOR HAND BOOK BY MAIL. FOR EASTER. We have as usual an elegant assortment of EASTER CARDS and novelties, from the leading publishers, in prices ranging from Two Cents and upward. A choice selection of Fringe Cards, from 12 cents to $1.50. AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY, 150 Nassau St., New York; 52 Brom~ field St., Boston; 1 512 Chestnut St., Philadelphia; 75 State St., Rochester; 153 Wabash Ave., Chicago; 757 l!Ia ket St., San Francisco. (127) SPRING ISSUES. THE GOOD-TIMES GIRLS. A number of girls form a club for the purpose of having a good time among themselves hut thrown into the scciety of Miss Beatrice, they soon find a much better way of enjoying them- selves hy helping others who are in trouble and need, and so make the club a blessing to them- selves and others. l2mo, 472 pp. 6 cuts. $1.50. SEVENTEEN AND TWIOB SEVEN- TEEN. A most helpful hook for the older girls show- ing the change in the heroine from an impulsive girl, impatient of disappointment or restraint, to an unselfish, useful woman, schooled to en- dure hardness, whose motive is love to Christ. l2mo, 320 pp., 4 cuts. $L25. THE FELLOW-STUDENTS. An interesting picture of student and home life in Germany. following out wrong teachings and right teachings in morals and religion to their results. l2mo, 262 pp., 4 cuts. $1.10. HAMPERED. A family story. with the trials, perplexities and discomforts of those who are hampered hy poverty. The children all try to help bear the burden, and at last everything is rhown to he for the best: contentment with Gods dealings brings a full and lasting release. l2mo, 198 pp. 3 cuts. 90 cts. MOTHER MIOHAUD. The story of the McAll Mission work in Paris, giving an inside view of the lives of the hard- working friends among the poor classes of that city. l2mo, 160 pp., 3 cuts. 75 cts. NEW SUNDAY-SCHOOL CARDS. No. 54. A series of most charming floral cards, with Palestine views. Texts and verses on each. 6 cards, 6~4 hy 4~ inches. 30 cts. 55. WORDS OF GRACE. 1st Series. Charm- ing floral designs. 12 cards. 5 by 33A inches. 12 texts. 20 cts. 56. WORDS OF GRACE. 2d Series. Different designs from 1st Series. 12 cards, 12 texts. 20 cts. 57. WORDS OF PROMISE. Floral cards. something entirely new in design. 12 cards, 12 texts. 20 cts. 58. WORDS OF PROMISE. 2d Series. Same kind as 1st Series, hut different dfsigns and texts. 12 cards, 5 by 3~6 inches. 12 texts, 20 cts. 59. WATCHWORDS. Floral designs, with ap- propriate texts. 24 cards, 39.~ hy 2~ inches. 24 texts. l5cts. 60. WATCHWORDS. 2d Series. Same kind of card as No. 50, but all different. 24 cards, 24 texts. 15 cts. 61. THANKSGIVINGS. 1st Series. Elegant floral cards with texts. 24 cards, 3~6 by 2~ inches. 24 texts. 15 cts. 62. THANKSGIVINGS. 2d Series. Same gen- eral style as 1st Series, but different designs and texte. 24 cards, 24 texts. 15 cts. BOOKS FOR THE TiMES. A continuation of our series of hooks upon suh- jects of present interest, intended for thoughtful readers. No. 6. Early Prevalence of Monotheistic Beliefs. Rawlinson 55 pp. 10 cts. 7. Rise and Decline of Islam. Sir William Muir. 69 pp. lOc. 8. Witne~s of Mans Moral Nature to Chris- tianity. Thomson. 58 pp. lOc. 9. Authenticity of the Four Gospels. Wace. 54 pp. lOc. 10. Age and Origin of Man Geologically Con- sidered. S. R. Pattison, F. G. 5. 57 pp. 10 cts. ii. Modern Materialism. Wilkinson. St pp. lOc. POPULAR SERIES. We invite special attention to our new issues in this line. Our hooks are on good paper, well printed, and strongly bound, and sold at rates that fully meet the demand for low prices. 5 CENTS EACH. Joseph end his Brethren. Star of Bethlehem (color). Morning Stai-. 10 CENTS EACH. Advice to a Young Christian. Blood of Jesus - Bethlehem and her Children. Evidences of Divine Revelation. History of Solomon. Little Captain. Little Dot. Little Robbie. Our Father. Old Kitchen Fire. Stories for Little Ones. Whiter than Snow. 15 CENTS EACH. Amusements. Anxious Inquirer. Christies Old Organ. Fall of Jerusalem. history of Daniel. AMEIRICAN TBACT SOCIETY, 150 NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK. BOSTON, S2 Bromfield Street. PHjLADELPHIA, 1512 Chestnut Street. ROCHESTER, N. Y., 7S State Street. CINCINNATI, 170 Elm Street. CHICAGO, 153 Wabash Avenue. SAN FRANCISCO, 757 Market Street. I

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The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 5 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York May 1884 0038 005
The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 5, miscellaneous front pages 128A-128B

EDITORIAL. PAGE. PAGE. A FINANCIAL STATEMENTSHALL WE IN- STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS (cut)... CUR A DEBT~ 129 BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. PARAGRAPHDISTRICT SECY FOR I CAGOREVIVALS . RELATION OF THE BUREAU TO THE TREAS ~ 31 OUR SOUTHERN MOUNTAIN WORK DRY 148 COMITY IN APPEALS 13, ~ ETTERS TO THE SECRETARY 148 PARAGRAPHSBENEFACTIONS 137 THE CHINESE. GENERAL NOTES 138 COMI~ N DISCOMFORT 150 EXPLORING PARTY CROSSING A RIVER IN AFRICA (cut) 139 - THE INDIANS. THE SOUTH. SKOKOMISH AGENCY, XV. T 152 REVIVAL NEWSFISK UNIVERSITYAT- MOUNT HOOD (cut) 153 LANTA UNIVERSITYNEW ORLEANS CHILDRENS PAGE. TALLADEGAATHENS. GA. MACON, A PAGE OF SAMS HISTORY 154 GA.SAVANNAH, GA.MCINTOSH, GA. RALEIGH, N. C..... . 141 RECEIPTS 156 NEW YORK: PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. Rooms, 56 Reade Street. - Price 50 Cents a Year, in Advance. Entered at the PostOfficc at New York, N. V., as sccond-class matter. JWAY, 1884. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCiATION. PRESIDENT. Hoi~. Wx, ~. WASHNUaw, LIJ.D., Nass. CORRESPONDING SECRETANY.--REV. M. E. STRIEBY, D. P., 56 Reade Street, N. 1. AseIsT& IiT SECRWFARY FOR COLLECTION.REV. JAMES POWELL, 56 Reade Street, N. 1, TREANDREI~.H. W. HUBBARD, Esq., 56 Reade Street, N. 1?. ArrnTO~.Wx. A. NASH, W. H. ROGERS. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. Jow H. WASHBuRN, Chairman; A. P. FOSTER, Secretary; LYMAN ABBOTT, A. S. BARNES, J. B. DANFOUTH, CLINTON B. FISK, S. B. HALLIDAY, EDWARD HAWES, SAMUEL HOLMES. CHARLES A. HULL, SAXTEL S. MARPLES, OIIAlILES L. MEAD, S. H. VIRGIN, WM. H. WARD, J. L. WITHUOW. DISTRICT SHCR5TARIES. Rev. C. L. WOODWOBTH, 1).D., Boston. Rev. G. D. PIKE, P.1)., New lort Chicago. COMMUNICATIONS relating to the work of the Association may be addressed to the Corresponding Secretary; thoSe relatingto the collecting fieldS, to the District Secretaries; letters for the Editor of the American Missionary, to Rev. G. P. Pike, P. I)., at the New York Office; letters for the Bureau of Womana Work. to Miss P. E. Emerson, at the New York Office. DONATIONS AND SU~SCRIPTIONS may be sent to H. W. Hubbard Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New York, or, when more con- venient, to either of the Branch (5ffices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street, Chicago, ill. A payment of thirty doUars at one time constitutes a Life Member. FORM OF A BEQUEST. I BEQEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay the same in ...........davci afte my decease to the person who, when the same is psyarule, shall act as Treasurer of the American Missionary Assocsttibn, of New York City, to be applied, under the direction of the Executive Committee of the Association, to its charitable uses and purposes. The Will should be attested by three witnesses. CHAPTER II. WORTH (Jan. i, 1113) $i 0,265,63 z.6o. So says our sworn statement of that year, and the above figures you will find head the column in state- ment dated January i, 1114. This money value was in the shape of Bonds and Mortgages, Loans, United States Bonds, Real Estate (estimated at Cost), and Cash. Working with this capital, we pushed our business vigorously during the year 1883, and with what re- sult we will show in chapter three. Respectfully yours, MANHAflAN l4F~ IN5URANC~ GOD, 156 & 158 Broadway, New York. HENRY STOKES,. President. J. L. HALSEY, ist Vice-P. H. V. WEMPLE, Secy. H. B. STOKES, Id Vice-P. S. N. STEBBINS, Acty. I1O-RSFORDS ACID PHOSPHATE. (LIQUID.) FOR DYSPEPSIA, MENTAL AND PHYSICAL EXHAUSTION NERVOUSI~ESS, DI. MINISHED VITALTTY, URINARY DIFFICULTIES, ETU. PREPARED ACCORDING TO THE DIRECTION OF Prof. N. N. Horaford, of Cambridite, Mass. There seems to be DO difference of opinion in high medical authority of the value of phos- phoric acid, and no preparation has ever been offered to the public which seems to so happlly meet the general want as this. It is not nauseous, but agreeable to the taste. No danger can attend its use. Its action will harmonise with such stimuiants as are necessary to take. It makes a deilcious drink with water and sugar only. Prices reaancaable. Pamphlet giving further particuiars mailed free on application. MANUFACTURED BY THE RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS5 Providenceq H. I., AND FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS.

A Financeal Statement Editorial 129

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL. XXXVIII. MAY, 1884. No. 5. ?ymftztiiafl ~tis$iirnaX~3 ~ss~wiatbn. A FINANCIAL STATEMENT.. Six months of our fiscal year ended March 31, and the receipts from donations were $96,926.67 and from legacies. $14,518.34, making a total of $111,445.01. There was an increase from donations of $5, 896.69 over last year, but a decrease in legacies of $17,073.32, making the decrease of total receipts for the six months $11,176.63. Last year our largest lega- cies came in during the last six months; but for the remaining six months of this fiscal year we have no large legacies in view. Our payments up to date have exceeded our receipts by $38,750.57. We must rely upon the pastors and officers of the churches and upon the friends of our great and growing work to save us from this debt. The last annual meeting, recognizing our pressing needs, voted that an appeal be made for $1,000 a day. One of the churches in Massachusetts a few Sabbaths since trebled its regular collection, and raised $1,000 in response to that appeal. Will not other churches and individuals under. take to meet the needs of a quarter, a half, ,or of a whole day? We do not want to call a halt. The work must go forward. We dread the burden of debt. _____________________________ SHALL WE INCUR A DEBT? With an increase of gifts from the living, but with a large falling off in legacies, we have no alternative but a debt or increased receipts. We have not the choice of retrenchment. It is too late for that. Our missionaries and teachers are in the field among the different races in our land, scattered over a great extent of country. rrhe work in all its varieties is going

Shall we Incur a Debt? Editorial 129-130

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL. XXXVIII. MAY, 1884. No. 5. ?ymftztiiafl ~tis$iirnaX~3 ~ss~wiatbn. A FINANCIAL STATEMENT.. Six months of our fiscal year ended March 31, and the receipts from donations were $96,926.67 and from legacies. $14,518.34, making a total of $111,445.01. There was an increase from donations of $5, 896.69 over last year, but a decrease in legacies of $17,073.32, making the decrease of total receipts for the six months $11,176.63. Last year our largest lega- cies came in during the last six months; but for the remaining six months of this fiscal year we have no large legacies in view. Our payments up to date have exceeded our receipts by $38,750.57. We must rely upon the pastors and officers of the churches and upon the friends of our great and growing work to save us from this debt. The last annual meeting, recognizing our pressing needs, voted that an appeal be made for $1,000 a day. One of the churches in Massachusetts a few Sabbaths since trebled its regular collection, and raised $1,000 in response to that appeal. Will not other churches and individuals under. take to meet the needs of a quarter, a half, ,or of a whole day? We do not want to call a halt. The work must go forward. We dread the burden of debt. _____________________________ SHALL WE INCUR A DEBT? With an increase of gifts from the living, but with a large falling off in legacies, we have no alternative but a debt or increased receipts. We have not the choice of retrenchment. It is too late for that. Our missionaries and teachers are in the field among the different races in our land, scattered over a great extent of country. rrhe work in all its varieties is going 130 Shall We Incur a Debt? forward, with engagements made and obligations incurred. Nor have we been thoughtless in incurring these obligations. They have not been based on what is required in our great field, but on the warrant of past gifts to our treasury. Retrenchment is not desirable, if it were possible. Our work is expanding, and growth necessitates increased outlay. IC we attempt to sweep away the barriers of sin and ignorance we cannot do it with a diminishing flood; if we are laying foundations, they are useless unless we rear the superstructure; if our work is a specimen like the pattern shown in the mount, it will not be copied unless it maintain its strength and proportions. The A. M. A. has done a large and successful work. It has won the confidence and commendations not only of those who are benefited by it, but of those who once despised and opposed it. Its ~encomiurns are found in papers published in the South, and in letters written by observers from the North. Its monuments are on mountain tops, and in valleys, and its success is a harbinger of a better day in the South, and a bond of union between the two sections of our common country. The churches and individuals who have mainly sustained it by their gifts and their prayers have scarcely made a better record of missionary achievement in the last quarter of a century. The necessity of its work is becoming more manifest every day. The urgency instead of diminishing is increasing. The growth of the colored population is at the rate of 500 per day or 200,000 a year. All the com- bined efforts for their education and elevation fail to meet the emergency. Illiteracy grows upon them, and voters not able to read their ballots increase in number every year. The nation has no problem of greater urgency and hopefulness. The victory must be won if we are saved; it can be won if we will make the effort. This is no time for the A. lvi. A. to retrench if it could. We appeal to our friends to aid us in the remaining six months in averting a debt for the present year, and thus saving our future efforts from being crippled and hindered. Piedmont Church, Worcester, Mass., assumes the entire expenses of the American Missionary Association, both in its Northern and Southern departments, for one day of the current year. So writes its pastor, Rev. Dr. Mears. Our readers will see the significance of this communication when they remember that at the recommendation of our Finance Com- mittee we have been asking ~1,000 a day as needed to carry forward our work. But even more significant is the example Piedmont Church sets before other churches. Are there not many abundantly able to follow? Which is the next church to step to the front and assume the entire expense of this Association for one day of the current year? We shall be glad to chronicle it.

Paragraph Editorial 130-131

130 Shall We Incur a Debt? forward, with engagements made and obligations incurred. Nor have we been thoughtless in incurring these obligations. They have not been based on what is required in our great field, but on the warrant of past gifts to our treasury. Retrenchment is not desirable, if it were possible. Our work is expanding, and growth necessitates increased outlay. IC we attempt to sweep away the barriers of sin and ignorance we cannot do it with a diminishing flood; if we are laying foundations, they are useless unless we rear the superstructure; if our work is a specimen like the pattern shown in the mount, it will not be copied unless it maintain its strength and proportions. The A. M. A. has done a large and successful work. It has won the confidence and commendations not only of those who are benefited by it, but of those who once despised and opposed it. Its ~encomiurns are found in papers published in the South, and in letters written by observers from the North. Its monuments are on mountain tops, and in valleys, and its success is a harbinger of a better day in the South, and a bond of union between the two sections of our common country. The churches and individuals who have mainly sustained it by their gifts and their prayers have scarcely made a better record of missionary achievement in the last quarter of a century. The necessity of its work is becoming more manifest every day. The urgency instead of diminishing is increasing. The growth of the colored population is at the rate of 500 per day or 200,000 a year. All the com- bined efforts for their education and elevation fail to meet the emergency. Illiteracy grows upon them, and voters not able to read their ballots increase in number every year. The nation has no problem of greater urgency and hopefulness. The victory must be won if we are saved; it can be won if we will make the effort. This is no time for the A. lvi. A. to retrench if it could. We appeal to our friends to aid us in the remaining six months in averting a debt for the present year, and thus saving our future efforts from being crippled and hindered. Piedmont Church, Worcester, Mass., assumes the entire expenses of the American Missionary Association, both in its Northern and Southern departments, for one day of the current year. So writes its pastor, Rev. Dr. Mears. Our readers will see the significance of this communication when they remember that at the recommendation of our Finance Com- mittee we have been asking ~1,000 a day as needed to carry forward our work. But even more significant is the example Piedmont Church sets before other churches. Are there not many abundantly able to follow? Which is the next church to step to the front and assume the entire expense of this Association for one day of the current year? We shall be glad to chronicle it. District Secretary J~r OhicagoBe?ilvats. 131 A GIFT OF Cows.The pupils of our Normal Training School, at Santee Agency, Nebraska, have been made glad by the purchase of two cows, the New Years gift of Lottie, Emily, Charlie, Minnie and Eddie Leeds, of Stamford, Conn. DISTRICT SECRETARY FOR CHICAGO. We are glad to announce the appointment of the Rev. Charles XV. Shelton as District Secretary for Chicago, in the place of Rev. James Powell, who has been transferred to this office. We have sought with diligence for some one adapted to this position, and feel quite confident that the fit man has been found. Mr. Shelton is one of the Yale Dakota Band, and has had experience in missionary life, and more recently in collecting funds for Yankton College. His success in his different fields of work gives the best guarantee of his usefulness in the one to which he has now been appointed. We ask for him a cordial welcome, and a fraternal co-operation among the pastors and churches of the West. REVIVALS. Considerable space is given in this number of the MIssIoNARY to reports of revival work. We believe the importance of conversion to Christ as a qualification for all that is best in school life is keenly felt at our various institutions. ~A prominent object of this school, wrote one of the founders of the Fisk University, is to illustrate in practice what most educators are willing to admit in theory, that conversion is the proper door into the kingdom of science as well as the Kingdom of ilcaven ; that science and religion were made to go hand in hand ; that the two joined are the Heaven-appointed means of lighting humanity to its proper stand- ing and dignity. This Association has builded its best on fundamental principles here set forth, and every conversion, whether at times of unusual religious awak- ening or at other times, is hailed as a way-mark of success in school work. For this reason, as well as for the more general one of saving souls from death, we rejoice to report revivals. By careful study of the communications published, it will be seen that the manifestations of the Spirit during revival work have resulted in various types of experience incident to the condition of those affected. More advanced students and more educated and intelligent parishioners have been less demonstrative, and have submitted themselves to the Lord with more deliberation and intelligence than those less favored. We believe our readers will be cheered by these reports, and earnestly urge that they pray with us that the young converts, numbered by hundreds, may walk worthy of their high calling in Christ Jesus.

District Secretary for Chicago Editorial 131

District Secretary J~r OhicagoBe?ilvats. 131 A GIFT OF Cows.The pupils of our Normal Training School, at Santee Agency, Nebraska, have been made glad by the purchase of two cows, the New Years gift of Lottie, Emily, Charlie, Minnie and Eddie Leeds, of Stamford, Conn. DISTRICT SECRETARY FOR CHICAGO. We are glad to announce the appointment of the Rev. Charles XV. Shelton as District Secretary for Chicago, in the place of Rev. James Powell, who has been transferred to this office. We have sought with diligence for some one adapted to this position, and feel quite confident that the fit man has been found. Mr. Shelton is one of the Yale Dakota Band, and has had experience in missionary life, and more recently in collecting funds for Yankton College. His success in his different fields of work gives the best guarantee of his usefulness in the one to which he has now been appointed. We ask for him a cordial welcome, and a fraternal co-operation among the pastors and churches of the West. REVIVALS. Considerable space is given in this number of the MIssIoNARY to reports of revival work. We believe the importance of conversion to Christ as a qualification for all that is best in school life is keenly felt at our various institutions. ~A prominent object of this school, wrote one of the founders of the Fisk University, is to illustrate in practice what most educators are willing to admit in theory, that conversion is the proper door into the kingdom of science as well as the Kingdom of ilcaven ; that science and religion were made to go hand in hand ; that the two joined are the Heaven-appointed means of lighting humanity to its proper stand- ing and dignity. This Association has builded its best on fundamental principles here set forth, and every conversion, whether at times of unusual religious awak- ening or at other times, is hailed as a way-mark of success in school work. For this reason, as well as for the more general one of saving souls from death, we rejoice to report revivals. By careful study of the communications published, it will be seen that the manifestations of the Spirit during revival work have resulted in various types of experience incident to the condition of those affected. More advanced students and more educated and intelligent parishioners have been less demonstrative, and have submitted themselves to the Lord with more deliberation and intelligence than those less favored. We believe our readers will be cheered by these reports, and earnestly urge that they pray with us that the young converts, numbered by hundreds, may walk worthy of their high calling in Christ Jesus.

Revivals Editorial 131

District Secretary J~r OhicagoBe?ilvats. 131 A GIFT OF Cows.The pupils of our Normal Training School, at Santee Agency, Nebraska, have been made glad by the purchase of two cows, the New Years gift of Lottie, Emily, Charlie, Minnie and Eddie Leeds, of Stamford, Conn. DISTRICT SECRETARY FOR CHICAGO. We are glad to announce the appointment of the Rev. Charles XV. Shelton as District Secretary for Chicago, in the place of Rev. James Powell, who has been transferred to this office. We have sought with diligence for some one adapted to this position, and feel quite confident that the fit man has been found. Mr. Shelton is one of the Yale Dakota Band, and has had experience in missionary life, and more recently in collecting funds for Yankton College. His success in his different fields of work gives the best guarantee of his usefulness in the one to which he has now been appointed. We ask for him a cordial welcome, and a fraternal co-operation among the pastors and churches of the West. REVIVALS. Considerable space is given in this number of the MIssIoNARY to reports of revival work. We believe the importance of conversion to Christ as a qualification for all that is best in school life is keenly felt at our various institutions. ~A prominent object of this school, wrote one of the founders of the Fisk University, is to illustrate in practice what most educators are willing to admit in theory, that conversion is the proper door into the kingdom of science as well as the Kingdom of ilcaven ; that science and religion were made to go hand in hand ; that the two joined are the Heaven-appointed means of lighting humanity to its proper stand- ing and dignity. This Association has builded its best on fundamental principles here set forth, and every conversion, whether at times of unusual religious awak- ening or at other times, is hailed as a way-mark of success in school work. For this reason, as well as for the more general one of saving souls from death, we rejoice to report revivals. By careful study of the communications published, it will be seen that the manifestations of the Spirit during revival work have resulted in various types of experience incident to the condition of those affected. More advanced students and more educated and intelligent parishioners have been less demonstrative, and have submitted themselves to the Lord with more deliberation and intelligence than those less favored. We believe our readers will be cheered by these reports, and earnestly urge that they pray with us that the young converts, numbered by hundreds, may walk worthy of their high calling in Christ Jesus.

A Gift of Cows Editorial 131-132

District Secretary J~r OhicagoBe?ilvats. 131 A GIFT OF Cows.The pupils of our Normal Training School, at Santee Agency, Nebraska, have been made glad by the purchase of two cows, the New Years gift of Lottie, Emily, Charlie, Minnie and Eddie Leeds, of Stamford, Conn. DISTRICT SECRETARY FOR CHICAGO. We are glad to announce the appointment of the Rev. Charles XV. Shelton as District Secretary for Chicago, in the place of Rev. James Powell, who has been transferred to this office. We have sought with diligence for some one adapted to this position, and feel quite confident that the fit man has been found. Mr. Shelton is one of the Yale Dakota Band, and has had experience in missionary life, and more recently in collecting funds for Yankton College. His success in his different fields of work gives the best guarantee of his usefulness in the one to which he has now been appointed. We ask for him a cordial welcome, and a fraternal co-operation among the pastors and churches of the West. REVIVALS. Considerable space is given in this number of the MIssIoNARY to reports of revival work. We believe the importance of conversion to Christ as a qualification for all that is best in school life is keenly felt at our various institutions. ~A prominent object of this school, wrote one of the founders of the Fisk University, is to illustrate in practice what most educators are willing to admit in theory, that conversion is the proper door into the kingdom of science as well as the Kingdom of ilcaven ; that science and religion were made to go hand in hand ; that the two joined are the Heaven-appointed means of lighting humanity to its proper stand- ing and dignity. This Association has builded its best on fundamental principles here set forth, and every conversion, whether at times of unusual religious awak- ening or at other times, is hailed as a way-mark of success in school work. For this reason, as well as for the more general one of saving souls from death, we rejoice to report revivals. By careful study of the communications published, it will be seen that the manifestations of the Spirit during revival work have resulted in various types of experience incident to the condition of those affected. More advanced students and more educated and intelligent parishioners have been less demonstrative, and have submitted themselves to the Lord with more deliberation and intelligence than those less favored. We believe our readers will be cheered by these reports, and earnestly urge that they pray with us that the young converts, numbered by hundreds, may walk worthy of their high calling in Christ Jesus. 132 Our Southern Mountain Work. OUR SOUTHERN MOUNTAIN WORK. BY WILLIAM HAYES WARD, D. D., OF THE EX. COB. Seventy-five years ago Washington Irving said that the tumble-bug was the only bit of uctivity to be found in Virginia. Whatever truth there was in the playful satire, it would seem to apply to the descendants of those Virginians and Carolinians who about that time were moving into the mountain valleys of Eastern Kentucky and Tennessee. Up to within the last few years they appear to have made absolutely no progress since the time when they put up their first log cabins. The log hut was the necessity of only a few years in Ohio, and was soon replaced by comfortable frame houses. But in the mountains of Kentucky and Tennessee nine- tenths of the people still live in ~og houses, and it is doubtful if half of these houses can boast a glazed window. The school-houses and the churches are still built of logs, and in the rudest style. But a new era has opened within the past two or three years. Northern capital is start- ing railroads and building saw-mills, and opening the exhaustless coal mines. The spinning-wheels which are now in use everywhere must very soon be thrown away, and the old order give place for the new. Into this region the American Missionary Association entered before the war. In 1859 one of our teachers had a rope put around his neck and would have been hanged but for the bravery of two brothersand hot sympathizers with secession they were, teewho declared the teacher should be treated with hospitality, and who, enforcing the demand with their rifles, required that he be delivered up to them within five minutes. I had the pleasure of spending a week in March visiting the work as now opening before us there. The occasion was the dedication, on Sun- day and Monday, March 16 and 17, of the new church and school-house in Williamsburg, Whitley County. It hardly seems possible that an old county seat in an old State could be found in which there has never, up to this time, been erected a house of worship. Where a log house has been begun it has rotted down unfinished, or, as only a few years ago, minis- ter and people got drunk together and hitched their oxen to the half-erected house and pulled it to pieces. Here the American Missionary Association several years ago sent the Rev. A. A. Myers, a man of extraordinary energy and devotion, a Free Baptist originally, and one who has had great experience in revival work. He has made himself the most aggressive and influential man in half a dozen counties, pushing forward the cause not only of evangelical religion, but of education, temperance and equal rights. There is in this region a magnificent opportunity for such decided, intelligent men to do great good. At the dedication of the new Congregational Church building there were present from abroad the Field Secretary,Dr. Roy, from Atlanta;

William Hayes Ward, D.D. Ward, William Hayes, D.D. Our Southern Mountain Work Editorial 132-133

132 Our Southern Mountain Work. OUR SOUTHERN MOUNTAIN WORK. BY WILLIAM HAYES WARD, D. D., OF THE EX. COB. Seventy-five years ago Washington Irving said that the tumble-bug was the only bit of uctivity to be found in Virginia. Whatever truth there was in the playful satire, it would seem to apply to the descendants of those Virginians and Carolinians who about that time were moving into the mountain valleys of Eastern Kentucky and Tennessee. Up to within the last few years they appear to have made absolutely no progress since the time when they put up their first log cabins. The log hut was the necessity of only a few years in Ohio, and was soon replaced by comfortable frame houses. But in the mountains of Kentucky and Tennessee nine- tenths of the people still live in ~og houses, and it is doubtful if half of these houses can boast a glazed window. The school-houses and the churches are still built of logs, and in the rudest style. But a new era has opened within the past two or three years. Northern capital is start- ing railroads and building saw-mills, and opening the exhaustless coal mines. The spinning-wheels which are now in use everywhere must very soon be thrown away, and the old order give place for the new. Into this region the American Missionary Association entered before the war. In 1859 one of our teachers had a rope put around his neck and would have been hanged but for the bravery of two brothersand hot sympathizers with secession they were, teewho declared the teacher should be treated with hospitality, and who, enforcing the demand with their rifles, required that he be delivered up to them within five minutes. I had the pleasure of spending a week in March visiting the work as now opening before us there. The occasion was the dedication, on Sun- day and Monday, March 16 and 17, of the new church and school-house in Williamsburg, Whitley County. It hardly seems possible that an old county seat in an old State could be found in which there has never, up to this time, been erected a house of worship. Where a log house has been begun it has rotted down unfinished, or, as only a few years ago, minis- ter and people got drunk together and hitched their oxen to the half-erected house and pulled it to pieces. Here the American Missionary Association several years ago sent the Rev. A. A. Myers, a man of extraordinary energy and devotion, a Free Baptist originally, and one who has had great experience in revival work. He has made himself the most aggressive and influential man in half a dozen counties, pushing forward the cause not only of evangelical religion, but of education, temperance and equal rights. There is in this region a magnificent opportunity for such decided, intelligent men to do great good. At the dedication of the new Congregational Church building there were present from abroad the Field Secretary,Dr. Roy, from Atlanta; O~tr Soathern 2llountain Work. 133 the Assistant Secretary, the Rev. James Powell, and myself, from New York; and President Fairchild and Professor Dodge, from Berea College. We found a fine, commodious and tasteful building, with stained glass windows and hard wood finishing, and a good bell in the tower. It is the best church in all the mountain region, and cost three thousand dollars, every cent paid for, and that too wholly by the people on the ground. The stirring up indicated by this grand achievement is wonderful, and would have been impossible but for the new life that has come with the railroad a year ago and the opening of saw-mills or coal mines; and yet it is not Northern men, but Kentuckians, native to this region, men of the quickness and energy of which these mountain men are capable, who have, been the chief supporters of this enterprise, and who compose the thirty- five members of the new church. The whole community turned out to attend the dedication services. There were sermons morning, afternoon and evening, with the celebration of the communion. It was beyond all question that the sympathy of nearly all the leading people of the place was with the enterprise. Nearly a dozen local preachers, of various denominations, assisted by their pres- ence on the platform. Ga Monday caine the dedication of the three-story frame academy, crowning the most prominent elevation in town, which has been built by the A. M. A. at an expense of three thousand dollars. It was a week before the end of the school term, and the scholars took their new places. It was a time of not a little anxiety for the friends of the academy, for it was fully understood that colored as well as white children would be welcome. In the church the race conflict was at an end. Those of dark skin sat with the white in the same seats, and their children were in the same Sunday-school classes. But in a State where co-education of the race is forbidden in the l)ublic schools, where public sentiment has hardly gotten over the shock of the suggestion of the thing, it is not strange that the prejudice is not easily yielded. The railroad ha~ brought in a considerable Negro population, and the question threatens to be a practical one. Before the school was built a paper was signed by leading citizens giving their consent to Negroes having equal rights in it. They, how- ever, by no means indicated a hearty approval of the principle, and it was feared that a large number of the public would stay. away. It was, therefore, a great pleasure to find not only a number of colored people in the audience at the dedication of the Academy, but nearly all t~he seventy- five scholars. Addresses were made by the visiting gentlemen, as also by Mr. Wheat, a business man from Louisville, and an active worker in the Young Mens Christian Association, and by R. D. lUll, Esq., the leading lawyer in the region, and a devoted member of the new church. It was very refreshing to hear the intensity with which Mr. Myers addressed the older pupils, young men and women, bidding them mark that man as an

Rev. Jas. W. Cooper Cooper, Jas. W., Rev. Comity in Appeals Editorial 133-136

O~tr Soathern 2llountain Work. 133 the Assistant Secretary, the Rev. James Powell, and myself, from New York; and President Fairchild and Professor Dodge, from Berea College. We found a fine, commodious and tasteful building, with stained glass windows and hard wood finishing, and a good bell in the tower. It is the best church in all the mountain region, and cost three thousand dollars, every cent paid for, and that too wholly by the people on the ground. The stirring up indicated by this grand achievement is wonderful, and would have been impossible but for the new life that has come with the railroad a year ago and the opening of saw-mills or coal mines; and yet it is not Northern men, but Kentuckians, native to this region, men of the quickness and energy of which these mountain men are capable, who have, been the chief supporters of this enterprise, and who compose the thirty- five members of the new church. The whole community turned out to attend the dedication services. There were sermons morning, afternoon and evening, with the celebration of the communion. It was beyond all question that the sympathy of nearly all the leading people of the place was with the enterprise. Nearly a dozen local preachers, of various denominations, assisted by their pres- ence on the platform. Ga Monday caine the dedication of the three-story frame academy, crowning the most prominent elevation in town, which has been built by the A. M. A. at an expense of three thousand dollars. It was a week before the end of the school term, and the scholars took their new places. It was a time of not a little anxiety for the friends of the academy, for it was fully understood that colored as well as white children would be welcome. In the church the race conflict was at an end. Those of dark skin sat with the white in the same seats, and their children were in the same Sunday-school classes. But in a State where co-education of the race is forbidden in the l)ublic schools, where public sentiment has hardly gotten over the shock of the suggestion of the thing, it is not strange that the prejudice is not easily yielded. The railroad ha~ brought in a considerable Negro population, and the question threatens to be a practical one. Before the school was built a paper was signed by leading citizens giving their consent to Negroes having equal rights in it. They, how- ever, by no means indicated a hearty approval of the principle, and it was feared that a large number of the public would stay. away. It was, therefore, a great pleasure to find not only a number of colored people in the audience at the dedication of the Academy, but nearly all t~he seventy- five scholars. Addresses were made by the visiting gentlemen, as also by Mr. Wheat, a business man from Louisville, and an active worker in the Young Mens Christian Association, and by R. D. lUll, Esq., the leading lawyer in the region, and a devoted member of the new church. It was very refreshing to hear the intensity with which Mr. Myers addressed the older pupils, young men and women, bidding them mark that man as an 134 Our Southern ifountain Work. enemy who dared to say one word, on any pretense, to interfere with their getting an education. If any people in Williamsburg or the vicinity venture Zo bring the color line forward to interfere with equality in church or school, they will find themselves met in the most peremptory way. In the evening a large and enthusiastic educational meeting was held, and we had abundant evidence of the sympathy of the good citizens of the county, for whose growing public and Christian spirit, and quiet responsiveness to every impulse for good we learned the warmest respect. Williamsburg is the centre of a growing religious and educational work. The two must go together. The history of the past seventy-five years there shows that an uneducated Christianity, however fervent it may be, elevates neither religion nor morals. It has been only since new and edu- cated influences have come in that the sale of liquor has been driven out of the county. Even secret sales have been broken up, and the sellers have been made to break stone in the highway. For this work the A. M. A. is exactly fitted, and it ought to aim to plant its academies and churches in every county seat and its day schools in a hundred hamlets. The pub- lic schools there are little more than a farce, or are kept open only three or four months in the year. A teacher will soon be located at Pleasant View, a few miles to the south, and a school will be erected soon at Wood- bine. a few miles to the north. Mrs. Myers spends every Sunday at the latter place, conducting a Sunday-school, which will grow into a church, and at the former place a good Sunday-school is already started. South, just on the State line at Jellico, an important town with coal mines, and at its suburb, Dowliss, two new schools are being started on the anti- caste basis or with some Welsh Congregational backing. When we add to this the fine centres in the hills of North Georgia, at Pomona and Grand View, with their schools and churches, we see the large beginning of what bids fair to be a very important religious movement where our edu- cational, as well as religious work, is needed to elevate the community, and where it has a grand and vigorous body of people to work in. Here the battle of equality will be most easily fought. It will be a long time before in the fertile plains whites and blacks can be brought to recognize each others rights ; but in the mountains, where the population is mainly white, or where Bercas glorious success has already pointed the way, we find the field aad the home waiting for us. And yet the A. M. A. has only felt justified in appropriating some five thousand dollars for this very needy and very fruitful portion of its work. (Jom~ity in Appeals. 135 COMITY IN APPEALS. REV. JAN. W. COOPER, NEW BRITAIN, CONN. Various as the billows, one as the seathat is the description of the benevolent work of the churches, at home and abroad, at the present time. All the rivers run into the sea, yet the sea is not full that is the his- tory of our contributions. Especially is it true that the sea is not full. How to create more str ains, and make them all broader, deeper, clearer, flowing more steadily and with a swifter current, that is the problem with which our good brethren, the Secretaries, are continually struggling. Freshets are rare in our benevolent societies. Floods have never been known to inundate their treasuries. It is not strange, therefore, that there should sometime& seem to be something dangerously like competition, as the different commissioners visit the hill-countries where the little springs begin to flow.? Each man points eagerly to the impending drought in that particular water-course which it is his particular duty to keep full. Of late, ~specia1 appeals have been added to the more general ones. We have long been accustomed to special appeals for special causes; but now it is special appeals from the great societies. The American Board asks for a special for the new Morning Star ; the Home Missionary Society for its Emergency Fund; the American Missionary Association for Indian Work. There is a sense in which it is really necessary, if one Society ap- peals for a special, that others must do the same. They must do this or their supplies will fall behind. They must do it, or they cease to be ag- gressive. Some pastors and churches are annoyed by this. More are confused. How to meet these special calls of all the great societies and not diminish the general supplies for any, that isthe pirtion of the diffi- cult problem which falls to the churches and pastors to solve. Let us lay down this principle. Booms are to be deplored, not sought after. Inflation is bad in benevolent stock as well as in business sto~k.. There is sure to be a reaction. Steady growth is better. A big coll~e- tion this year and none next is no gain. A good general average is far more useful than an occasional brilliant showing. That mans account is of most value to a bank which is most regular and reliable; he may do a smaller business than some other man, but his account is worth more. The same thing is true in the Lords Bank of Missions. Contribute regularly, and every dollar you give is worth two. Our splendid societies are organized for permanent business. They must have a reliable con- stituency. What shall we do, then, with these special appeals? Ignore them? By no means. Use them in m~dntaining and increasing your general average! 136 Gomity in Appeals. If our people had greater interest in the benevolent work they could cer- tainly give more than they do. These special appeals create this interest. They are just the thing. I had a talk not many days ago with a gentle- man who is made responsible for the sales in a large manufactory. The goods are produced in immense quantities; it is his business to sell them. He tells me that he is most fortunate when he has some specialty. lie sells all, when he makes a point on some one article. He is even on the lookout for specialties, because this is the very best way to keep up an interest in his stock and increase the general average of his sales. That is good business policy. A manufactory that makes no advances, that introduces no improved measures and never appeals to the market with new goods, is wanting in enterprise. So is a great working missionary society. We have~been taught the advantage of systematic benevolence. Our churches are fast learning the blessing of regular, weekly offerings, every Lords day. Suppose, therefore, that we set apart certain Sundays of the year to each of the several societies. While we are waiting for the privilege of giving, for example, to the Americaii Missionary Association, the special appeals for that work come in. We are neither annoyed nor confused by them. They are our stock in trade. We carefully preserve them, and make up our case of samples. When the proper time comes we present them to our people. At one time it is the educational work among the negroes; at another it is the church work; at another, the Indian work; at another, the Chinese work. There is something new to say. New work is being done. Advances are being made, now in this direction, now in that. There is no monotony. By descending to particulars we rise to larger and clearer conceptions. We are not begging, we are commending. Information is given. Interest is excited. Confidence is established. We are not merely supporting causes; we are maintaining ~igoro us, aggressive, successful Christian enterprises, to have a part in which is a privilege and an honor. Christian business men will feel it so. This is not altogether an ideal picture. Is it not a simple, practical solution of two important problemswhat to do with the continual press- ing appeals from our benevolent societies, and how to give them the most regular and reliable support? A good number. of the teachers and students of a well-known New England female seminary are illustrating womanly ingenuity and benefi- cence, by contributing one cent for missions as often as they pay two cents for postage, thus giving the cause of Christ the benefit of the reduction of letter postage from three to two cents. How much would our Missionary treasuries lack if all Christian people followed their example?

Paragraphs Editorial 136-137

136 Gomity in Appeals. If our people had greater interest in the benevolent work they could cer- tainly give more than they do. These special appeals create this interest. They are just the thing. I had a talk not many days ago with a gentle- man who is made responsible for the sales in a large manufactory. The goods are produced in immense quantities; it is his business to sell them. He tells me that he is most fortunate when he has some specialty. lie sells all, when he makes a point on some one article. He is even on the lookout for specialties, because this is the very best way to keep up an interest in his stock and increase the general average of his sales. That is good business policy. A manufactory that makes no advances, that introduces no improved measures and never appeals to the market with new goods, is wanting in enterprise. So is a great working missionary society. We have~been taught the advantage of systematic benevolence. Our churches are fast learning the blessing of regular, weekly offerings, every Lords day. Suppose, therefore, that we set apart certain Sundays of the year to each of the several societies. While we are waiting for the privilege of giving, for example, to the Americaii Missionary Association, the special appeals for that work come in. We are neither annoyed nor confused by them. They are our stock in trade. We carefully preserve them, and make up our case of samples. When the proper time comes we present them to our people. At one time it is the educational work among the negroes; at another it is the church work; at another, the Indian work; at another, the Chinese work. There is something new to say. New work is being done. Advances are being made, now in this direction, now in that. There is no monotony. By descending to particulars we rise to larger and clearer conceptions. We are not begging, we are commending. Information is given. Interest is excited. Confidence is established. We are not merely supporting causes; we are maintaining ~igoro us, aggressive, successful Christian enterprises, to have a part in which is a privilege and an honor. Christian business men will feel it so. This is not altogether an ideal picture. Is it not a simple, practical solution of two important problemswhat to do with the continual press- ing appeals from our benevolent societies, and how to give them the most regular and reliable support? A good number. of the teachers and students of a well-known New England female seminary are illustrating womanly ingenuity and benefi- cence, by contributing one cent for missions as often as they pay two cents for postage, thus giving the cause of Christ the benefit of the reduction of letter postage from three to two cents. How much would our Missionary treasuries lack if all Christian people followed their example? Benefactions. We are in receipt of a letter from a young pastor who recently left Connecticut to take charge of a church in Washington Territory, asking for documents suitable for use in informing his people of out great work~ He says: One of the first things I found to do here was to bring the matter of benevolence into systematic shape, and we have adopted a plan which contemplates a collection each month of the year. We have already raised $50 for the American Board and the Home Missionary Society. Will you not send me what (documents) you have to spare for such pur- poses, and we will return what I suppose will be the first contribution this church has ever given to your work ? Church extension West means church extension at the South and beyond the seas, as is well illustrated by Brother Taylor in his new charge at Seattle. BEN EFACTIO N S. Prof. S. Wells Williams bequeathed $5,000 to Yale College to estab- lish a fund for a professorship of the Chinese language, and a cabinet of Chinese minerals valued at $1,000. The late George Ball, of Galveston, Tex., gave $60,000 for a high school in that city a short time before his death. Mr. John Guy Vassar has given $10,000, the income of which is to be used for the benefit of the laboratory of Vassar College. Beverly Livingstone, class of 74, in Yale College, left his scientific col- lection to the Sheflield Scientific School, Yale College, it being the first legacy to the school. In transmitting the collection his father added *3,000 in memory of his son. By a recent decision of the Supreme Court of New York, in the will case of the late Miss Sara Burr, of that city, the Burr and Burton Seminary of Manchester Vt., comes in to possession of $20,000, willed to that institu- tion. The will of Mrs. Louisa S. Vought, of Freehold, N. J., makes, among other public bequests, one of $5,000 for the education of destitute orphan and other children in the diocese of New Jersey. The late Julius Haligarten bequeathed to the University of New York *50,000. Yale College has a gift of $50,000 for a new dornii4ory, from Mrs. Law- rence, of Chicago, mother of the late T. G. Lawrence, of the class of 84. Mrs. Jane W. Sterritt has given $10,000 toward the endowment of the chair of political philosophy in Geneva College. There is no surer method of perpetuating the principles of iTherty, of anti-caste and of evangelical piety, as taught by the A. M A. in all its institutions, than by the endowment of its Theological, Collegiate, and other training schools.

Benefactions Editorial 137-138

Benefactions. We are in receipt of a letter from a young pastor who recently left Connecticut to take charge of a church in Washington Territory, asking for documents suitable for use in informing his people of out great work~ He says: One of the first things I found to do here was to bring the matter of benevolence into systematic shape, and we have adopted a plan which contemplates a collection each month of the year. We have already raised $50 for the American Board and the Home Missionary Society. Will you not send me what (documents) you have to spare for such pur- poses, and we will return what I suppose will be the first contribution this church has ever given to your work ? Church extension West means church extension at the South and beyond the seas, as is well illustrated by Brother Taylor in his new charge at Seattle. BEN EFACTIO N S. Prof. S. Wells Williams bequeathed $5,000 to Yale College to estab- lish a fund for a professorship of the Chinese language, and a cabinet of Chinese minerals valued at $1,000. The late George Ball, of Galveston, Tex., gave $60,000 for a high school in that city a short time before his death. Mr. John Guy Vassar has given $10,000, the income of which is to be used for the benefit of the laboratory of Vassar College. Beverly Livingstone, class of 74, in Yale College, left his scientific col- lection to the Sheflield Scientific School, Yale College, it being the first legacy to the school. In transmitting the collection his father added *3,000 in memory of his son. By a recent decision of the Supreme Court of New York, in the will case of the late Miss Sara Burr, of that city, the Burr and Burton Seminary of Manchester Vt., comes in to possession of $20,000, willed to that institu- tion. The will of Mrs. Louisa S. Vought, of Freehold, N. J., makes, among other public bequests, one of $5,000 for the education of destitute orphan and other children in the diocese of New Jersey. The late Julius Haligarten bequeathed to the University of New York *50,000. Yale College has a gift of $50,000 for a new dornii4ory, from Mrs. Law- rence, of Chicago, mother of the late T. G. Lawrence, of the class of 84. Mrs. Jane W. Sterritt has given $10,000 toward the endowment of the chair of political philosophy in Geneva College. There is no surer method of perpetuating the principles of iTherty, of anti-caste and of evangelical piety, as taught by the A. M A. in all its institutions, than by the endowment of its Theological, Collegiate, and other training schools. 138 G1eneral Notes. WE have been cheered by the number of subscript ions for the AMERICAN MIssIoNARY for the first three months of 1884. The forthcoming numbers will be quite as full of interest as any during the ye~Ir, as reports of the anniversary services of our different educational institutions will be pub- lished through the summer months. Will not our friends help inform others of what we are doing and what needs to be done, by a continua- tion of their efforts to increase the circulation of the MISSIONARY? The price is 50 cents. GENERAL NOTES AFRICA. M. Bovet, of Neuchatel, has been designated by the French minister of public instruction to take part in the expedition of S. de Brazza to the Congo. Cardinal Lavigerie, the founder of missions in Africa, has received from Count Chambord a legacy of 100,000 francs for the missions of the Sahara, the Soudan and Equatorial Africa. The Department of the Marine proposes to set out in the colony of Gahoon, plantations of the eucalyptus and bamboo-cane to improve the regions where deadly fevers are prevalent. According to The Exploration a caravan sent from Assab by the King of Choa will bear merchandise to the French establishment of Obock. The only route from CTha which offered any security was that of Assab. A correspondent of the Tbnes writes from Aden to that jour- nal that the caravan of M. Soleillet has arrived at Obock. Messrs. Solomon Reivach and Ernest Babelon, charged by the minis- try of public instruction with an archtnologieal mission in Tunis, have made at El-Kantara, at Bou-Ghara, and at Zian, to the south of the island of Djerba, excavations which have disclosed io them a quantity of statues in colored marble, of shafts of columns, of inscriptions, and a forum sur- rounded with grand porticoes. The French Ministry of the Marine has placed upon the bureau of the Chamber a project specially demanding from the King for the railway to the Haut-Senegal, a credit of three millions to allow the Government to fulfill its contracts for the last year. A~ to the road from Saint-Louis to Dakur, the section from Saint Louis to Mt. Pal (30 kilometers) was finished the 22d of January. M. Mizon has contributed to the Society of Geography of Paris the first sheet of the map which was prepared in his journey between Ogoou6 and the Atlantic Ocean. This sheet gives the course of the Ogoou6 and the Passa, (if the River Ivendo to Franceville. In two other sheets he will give the region extending from Franceville to Mayoumba; the line between the two basins of the Ogoou6 and Quilon-Niavi will be indicated.

General Notes Editorial 138-141

138 G1eneral Notes. WE have been cheered by the number of subscript ions for the AMERICAN MIssIoNARY for the first three months of 1884. The forthcoming numbers will be quite as full of interest as any during the ye~Ir, as reports of the anniversary services of our different educational institutions will be pub- lished through the summer months. Will not our friends help inform others of what we are doing and what needs to be done, by a continua- tion of their efforts to increase the circulation of the MISSIONARY? The price is 50 cents. GENERAL NOTES AFRICA. M. Bovet, of Neuchatel, has been designated by the French minister of public instruction to take part in the expedition of S. de Brazza to the Congo. Cardinal Lavigerie, the founder of missions in Africa, has received from Count Chambord a legacy of 100,000 francs for the missions of the Sahara, the Soudan and Equatorial Africa. The Department of the Marine proposes to set out in the colony of Gahoon, plantations of the eucalyptus and bamboo-cane to improve the regions where deadly fevers are prevalent. According to The Exploration a caravan sent from Assab by the King of Choa will bear merchandise to the French establishment of Obock. The only route from CTha which offered any security was that of Assab. A correspondent of the Tbnes writes from Aden to that jour- nal that the caravan of M. Soleillet has arrived at Obock. Messrs. Solomon Reivach and Ernest Babelon, charged by the minis- try of public instruction with an archtnologieal mission in Tunis, have made at El-Kantara, at Bou-Ghara, and at Zian, to the south of the island of Djerba, excavations which have disclosed io them a quantity of statues in colored marble, of shafts of columns, of inscriptions, and a forum sur- rounded with grand porticoes. The French Ministry of the Marine has placed upon the bureau of the Chamber a project specially demanding from the King for the railway to the Haut-Senegal, a credit of three millions to allow the Government to fulfill its contracts for the last year. A~ to the road from Saint-Louis to Dakur, the section from Saint Louis to Mt. Pal (30 kilometers) was finished the 22d of January. M. Mizon has contributed to the Society of Geography of Paris the first sheet of the map which was prepared in his journey between Ogoou6 and the Atlantic Ocean. This sheet gives the course of the Ogoou6 and the Passa, (if the River Ivendo to Franceville. In two other sheets he will give the region extending from Franceville to Mayoumba; the line between the two basins of the Ogoou6 and Quilon-Niavi will be indicated. EXPLORING PARTY CROSSING A RIVER IN AFRICA. cf~ 140 General Notes. THE CHINESE. A Chinese Uass has been established in the Second Presbyterian Church, at Camden, N. J. The FOREIGN MISSIONARY reports that the Chinese churches of Oak- land, Sacramento and Napa number 117 communicants, and their contri- butions during the year have reached $305. They are not rice Chris- tians, evidently. The Presbyterian Synod of China, at its last meeting, declined to yote that female members of the church, who persist in binding their feet, should be excommunicated. A public dispensary has lately been opened in Swatow by General Fang, and placed under the care of two Chinese doctors. The Sacred Edict of the Chinese is read to the patients there in the same way that the Bible is read to them at the Protestant Mission Hospital. Out of the receipts of $280, given for Chinese missions under the supervision of Rev. W. C. Pond, of California, not less than $216.45 came from Chinese contributors. A colony of Chinese laborers has been established near Port Eliza- beth, South Africa, where the wool-washing business is carried on. The workmen propose to remain in Africa till they have earned 100 each, and then return to China. It is thought that eventually many laborers of this kind will be employed in South Africa. THE INDIANS. The Presbyterian Indian Training School, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, has 150 students, and is to receive from the Government a new builaing costing $25,000. The Baptist Home Missionary society, after memoralizing the Gov- ernment for an educational appropriation for the Indians in Alaska, have voted to send missionaries of their own to that Territory, urging that the cry for help is as pitiful and hopeless as any that ever startled Chris- tian ears from the lands beyond the sea. At the agency of the Nez Perces 172 Indians have been admitted as members to the Presbyterian Church. They have a native pastor, and their church officers are chosen from their own numbers. According to Major Riordan, United States Indian Agent among the Navajos, the Government thirteen years ago pledged by treaty school facilities requiring 113 school-houses, of which but one has been built, and money for school purposes, still unpaid, amounting to $792,000. The Government, however, has given a written pledge of $7,500, on coftdition that a like amount be given by charitable people for the civilization of these Indians. Revival News. 141 THE SOUTH. REV. JOSEPH E. Roy, D.D., FIELD SUPERINTENDENT. Puo~. ALBERT SALISBURY, SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION. REVIVAL NEWS. FISK UNIVERSITYPROF. A. K. SPENCE. The religious work in Fisk University during the year that is now nearly gone has not been remarkable. During the early weeks of the term last autumn the pastor of the college church preached several sermons designed to turn the atten- tion of professing Christians toward labor for the unconverted, with appeaLs to the unconverted themselves to seek their own salvation. No great interest was aroused. At no time has there been what is ordinarily called a revival of religion. Still there has been a calm conviction that in an institution of learning like this religion occupies a position of first importance. Few extra efforts have been made, but sixteen students have during the year made profession of their faith in Christ. in alluding to extra efforts it is necessary to give a general idea to those not familiar with the management of American Missionary Association schools of the ordinary means of grace among us. On Sunday there are three servicesone a preaching service, one a Sunday-school, and one a prayer meeting. A prayer meeting is also held during the week. Besides these meetings, there are daily morning and evening prayers. All these services are attended by the Faculty and studentson the part of the latter by requirement. Many voluntary meetings are also held, some conducted by members of the Faculty and some by the students. The young men have a Young Mens Christian Association,which has done efficient work both within the institution and without. What extra revival efforts have been put forth have been largely under the direction of that society by way of short prayer and inquiry meetings, room meetings and personal labor. The work done by the young men outside of the University has been, in the main, two-fold. A certain number of them labor each Sunday in the State peni- tentiary, and especially in the hospital there, among the sick and the dying. Others planted a mission in a destitute part of the city near us, which has resulted in the formation of the Jackson Street Congregational Church. The Rev. H. E. Brown, Y. M. C. A. Secretary for the work among the colored people, spent some days with us, and his labors were very acceptable and much blessed to the good of the society here. The young women have a Y.W. C. A., which does efficient ser- vice among the young lady boarders. While it is to be regretted that not more conversions have taken place, it may be proper to state that, of the one hundred and eight students enrolled in the col- legiate department, all but eight are professing Christians, so that the uncon verted are mostly in our lower classes. in the English school about one-half are of this class. Quite a number of these live in the city, and our influence over them, outside of their studies, is limited. In order to give the whole truth, it is necessary to add that there has been a growing feeling among us that the minds of our Christian students need to be turned much to their own growth in grace and practical Christian living, rather than to revival efforts for others, forgetting these things. One very interesting case of conversion occurred. A young man came on a Wednesday, and the next Sunday he found peace. He had been previously a seeker. He joined our church at the first communion season after his conver- sion.

Prof. A. K. Spence Spence, A. K., Prof. Revial News: Fisk University The South 141-142

Revival News. 141 THE SOUTH. REV. JOSEPH E. Roy, D.D., FIELD SUPERINTENDENT. Puo~. ALBERT SALISBURY, SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION. REVIVAL NEWS. FISK UNIVERSITYPROF. A. K. SPENCE. The religious work in Fisk University during the year that is now nearly gone has not been remarkable. During the early weeks of the term last autumn the pastor of the college church preached several sermons designed to turn the atten- tion of professing Christians toward labor for the unconverted, with appeaLs to the unconverted themselves to seek their own salvation. No great interest was aroused. At no time has there been what is ordinarily called a revival of religion. Still there has been a calm conviction that in an institution of learning like this religion occupies a position of first importance. Few extra efforts have been made, but sixteen students have during the year made profession of their faith in Christ. in alluding to extra efforts it is necessary to give a general idea to those not familiar with the management of American Missionary Association schools of the ordinary means of grace among us. On Sunday there are three servicesone a preaching service, one a Sunday-school, and one a prayer meeting. A prayer meeting is also held during the week. Besides these meetings, there are daily morning and evening prayers. All these services are attended by the Faculty and studentson the part of the latter by requirement. Many voluntary meetings are also held, some conducted by members of the Faculty and some by the students. The young men have a Young Mens Christian Association,which has done efficient work both within the institution and without. What extra revival efforts have been put forth have been largely under the direction of that society by way of short prayer and inquiry meetings, room meetings and personal labor. The work done by the young men outside of the University has been, in the main, two-fold. A certain number of them labor each Sunday in the State peni- tentiary, and especially in the hospital there, among the sick and the dying. Others planted a mission in a destitute part of the city near us, which has resulted in the formation of the Jackson Street Congregational Church. The Rev. H. E. Brown, Y. M. C. A. Secretary for the work among the colored people, spent some days with us, and his labors were very acceptable and much blessed to the good of the society here. The young women have a Y.W. C. A., which does efficient ser- vice among the young lady boarders. While it is to be regretted that not more conversions have taken place, it may be proper to state that, of the one hundred and eight students enrolled in the col- legiate department, all but eight are professing Christians, so that the uncon verted are mostly in our lower classes. in the English school about one-half are of this class. Quite a number of these live in the city, and our influence over them, outside of their studies, is limited. In order to give the whole truth, it is necessary to add that there has been a growing feeling among us that the minds of our Christian students need to be turned much to their own growth in grace and practical Christian living, rather than to revival efforts for others, forgetting these things. One very interesting case of conversion occurred. A young man came on a Wednesday, and the next Sunday he found peace. He had been previously a seeker. He joined our church at the first communion season after his conver- sion. 142 Revival News. ATLANTA UNIYERSITY.REV. C. W. FRANCIS. Our school has been more deeply stirred within the past few weeks than at any time since the remarkable awakening of 1881. Then over fifty were hopefully con- verted within the last five months of the year, and more than twenty of them united with the school church. This year the interest was awakened earlier, deep feeling being shown during the Week of Prayer, and the next three weeks, when meetings were held every nig:it. The work also received a new impulse by the observance of the Day of Prayer for Colleges. Some extra meetings have been continued nearly up to the prcsent time, and already more than thirty seem to have entered upon the new life, and there remain hopeful cases. The means employed have been the steady presentation of the old truths of the Gospel, joined with much prayer and the abundant personal efforts of teachers, as well as companions and friends. There has been no undue excitement or yielding to excessive emotionthe conscience has been aimed at rather than the feelingsand no greater interference with regular school duties than was involved in giving an hour to the evening meeting. We have been able as never befere, I think, to secure the attention of the day pupils and enlist efforts in their behalf, and as a result quite a number of them have been brought in. We have also secured an unusual degree of co-oper- ation on the part of nearly all wh~ bear the Christian name, so that the work has the marks of a genuine reviving of the church. We are led to give God hearty thanks and to take courage. NEW ORLEANS.W. S. ALEXANDER, D. D. A revival in Central Church is preceded by days and weeks of special p rayer~ This is the spiritual preparation of the church for the work of grace which they joyfully and believingly anticipate. If a season of religious awakening did not occur during the year it would be a source of real and grievous disappointment. This faith in Gods willingness and purpose to bless His people is, I believe, an important element in the religious experience of this church. From October to January we thought and planned and prayed for this work of grace. When the week of prayer came, the church came together to engage heartily in the Masters work. In the school, especially among our boarding students, evidences of seriousness and inquiry were already manifest. On the first night, when the seekers after God were invited forward for prayer, ten responded, and from that night the work went on with increasing power. Each evening brought to us some fresh token of Gods love and remembrance. Hardly a night passed when there were not 20 or 25 on the anxious seats tearfully and earnestly seeking salvation. The church was deeply moved. Strong men, for whom many prayers had been offered, and who had till now resisted the pleading of the Spirit, were utterly broken down, and after days of deepest seriousness, in which their tears attested their sincerity, came into the full fellowship of the Gospel. I have before my mind scenes of the tenderest interest. I have seen strong men, members of the church, with their arms around other men for whose conversion they were anxious, pleading with tears that they would give up all for God. In it all there was the deepest solemnity. Hardly a spoken Amen or Praise God, nothing to offend the most fastidious; but simple, earnest faith and work. It was my privilege to preach the precious Gospel of a forgiving Saviour for 24 consecutive nights. The teachers in the University were faithful and devoted, and many of them, weary as they were with the hard work of the day in the school-room, came night after night to help on the work of our dear Lord. As the result of this revival. some 50 professed hope in Christ, including a few

Rev. C. W. Francis Francis, C. W., Rev. Revival News: Atlanta University The South 142

142 Revival News. ATLANTA UNIYERSITY.REV. C. W. FRANCIS. Our school has been more deeply stirred within the past few weeks than at any time since the remarkable awakening of 1881. Then over fifty were hopefully con- verted within the last five months of the year, and more than twenty of them united with the school church. This year the interest was awakened earlier, deep feeling being shown during the Week of Prayer, and the next three weeks, when meetings were held every nig:it. The work also received a new impulse by the observance of the Day of Prayer for Colleges. Some extra meetings have been continued nearly up to the prcsent time, and already more than thirty seem to have entered upon the new life, and there remain hopeful cases. The means employed have been the steady presentation of the old truths of the Gospel, joined with much prayer and the abundant personal efforts of teachers, as well as companions and friends. There has been no undue excitement or yielding to excessive emotionthe conscience has been aimed at rather than the feelingsand no greater interference with regular school duties than was involved in giving an hour to the evening meeting. We have been able as never befere, I think, to secure the attention of the day pupils and enlist efforts in their behalf, and as a result quite a number of them have been brought in. We have also secured an unusual degree of co-oper- ation on the part of nearly all wh~ bear the Christian name, so that the work has the marks of a genuine reviving of the church. We are led to give God hearty thanks and to take courage. NEW ORLEANS.W. S. ALEXANDER, D. D. A revival in Central Church is preceded by days and weeks of special p rayer~ This is the spiritual preparation of the church for the work of grace which they joyfully and believingly anticipate. If a season of religious awakening did not occur during the year it would be a source of real and grievous disappointment. This faith in Gods willingness and purpose to bless His people is, I believe, an important element in the religious experience of this church. From October to January we thought and planned and prayed for this work of grace. When the week of prayer came, the church came together to engage heartily in the Masters work. In the school, especially among our boarding students, evidences of seriousness and inquiry were already manifest. On the first night, when the seekers after God were invited forward for prayer, ten responded, and from that night the work went on with increasing power. Each evening brought to us some fresh token of Gods love and remembrance. Hardly a night passed when there were not 20 or 25 on the anxious seats tearfully and earnestly seeking salvation. The church was deeply moved. Strong men, for whom many prayers had been offered, and who had till now resisted the pleading of the Spirit, were utterly broken down, and after days of deepest seriousness, in which their tears attested their sincerity, came into the full fellowship of the Gospel. I have before my mind scenes of the tenderest interest. I have seen strong men, members of the church, with their arms around other men for whose conversion they were anxious, pleading with tears that they would give up all for God. In it all there was the deepest solemnity. Hardly a spoken Amen or Praise God, nothing to offend the most fastidious; but simple, earnest faith and work. It was my privilege to preach the precious Gospel of a forgiving Saviour for 24 consecutive nights. The teachers in the University were faithful and devoted, and many of them, weary as they were with the hard work of the day in the school-room, came night after night to help on the work of our dear Lord. As the result of this revival. some 50 professed hope in Christ, including a few

W. S. Alexander, D.D. Alexander, W. S., D.D. Revival News: New Orleans The South 142-143

142 Revival News. ATLANTA UNIYERSITY.REV. C. W. FRANCIS. Our school has been more deeply stirred within the past few weeks than at any time since the remarkable awakening of 1881. Then over fifty were hopefully con- verted within the last five months of the year, and more than twenty of them united with the school church. This year the interest was awakened earlier, deep feeling being shown during the Week of Prayer, and the next three weeks, when meetings were held every nig:it. The work also received a new impulse by the observance of the Day of Prayer for Colleges. Some extra meetings have been continued nearly up to the prcsent time, and already more than thirty seem to have entered upon the new life, and there remain hopeful cases. The means employed have been the steady presentation of the old truths of the Gospel, joined with much prayer and the abundant personal efforts of teachers, as well as companions and friends. There has been no undue excitement or yielding to excessive emotionthe conscience has been aimed at rather than the feelingsand no greater interference with regular school duties than was involved in giving an hour to the evening meeting. We have been able as never befere, I think, to secure the attention of the day pupils and enlist efforts in their behalf, and as a result quite a number of them have been brought in. We have also secured an unusual degree of co-oper- ation on the part of nearly all wh~ bear the Christian name, so that the work has the marks of a genuine reviving of the church. We are led to give God hearty thanks and to take courage. NEW ORLEANS.W. S. ALEXANDER, D. D. A revival in Central Church is preceded by days and weeks of special p rayer~ This is the spiritual preparation of the church for the work of grace which they joyfully and believingly anticipate. If a season of religious awakening did not occur during the year it would be a source of real and grievous disappointment. This faith in Gods willingness and purpose to bless His people is, I believe, an important element in the religious experience of this church. From October to January we thought and planned and prayed for this work of grace. When the week of prayer came, the church came together to engage heartily in the Masters work. In the school, especially among our boarding students, evidences of seriousness and inquiry were already manifest. On the first night, when the seekers after God were invited forward for prayer, ten responded, and from that night the work went on with increasing power. Each evening brought to us some fresh token of Gods love and remembrance. Hardly a night passed when there were not 20 or 25 on the anxious seats tearfully and earnestly seeking salvation. The church was deeply moved. Strong men, for whom many prayers had been offered, and who had till now resisted the pleading of the Spirit, were utterly broken down, and after days of deepest seriousness, in which their tears attested their sincerity, came into the full fellowship of the Gospel. I have before my mind scenes of the tenderest interest. I have seen strong men, members of the church, with their arms around other men for whose conversion they were anxious, pleading with tears that they would give up all for God. In it all there was the deepest solemnity. Hardly a spoken Amen or Praise God, nothing to offend the most fastidious; but simple, earnest faith and work. It was my privilege to preach the precious Gospel of a forgiving Saviour for 24 consecutive nights. The teachers in the University were faithful and devoted, and many of them, weary as they were with the hard work of the day in the school-room, came night after night to help on the work of our dear Lord. As the result of this revival. some 50 professed hope in Christ, including a few Revival News. 143 oases of reconsecration. Of this number about one half were students in our University. There were several heads of families, and not a few who had been christened in the RQman Catholic church. On the second Sabbath of February 23 w3re received to Central Church on profession of their faith in Christ. Others will be received at a later date. Now comes the work of instruction and confir- mation in the faith. May God give grace and strength to meet this duty strongly and wisely. TALLADEGA, ALA.REY. 0. W. FAY. I am happy to say that we are just now enjoying a most precious outpouring of the Holy Spirit. I think at least between thirty and forty have been truly converted. At the opening of the College in O~rober I determined to direct my preaching and effort especially to produce a spiritual quickening in the church, and to arouse the unconverted and bring them to a decision for Christ. The attendance at church on the Sabbath has been unusually large, and there has seemed an uncommonly tender interest on the part of teachers and students and persons not connected with the College. We hoped for great result~ during the Week of Prayer, but the weather was exceedingly unfavorable and it was not deemed best to continue the meetings. But, judging from indications, we decided that it would be wise to make specid account of the Day of Prayer for Colleges, which was observed by a preaching service on Consecration, in the chapel, conducted by Presid.~nt De Forest. Professor Howe conducted a service in the Primiry Rom at Cassedy Hall, while I, by special request from Mr~. Rindge, conducted a service in her room, the Intermediate, at Cassedy. All of these services were impressive and profitable. In the afternoon we had a general prayer meeting in the chapel, following up the thought of the morning. In the evening the President preached, and we have continued the meetings every night, except Saturday, until now. The interest at present seems very deep and genuine. Miss Yeomans stated last night in our meeting that there were 48 souls in Stone Hall, and 46 of them were for Christ. All the students in the Normal room except two, and all in the Grammar room except four, profess to be Christians. A good many at Cassedy have been converted; just how many there yet remain uncon- verted I am unable to say. The Presi lent has preached duuing the meetings, giving me time for pastor~d and hand-to-hand work, and I have conducted the inqu~ry meetings, which have been of great interest and power. We all rejoice in this good work, and feel more than ordinary assurance that it is of God, and consequently genuine and thorough, ATHENS, GA.IIEY. GEO. V. OLARK. Last December, about the 10th, Rev. J. C. Fields and wife came to Athens to do evangelistic work. The season was a very unfavorable one. The weather was cold and rainy much of the time. It, too, was during the holidays, when all, col- ored and white, give themselves up to amusements. Hence the evangelists success was not so great here as in other places. The meetings, on the whole, were well attended. After a weeks earnest labor one young man came forward and gave himself to the Saviour. He was one of the leaders in the holiday dancing parties and a member of the committee to get up the dances. After some days of unabated earnestness in prayer and preaching. two more young men were converted. After these, at short intervals, about twelve or thirteen more were added to the Lord. Mr. Fields remained with us three weeks, and was the means, under the Spirit, cf

Rev. O. W. Fay Fay, O. W., Rev. Revival News: Talladega, Ala. The South 143

Revival News. 143 oases of reconsecration. Of this number about one half were students in our University. There were several heads of families, and not a few who had been christened in the RQman Catholic church. On the second Sabbath of February 23 w3re received to Central Church on profession of their faith in Christ. Others will be received at a later date. Now comes the work of instruction and confir- mation in the faith. May God give grace and strength to meet this duty strongly and wisely. TALLADEGA, ALA.REY. 0. W. FAY. I am happy to say that we are just now enjoying a most precious outpouring of the Holy Spirit. I think at least between thirty and forty have been truly converted. At the opening of the College in O~rober I determined to direct my preaching and effort especially to produce a spiritual quickening in the church, and to arouse the unconverted and bring them to a decision for Christ. The attendance at church on the Sabbath has been unusually large, and there has seemed an uncommonly tender interest on the part of teachers and students and persons not connected with the College. We hoped for great result~ during the Week of Prayer, but the weather was exceedingly unfavorable and it was not deemed best to continue the meetings. But, judging from indications, we decided that it would be wise to make specid account of the Day of Prayer for Colleges, which was observed by a preaching service on Consecration, in the chapel, conducted by Presid.~nt De Forest. Professor Howe conducted a service in the Primiry Rom at Cassedy Hall, while I, by special request from Mr~. Rindge, conducted a service in her room, the Intermediate, at Cassedy. All of these services were impressive and profitable. In the afternoon we had a general prayer meeting in the chapel, following up the thought of the morning. In the evening the President preached, and we have continued the meetings every night, except Saturday, until now. The interest at present seems very deep and genuine. Miss Yeomans stated last night in our meeting that there were 48 souls in Stone Hall, and 46 of them were for Christ. All the students in the Normal room except two, and all in the Grammar room except four, profess to be Christians. A good many at Cassedy have been converted; just how many there yet remain uncon- verted I am unable to say. The Presi lent has preached duuing the meetings, giving me time for pastor~d and hand-to-hand work, and I have conducted the inqu~ry meetings, which have been of great interest and power. We all rejoice in this good work, and feel more than ordinary assurance that it is of God, and consequently genuine and thorough, ATHENS, GA.IIEY. GEO. V. OLARK. Last December, about the 10th, Rev. J. C. Fields and wife came to Athens to do evangelistic work. The season was a very unfavorable one. The weather was cold and rainy much of the time. It, too, was during the holidays, when all, col- ored and white, give themselves up to amusements. Hence the evangelists success was not so great here as in other places. The meetings, on the whole, were well attended. After a weeks earnest labor one young man came forward and gave himself to the Saviour. He was one of the leaders in the holiday dancing parties and a member of the committee to get up the dances. After some days of unabated earnestness in prayer and preaching. two more young men were converted. After these, at short intervals, about twelve or thirteen more were added to the Lord. Mr. Fields remained with us three weeks, and was the means, under the Spirit, cf

Rev. Geo. V. Clark Clark, Geo. V., Rev. Revival News: Athens, Ga. The South 143-144

Revival News. 143 oases of reconsecration. Of this number about one half were students in our University. There were several heads of families, and not a few who had been christened in the RQman Catholic church. On the second Sabbath of February 23 w3re received to Central Church on profession of their faith in Christ. Others will be received at a later date. Now comes the work of instruction and confir- mation in the faith. May God give grace and strength to meet this duty strongly and wisely. TALLADEGA, ALA.REY. 0. W. FAY. I am happy to say that we are just now enjoying a most precious outpouring of the Holy Spirit. I think at least between thirty and forty have been truly converted. At the opening of the College in O~rober I determined to direct my preaching and effort especially to produce a spiritual quickening in the church, and to arouse the unconverted and bring them to a decision for Christ. The attendance at church on the Sabbath has been unusually large, and there has seemed an uncommonly tender interest on the part of teachers and students and persons not connected with the College. We hoped for great result~ during the Week of Prayer, but the weather was exceedingly unfavorable and it was not deemed best to continue the meetings. But, judging from indications, we decided that it would be wise to make specid account of the Day of Prayer for Colleges, which was observed by a preaching service on Consecration, in the chapel, conducted by Presid.~nt De Forest. Professor Howe conducted a service in the Primiry Rom at Cassedy Hall, while I, by special request from Mr~. Rindge, conducted a service in her room, the Intermediate, at Cassedy. All of these services were impressive and profitable. In the afternoon we had a general prayer meeting in the chapel, following up the thought of the morning. In the evening the President preached, and we have continued the meetings every night, except Saturday, until now. The interest at present seems very deep and genuine. Miss Yeomans stated last night in our meeting that there were 48 souls in Stone Hall, and 46 of them were for Christ. All the students in the Normal room except two, and all in the Grammar room except four, profess to be Christians. A good many at Cassedy have been converted; just how many there yet remain uncon- verted I am unable to say. The Presi lent has preached duuing the meetings, giving me time for pastor~d and hand-to-hand work, and I have conducted the inqu~ry meetings, which have been of great interest and power. We all rejoice in this good work, and feel more than ordinary assurance that it is of God, and consequently genuine and thorough, ATHENS, GA.IIEY. GEO. V. OLARK. Last December, about the 10th, Rev. J. C. Fields and wife came to Athens to do evangelistic work. The season was a very unfavorable one. The weather was cold and rainy much of the time. It, too, was during the holidays, when all, col- ored and white, give themselves up to amusements. Hence the evangelists success was not so great here as in other places. The meetings, on the whole, were well attended. After a weeks earnest labor one young man came forward and gave himself to the Saviour. He was one of the leaders in the holiday dancing parties and a member of the committee to get up the dances. After some days of unabated earnestness in prayer and preaching. two more young men were converted. After these, at short intervals, about twelve or thirteen more were added to the Lord. Mr. Fields remained with us three weeks, and was the means, under the Spirit, cf 144 Revival News. eighteen converts. Out of this number we received, into our church, thirteen. The others have not joined anywhere as yet. His efforts are not confined simply to securing new~converts, but he wisely seeks to get Christians of more advanced years to take a higher standard of Christian living. He styles it the Higher Life. To this end he preached, toward the close of the series, especially to Christians. If any wish to take this vow they are required to come forward, as new converts do, and publicly do so. This he calls conversion to the Higher Life. As I under- stand him, he inculcates no new notions, nor engenders any strife. Neither does he, by his methods, attempt to weaken the confidence of the people in their pastors as is done by some unwise evangelists. I regard Bro. Fields as intelligent devout, orthodox, and Scriptural. MACON, GEORGIAREV. S. E. LATHROP. Our A. M. A. Evangelist, Rev. J. C. Fields, began meetings with our church on Sunday, Nov. 11. His coming was sooner than we expected, and there had not been time for the special preparation which we desired. Wit the people rallied with faith and prayer. The earnestness of Brother Fields, with the efficient help of his good wife, attracted attention. His style of preaching was pictorial and Scriptural, devout and direct, without noise or nonsense. Little cards of invitation to the meetings were printed by the pastor and distributed by the people, thus giving them something to do. The audiences were not extraordinarily large, but full of interest and attention. Conversions soon began to occur, and continued quite steadily, though with little excitement accompanying. The work seemed to spread mostly among the children of the Sunday-school and the Lewis High School. In the High School, meetings were held for two weeks daily, at the time of the noon recess, which occupied only a half hour. The great majority of the children voluntarily left their play and attended these meetings in large numbers. The result was that over fifty professed conversion. On the 9th of December thirty persons united with our church, all but one on profession of their faith in Christ. A number of others united with other churches where their parents or friends were connected. One of our best young women, the faithfnl teacher of our Infant Class in Sun- day-school, was teaching a public school in Unionville, a suburb of Macon, three miles out. She earnestly desired that Mr. Fields should visit her school, as some of her pupils, who were in our Sunday-school, had already been converted. We made two visits to that school, which was joined by the pupils of another school near by, taught by a young man who was also one of our former pupils. There was a wonderful outpouring of the Spirit among these children. As the fruit of the earnest prayers of this faithful teacher, more than fifty of the children gave themselves to God. Some were perhaps too young to understand fully what they were doing, but most of them, after careful examination, seemed to give good evidence of conversion. Those who uuited with churches mostly did so in that neighborhood, where there are two Baptist and one Methodist Church, to one or the other of which most of the people belong. Some, however, came and united with us. We have heard of several instances where the parents, insisting upon the old-fashioned spectacular sort of religion, with dreams and shouts and visions, ridiculed the quiet and earnest consecration of these children, and would not allow them to unite with any churchthis in some cases where the parents themselves are prominent members of some church. These things are painful, but are the fruit of ignorance and superstition. Twenty-two of the thirty who united with us were members of our Sunday-school. Though these additions brought but little financial strength, we rejoice greatly

Rev. S. E. Lathrop Lathrop, S. E., Rev. Revival News: Macon, Georgia The South 144-145

144 Revival News. eighteen converts. Out of this number we received, into our church, thirteen. The others have not joined anywhere as yet. His efforts are not confined simply to securing new~converts, but he wisely seeks to get Christians of more advanced years to take a higher standard of Christian living. He styles it the Higher Life. To this end he preached, toward the close of the series, especially to Christians. If any wish to take this vow they are required to come forward, as new converts do, and publicly do so. This he calls conversion to the Higher Life. As I under- stand him, he inculcates no new notions, nor engenders any strife. Neither does he, by his methods, attempt to weaken the confidence of the people in their pastors as is done by some unwise evangelists. I regard Bro. Fields as intelligent devout, orthodox, and Scriptural. MACON, GEORGIAREV. S. E. LATHROP. Our A. M. A. Evangelist, Rev. J. C. Fields, began meetings with our church on Sunday, Nov. 11. His coming was sooner than we expected, and there had not been time for the special preparation which we desired. Wit the people rallied with faith and prayer. The earnestness of Brother Fields, with the efficient help of his good wife, attracted attention. His style of preaching was pictorial and Scriptural, devout and direct, without noise or nonsense. Little cards of invitation to the meetings were printed by the pastor and distributed by the people, thus giving them something to do. The audiences were not extraordinarily large, but full of interest and attention. Conversions soon began to occur, and continued quite steadily, though with little excitement accompanying. The work seemed to spread mostly among the children of the Sunday-school and the Lewis High School. In the High School, meetings were held for two weeks daily, at the time of the noon recess, which occupied only a half hour. The great majority of the children voluntarily left their play and attended these meetings in large numbers. The result was that over fifty professed conversion. On the 9th of December thirty persons united with our church, all but one on profession of their faith in Christ. A number of others united with other churches where their parents or friends were connected. One of our best young women, the faithfnl teacher of our Infant Class in Sun- day-school, was teaching a public school in Unionville, a suburb of Macon, three miles out. She earnestly desired that Mr. Fields should visit her school, as some of her pupils, who were in our Sunday-school, had already been converted. We made two visits to that school, which was joined by the pupils of another school near by, taught by a young man who was also one of our former pupils. There was a wonderful outpouring of the Spirit among these children. As the fruit of the earnest prayers of this faithful teacher, more than fifty of the children gave themselves to God. Some were perhaps too young to understand fully what they were doing, but most of them, after careful examination, seemed to give good evidence of conversion. Those who uuited with churches mostly did so in that neighborhood, where there are two Baptist and one Methodist Church, to one or the other of which most of the people belong. Some, however, came and united with us. We have heard of several instances where the parents, insisting upon the old-fashioned spectacular sort of religion, with dreams and shouts and visions, ridiculed the quiet and earnest consecration of these children, and would not allow them to unite with any churchthis in some cases where the parents themselves are prominent members of some church. These things are painful, but are the fruit of ignorance and superstition. Twenty-two of the thirty who united with us were members of our Sunday-school. Though these additions brought but little financial strength, we rejoice greatly Revival News. 145 in the consecration of so many young and tender hearts to Christ and His service, and we pray for wisdom to guide them aright. The A. M. A. has reason to con- gratulate itself u~pon the successful labors of Brother Fields among all our churches, and we trust his efficient services may be continued. SAVANNAh, GA.REV. DANA SHERRILL. In Savannah evidence of awakening was noted in October. The meetings were full and solemn. Miss J. S. Hardy, Lady Missionary, and the A. M. A. teachers met their Sunday-school classes at The Home Sabbath afternoons and during week-day evenings for special Bible study. In another circle Miss Hardy had, by visiting and her cottage prayer meetings, prepared elder people for the work. An impressive conversion in December began a new era of interest. Many were ready to decide, but Evangelist Fields was announced, and all work done was in preparation for his coming. During January there were meetings each night at the church, and each after- noon at Beach Institute, for students. As a result about 100 persons were hope- fully converted, one half being found among the children and nearly all below middle life. Ninety per cent. were from the Sunday-school and families reached by it. About 50 will be added to the church as results of the January meetings and others that have followed since. The A. M. A. teachers all came to the help of pastor and evangelists, attending all meetings and giving personal instruction to many awakened souls. Visions, dreams and penances of prayer, as evidences of conversion, were spe cially discredited. Repentance resulting in righteousness, temperance and close following after Christ, in deed and spirit, were made very prominent, in this particular the meetings have had wide influence in other churches. A months delay for the examination of candidates for church membership, that~ those simply excited might come to themselves, was deemed wise. January 13, Rev. G.C. Rowe, of Cypress Slash, visited Woodville, by request of the pastor, for temperance work, but found the Lord had called him for a larger pur- pose. Souls were converted daily during the two weeks of Mr. Rowes work. God had planned and directed this work without human help, and before the time fixed for the Evangelists meetings to begin all was finished. About 50 were converted. Simple exposition of Scripture regarding temperance, repentance and godliness was our Davids Smooth Stone. At McIntosh over 70 have been added to the membership of the Grove Church. The pastor has been assisted by Messrs. Sherrill, Rowe and Evangelist Fields in the order named, the A. M. A. teachers preparing the way by means of a daily Bible reading since the school year began. The result at Cypress Slash, where Mr. Fields is now laboring, is not manifest at this writing. That field has been well seeded, and the reaper will gather sheaves. The visible results of these extra meetings held since 1884 began are 200 new members for our churches. MCINTOSH, GA.REV. FLOYD SNELSON. We have for the last five weeks been holding extra meetings here. Rev. J. C. Fields and wife cane on the 28th uLt. to aid us, and spent three weeks with us. In aw~eks time after they came we found that the field was so completely worked over near the church that we could go out and do more good in reading sinners. Therefore we made an appointment on two sides of the church, one place five miles

Rev. Dana Sherrill Sherrill, Dana, Rev. Revival News: Savannah, Ga. The South 145

Revival News. 145 in the consecration of so many young and tender hearts to Christ and His service, and we pray for wisdom to guide them aright. The A. M. A. has reason to con- gratulate itself u~pon the successful labors of Brother Fields among all our churches, and we trust his efficient services may be continued. SAVANNAh, GA.REV. DANA SHERRILL. In Savannah evidence of awakening was noted in October. The meetings were full and solemn. Miss J. S. Hardy, Lady Missionary, and the A. M. A. teachers met their Sunday-school classes at The Home Sabbath afternoons and during week-day evenings for special Bible study. In another circle Miss Hardy had, by visiting and her cottage prayer meetings, prepared elder people for the work. An impressive conversion in December began a new era of interest. Many were ready to decide, but Evangelist Fields was announced, and all work done was in preparation for his coming. During January there were meetings each night at the church, and each after- noon at Beach Institute, for students. As a result about 100 persons were hope- fully converted, one half being found among the children and nearly all below middle life. Ninety per cent. were from the Sunday-school and families reached by it. About 50 will be added to the church as results of the January meetings and others that have followed since. The A. M. A. teachers all came to the help of pastor and evangelists, attending all meetings and giving personal instruction to many awakened souls. Visions, dreams and penances of prayer, as evidences of conversion, were spe cially discredited. Repentance resulting in righteousness, temperance and close following after Christ, in deed and spirit, were made very prominent, in this particular the meetings have had wide influence in other churches. A months delay for the examination of candidates for church membership, that~ those simply excited might come to themselves, was deemed wise. January 13, Rev. G.C. Rowe, of Cypress Slash, visited Woodville, by request of the pastor, for temperance work, but found the Lord had called him for a larger pur- pose. Souls were converted daily during the two weeks of Mr. Rowes work. God had planned and directed this work without human help, and before the time fixed for the Evangelists meetings to begin all was finished. About 50 were converted. Simple exposition of Scripture regarding temperance, repentance and godliness was our Davids Smooth Stone. At McIntosh over 70 have been added to the membership of the Grove Church. The pastor has been assisted by Messrs. Sherrill, Rowe and Evangelist Fields in the order named, the A. M. A. teachers preparing the way by means of a daily Bible reading since the school year began. The result at Cypress Slash, where Mr. Fields is now laboring, is not manifest at this writing. That field has been well seeded, and the reaper will gather sheaves. The visible results of these extra meetings held since 1884 began are 200 new members for our churches. MCINTOSH, GA.REV. FLOYD SNELSON. We have for the last five weeks been holding extra meetings here. Rev. J. C. Fields and wife cane on the 28th uLt. to aid us, and spent three weeks with us. In aw~eks time after they came we found that the field was so completely worked over near the church that we could go out and do more good in reading sinners. Therefore we made an appointment on two sides of the church, one place five miles

Rev. Floyd Snelson Snelson, Floyd, Rev. Revival News: McIntosh, Ga. The South 145-146

Revival News. 145 in the consecration of so many young and tender hearts to Christ and His service, and we pray for wisdom to guide them aright. The A. M. A. has reason to con- gratulate itself u~pon the successful labors of Brother Fields among all our churches, and we trust his efficient services may be continued. SAVANNAh, GA.REV. DANA SHERRILL. In Savannah evidence of awakening was noted in October. The meetings were full and solemn. Miss J. S. Hardy, Lady Missionary, and the A. M. A. teachers met their Sunday-school classes at The Home Sabbath afternoons and during week-day evenings for special Bible study. In another circle Miss Hardy had, by visiting and her cottage prayer meetings, prepared elder people for the work. An impressive conversion in December began a new era of interest. Many were ready to decide, but Evangelist Fields was announced, and all work done was in preparation for his coming. During January there were meetings each night at the church, and each after- noon at Beach Institute, for students. As a result about 100 persons were hope- fully converted, one half being found among the children and nearly all below middle life. Ninety per cent. were from the Sunday-school and families reached by it. About 50 will be added to the church as results of the January meetings and others that have followed since. The A. M. A. teachers all came to the help of pastor and evangelists, attending all meetings and giving personal instruction to many awakened souls. Visions, dreams and penances of prayer, as evidences of conversion, were spe cially discredited. Repentance resulting in righteousness, temperance and close following after Christ, in deed and spirit, were made very prominent, in this particular the meetings have had wide influence in other churches. A months delay for the examination of candidates for church membership, that~ those simply excited might come to themselves, was deemed wise. January 13, Rev. G.C. Rowe, of Cypress Slash, visited Woodville, by request of the pastor, for temperance work, but found the Lord had called him for a larger pur- pose. Souls were converted daily during the two weeks of Mr. Rowes work. God had planned and directed this work without human help, and before the time fixed for the Evangelists meetings to begin all was finished. About 50 were converted. Simple exposition of Scripture regarding temperance, repentance and godliness was our Davids Smooth Stone. At McIntosh over 70 have been added to the membership of the Grove Church. The pastor has been assisted by Messrs. Sherrill, Rowe and Evangelist Fields in the order named, the A. M. A. teachers preparing the way by means of a daily Bible reading since the school year began. The result at Cypress Slash, where Mr. Fields is now laboring, is not manifest at this writing. That field has been well seeded, and the reaper will gather sheaves. The visible results of these extra meetings held since 1884 began are 200 new members for our churches. MCINTOSH, GA.REV. FLOYD SNELSON. We have for the last five weeks been holding extra meetings here. Rev. J. C. Fields and wife cane on the 28th uLt. to aid us, and spent three weeks with us. In aw~eks time after they came we found that the field was so completely worked over near the church that we could go out and do more good in reading sinners. Therefore we made an appointment on two sides of the church, one place five miles 146 k4tlaight University. away and the other three. At these two places sixty-six persons confesse d a hope in Christ. Only a few of them will unite with us, as tI~eir relations ere members of other denominations. Last Sunday was our communion season, at which time we welcomed into the fellowship of our church Seventy-seven who claimed to be hopeful y converted. The rain fell very hard during a part of the day, and therefore many we; e kept away, still probably not less than a thonsand peo- ple were present. Pray for us, that these may hold out faithfuby. RALEIGH, N. C.REV. GEO. 5. SMITH. Our church has just enjoyed a most precious revival, during which thirty-four x~ ere happily corverted. Thirty-one united with our church; several of these were sunday-school scholars, but the majoiity were men and xv men of fan dli s. Our church was never in a hetter spiritual condition; indee 1, tJ-.e spirit of the Lord has beeo in our midst ever since the Week of Prayer. P;ay for us, that the good work may go on. STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY. PRES. W. S. ALEXANDER. D D. Straight University, New Orleans. Li., with its group of three buildings is situ- atel u~9ri Cianal street in a mcut elioibh site; the University attracts the notice and favorable comment of thousands who frequent this favorite boule ard of the city. The central building was erected in 1878. Stone Hall, the gins dorm tory, furnishing accommodation for 75 teachers and boarding pupils, was built in 1880 by the munificnt generosity of Mrs. Yaleria G. Stone. iIa~y of the roo ns have been funished by the gifts of frionds and Sabbath schools in the North, whose kindness is kept in grateful memory by small shields upon the doors, bear ng their names. This building was put up under the ~ffici~nt supervision of Professor T. N. Chase, of Atlanta. to whose good taste and fidelity we owe its chaste design and thorough construction. Whitin Hail, the boys dormitory. bui t under the supervision of Rev. 0. D. Crawford, is the result of the united gifts of the late John C Wh!tin and Hon. Seymour Straight. It was finished ready for occupation in Sepember last. To prove that these fine baildin ~s m 4 a pe;ent de nazsd we have only to state that the u iversity is full to overflowing. Nearly 590 n im s are already upon the roll, and fresh applicants, sometimes by the score, present themselves at the beginning of every month. The girls dormitory is so fll that we are compelled unwillingly to put three girls in several of the rooms which were desgned only for two. About 50 young men occupy Whitin Hall, and every room will be in demand before the close of the year. The present year has been one of unexampled and almost phenominal prosperity in all respects. For the first time in our history we have been compelled to refuse eag r applicants. One demand creates another. We now need and must have a model school building. Three thousand dollars will secure its immediate erection. About onethird or this amount has already been pledged. It could be filled in one mat~I by a bright class of boys nd girls, and this department would be a feeder to the higher gr des. It is a need that should be at once recognized and met. that the highest efficiency (If the school may be secured, and thit we may respond to a public demand that is forced upon us constantly. Grateful for the marked success which has crowned the university, we can only repe~ t, in view tif the present and urgent demand for enlargement, the precious words, The Lord will provide.

Rev. Geo. S. Smith Smith, Geo. S., Rev. Revival News: Raleigh, N.C. The South 146-148

146 k4tlaight University. away and the other three. At these two places sixty-six persons confesse d a hope in Christ. Only a few of them will unite with us, as tI~eir relations ere members of other denominations. Last Sunday was our communion season, at which time we welcomed into the fellowship of our church Seventy-seven who claimed to be hopeful y converted. The rain fell very hard during a part of the day, and therefore many we; e kept away, still probably not less than a thonsand peo- ple were present. Pray for us, that these may hold out faithfuby. RALEIGH, N. C.REV. GEO. 5. SMITH. Our church has just enjoyed a most precious revival, during which thirty-four x~ ere happily corverted. Thirty-one united with our church; several of these were sunday-school scholars, but the majoiity were men and xv men of fan dli s. Our church was never in a hetter spiritual condition; indee 1, tJ-.e spirit of the Lord has beeo in our midst ever since the Week of Prayer. P;ay for us, that the good work may go on. STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY. PRES. W. S. ALEXANDER. D D. Straight University, New Orleans. Li., with its group of three buildings is situ- atel u~9ri Cianal street in a mcut elioibh site; the University attracts the notice and favorable comment of thousands who frequent this favorite boule ard of the city. The central building was erected in 1878. Stone Hall, the gins dorm tory, furnishing accommodation for 75 teachers and boarding pupils, was built in 1880 by the munificnt generosity of Mrs. Yaleria G. Stone. iIa~y of the roo ns have been funished by the gifts of frionds and Sabbath schools in the North, whose kindness is kept in grateful memory by small shields upon the doors, bear ng their names. This building was put up under the ~ffici~nt supervision of Professor T. N. Chase, of Atlanta. to whose good taste and fidelity we owe its chaste design and thorough construction. Whitin Hail, the boys dormitory. bui t under the supervision of Rev. 0. D. Crawford, is the result of the united gifts of the late John C Wh!tin and Hon. Seymour Straight. It was finished ready for occupation in Sepember last. To prove that these fine baildin ~s m 4 a pe;ent de nazsd we have only to state that the u iversity is full to overflowing. Nearly 590 n im s are already upon the roll, and fresh applicants, sometimes by the score, present themselves at the beginning of every month. The girls dormitory is so fll that we are compelled unwillingly to put three girls in several of the rooms which were desgned only for two. About 50 young men occupy Whitin Hall, and every room will be in demand before the close of the year. The present year has been one of unexampled and almost phenominal prosperity in all respects. For the first time in our history we have been compelled to refuse eag r applicants. One demand creates another. We now need and must have a model school building. Three thousand dollars will secure its immediate erection. About onethird or this amount has already been pledged. It could be filled in one mat~I by a bright class of boys nd girls, and this department would be a feeder to the higher gr des. It is a need that should be at once recognized and met. that the highest efficiency (If the school may be secured, and thit we may respond to a public demand that is forced upon us constantly. Grateful for the marked success which has crowned the university, we can only repe~ t, in view tif the present and urgent demand for enlargement, the precious words, The Lord will provide. STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS. Womans Buream. 145 BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. Miss D. E. EMERSON, SECRETARY. THE RELATION OF THE BUREAU TO THE TREASURY. There is but one Treasury. All funds designed for the support of special missionaries, or for womans work in particular, should be so designated in remitting to the treasurer, II. XV. Hubbard, 56 Reade St., New York, and the money will be credited to the proper account. Special acknoxvled~ment will be made by the Secretary of the Bureau to all con- tributing to this department. LETTERS TO THE SECRETARY. Our society was organized but six months ago and has been successful beyond our hope. We divide the amount raised into three equal parts, giving to each of the three organizations, Womans Board of Foreign Missions, Womans Depart- ment of the A. H. M. S. and Womans Bureau of the American Missionary Asso- ciation. We send our mite, hoping that we may add more when it is possible and with the prayer that it may be blessed in your hands. Having received your circular concerning womans work in connection with the American Missionary Association, a few ladies of the Congregational Church became much interested in the very important matter and determined, as individ- uals, to aid in the support of one of the missionaries. We have a missionary soci- ety connected with the church, but as all of its funds belong to the foreign field we could do nothing for you as a body, but knowing that every little helps we prayerfully forward our contribution, which please accept from willing hearts. FROM THE DAKOTA MISSION. DEAR FRIENDS You would doubtless be surprised if you were to call upon us just now, to find us in an Indian hut up at the Grand River Station on tue Stand- ing Rock Agency. We left home three weeks ago, camping out by the way. Reaching here, we rented a log-house, with dirt roof and floor and abundance of dirt in other places. I washed the door and window, and we put some hay in the corner, and that, with our blankets and robes, composed our bed. We slept very cold and uncomfortably at first, as it had turned very cold indeed, and a strong northwest wind blew for three or four days. The weather is milder now. I have been astonished at the great numbers of heathen here. They have nevex been with white people and are as truly heathen, in the worst sense of the word, as you could find in the darkest corner of the earth. I called on one family who were living out of doors in a tent near their house. The women opened the door of the house and led me in. There on a bench in a corner lay a long piece of orange-colored calico underneath was a necklace and a lock of hair said to belong to a departed friend, at one end was a large cluster of feathers of all kinds, near by were sceptres beaded and wrought in porcupine quills ; calico, furs, dishes, robes, meat, bread and almost every conceivable thing were laid around and near the altar. There were bags wrought in beads, of which the beads alone must have cost twenty dollars, and there were a score of them. Then near

The Relation of the Bureau to the Treasury Bureau of Woman's Work 148

Womans Buream. 145 BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. Miss D. E. EMERSON, SECRETARY. THE RELATION OF THE BUREAU TO THE TREASURY. There is but one Treasury. All funds designed for the support of special missionaries, or for womans work in particular, should be so designated in remitting to the treasurer, II. XV. Hubbard, 56 Reade St., New York, and the money will be credited to the proper account. Special acknoxvled~ment will be made by the Secretary of the Bureau to all con- tributing to this department. LETTERS TO THE SECRETARY. Our society was organized but six months ago and has been successful beyond our hope. We divide the amount raised into three equal parts, giving to each of the three organizations, Womans Board of Foreign Missions, Womans Depart- ment of the A. H. M. S. and Womans Bureau of the American Missionary Asso- ciation. We send our mite, hoping that we may add more when it is possible and with the prayer that it may be blessed in your hands. Having received your circular concerning womans work in connection with the American Missionary Association, a few ladies of the Congregational Church became much interested in the very important matter and determined, as individ- uals, to aid in the support of one of the missionaries. We have a missionary soci- ety connected with the church, but as all of its funds belong to the foreign field we could do nothing for you as a body, but knowing that every little helps we prayerfully forward our contribution, which please accept from willing hearts. FROM THE DAKOTA MISSION. DEAR FRIENDS You would doubtless be surprised if you were to call upon us just now, to find us in an Indian hut up at the Grand River Station on tue Stand- ing Rock Agency. We left home three weeks ago, camping out by the way. Reaching here, we rented a log-house, with dirt roof and floor and abundance of dirt in other places. I washed the door and window, and we put some hay in the corner, and that, with our blankets and robes, composed our bed. We slept very cold and uncomfortably at first, as it had turned very cold indeed, and a strong northwest wind blew for three or four days. The weather is milder now. I have been astonished at the great numbers of heathen here. They have nevex been with white people and are as truly heathen, in the worst sense of the word, as you could find in the darkest corner of the earth. I called on one family who were living out of doors in a tent near their house. The women opened the door of the house and led me in. There on a bench in a corner lay a long piece of orange-colored calico underneath was a necklace and a lock of hair said to belong to a departed friend, at one end was a large cluster of feathers of all kinds, near by were sceptres beaded and wrought in porcupine quills ; calico, furs, dishes, robes, meat, bread and almost every conceivable thing were laid around and near the altar. There were bags wrought in beads, of which the beads alone must have cost twenty dollars, and there were a score of them. Then near

Letters to the Secretary Bureau of Woman's Work 148-150

Womans Buream. 145 BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. Miss D. E. EMERSON, SECRETARY. THE RELATION OF THE BUREAU TO THE TREASURY. There is but one Treasury. All funds designed for the support of special missionaries, or for womans work in particular, should be so designated in remitting to the treasurer, II. XV. Hubbard, 56 Reade St., New York, and the money will be credited to the proper account. Special acknoxvled~ment will be made by the Secretary of the Bureau to all con- tributing to this department. LETTERS TO THE SECRETARY. Our society was organized but six months ago and has been successful beyond our hope. We divide the amount raised into three equal parts, giving to each of the three organizations, Womans Board of Foreign Missions, Womans Depart- ment of the A. H. M. S. and Womans Bureau of the American Missionary Asso- ciation. We send our mite, hoping that we may add more when it is possible and with the prayer that it may be blessed in your hands. Having received your circular concerning womans work in connection with the American Missionary Association, a few ladies of the Congregational Church became much interested in the very important matter and determined, as individ- uals, to aid in the support of one of the missionaries. We have a missionary soci- ety connected with the church, but as all of its funds belong to the foreign field we could do nothing for you as a body, but knowing that every little helps we prayerfully forward our contribution, which please accept from willing hearts. FROM THE DAKOTA MISSION. DEAR FRIENDS You would doubtless be surprised if you were to call upon us just now, to find us in an Indian hut up at the Grand River Station on tue Stand- ing Rock Agency. We left home three weeks ago, camping out by the way. Reaching here, we rented a log-house, with dirt roof and floor and abundance of dirt in other places. I washed the door and window, and we put some hay in the corner, and that, with our blankets and robes, composed our bed. We slept very cold and uncomfortably at first, as it had turned very cold indeed, and a strong northwest wind blew for three or four days. The weather is milder now. I have been astonished at the great numbers of heathen here. They have nevex been with white people and are as truly heathen, in the worst sense of the word, as you could find in the darkest corner of the earth. I called on one family who were living out of doors in a tent near their house. The women opened the door of the house and led me in. There on a bench in a corner lay a long piece of orange-colored calico underneath was a necklace and a lock of hair said to belong to a departed friend, at one end was a large cluster of feathers of all kinds, near by were sceptres beaded and wrought in porcupine quills ; calico, furs, dishes, robes, meat, bread and almost every conceivable thing were laid around and near the altar. There were bags wrought in beads, of which the beads alone must have cost twenty dollars, and there were a score of them. Then near Letter from Dakota Afission. 149 was an altar on which some kind of root was burned as an incense-offering to the spirit. A plate containing choice food was placed in the centre of the room for the spirit. I asked what nil this meant. They told me their friend had died, and that the spirit or soul had taken possession of that house, and would be displeased with any less homage than they paid it. I said: Where do you get all these things ? The answer was: We buy them a little at a time, and put them here. I asked: What becomes of them ? A woman replied: We give them away every now and then. We call the people together and xvail for the dead. Some feel very badly for us and wail very loud indeed, and we give all these things away. My husband is a good man with a large heart, and he gives these people all he gets, we keep nothing, and it was literally true. This woman lived in a tent, sleeping oa one robe with one blanket, and in a recent illness suffered from cold ; there was no fire, because her husband, with others, was smoking in the abode of the soul, and could not come away. As I write my ears are filled with sounds of revelry. A great grass-dance is in progress, and hundreds of people from all about are here to attend it. They have now danced for thirty-six hours, with no sign of ceasing. The music is a monoto- nous rub-a-dub-dub on a drum made of a cheese hoop with a skin stretched over one end and pounded upon with one stick. Old women scream and yell, and then some man stands up and tells of some friend who fell on the war-path, and of his wonderful bravery, and the old women wail and howl. Then another man gets up and gives away his horse or blanket, or something else, to gain glory, and the men yell, and scream, and dance. They have only a breech-cloth and painted bodies for covering. They have a large octagon log hcuse, with roof made witl a hole in the centre for the smoke to issue from, and there they have a big fire. Now and then the dance is relieved by bringing eight or ten big kettles of dog soup, and men go about with the kettles, giving each a cup of soup and fishing out with the hand a piece of meat to go with it. The hand is then wiped on the mocca- sin and then on the hair to clean (?) it ready for the next guests portion. Each person in this gathering is intent on glorifying himself and telling great stories about the Indians and against white people. I wonder how many wars have grown out of just such dances as these. On Saturday the dance closed. I presume the reason was that they had eaten up all their food and there was no occasion for the guests remaining any longer. After they had all gone, Running Antelope came to our house and said, They are gone! The dancing has stopped, and we are out of food ! I said, You have spent a week in foolish playing, and now you will spend a week in starving. He replied, ~Yes, we must follow our customs; you do not understand our customs, and that is why you laugh at us. He said, They gave me a horse and a robe and many other things. I am very wise, and never have an evil thought. and the people show me great honor. I told him it was well to be honored by our friends, but if we would seek the glory that has no end, that dieth not, we must seek it in another way from that in which he sought it. He said, I am good; I never lie nor steal. Poor people ! It is hard to reach them, and God alone can reach their hearts. I should be wholly discouraged but that I know He is able to save to the uttermost. I have talked with a number of the people and they seem tired of this life, but know of no better. They are anxious for schools, and probably will in time attend school regularly, but there should be a white missionary family here to live before them. If they could not speak a word to them the life of a Christian family would work wonders here. I just saw one old woman go out and stand by a stone and pray to it. She first put some red paint on it, and then, supposing it to be pleased with 150 The Ghi9zese. her, begged for long life. They desire long life on earth, for they know not what will come after death ; it is all darkness to them, and therefore, even though old and lame and blind, they still call upon the earth and the water, the trees and the stones, to grant unto them length of days. Can the Christian people of the East realize what a terrible, dark spot blights our fair countrys name? Talk of Japan, read of Turkey, hear of Africa, and weep, but friends of God shall weep even more bitter tears when the souls of our own American-born people are required at our hands. Because there is no other nation to help in this matter we and we only are responsible to God. Shall we shirk this responsibility? God forbid. Rather may we joyfully take it up, with Christs help, until every North American Indian has heard the glad rews and until hosts are standing before God joiningtheir voices with those of the redeemed from every nation. I thank the Lord for the part he has given me in this work, but my soul is sorrowful because of the weakness of our hands. The field is large and white for the harvest and the laborers are so few. With faith and hope for the future, I remain your friend. MARY C. COHINs. THE CHINESE. COMFORT IN DISCOMFORT. BY REV. W. C. POND. No work for God and truth and right in this world of error and of wrong goes on without more or less discomfort. There will be receding waves even with an incoming tide; and sometimes the tide itself will seem to be ebbing, and the com- fort of our too faithless hearts ebbs with it. In common with all who are working for the evangelization of the Chinese in California, we encounter this year some discouragements. Our schools, with scarcely an exception, are smaller than in preceding years, and our statistics are studied with less complacency than formerly. If rumor may be trusted, this decrease has been less with us than with others, and it is possible that we still are reaching nearly as many Chinese as all the other missions combined, but this does not prevent some twinges of depression when we see the school-rooms that two years ago were packed to their utmost capacity now showing room enough and to spare.~~ But there is comfort mingled in the cup. In the first place, we are not disap- pointed. It is what we were led to expect as a temporary result of the Exclusion Act. For this reason we determined to seize the opportunity which this con- traction of our work would afford, to pay off the entire indebtedness resting upon our two Mission-Houses in this city. This debt, though somewhat diminished year by year, stood last September at $4,050. The second element in our comfort is that this has already been cut dowa to $2,950, and that we have good hope of its complete extinguishment before Sept. 1st. The third and chief element in our comfort is in the saving use which the Spirit of Grace makes of our little work. Our harvest does not even lessen, much less cease. From all our schools I think, except one, I have had the good news of souls saved. Sometimes it is but onesometimes two; sometimes more. But one soul who shall tell what its salvation means? For example, Wong Ock, our fervid helper at Santa Cruz, writes: Do you not

Rev. W. C. Pond Pond, W. C., Rev. Comfort in Discomfort The Chinese 150-152

150 The Ghi9zese. her, begged for long life. They desire long life on earth, for they know not what will come after death ; it is all darkness to them, and therefore, even though old and lame and blind, they still call upon the earth and the water, the trees and the stones, to grant unto them length of days. Can the Christian people of the East realize what a terrible, dark spot blights our fair countrys name? Talk of Japan, read of Turkey, hear of Africa, and weep, but friends of God shall weep even more bitter tears when the souls of our own American-born people are required at our hands. Because there is no other nation to help in this matter we and we only are responsible to God. Shall we shirk this responsibility? God forbid. Rather may we joyfully take it up, with Christs help, until every North American Indian has heard the glad rews and until hosts are standing before God joiningtheir voices with those of the redeemed from every nation. I thank the Lord for the part he has given me in this work, but my soul is sorrowful because of the weakness of our hands. The field is large and white for the harvest and the laborers are so few. With faith and hope for the future, I remain your friend. MARY C. COHINs. THE CHINESE. COMFORT IN DISCOMFORT. BY REV. W. C. POND. No work for God and truth and right in this world of error and of wrong goes on without more or less discomfort. There will be receding waves even with an incoming tide; and sometimes the tide itself will seem to be ebbing, and the com- fort of our too faithless hearts ebbs with it. In common with all who are working for the evangelization of the Chinese in California, we encounter this year some discouragements. Our schools, with scarcely an exception, are smaller than in preceding years, and our statistics are studied with less complacency than formerly. If rumor may be trusted, this decrease has been less with us than with others, and it is possible that we still are reaching nearly as many Chinese as all the other missions combined, but this does not prevent some twinges of depression when we see the school-rooms that two years ago were packed to their utmost capacity now showing room enough and to spare.~~ But there is comfort mingled in the cup. In the first place, we are not disap- pointed. It is what we were led to expect as a temporary result of the Exclusion Act. For this reason we determined to seize the opportunity which this con- traction of our work would afford, to pay off the entire indebtedness resting upon our two Mission-Houses in this city. This debt, though somewhat diminished year by year, stood last September at $4,050. The second element in our comfort is that this has already been cut dowa to $2,950, and that we have good hope of its complete extinguishment before Sept. 1st. The third and chief element in our comfort is in the saving use which the Spirit of Grace makes of our little work. Our harvest does not even lessen, much less cease. From all our schools I think, except one, I have had the good news of souls saved. Sometimes it is but onesometimes two; sometimes more. But one soul who shall tell what its salvation means? For example, Wong Ock, our fervid helper at Santa Cruz, writes: Do you not Uon?fort in Discomfort. 151 be exceedingly glad that four more of our boys are willing to receive the Lords bapti-.m OQ next Sabbath? Yes, I have no doubt you do, because sinners return to Christ. Glory be to His hoy name Mrs. McLain, teacher of the school at Placervillethe youngest and smallest of our mi-sionswrites on the evening of the Chinese New Year (January 28th), This afternoon I have called on some families (Chinese), who though they were ready to treat me to nuts and candies, had nc time to-day, to read. So I talked with them through the children as interpreters, and, I think, m ide them all understand. Our Mary and her boy of seven years having previously invited me and my daughter, were ready with presents of an orange and pretty box for us ; and their clean house aid nicely p ipered walls on which they called our attention to our pictures and mottoes in place of their gaudy Chinese ones, showed some progress, we thought, or at least some appreciation of our interest in them. She told me that she bought but two candles for this New Year, an I, with a reverential look, insisted that she burned them to our God: the God of Heaven. * * * Yok Som is reading to my daughter while I write. He has given up following Chinese customs almost entirely, and I think he woild live a consistent Christian life, if he could be made to regard the Christian Sabbath properly. I have endeavored to impress upon him the im- porance of doing this, and yesterday he shut up his shop [he is a shoe-maker W. C. P.], and xvent to church all day. As Sunday is his busiest and best-paying day, he has been considering whether he could not keep some other day; or such hours of that day as were not specially occupied. He has a New Testament and a copy of the Gospel songs. and he reads them daily. And he has none of the evil habits prevalent among the Chinese. A subsequent letter tells me than Yok Som has has come out clearly as a Christian. Joe Jet, writing from Oroville, tells of two converted there, giving their names. 1 am very glad, he says, that Gods grace on them opened their hearts to know their sin, and is teaching them to try to do fight. Perhaps our re aders would be interested in Joe Jets account of his regular work. Now, I have been te iching the school evening time, and sometime I explain Bible after Miss Denel is gonethat is, after school. [That is, after 9 oclock ~. M., at which time our schools close.] And Friday evening Miss Denel not come, so they have no school, like Marysville. Mis~ Flint do have no school on Saturday evening. [Our schools are held on only five days of each week.] So I take Friday evening for Bible les- son. And on Sunday, at noon time, some boys are out of their work, and I explain Bible to them about one hour. From six oclock till seven have Sunday- school, and from eight to nine oclock I preach the gospel and sing; and after that titue I ask them anything to question or not [if they would like to ask me any questions] before we close the door. But one man in Oroville, he had been study long time and learning about Chinese Confucius doctrine. He heard also about Christian doctrinenot worship ancestorsand he said, That is against our Con- fucius doctrine. He said that for a Chinese to become a Christian was foolish; and that if he came to dispute with me, if I conquer him he will cut off his head. He sent a man to say this to me. I said, I am very glad he would come to talk with me, but I do not like the cut off the head. I wish he would trust Jesus to save his soul. So he came last Sunday evening at nine oclock. We talked till twelve. Every word I overcame him; he had nothing to say. I am sorry for him, for he did not confess his sin, only his face grow red and shamed. The many friends who remember J ee Gain and his addresses while at the East, will be glad to hear that his wife, who came to him from China about three years agoa heathenhas now come out clear and decided as a Christian, and is to be baptized on the first Sunday of April. But my space is full and I must cease. 1~i2 The Indians. TilE IINDIANS. SKOKOMISH AGENCY, W. T. FROM REV. MYRON EELLS. When I wrote YOU last spring, affairs looked rather dark, with a very little light ahead. Since then affairs have become more encouraging, though now as then we rejoice with trembling. In April, as I wrote, five of the older Indians united with the church. In July three more joined, in October two more, in November two more, making twelve who have joined on profession of faith since the first of April. In September and October we had the most severe conflict. Our Catholic element went on from bad to worse, seeing visions and dreaming dreams, shaking their heads, lighting candles and setting them on their heads, one of them calling himself the Son of God, and mixing superstition, their old heathenish rit3s, their own imaginations and a little religion together, but in such a way that the real Catholics could hardly recognize them. None of our Protestant Indians yielded to them, although sorely tempted. They finally xvent to such extreme lengths that they earned the name of fools, with a strong probability that some might be- come crazy. As the result of their foolishness they lost several weeks of time, considerable property, and a mother and her child. About the middle of October the agent visited us, and, with the help of the better Indians, compelled them to stop the foolish part of the affair. He did not compel them to give up the Catholic religion, though he advised them to do so, as it had been the means of such fierce contentions here. They talked the matter over. Some were in favor of retaining it, but there was so much opposition to it among the Indians that they decided to give it all up. The opposition then came to me for instruction, and their leaders took hold with a will in the right direction, and have been doing well since that time. Still, I can see that reconstruction needs much wisdom. The month of November was chiefly spent in a tour among the Clallam Indians. The church at Jamestown, near Dunginess, seems to be doing well. My last visit to them was in May. At that time the school teacher, who had aided them largely in their Sabbath services, resigned, and they have had none since. The church, however, chose one of their number as superintendent of the Sabbath schcol, and they have steadily kept that and the prayer-meeting in operation. Five new members joined the church on profession of faith during this triptwo Indian men and their wives, and one white man, their nearest neighbor. He was seventy-three years old, the oldest person I ever received into a church by about twenty years, on profession, and the oldest I ever saw join thus, though I have some reason to believe he has been a Christian for many years, perhaps thirty, but has been kept back from uniting with any church through mistaken ideas of the qualifications of church membership. As we went home from church that Sabbath he said to me: I ought to have done this forty years ago. The few whites who have been members of that church, have been a great encouragement to the Indians. I also at that time baptized five infants, the first ever baptized there among the Indians, though two white children have been baptized in that church. Three of the Christian Indians accompanied me in a weeks tour further down the Sound to Clallam Bay, where there is a small settlement of Indians. It was the first missionary work of the kind they had ever done, and I was pleased with the heartiness and zeal with which they entered into it. I trust some good

Rev. Myron Eells Eells, Myron, Rev. S'kokomish Agency, W. T. The Indians 152-154

1~i2 The Indians. TilE IINDIANS. SKOKOMISH AGENCY, W. T. FROM REV. MYRON EELLS. When I wrote YOU last spring, affairs looked rather dark, with a very little light ahead. Since then affairs have become more encouraging, though now as then we rejoice with trembling. In April, as I wrote, five of the older Indians united with the church. In July three more joined, in October two more, in November two more, making twelve who have joined on profession of faith since the first of April. In September and October we had the most severe conflict. Our Catholic element went on from bad to worse, seeing visions and dreaming dreams, shaking their heads, lighting candles and setting them on their heads, one of them calling himself the Son of God, and mixing superstition, their old heathenish rit3s, their own imaginations and a little religion together, but in such a way that the real Catholics could hardly recognize them. None of our Protestant Indians yielded to them, although sorely tempted. They finally xvent to such extreme lengths that they earned the name of fools, with a strong probability that some might be- come crazy. As the result of their foolishness they lost several weeks of time, considerable property, and a mother and her child. About the middle of October the agent visited us, and, with the help of the better Indians, compelled them to stop the foolish part of the affair. He did not compel them to give up the Catholic religion, though he advised them to do so, as it had been the means of such fierce contentions here. They talked the matter over. Some were in favor of retaining it, but there was so much opposition to it among the Indians that they decided to give it all up. The opposition then came to me for instruction, and their leaders took hold with a will in the right direction, and have been doing well since that time. Still, I can see that reconstruction needs much wisdom. The month of November was chiefly spent in a tour among the Clallam Indians. The church at Jamestown, near Dunginess, seems to be doing well. My last visit to them was in May. At that time the school teacher, who had aided them largely in their Sabbath services, resigned, and they have had none since. The church, however, chose one of their number as superintendent of the Sabbath schcol, and they have steadily kept that and the prayer-meeting in operation. Five new members joined the church on profession of faith during this triptwo Indian men and their wives, and one white man, their nearest neighbor. He was seventy-three years old, the oldest person I ever received into a church by about twenty years, on profession, and the oldest I ever saw join thus, though I have some reason to believe he has been a Christian for many years, perhaps thirty, but has been kept back from uniting with any church through mistaken ideas of the qualifications of church membership. As we went home from church that Sabbath he said to me: I ought to have done this forty years ago. The few whites who have been members of that church, have been a great encouragement to the Indians. I also at that time baptized five infants, the first ever baptized there among the Indians, though two white children have been baptized in that church. Three of the Christian Indians accompanied me in a weeks tour further down the Sound to Clallam Bay, where there is a small settlement of Indians. It was the first missionary work of the kind they had ever done, and I was pleased with the heartiness and zeal with which they entered into it. I trust some good Mount flood. C z H C 0 e. 153 154 A Page of & tms History. seed was sown, and some help given to the chief who had recently been appointed, and had about all he could do to manage the whisky element under him. They are a small community, have purchased land of their own, and have made a fair beginning on it. They have about twenty chidren and asked earnestly for Govern- ment to furnish them a teacher, saying that if this was done they would build a school-house, though they are very loth to send their children to Jamestown, fifty or sixty miles distant. The chief, who has never been to school, but who has superior natural talents for drawing, has lately learned to print and write his own name, and that of his wife and children, from copies I set him last spring, and which others have set him, simply as an imitation of the word, though he hardly knows the letters. CELILDIRENS PAGE. A PAGE OF SAMS HISTORY. BY MISS E. E. BACKUP. The sunny South! Do the words evoke a sunlit vision of green flelds, wav- ing trees and lovely flowers, whei e only gentlest breezes blow, and where the air is always soft and balmy? Sam lived in the sunny South, and dealt with stern realities, not with visionary ideals. It was with very stern facts that Sam battled that morning. During the night a frigid wave had swept over the Southland, and the thermometer had sunk to zero. It seemed as it the frigid zone had suddenly taken possesskn of the Southern country. Sam knew nothing of the frigid zone, and would have shivered severely in his tattered garments while he patiently waited for mild weather, but there were the poor, sick mother and the little ones in the wretched cabin with scanty food and less fuel. Sams kind heart ached as he brought coal and made fires in the big house where he was employed. Pears like they have everythin, he cogitated, and we has nothin. Taint fair! I dont care if we be black, weve done got as good a right to live as they have. Why they treat the dogs a heap better than they do me! im only that worthless nigger, fit for nothin but to be pestered and found fault with. Twas only yesterday I heard Miss Alice say, Sams a drefful light-fingered chap, I may as well have the game as the name, Ill not let po mammy freeze or starve. Poor Sam, with the thermometer at zero, had quite lost his usual light-hearted- ness, and had suddenly grown very bitter, alas! and wicked, too. But do not blame him too much. From a little fellow he had worked to help supporr. his widowed mother and the younger children. He had never been to school a day, and very rarely had he been to Sunday-school. He had a good mother, and he lived in a Christian land, but he was something of a heathen nevertheless. Sam watched for an opportunity, and soon was missing from the great house.. He appeared at his mothers door with a sack of coal and a plucked chicken. See what Ive brought you, mammy, he said, the cold snaps made the boss mighty ginerous. Tank de Lord! De Lord bress Massa Barnes ! exclaimed the poor unsuspect- ing mother. Ill just start up the fire, and Niniveh here can bile the chicken, and Sam rushed away hoping to reach the house before his absence was discovered. He was to9 late; there had been a great outcry for Sam, and Susan. the colored cook.

Miss E. E. Backup Backup, E. E., Miss A Page of Sam's History Children's Page 154-156

154 A Page of & tms History. seed was sown, and some help given to the chief who had recently been appointed, and had about all he could do to manage the whisky element under him. They are a small community, have purchased land of their own, and have made a fair beginning on it. They have about twenty chidren and asked earnestly for Govern- ment to furnish them a teacher, saying that if this was done they would build a school-house, though they are very loth to send their children to Jamestown, fifty or sixty miles distant. The chief, who has never been to school, but who has superior natural talents for drawing, has lately learned to print and write his own name, and that of his wife and children, from copies I set him last spring, and which others have set him, simply as an imitation of the word, though he hardly knows the letters. CELILDIRENS PAGE. A PAGE OF SAMS HISTORY. BY MISS E. E. BACKUP. The sunny South! Do the words evoke a sunlit vision of green flelds, wav- ing trees and lovely flowers, whei e only gentlest breezes blow, and where the air is always soft and balmy? Sam lived in the sunny South, and dealt with stern realities, not with visionary ideals. It was with very stern facts that Sam battled that morning. During the night a frigid wave had swept over the Southland, and the thermometer had sunk to zero. It seemed as it the frigid zone had suddenly taken possesskn of the Southern country. Sam knew nothing of the frigid zone, and would have shivered severely in his tattered garments while he patiently waited for mild weather, but there were the poor, sick mother and the little ones in the wretched cabin with scanty food and less fuel. Sams kind heart ached as he brought coal and made fires in the big house where he was employed. Pears like they have everythin, he cogitated, and we has nothin. Taint fair! I dont care if we be black, weve done got as good a right to live as they have. Why they treat the dogs a heap better than they do me! im only that worthless nigger, fit for nothin but to be pestered and found fault with. Twas only yesterday I heard Miss Alice say, Sams a drefful light-fingered chap, I may as well have the game as the name, Ill not let po mammy freeze or starve. Poor Sam, with the thermometer at zero, had quite lost his usual light-hearted- ness, and had suddenly grown very bitter, alas! and wicked, too. But do not blame him too much. From a little fellow he had worked to help supporr. his widowed mother and the younger children. He had never been to school a day, and very rarely had he been to Sunday-school. He had a good mother, and he lived in a Christian land, but he was something of a heathen nevertheless. Sam watched for an opportunity, and soon was missing from the great house.. He appeared at his mothers door with a sack of coal and a plucked chicken. See what Ive brought you, mammy, he said, the cold snaps made the boss mighty ginerous. Tank de Lord! De Lord bress Massa Barnes ! exclaimed the poor unsuspect- ing mother. Ill just start up the fire, and Niniveh here can bile the chicken, and Sam rushed away hoping to reach the house before his absence was discovered. He was to9 late; there had been a great outcry for Sam, and Susan. the colored cook. A Page of Sam s History. 155 had shaken her head despondently, declaring for the fiftieth time that Sam was so triflin. Where have you been, you black ape ? were the gentle words with which the boss greeted Sam as he entered the house. I went home to give mammy her medicine, was Sams ready lie, which mol- lified the hos~, while it softened the heart of the tender-hearted Susan. Sams mighty good to his mammy and the chillens, she said approvingly. But Sam had something which answered for a conscience, and which made Susans approbation less pleasing than the genuine scolding which he had expected. The weather continued very cold, and Sam was thinking how he should manag& to carry home another sack of coal, when Susan called, Oh, Sam, Miss Lizzie wants to see you.~ The thought had somewhat tardily occurred to Mrs. Barnes that perhaps she could be of service to Sams family. How does the stove work, Sam ? inquired Mrs. Barnes, when Sam had appeared before her. Mrs. Barnes had the week previous given Sam an old stove, to supply which the coal had been appropriated. We only tried it to-day, replied Sam, confusedly, and it was drawing right smart when I left home. The wood was mighty low, and I was fraid the young uns would freeze. Poor things! said Mrs. Barnes, compassionately. You ought to keep two fires while this weather lasts. Get out the wheelbarrow and pile on a sack of coal and as much wood as you can haul, and when Susan goes home Ill send some provisions to your mother. Sam stammered his thanks, and had he been familiar with Scripture, would have thought of the verse about coals of fire. Sams appearance with the wood and coal was the signal for great rejoicing in the little cabin. And when Susan followed with a big basket of good things the children danced with glee, while the good mother shouted, Praise de Lord 1 Sam did not enter heartily into the festive demonstrations. The coals of fire had taken effect. The poor boy had been a sort of scape-goat at the big house, until he had grown to consider the members of the household in the light of natu- ral enemies. He had borne abuse unflinchingly, but this unexpected kindness melted him. What ails yer, honey, inquired Sams mammy.~~ Pears like yer drefful down in the mouth. Oh, mammy, cried Sam, I feel so mean! I done stole the coal and the chicken this morning and then lied about it. Po boy! It looks like the ole sarpint has tempted yer. Why, chile; didnt yer say, Satan, get behind me. What do de Lord tink about it? What yer spose Miss Lizzie say ? Ill see Miss Lizzie right straight off, and Sam was out of the house in a minute. Mrs. Barnes listened to his story with moist eyes. She felt as if the heathen might develop, under suitable training, into the hero. When i~ came to Sams turn to listen, it dawned upon him that it was not only mean and foolish, but wicked to lie or steal. His frank confession convinced Mrs. Barnes that there was good in the boy, and it showed her, too, the benign influence of kind deeds and sym- pathizing words. That bitter cold day, with its record of sin and honest repentance, proved an eventful one in Sams history. He is no longer the scape-goat of the household. God has given him kind friends, and golden opportunities are opening before him. Som~still call him nothing but a nigger, but others see in him the devoted son and brother, the faithful friend, the humble and fervent Christian. Receipts. RECEIPTS FOR MARCH. l~54. MAiNE, $240.26. Augusta. South Cong. Ch. an(l Soc.... Brunswick. Mrs. J. D. Lincoln, for Selma, Ala Calais. Cong. Ch. and Soc Corni~h. Cong. Cli., for Mobile. Ala.. Edgecomli. Cong. Cli. and Soc Machias. Cong. Sab. Sch New Gloucester. First Cong. Ch. and Soc Orono. Cong. Sab. 5db Rockland. A Friend, for Atlanta U. South Berwick. Cong. Ch. and Soc.... Union. Bhl. of C.. for Selma. Ala. NEW HAMPSHIRE, $230.18. Campton. Ladies of Cong. Cli., Bbl. of C..for Fisk U. Dunbarton. Cong. Ch. Sab. 5db Exeter. A Eriend Exeter. Ladies of Second Cong. Cli., 2 Bbis. of C.. Val. 130. 3 for Freight, for Tillotson C. and N. Inst Franklin. Cong. Cli. and Soc Hanover Center. Cong. Ch Hopkinton. Ladies, for Womans Work Lancaster. Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Atlanta U Orford. David E. Willard Milford. Peter and Cynthia S. Burns... Peterborough. Avery III. Clark Stratham. Cong. Cli. and Soc., 24.40 in January number should read adi to const MRS. SARAH A. E. PEABODY L. M. Temple. Cong. Sab. Sch West Lebanon. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to const. MRs. OLIvER S. MARTIN L. .1.... Wolfeborough. Rev. S. Clark VERMONT, $500.80. Ascutneyville. Dea. N. Ga2e Brattleborough. First Cong. Cli., for Freight Burlington. Sab. Pci. of First Cong. Ch. Danville. Cong. Cli. and Soc East Hardwick. S. W. Owen East Ponitney. Cong. Ch. and Soc Georgia. Cong. Cli. and Soc Cranby. Mrs. N. M. R. Milton. Cong. Cli and Soc Newbury. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. to const. EDwARD HAI.x and D. P. KIM- BALLL. Ms North Bennington. Cong. Cli. and Soc. Nortfield. Cong. Cli. and Soc North Thetford. Cong. Cli. and Soc Quechee. Cong. Cli. and Soc Saint Jolinshury. ~Friends, by Mrs. Franklin Fairbanks, Box of C., for Fisk U. Saint Jolinsliury. Mrs. Theron M. Howard, for Student Aid, Fisk U Strafford. Cong. Cli. and Soc Wallingtord. Ladies of Cong. Cli., Dlii. of C., 2.50. for Freight, for Charles- ton, S. C West Fairlee. G. B. Holbrook West Hartford. Cong. Cli. and Soc.... Wolcott. Cong. Cli Ladies of Vt., by Mrs. A. W. Wild, for Lady Missy. McIntosh, Ga..: Curling- ton. College St. Ili., 24.80; Win. Ave., adI.. 2.25; Fair Haveni 2.50: Georgia, 8; Gujidhall, 8.50; Higligate Centre, 3; Irasburg. 7.40: New Haven, 25; Orwell. 13.v 3; Pawlet. 4.25; Peacham, 21; Pittsford, 20; Saint Jolinsliury $23 42 1 00 46 00 4 33 5 00 8 86 76 45 5 20 50 00 20 00 50 00 20 00 3 00 20 00 2 67 9 00 13 20 5 00 30 00 1 00 21 50 49 51 5 00 5 00 1 20 61) 00 15 25 50 7 00 9 20 1 00 10 00 73 50 7 00 17 (17 6 00 25 00 20 00 22 25 2 50 1 00 a 00 2 60 (adO, 2.50; Sharon, 13; Springfield, 15; Westminster West, 13.70; Wi)- liamstown, 20.50; Total, 214.43; (less, 26, expenses) $188?43 Ladies of Vt., by Mrs. A. W. Wild, Clothing and freight, for McIntosh, Ga.; Charlotte, Dlii.. 2; Fair Haven, Bbl., 3; Greensliorough, Blil., 3; Jericho, Bhl.. 2; Jericho Center, Dlii.. 2; Middlebury. Dlii., 2; Newport, Box and Bhl., 3; Post Mills, Box; Rich- mond, Bhl., 2; Windsor, Bbl., 2 21 00 MASSACHUSETTS, $2,650.78. Amherst. Miss L. F. Boylston, for Womans Work 20 00 Andover. South Cong. Cli. and Soc. 125; Calvin E. Goodell, 30 155 00 Aslifield. Mrs. Alvin Perry, Freight 1 55 Bernardston. Orthodox Cong. Cli. Sab. Sci Boston. Two Friends, ~. ~ 00 tion, 1; Donation. 1 22 00 Boston. Mrs. C. A. Spaulding. 50. for Model Sch. Building, Straight U., and 50 for Girls Dormitory, Tillotson C. ~ N. Inst 100 00 Boston Park St. Cong. Cli. Sab. Sci., for Student Aid, Atlanta U 50 00 Boston. A. F. Cross Pen Co., 5 Vols., for Library, Macon. Ga. Boston. Jamaica Plain. Central Cong. Cli. liab. Sch., for School at Kittre tl, N.C 5000 Boston. Roxhury. Eliot Cli. and Soc., adi 42 00 Boxford. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. to conat. REV. ROBERT R. KENDALL L. M 31 50 Brockton. Joseph Hewelt 5 00 Brimfield. Benev. Soc. of First Cong. Cli. to coust. JAMES REED BROWN L. M 34 50 Cambridge. A Friend 1 00 Charlemont E. Guild .. 5 00 Conway. Mrs. Austin Rice 20 00 Dorchester. Mrs. E. J. W. Baker, for Student Aid. Fisk U 50 00 East ltridgewater. Union Cli. Sab. 5db. for Student Aid, Talladega C ... . 17 16 Eastham p ton. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. 57.07; Rev. A. M. Colton. 5 62 07 Easthampton. Payson Cli. Sab. 5db. for Student Aid. Fisk U 30 00 Easthampton. Ladies of First Cong. Cli., Box Bedding and C.. for Tallade- ga C. East Weymouth. Cong. Cli. and Soc 22 92 Fitchburg. Herbert H. Dole, Bdl. of Pa- pers, etc. Foxhorougli. Orthodox Cong. Cli. and Soc 38 17 Great Barrington. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 100 00 Globe Village. Byron Harwood 31) 00 Hampden Benev. Asso, Charles Marsh, Trans.: Cong. Churches Chicopee, Third, 22.22; Holyoks. Second. 19 75; Ludlow, First, 17.33; West Spring- field, 14 00 73 30 Hanson. Cong Cli. and Soc 6 67 Hinrlihm. Evan. Cong. Ch. and Soc 4 12 Holliston. BibleChristians of Dis No. 4 25 00 Hollisron. Mrs M.M.Fiske, for IndianM 5 00 Lawrence. Trinily Cong. I li 59 10 Lawrence. Lawrence St. Cli. Sab. Sob for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Leominster. Oliver G. CaIdwell, for Tallodega C 20 00 Littleton. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Student Aid, Atlanta, U 25 00 156

Receipts for March, 1884 156-160

Receipts. RECEIPTS FOR MARCH. l~54. MAiNE, $240.26. Augusta. South Cong. Ch. an(l Soc.... Brunswick. Mrs. J. D. Lincoln, for Selma, Ala Calais. Cong. Ch. and Soc Corni~h. Cong. Cli., for Mobile. Ala.. Edgecomli. Cong. Cli. and Soc Machias. Cong. Sab. Sch New Gloucester. First Cong. Ch. and Soc Orono. Cong. Sab. 5db Rockland. A Friend, for Atlanta U. South Berwick. Cong. Ch. and Soc.... Union. Bhl. of C.. for Selma. Ala. NEW HAMPSHIRE, $230.18. Campton. Ladies of Cong. Cli., Bbl. of C..for Fisk U. Dunbarton. Cong. Ch. Sab. 5db Exeter. A Eriend Exeter. Ladies of Second Cong. Cli., 2 Bbis. of C.. Val. 130. 3 for Freight, for Tillotson C. and N. Inst Franklin. Cong. Cli. and Soc Hanover Center. Cong. Ch Hopkinton. Ladies, for Womans Work Lancaster. Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Atlanta U Orford. David E. Willard Milford. Peter and Cynthia S. Burns... Peterborough. Avery III. Clark Stratham. Cong. Cli. and Soc., 24.40 in January number should read adi to const MRS. SARAH A. E. PEABODY L. M. Temple. Cong. Sab. Sch West Lebanon. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to const. MRs. OLIvER S. MARTIN L. .1.... Wolfeborough. Rev. S. Clark VERMONT, $500.80. Ascutneyville. Dea. N. Ga2e Brattleborough. First Cong. Cli., for Freight Burlington. Sab. Pci. of First Cong. Ch. Danville. Cong. Cli. and Soc East Hardwick. S. W. Owen East Ponitney. Cong. Ch. and Soc Georgia. Cong. Cli. and Soc Cranby. Mrs. N. M. R. Milton. Cong. Cli and Soc Newbury. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. to const. EDwARD HAI.x and D. P. KIM- BALLL. Ms North Bennington. Cong. Cli. and Soc. Nortfield. Cong. Cli. and Soc North Thetford. Cong. Cli. and Soc Quechee. Cong. Cli. and Soc Saint Jolinshury. ~Friends, by Mrs. Franklin Fairbanks, Box of C., for Fisk U. Saint Jolinsliury. Mrs. Theron M. Howard, for Student Aid, Fisk U Strafford. Cong. Cli. and Soc Wallingtord. Ladies of Cong. Cli., Dlii. of C., 2.50. for Freight, for Charles- ton, S. C West Fairlee. G. B. Holbrook West Hartford. Cong. Cli. and Soc.... Wolcott. Cong. Cli Ladies of Vt., by Mrs. A. W. Wild, for Lady Missy. McIntosh, Ga..: Curling- ton. College St. Ili., 24.80; Win. Ave., adI.. 2.25; Fair Haveni 2.50: Georgia, 8; Gujidhall, 8.50; Higligate Centre, 3; Irasburg. 7.40: New Haven, 25; Orwell. 13.v 3; Pawlet. 4.25; Peacham, 21; Pittsford, 20; Saint Jolinsliury $23 42 1 00 46 00 4 33 5 00 8 86 76 45 5 20 50 00 20 00 50 00 20 00 3 00 20 00 2 67 9 00 13 20 5 00 30 00 1 00 21 50 49 51 5 00 5 00 1 20 61) 00 15 25 50 7 00 9 20 1 00 10 00 73 50 7 00 17 (17 6 00 25 00 20 00 22 25 2 50 1 00 a 00 2 60 (adO, 2.50; Sharon, 13; Springfield, 15; Westminster West, 13.70; Wi)- liamstown, 20.50; Total, 214.43; (less, 26, expenses) $188?43 Ladies of Vt., by Mrs. A. W. Wild, Clothing and freight, for McIntosh, Ga.; Charlotte, Dlii.. 2; Fair Haven, Bbl., 3; Greensliorough, Blil., 3; Jericho, Bhl.. 2; Jericho Center, Dlii.. 2; Middlebury. Dlii., 2; Newport, Box and Bhl., 3; Post Mills, Box; Rich- mond, Bhl., 2; Windsor, Bbl., 2 21 00 MASSACHUSETTS, $2,650.78. Amherst. Miss L. F. Boylston, for Womans Work 20 00 Andover. South Cong. Cli. and Soc. 125; Calvin E. Goodell, 30 155 00 Aslifield. Mrs. Alvin Perry, Freight 1 55 Bernardston. Orthodox Cong. Cli. Sab. Sci Boston. Two Friends, ~. ~ 00 tion, 1; Donation. 1 22 00 Boston. Mrs. C. A. Spaulding. 50. for Model Sch. Building, Straight U., and 50 for Girls Dormitory, Tillotson C. ~ N. Inst 100 00 Boston Park St. Cong. Cli. Sab. Sci., for Student Aid, Atlanta U 50 00 Boston. A. F. Cross Pen Co., 5 Vols., for Library, Macon. Ga. Boston. Jamaica Plain. Central Cong. Cli. liab. Sch., for School at Kittre tl, N.C 5000 Boston. Roxhury. Eliot Cli. and Soc., adi 42 00 Boxford. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. to conat. REV. ROBERT R. KENDALL L. M 31 50 Brockton. Joseph Hewelt 5 00 Brimfield. Benev. Soc. of First Cong. Cli. to coust. JAMES REED BROWN L. M 34 50 Cambridge. A Friend 1 00 Charlemont E. Guild .. 5 00 Conway. Mrs. Austin Rice 20 00 Dorchester. Mrs. E. J. W. Baker, for Student Aid. Fisk U 50 00 East ltridgewater. Union Cli. Sab. 5db. for Student Aid, Talladega C ... . 17 16 Eastham p ton. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. 57.07; Rev. A. M. Colton. 5 62 07 Easthampton. Payson Cli. Sab. 5db. for Student Aid. Fisk U 30 00 Easthampton. Ladies of First Cong. Cli., Box Bedding and C.. for Tallade- ga C. East Weymouth. Cong. Cli. and Soc 22 92 Fitchburg. Herbert H. Dole, Bdl. of Pa- pers, etc. Foxhorougli. Orthodox Cong. Cli. and Soc 38 17 Great Barrington. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 100 00 Globe Village. Byron Harwood 31) 00 Hampden Benev. Asso, Charles Marsh, Trans.: Cong. Churches Chicopee, Third, 22.22; Holyoks. Second. 19 75; Ludlow, First, 17.33; West Spring- field, 14 00 73 30 Hanson. Cong Cli. and Soc 6 67 Hinrlihm. Evan. Cong. Ch. and Soc 4 12 Holliston. BibleChristians of Dis No. 4 25 00 Hollisron. Mrs M.M.Fiske, for IndianM 5 00 Lawrence. Trinily Cong. I li 59 10 Lawrence. Lawrence St. Cli. Sab. Sob for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Leominster. Oliver G. CaIdwell, for Tallodega C 20 00 Littleton. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Student Aid, Atlanta, U 25 00 156 Receipts. Littleton Cong. Sab. 5db. Class, Lower Lights, Bbi. of C., for At- lanta U. Mansfield. Orthodox Cong. Ch. and Soc. Marshfleld. First Cong. Sab. 5db., for Student Aid. Atla ta U Milibury. Ladies of First Cong. Ch.. Box of Bedding and C., for Atlanta U. Newbury. 1 irst Cli. and Soc Newburyport. Sab. Sch. Class, by Julia N. Baich, for Indian M Newton Upper Falls. S. D. Hunt Norton. Trinity Cong. Ch. and Soc Northampton. A. L. Williston, 42U; A Friend, 100 Northborough. Womans Home Mission- ary Soc., by A. A. Adams, Treas., for Womans Work for Women Plymouth. Amasa Holmes Prescott. A. Friend, for Indian M... Roxhury. Mrs. James Fisher, for Stu- dent Aid, Fisk U Rutland. Cong. Ch. and Soc Quincy. Evan. Cong. Cli. and Soc Qumcy. ~Pearl Seekers, for Stude t Aid, Straight U Salem. Uirls Missionary Soc.. of South Cli., Box, for Dakota Home, Santee Agency, Neb. Shelburne Falls. Cona~ Cli. and Soc.... Southbridge. A Friend for Chinese M South Braintree. Ladies of Cong. Cli., Bhl. of Bedding and C. ,for Atlanta U. (lost on City of Columbus.) South Deerfield. Mrs. M. C. Tilton South Hadley. Cong. Ch. and Soc South Hadley Falls. Earnest Workers, for Chattanooga, Tenn Somerville. Young Ladies Mission Cii- cle of Franklin St. Ch., for Indian girl, Dakota Home Somerville. Fraklin St. Ch., for Stu- dent Aid, Straight U Spencer. Ladies Benev. Soc., by Mrs. J. W. Temple. Bbl of C.. 3for Freight, for Tillotson C. & N. Inst Taunton. Ladies Sew. Circle of Trin. Con?. Ch.. Blil. of Bedding. Val. 37; Sewing Soc.. Broadway Cong. Ch., Bol. of Bedding, 1 for Freight, for Atlanta U -. Truro. First Cone. Cli. and Soc Upton. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Indian M Ware. A Friend, for Cal. Chinese M. Waltham. Trin. Cong. Cli and Soc. ... Walpole. 2 Blils. of C., for McIntosh, Ga. Wayland. Miss Alice Braman, for School Books, Topeka, Kansas Webster. Rev. J. 0. Leavitt. for Selina. Wellficet. First Cong. Cli. and Soc Westhorough. Ev. (ong. Ch. and Soc.. West Boylston. WillingWorkers, for Student Aid, Atlanta U Westfield. Miss E. B. Dickinson 30 hlrs. Charlotte W. Fowler, S Westfield. Friends, by Miss Lucy Smith. for Student Aid, Straight U Westfield. Second Cong. Cli., for In- dian M Westfi& d. Mrs. W. S. E. Shaw, Box of C., for Macon, Ga. West Mansfield. Solomon Briggs West Medford. Harvard Av. Cong. Cli., Bhl. at C. and Eight dollars worth of dry goods, for Tatladega C. Westminster. Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db. 50; The Cheerful Givers, 5, for Student Aid, Fisk U West Somerville. Cong. Cli. and Soc... Worcester. Plymouth Cong. (h Worcester. Infant Class Piedniont Sab. 5db., for Student Aid, Atlanta U Worcester. Salem St. Sab. 5db., for Indian M $12 35 20 00 19 92 10 00 10 00 117 68 520 00 15 50 5 00 5 00 50 00 4 00 30 23 10 00 2 00 5 00 2 00 22 50 5 00 50 00 27 44 3 00 1 00 5 00 15 00 5 00 23 16 10 00 15 00 35 00 85 07 40 00 55 00 50 00 15 52 2 00 55 00 it 33 75 00 25 00 20 00 157 RHODE ISLAND, $110.00. Bristol. Mrs. M. De Wolf Rogers, for Student Aid, Fisk U $100 QO North Scituate. Cong. Cli 2 00 Westerly. Ladies Benny. Soc. of Cong. Cli.. 5; Friends, 3, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 8 00 CONNECTICUT, $2,081.25. Andover. H itt 50 Berlin. Second Cong. Cli 61 00 Branford. H. G. Harrison 10 00 Bridgeport. Park St. Sab. 5db., for Stu- dent Aid, Tillotson C. & N. Inst 30 00 Bristol. Cong. Cli 122 80 Canterbury. Westminster Coiig. Cli 3 85 East Granby. Cong. Cli 0 75 East Hartford. Edward A. Williams 20 00 East Windsor. First Cong Cli. and Soc 10 00 East Woodstock. Silas Newton 2 00 Enfield. First Cong. Cli 108 00 Essex. Firt,t Cong. Cli 19 55 Fairfield. Cong.Ch., 24.39; Pulpit Sup- ply, 10 34 39 Fairfield. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Indian M 21 00 Fair Haven. ~etond Cong. Ch 45 00 Franklin. Cong. Sab, Sch., for Student Aid. Atlanta U 2 11 Graiiby. South Cong. Cli 5 15 Greenwich. Second Coiig. Cli 34 00 Hartford. A friend to the Work, 400: Cli. of Christ, 39.88; Windsor Av. Cong. Cli., 34.40 474 28 Lisbon. Cong. Cli. and Soc 4 00 Mansfield. Cong. Cli., Bbl. of Bedding and C., 2 for Freight, for Straight U 2 00 Naugatuck. Cong. Cli 100 00 INew Britain. First Cli. of Clirist 92 83 New Preston. Cong. Cli 49 25 North Ford. Cong. Ch 5 17 North Or enwich. Members Cong. Cli., for Tndian ill 9 74 North Guilford. Cong. Ch .... 20 00 North Guilford. Mrs. Eben F. Dudley, 5, ~Alice and little Sopliia Dudley, for Indian Childi en, I 6 00 Norwich Town. A Friend, for Freed- man, Indian and Chinese M. ....... - 15 00 Plautaville. Cong. Cli 220 57 Putnam. Ladies of Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Straight U 29 50 Saybrook. Cong. Cli 12 64 Sound Beach. Two Blils. of C. and Books, for Athens. Ala. South Britain. Cong. Cli 10 00 Tolland. Mrs. Lucy L. Clougli 50 00 Vernon. Mrs. Lticy F. Pearl 50 Vernon. Miss Mercy Lewis, for Mt. White Work 50 Washingt~n. Mrs. D. C. Nettleton 5 00 Waterbury. Second Cong. Cli 304 29 Waterbury. First Cong. Sab 5db.. for New Building, Tillotson C. and N. Inst 21 38 Waterbury. Mrs. C. 51. Benedict, 3 Vols., for Library, Macon, Ga. Watertown. Cong. Sab. Sch., to const. CnAs. W. BIDwELL L. M 58 CO West Haveii. Coog, Cli. and Soc., for Indian V 16 50 West Suffield. Cong. Cli. and Soc 15 00 Woodliridge. Cong Cli, Sab. Sch 5 00 NEW YORK, $2,813.62. Brooklyn. Tompkins Ave. Cong. Cli., 243.75; Rev. A. Merwin, 10 253 75 Cambria. Cong. Cli and Sab. Scli 15 56 Chautauqua. Bhl. of C. and Books, for Athens. Ala. Coxsnckie. A Friend 5 00 Fairport. C. Ayrault to coiist. Mas. ALLEN AYHAIJLT L. Si 30 00 Franklin. First Cong. Cli 41 31 Gilbertaville. A. Wood, A. M 5 00 Goslien. A Friend of the Cause 50 Holly. Holly 10 00 1)3 .fUcet~pts. Honeoye. Cong. Ch $4i 00 Jeffer~on. Mrs. S. Ruliffson 2 50 Livonia. Young Ladies hoc., 10; Mr~i. J. W. Davis, lo, for Student Aid, At- lanta U 20 00 Lockport. Cong. nh., 3 Bbls. Bedding and C., for Ta tiadega C. New York. Rev. L. H. Cobb. D. D 10 00 New York, Henry C Houghton, M. D., for Furnishing a l?ooin, Straight U 50 00 New York. Mr. Ferris, 5; fly Miss Ferris, 7; , Box of C.. for Athens, La 12 00 New York. E. B. Treat. 4 Vols., for Library, Macon. Ga. Osweeo. L. H Allen 10 00 Sherburne. Cong. Sab. Seli., for Student Aid, Talladeqa, C ~0 00 Spencerport. Miss Mary E. Dyer 5 00 Troy. James H. Kellogg, 6 Vols., for Library, Macon, Ga. LEGACy $563 62 Waverly. Estate of Mrs. Phehe Hep- burn 2,250 00 NEW JERSEY, $501.01. $2,813 6~ Montclair. Sab. Sch Class. by Mrs. J. F. Pratt, for Student Aid, Talinega, 0 6 00 Montclair. Ladies Aid Soc., for Tillot- sonCc~N.Inst 300 Newark. C. S. Haines 30 00 Orange Valley. Cong. Cli 61 01 Vineland. Win. McGeorge, Sen 1 00 LEaAcv $101 01 Orange. Estate of John Hanco~k, by Rev. A. Stewart Walsh, Ex 400 00 01 01 PENNSYLVANIA, $15 00. Easton. Mrs. I. P. Ballard and Brain- ard Sab. 5db., Box of Books, for Reading Room, Wilmington, N. 0. Philadelphia. E. H. Evans S CO West Alexander. Alexander McCleery 10 00 OHIO, $691.12. Akron. Cong. Cli 232 75 Brookfield. Cong. Ch 6 50 Castalia. First Cong.Ch., 5., Sab. 5db., 1. 6 00 Cincinnati. A Friend, for Stude Aid, Talladeqa C . 15 00 4jlaridon. lvi. B. Stebbins 1 00 Clarksfield. Jennie Rowland. 1 00 Cleveland. Euclid Av. Cong. Cli., 1:34.85, to coust. Mrs. B. F. WHITMAN and Mrs F. B. Fox L.Ms.; Ply- mouth Cong. Cli., 60 194 85 Cleveland, Mrs. H. B. Spelman, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 20 00 Columbus. Womans Missy Soc. of Eastwood Cong. Cli 7 00 Harrison. Dr. John D. Bowles 5 00 Newark. Mrs. J. C. Wheaton 25 00 Oberlin. Royalty on Dr. Cowles Com- mentary. 4.47; Second CongOli., 15.51 19.98 Oberlin. Ladies Soc. of Second Cong. Cli.. for Lady Missionary Atlanta, Ga. 19 29 Painesville. Luetta P. B~.ntley, 10: Wo- mans Missy. Soc.. 15 (4 of which from Mrs. Albert Morley) 25 00 Rome. Pr-~sb. Ch., for Student Azd, Straight U 5 00 Salem. David A. Allen, for Tillotson C. k N. List 25 00 Sardinia. J. F. Cumberland 5 00 Sicily. Mrs. lvi 0. Cumberland 1 50 Tallmadge. Cong. Cli. and Soc . 28 00 Toledo. Mrs. Eliz~ H. Weed 10 00 Thomastown Welsh Cong. Cli 8 25 Wellington. Edward West 20 0 West Andover. Henry Holcomb 10 00 INDIANA, $25.00. Fort Wayne. Cong. Cli 15 00 Michigan City. Golden Links Soc of Cong. Cli.,for.~tudent Aid, Atlanfa U. 5 00 New Corydon. George Stolx 5 00 ILLINOIS, $87 t 94 Beeclier. Cong. Ch for Indian. M Belmont. Rev. P. ~V. Wallace Blue Island. First Cong. Cb Chandlerville. Cong. Cli Chicago. First Cong. Cli., 110.01: New Eng. Cong. Oh., 74.38; Plym. Cong. Cli., 77.93 Chicago. Ladies of Plym. Cong. Cli., for Lady Missy, Mobile, Ala Elmwood. Cong. Oh Galesburg. First Ch. of Christ Galva. Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch., for Stadent Aid. Fisk U Hinedale. ~A few Ladies, Missy, Little Rock, Ark lowell. V. G. L. Marseilles. Ladies of Cong. Cli., for Lady Miss~y, Little Rock, Ark Mattoon. Cong. Cli.. for Indian M Mendon. Mrs. Jeannette Fowler, for a Room, Edward Sniith College. Little Rock, Ark, and to coast. Mas. E. I. DICKERMAN, H. C. GARRETT and ALLIE TALLCOTT L. Ms Menion. Womens Missy Soc. of Cong. Cli., for Womans Work Moline. First Cong. Cli... Odell. Ladies of Cong. Cli for Lady Missy, Little Rock, Ark Oneida. Cong. Ch., 24.05, and Sab. hch., 2.20 Paxton. Missy Soc. of Cong. Cli., for Lady Missionaries Princeton. Mrs. P. B. Coras Quincy. JosHuA PERRY, to coast, him- self L. M Seward. Cong. Cli. (adD, for Indian M.. Stillinan Valley. Con. Cli Sycamore. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Student Aid, Talladega C Sycamore. Hon. Henry Wood. 10; Mrs. Henry Wood for Tougaloo U.S Tliawville. Ladtes of Cong. Cli., for Lady Missionary. Little Rock, Ark Warrensburgh. Prairie Glen tiers, for Lady Missionary, Little Rock, Ark.... Woodstock. Cong. Cli MISSOURI, $8.23. Holden. Mrs. R E. Ilawesfor Indian M. Saint Louis. Fifzli Cong.Ch. for Indian M. lviICHtGAN, $554.86. Armada. Cong. Cli., 32.80, and Sab. 5db., 6.75 Calumet. Cong. Cli Charlotte. First. Cong Cli Chelsea. First Cong. Cli Eat Saginaw. Cong Ch Greenville. Cong. Sab. 5db. ,for Student Aid, Atlanta U Hancock. First Cong. Sab. 5db., for Work-hop, Macon. Ga Kalamazoo. Plymouth Cong. Cli Lansing. Plymouth Cli. (adI ) Litchuleld. Missy Soc., Box of C., Val. $30 for Ath.-ns, Ala.. Litchlleld. Cong. Cli., Bbl. of C., for Athens. Ala Pent water. Mr~. Josephine Barnes.... Reed City. Cong. Cli Appleton. Cong. Cli Saline Eli Benton Soutti Hsven. Clark Pierce Utica. Member Cong. Cli., for In- dian M West Adrian. First Cong. Cli Whealland. Cong. Cli., for Athens, Ala. IOWA, $229.65. Anamosa. Womans Freedmens Soc. of First Cong. Ch.. foi~ Lady Miss on- ary, New One-ins, La Alta. J. C. Heywood Chester Center. Cong. Ch Davenport. George XV. Eells $12 00 5 00 8 5S 14 78 262 32 50 00 2800 35 75 9 87 14 00 2 00 11 00 5 00 100 00 24 40 103 74 13 25 2625 12 91 20 00 30 00 6 00 18 12 2500 15 00 5 00 10 00 4 00 :i 00 5 25 39 35 242 10 25 00 26 05 51 62 2500 25 00 4 40 26 00 50 7 00 2776 40 00 10 00 3 00 9 64 20 00 10 00 1 50 3t 50 10 00 Receipts. Dubtique. Young Peonies Missy Soc., fur tudent Ad. 7a.latega ~ $25 00 Gamin. Thinion Dewey 2 lIt) Lyons. Con,~ Ch.... .... 20 Ut) Oskaloosa Mission Band, for Student Aid, .~troioht U 4 95 Red Oak. Cong. Ch 14 80 Red Oak. Mrs. M. Willis, 5, and Ad- Va ce.fur Athens, Al 5 00 Winterset. Mrs. S. J. Diosmore, 10; hlrs. C. W. Parlin, 2; Mrs. E. E. Hodges, SOc 12 50 Des Moines. Womans Missionary Soc. of Plym. Cong Oh, $211. for Lady Missy, New Orb ans. Incorrectly ack. in ApI. number from Iowa City. Ladies, by ilire. N. H. Brainerd, state Corn., for Lady Miesy. New Orleans, La.: Algona. 6; Ceder Rapids. Mrs. Louise B. Stephens, 25; (hares City, 10; Des Molite., \X omans Missy Soc. of 1% m. Cong. Ch, 10; Golden Prairie 5; Iowa City, Busy Ring, 15; New Hampton. 5.10; Orchard, 1.30; Rockwell, 1 30; Stacyville, 5; Winthrop, 8.50 92 40 WISCONSIN, $306.71. Appleton. Cong. Oh 27 76 Appleton. Ladies Working Soc., Box of C., for Macon, Ga. Arena Ladies of Cong. Cli., for Lady Missy, austin. Tex 4 00 Beloit. S. Y. L 2 90 Beluit. Friends, by Rev. E. P. Wheel- er, 63 Vols., with Paper ani Rag., for Library. Macon. Ga. Beloit. Eclipse Wind Engine Co., by W. H. Wheeler. Pies., Force Pump, with 100 ft. of Pipe, and Lumber for Plat- firm, Val. 60, for Montgomery, Ala. Fond du Lac Ladies of Cong. Oh., for Lady Miss~y, Austin, Tex 10 00 Maz Manie. Mrs. Loughlin, for Lady Missy, Austin, Tex 1 00 New London. Ira Miliard. Sen, 20; A J. Burger, Tool chest and set of tools, Val. $25 for Workshop, Macon, Ga 20 00 Oshkosh. Mrs Lucy Bartlett, Box of C. and 55 vols. for Library. Macun, Ga. Salem. Mr. Cull, Tub of butter, for Athens, Ala Shopiere. Cong. Ch 9 49 Stocirbridge. Cong Cb 5 00 St~oughton. Mi~sA. B. Sewall 100 Watertown. Cong Ch 7 25 Friends. by Miss Cull, for Athens, Ala 7 00 LEOAcY. $95 31 Fort Howard. Estate of Rev. D. C. Curtiss, by Edward C. Curtiss, E..... 211 40 $30671 MINNESOTA, $45.99. Clear Water. Cong. Cli 2 79 Dassel. Cong. Ch 2 15 Hutchinson. Cong. Oh 2 00 Minneapolis. Plymouth Ch 28 36 Pleinview. A Friend 1 00 Worthington. Union Cong. Oh 9 09 KANSAS, $36.75. Topeka. Tuition 6 75 Wabaunsee. First Ch. of Christ 30 00 NEBiIASKA, $90.76. Humholdt. A Friend 30 00 Omaha. First C ng. Ch 42 70 Rising City Cong Cli 7 06 U1ys~es. First Cong. Ch 10 00 Waverly. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Emerson Inst 1 00 ARKANSAS, $14.50. Little Rock. Tuition 14 50 WASHINGTON TER., $34 00. Houghton. First li of Christ 2 65 New Tacoma. First Cong. Ch 12 50 8kokomish. Cong. Ch., for Indian Al.. 18 85 UTAH TER.. $5.00. Salt Lake City. Miss K C. Ayer $5 00 KENTUCKY, $261.50. Lexington. Tuition, 88.23; Rent, 4 92 25 Williamsburg. Tuition 169 25 TENNESSEE, $884.33. Chattanooga. Rert ... . 199 70 Jones .oroug~. Tuition 73 75 Knoxvilie. r~econd Cong. Ch 12 150 Ilemphis. be NI oyne Suli.. Tuition 264 40 Nashville. Fisk U, luition 321 70 Nashville. Prof. F. A. Chase, for Fisk U 12 78 NORTH CAROLINA, $.61.88. McLeansville. First Con.~. Cli 1 98 Trov. ~Friends, for Indian .1! 1 00 Wilmington. Tuition 25t).9u: Cong.Ch..8 258 90 SOUTH CAROLINA, $15.00. Charleston. Plym. Cong. Cli 15 00 OK RGIA. $873.16. Atlanta. Storrs Sch., 250.93; Rent, 3; First Cong. Ch., 30 283 9~ Belmont. Cong. li . 1 00 Macon. Lewis High Sch., Tuition, 350 11: Rent, 2.50; Cng. Ch , 12 ... 364 61 Macon. T. C. Hendrix, Work-benclifor Workshop. Val. 5. Mcintosh. Tuition 38 50 havannab. Tuition, 170.10: Rent. 15 185 1.0 ALABAMA, $848.83. Athens. Tuition 170 2~e Athens. Miss M. F. Wells, 14; Miss Belle J. Ferris, 2.30. for Atheirs 16 50 Marion. I. ong. Cli ~ Th)bile. 1 uition 221 85 Montgomery. Cong. Ch 10 00 Tallidega. Tuition. 365.90: Cong Cli ,10 375 90 Tni!adeg.r. Womans Home Missy Soc., for Teacher, Dakota Rome, ~Santee Agency, heb 50 00 LOUTSIAN A, $2C 3.00. New Orleans. Tuition 273 00 TEXAS, $317.70. Austin. Tillotson C. & . N. Inst., Tui tion 316 70 Sherman. Rev. W H. Gill, for New Buildiag, Tillotson C. & N. lest 1 00 INt (IMES, $696 18. Avery Fund, for Mesidi Al 425 64 I. F. DikeFund 5000 General Endowment Fund 50 00 Tuthill King Fund, for Berea C.. .. .... 170 54 CHINA. $1.00. Pao-ting-fu. Mrs. Sarah Pierson~ de- ceased, for Student Aid, Talladega C. 1 00 Total for March $16,490 01 Tota~from Oct. 1 to March 31 $111,145 01. FOR AMERICAN MISSIONARY. Subscriptions for March oo 69 Previously acknowledged 53 Total $540 12 H. W. HUBBARD, Treasurer, 56 Reade St., N. Y. J3 & R. LAMB, ~9 Carmine St.~ Sixth Ave. cars pass the doos. BANNERS IN ~JLK, NEW DESIGNS. CHURCH FURNITURE, SEND FOR HAND BOOK B~ MAIL. (160) aannnmn Our Book IWanual of E m~nuiv ERt ii kinds of embroide y. Needlework, 100 Pages. is a corn lete guide t oivesSiagrams and full instruction in Kensing- ton, Arasene and all the newembroidery stitches also gives directlons for Crocheting and Knitting with cotton twine, several handsome patterns of window and mantel Lambreq nins, also to crochet and knit fifty other useful and ornamental articles. Teaches how to make Modern Point, Iloniton and Macrame Lace, also Rug Mesking, Teet- ting, & c., & c. Profusely illustrated. Price 3~ cents, post-paid; Four fr OneDollar. Stamp- ipg Outfit of 10 full size perforated Em- broidery Pailerns, with powder, pad, & c., 60 cents. Parten Pub. Co., 47 Barclay st., New York. TAMQlN(~ Patterns for Kensington, S and all other Em broidery, 10 fuli size working patterns, Incluolug Scollops, Braiding, and Kensington Strips for under- wear and dress trimming, patterns for Clocking Stockings, Sprays of Flowers, Borders, Corners, & c., for fable and Piano Covers, Lambrequins, Chair Backs, & c., also your own imtials for Handkerchiefs, Hat-Bands, & c., with powder, pad and instructions sent post-paid for 60 centsCan be used a hun- dred times. BOOK of 100 Designs for Embroidery, BraidIng, & c., 21 cents. Oar Book Manual of Neediewo k, 100 pages, is a complete instroctor in all beanches of g.enl~roidery, Knitting, Crocheting, Lace Making, Rug Making, & e., 3~ cents; Four for $1.00. All toe ahove fos- $1.00. Address tatten Pub. to, 47 Barclay Street, New York. L A flI~ Do your own stamping for Em- UILJbroidery, with our l~tamping Pat- terns for Kensingto , Arasene, Outline, Braid Work, & c. Easily transferreu to any fabric or niaterlal and can be ttsed a hundred times over. 10 full-sized woe-king Pattereis of Flowers, Corners, Borders, Scoilops, Bra d Strips, outline figures, & c. also your own initial letters tor handkerchiefs, hat-bands, & c-, with powder, pad and directions for working, all for 60 cents, post- paid. r..A Book of 100 designs for Embroidery, Braid- ing, & c., 2~c. Our Book Manual of Needle~vork, Is a complete instructor In Keesington, Arasene nnd all other branches of Embroidery, Knit flag, Tatting, Crocheting, Lace Making, & c, cents; Four for $1.00. All the above for $1.00. Patten Pub. Co.~ 47 BarclaY Street, Neiv York. SKIN HUMORS CAN BE CURED BY W~ENNS SULPHUR SOAP. SAN FaANclsco, Feb. 16, 1883. Mr. C. N. Crittenton: DEAR Sta: I wish to call your attention to the good your Sulphur Soap has done me. For nearly fourteen years I have been trouOled with a skin humor resembling salt rheum. I have spent nearly a small fortune for doctors and medicine, but with only te m~crary relicf. I commenced using your Glenn s Sulphur Soap nearly two yenrs agoused it in baths and as a toilet soap daily. My skin is isow as clear as an infants, and no one would be able to tell that I ever had a skin complaint. I would not he withoutthe soap if it cost five limes the amount. Yours respectfully- M. H. MORRIS. Licz HousE. San Francisco, Cal. The above testimonial is indisputable evidence that Glenns Sulphur Soap will eliminate poison- ous Skin Diseases WH~N ALL OTHER MEANS HAVE FAILED- To this fact thousands have testified; and tnat it will banish lesser afflictions, such as common PIMPLES, ERUPTIONS and soREs, and keep the skin clear and beautiful, is abso- lutely certain. For this reason ladies whose complexions have been improved by the use of this soap NOW MAKE IT A CONSTANT TOILET AP- PENDAGE- The genuine always heals the name of 0. N. CRITTE NTON, 11.5 Fulton street, New York, sole proprietor. For sale by all druggists or mailed to any address on receipt of 30 cents in stamps, or three cakes for 75 cents. FRINKS Patent Refleetoms give the Most Powerful, the Softest, Cheapest and the Best Light known far Churches, Stares, Show Windows, Parlars. Banks. Offices. Picture Galler- _____ ies, Theatres, Depats, etc. New and ele. - gantdcsigna. Scud size of roan. Get circular and estinate. A liberal discount ta charches and the trade. I. P. 1.-RINK, 051 J~csrl St. N.Y.

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The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 6 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York June 1884 0038 006
The American missionary. / Volume 38, Issue 6, miscellaneous front pages 160A-160B

EDITORIAL. PAGE. SEVEN MONTII SILLUSTRATED ARTICLE INDIAN MiSsioss i6i OUR SPRING ASSOCIATIONS 163 REMEMBER THE POOR 165 Ci; RISTIAN EDUCATORS IN COUNCIL SOUTHERN MANUFACTURES i66 EARI.Y DAWNTURN IN THE ROAD JO:[N F. SLATERBENEFACTIONS 167 ~JENERAL NOTES T68 THE INDIANS. TuE DAKOTA INDIANS (Illustrated) 171 FORTY-FIYR YEARS IN WASHINGTON TER- RITORY THE CHINESE PAGE. LETTER FROM OAKLAND, CAL 182 EAU OF WOMANS WORK. LETTER. ~ HE SECRETARY 183 ALA. W6i~i ~~. ISS. ASSOC 184 UTH. SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK AT TOUGALOO.. 185 CHILDRENS PAGE. WONG NINGS IDEAS. . .. i86 RECEIPTS. . 187 NEW YORK: PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. Rooms, 56 Reade Street. Price 50 Cents a Year, in Advance. ~ntered at the Post-Office at New Yotk, N. Y., as second-class matter4 JUJI~, 1884. THE AMERiCAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. PRESIDENT. Hon. WE. B. WASm3Ustee, LL.D., Mass. CORRESPONDING SECRETARY.- RET. M. E. STRIEBY, D. D., 56 Reade Street, N; If. ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COLLECTION.REV. JAMES POWELL, 56 Reade Street, ii. i TREASURERH. W. HUBBARD, Esq., 56 Reacle Street, N. If. AUDrPORS.WM. A. NASE, W. H. ROGERS. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. Joins H. WASHBURN. Chairman; A. P. FOSTER, Secretary; LYMAN ABBOTT, A. S. BARNES, 3. R. DANFOETH, CLINTON B. FISK, S. B. HALLIDAY, EDWARD HAWES, SAMUEL HOLMES. CHARLES A. HULL, SAMUEL S. MARPLES, CHARLES L. MEAD, S. H. VIRGIN, WE. H. WARD, J. L. WITEROW. DISTRICT SECRETARIES. Rev. C. L. WOODWORTH, D.D., Boston. Rev. G. D. PIKE. D.D., Hartford. REV. CHARLES W. SHELTON, Chicago. COMMUNICATIONS relating to the Work of the AssoCiation may be addressed to the Corresponding Secretary; those e~atingto the Collecting fields, to the District Secretaries; letters for the iiclitor of the American Missionary. to Rev. G. D. Pike, D. D., at the NeW York Office; letters for the Bureau of Womans Work, to Miss D. E. Emerson. at the New York Office. DONATIONS AND SUBsCRIPTIONS may be sent to H. W. Hubhard, Treasurer 513 R~ad~ Street, NeW York, or, When more con Venient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 dnngre~eiti;nal House, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street. Chicago, Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a Life Member. FORM OF A BEQUEST. I BEQEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay the sam in days after my decease to the person Who, When the same is payale, shall act as Treasurer of the American Missionary Assochtion, of NeW York City, to be app lied, under the direction of the Executive Committee of the Association, to its charitable uses and purposes. The Will should be attested by three witnesses. CHAPTER II. WORTH 10,265,63 2.60. So says our sworn statement of that year, and the above figures you will find head the column in state- ment dated January i, 1884. This money value was in the shape of Bonds and Mortgages, Loans, United States Bonds Real Estate (estimated at cost), and Cash. Working with this capital, we pushed our business vigorously during the year 1883, and with what re- sult we will show in chapter three. Respectfully yours, MANHAflAN LIF~ INSURANCE CON, 156 & 158 Broadway, New York. HENRY STOKES, President. J. L. HALSEY, est Vice-P. H. V. WEMPIE, Secy. H. B. STOKES, Id Vice-P. 5. N. STEBBINS, Acty. a 000,,, .~ IIORSFOiRDS ACID PHOSPHATE. (LIQuen.) FOR DYSPEPSIA, MENTAL AND PHYSICAL EXHAUt~TION, NERVOUSNE~S. DI MINISHED VITALITY, URINARY DIFFICULTIES, ETJ. PREPARED ACCORDING TO TIlE DIRECTION OF Prof. N. N. Llorsford, of Cauabrid~e, Mass. There seems to be DO difference o~ opinion in high medical authority of the value of plios- phoric acid, and no preparation has ever been offered to the public which seems to BO happily meet the general Want as this. It Is not nauseous, but agreeable to the taste. No danger can attend its use. Its action will harmonise with such stimulants as are necessary to take. It makes a delicious drink with water and sugar only. Prices reasonable. Pamphlet giving further particulars mailed free on application. MANUFACTURED BY THE RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS, Providence, B. I., AND FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS,

Seven Months Editorial 161

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. \OL. XXXVIII. JUNE, 1884. No. 6. Se cen Jfwit/#s.Reccipts from collections and donations, $116,081.44, iind from legacies $20,571.35, making a total of $136,652.79. An in- crease from collections and donations of $6,905.71 over last year, but a decrease from legacies of $21,649.83, making the decrease of total receipts for the seven months of $14,744.12. We must again remind our friends that it is necessary to largely increase our collections and dona- tions or incur a debt. OUR ILLUSTRATED ARTICLE. It gives us pleasure to place before oar readers in this number an illus- trated article on our Dakota Mission. The plates were prepared for the use jointly of the JLLU5TRATEI) ChRISTIAN WEEKLY and the AMERICAN MissioNARy. The article was written by Rev. Addison P. Foster one of -our Executive Committee who visited the mission last year. The popu- larity of the Indian number of the MIssIoNARY which we issued in April, 1883, leads us to hope that this number will be welcomed and preserved for use as occasion may offer. OUR INDIAN MISSIONS. Nine schools, with 356 pupils; five churches, with 271 members; five stations ; thirteen missionaries ; thirty-seven teachers, are the statistics. The churches are Congregational, and the church and school go hand in hand. A careful survey of the necessities of these missions was made early in the year, and the estimate called for an appropriation of about ~:30,000. Repairs and improvements in old buildings and construction of

Our Illustrated Article Editorial 161

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. \OL. XXXVIII. JUNE, 1884. No. 6. Se cen Jfwit/#s.Reccipts from collections and donations, $116,081.44, iind from legacies $20,571.35, making a total of $136,652.79. An in- crease from collections and donations of $6,905.71 over last year, but a decrease from legacies of $21,649.83, making the decrease of total receipts for the seven months of $14,744.12. We must again remind our friends that it is necessary to largely increase our collections and dona- tions or incur a debt. OUR ILLUSTRATED ARTICLE. It gives us pleasure to place before oar readers in this number an illus- trated article on our Dakota Mission. The plates were prepared for the use jointly of the JLLU5TRATEI) ChRISTIAN WEEKLY and the AMERICAN MissioNARy. The article was written by Rev. Addison P. Foster one of -our Executive Committee who visited the mission last year. The popu- larity of the Indian number of the MIssIoNARY which we issued in April, 1883, leads us to hope that this number will be welcomed and preserved for use as occasion may offer. OUR INDIAN MISSIONS. Nine schools, with 356 pupils; five churches, with 271 members; five stations ; thirteen missionaries ; thirty-seven teachers, are the statistics. The churches are Congregational, and the church and school go hand in hand. A careful survey of the necessities of these missions was made early in the year, and the estimate called for an appropriation of about ~:30,000. Repairs and improvements in old buildings and construction of

Our Indian Missions Editorial 161-163

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. \OL. XXXVIII. JUNE, 1884. No. 6. Se cen Jfwit/#s.Reccipts from collections and donations, $116,081.44, iind from legacies $20,571.35, making a total of $136,652.79. An in- crease from collections and donations of $6,905.71 over last year, but a decrease from legacies of $21,649.83, making the decrease of total receipts for the seven months of $14,744.12. We must again remind our friends that it is necessary to largely increase our collections and dona- tions or incur a debt. OUR ILLUSTRATED ARTICLE. It gives us pleasure to place before oar readers in this number an illus- trated article on our Dakota Mission. The plates were prepared for the use jointly of the JLLU5TRATEI) ChRISTIAN WEEKLY and the AMERICAN MissioNARy. The article was written by Rev. Addison P. Foster one of -our Executive Committee who visited the mission last year. The popu- larity of the Indian number of the MIssIoNARY which we issued in April, 1883, leads us to hope that this number will be welcomed and preserved for use as occasion may offer. OUR INDIAN MISSIONS. Nine schools, with 356 pupils; five churches, with 271 members; five stations ; thirteen missionaries ; thirty-seven teachers, are the statistics. The churches are Congregational, and the church and school go hand in hand. A careful survey of the necessities of these missions was made early in the year, and the estimate called for an appropriation of about ~:30,000. Repairs and improvements in old buildings and construction of 16~ Our Indian Missions. new buildings, imperatively demanded for the efficient prosecution of the work, forbade a lower estimate. In surrendering our African missions, obedient to the voice of the churches that our appeal might be simplified, we gave up the proceeds of invested funds that in large part sustained that work ; while in receiving from tl)e American Board its Indian missions, there was placed just so much additional demand upon our treasury. Our inevitable outlook was a trilemmaeither enlarged receipts, or retrenchment, or debt. We therefore sent to about fifteen hundred Congregational ministers in February last a l)rinted circular asking FirstShall we raise this year ~30,000 for our mission work among the Indians? SecondWill you aid, and how? Up to date we have received 206 replies. To the first question the answers are nearly all in the affirmative ; most of them strong and posi- tive, a few cautious and questioning. To the second, 33 responded with immediate contributions ; 43 promised an increase in the regular church collections, 71 a special contribution from the missionary concert, and 3 the proceeds of a lecture. The replies are representative. Ministers in charge of the strong churches, and those in charge of the weaker, speak the same language of encouragement. Go ahead. Forward! is the word. We will back you. It is no more than fair that those who have hitherto sus- tained these Indian missions through the A. B. C. F. M. should now turn their hand into the A. M. A. to increase its funds for this work. Thirty thousand dollars will do more and better work than so many muskets. We love your work and will aid you all we can. Such are the sentiments these letters breathe. From all parts of the country they come. California strikes hands with Massachusetts, Washington Territory and Utah range themselves with Florida, all of them wishing us God-speed, and promising help in oui~ Indian work. We are glad to have received such encouragement as these letters give, and sincerely thank our brethren who took the trouble and time to answer our inquiries. We trust that none of them will fail to see that the promises are fulfilled. There will be in some cases need of special remembrance. Interests crowd in these days. Even what is lawful and regular has to fight for recognition. There are others who have not answered our questions, upon whose co-operation to bring up that ~30,000 we also rely. We hope that as they read these lines their eves will detect the special appeal, implied, though net expressed, that is here made to them. We commend anew the claims of these important mi~sions to our friends, and again remind them that if we are to worthily do this enlarged work they must come up to our help with enlarged contributions. Our Spring Associations. 163 OUR SPRING ASSOCIATIONS. REV. J. E. ROY, D. D. There were four of them, those of Alabama, at Montgomery; of Loui- siana, at New Orleans ; of Mississippi, at Meridian ; and of North Caro- lina, at Dudley. The first three came the first part of April ; the last caine the 1st of May. Alabama received two new ministers, Revs. A. J. Headen and C. L. harris, and two new churches, those of Birmingham and Tecumseh, places of large iron and coal interests. Louisiana received the Church of Chocahula and Rev. Byron Gunner. The meetings of Ala- bama have come to the dignity of State Anniversaries, those of the Sin- day-school Association, of the Association of Churches, and of the ans Missionary Association, which this year transferred its auxil- arysh ip from the Boston W. H. M. A. to the Womans Bureau of the A. i\I. A. The Sunday-school body took a day for its reports, addresses and discourses. Among other valuable contributions was that of Mrs. Ash, widow of the late Rev. W. II. Ash, upon the dress and deportment of the teacher. The body representing the churches and the ministers came lip to its own high-water mark of intellectual force and spiritual tone. Among the practical subjects discussed was that of the relation of th6 churches toward secret societies. In the whole discussion not a word was offered in defense of the clandestine orders. It would have done Brother Fee good to have heard the fearless discussion. The church of Mont- gomery, under the care of Rev. R. C. Bedford, was found in a prosperous condition, ten members being received during the sessions of the body. Prof. G. W. Andrews, an early pastor of the church, had the pleasure of baptizing into the church a lad of thirteen, who had been named after himself, George Whitefleld. Prof. Andrews also delivered an address upon the Mission of Congregationalism in the South, which was the feature of the week of services. Upon invitation three of the leading white churches of the city were supplied on the Lords Day, those of Dr. Petrie, First Presbyterian, Dr. Andrew, First Methodist, and Dr. Woodlin, First Baptistthe service being rendered by Revs. 0. W. Fay, G. W. Andrews and J. E. Roy. Four white families extended hospitality and four white pastors came into the meetings. And so recognition is coming along. The Louisiana Association met with Rev. Isaac Halls church, which with paiiit and fresco had put its house of worship into beautiful condi- tion. Dr. W. S. Alexander was elected Moderator for the eighth year. A member of his church, a converted Catholic, was liceIiscd that lie might preach among the French-speaking colored people in the city of New Orleans. The account of his conversion was extremely interesting, show- ing how, by the word of God, he had worked out of Bomish superstitions and had iound out what it wasto be l~orn again. During the sessions,

Rev. J. E. Roy, D.D. Roy, J. E., Rev., D.D. Our Spring Associations Editorial 163-165

Our Spring Associations. 163 OUR SPRING ASSOCIATIONS. REV. J. E. ROY, D. D. There were four of them, those of Alabama, at Montgomery; of Loui- siana, at New Orleans ; of Mississippi, at Meridian ; and of North Caro- lina, at Dudley. The first three came the first part of April ; the last caine the 1st of May. Alabama received two new ministers, Revs. A. J. Headen and C. L. harris, and two new churches, those of Birmingham and Tecumseh, places of large iron and coal interests. Louisiana received the Church of Chocahula and Rev. Byron Gunner. The meetings of Ala- bama have come to the dignity of State Anniversaries, those of the Sin- day-school Association, of the Association of Churches, and of the ans Missionary Association, which this year transferred its auxil- arysh ip from the Boston W. H. M. A. to the Womans Bureau of the A. i\I. A. The Sunday-school body took a day for its reports, addresses and discourses. Among other valuable contributions was that of Mrs. Ash, widow of the late Rev. W. II. Ash, upon the dress and deportment of the teacher. The body representing the churches and the ministers came lip to its own high-water mark of intellectual force and spiritual tone. Among the practical subjects discussed was that of the relation of th6 churches toward secret societies. In the whole discussion not a word was offered in defense of the clandestine orders. It would have done Brother Fee good to have heard the fearless discussion. The church of Mont- gomery, under the care of Rev. R. C. Bedford, was found in a prosperous condition, ten members being received during the sessions of the body. Prof. G. W. Andrews, an early pastor of the church, had the pleasure of baptizing into the church a lad of thirteen, who had been named after himself, George Whitefleld. Prof. Andrews also delivered an address upon the Mission of Congregationalism in the South, which was the feature of the week of services. Upon invitation three of the leading white churches of the city were supplied on the Lords Day, those of Dr. Petrie, First Presbyterian, Dr. Andrew, First Methodist, and Dr. Woodlin, First Baptistthe service being rendered by Revs. 0. W. Fay, G. W. Andrews and J. E. Roy. Four white families extended hospitality and four white pastors came into the meetings. And so recognition is coming along. The Louisiana Association met with Rev. Isaac Halls church, which with paiiit and fresco had put its house of worship into beautiful condi- tion. Dr. W. S. Alexander was elected Moderator for the eighth year. A member of his church, a converted Catholic, was liceIiscd that lie might preach among the French-speaking colored people in the city of New Orleans. The account of his conversion was extremely interesting, show- ing how, by the word of God, he had worked out of Bomish superstitions and had iound out what it wasto be l~orn again. During the sessions, 164 Our Spring Associations. by a proper Council, Mr. Byron Gunner, of the Theological Department of Talladega College, was examined and ordained to serve as pastor at New Iberia, the place where the Acadians settled and Whittiers Evan- geline drifted in search of her lover. Dr. Alexander preached the sermon and Rev. R. C. Bedford, of Montgomery, gave the charge. The vener- able brother, Rev. Daniel Clay, preached the opening sermon on the text, Fear not, little flock, for it is your Fathers good pleasure to give you the kingdom. The whole body was at the Boarding Hall of the Straight University for a lunch, when the President made the members a fine present of books from a Northern society. The meeting of the Mississippi body was the second, and it revealed a maturing process. President Pope and Professor Hatch represented Tougaloo Universitythe president preaching a sermon on Christian Industry, and the professor reading a capital paper on Revivals. Rev. C. L. Harris, of Jackson, preached the opening sermon. lie is finding a wide and effectual door at the Capital of the State. Pastor Grice, at Meridian, is encouraged by th~ assistance of Miss M. E. Green, a lady missionary. Miss A. D. Gerrish serves in the same capacity at New Orleans. At the meeting in the last named city, Miss E. B. Emery, from Maine, gave an impressive talk upon Womans Mission Work. Misses Sperry and Wilcox, teachers, followed with words of confirmation. In Mississippi three or four promising fields are opening for the Sci~ool and Church process, and these will be entered and occupied as soon as may be. The Old North State held its fifth annual meeting on the first four days of May, at Dudley. This was a 1)13cc at which the colored people, during the Ku-Klux terror, refugeed, making there a stand for lifethe hunted creatures at bay. Early the A. M. A. opened here its Mission School and Church. Difficulties, peculiar to the heterogeneous~ material thus gathered, have gradually been overcome, until now the gospel is in the ascendant as an assimilating force. rrlle church and school under Rev. J. E. B. Jewett and his wife, of Pepperell, Mass.~ are in a high degree of prosperity. The New England Academy Priri- cipal seems especially adapted to these children of toil. The Associa- tion had the round of discussions, essays, devotional meetings. ryI~e, National CouncH and the annual meeting of the A. M. A. were duly reported. The new Confession of Faith was heartily ap~ proved. A memorial service for the late Rev. Islay Walden~ a native cf North Carolina, was a marked feature of the occasion. The great work he had accomlilished for his people in so short a time was instructive and encouraging to the other young ministers, and to the young people of the Assembly. Mrs. Elenora Walden continues the school work of herehusband, greatly confided in by IP~rnentber the Poor. 165 the people. Rev. Zachariali Simmons takes up the pastoral work. Three delegates from Strieby and Troy had walked 130 miles for want of money to pay the railroad fare. rrhree new school-house churches were reported those of Pekin, Oaks and Hulisboro, the last two having been dedicated by the Field Superintendent on the Saturday and Sunday previous. Ser- mons were preached by Revs. D. D. Dodge, G. S. Smith (Moderator), J. E. Roy and Z. Simmons. Deacon Henry Clay Jones, of Raleigh, made a flaming temperance speech, claiming that 60,000 Prohibition voters held the balance of power, which, as a third party, could and should over- master the 100,000 majority that went against home protection. REMEMBER THE POOR. When Paul and Barnabas were about to set forth to labor among the heathen, Cephas, James and John gave them the right hand of fellowship with a charge included in these words: Only that they would remem- her the poor. how they should do it had been indicated by him who said of his own labors the poor have the gospel preached to them. The expression the poor is comprehensive. All human wants relate to it. The poverty of some, however, is more complete than that of others, and the poorest have early, if not the first, claim to attention. The Pauls and Barnabases of our times may justly listen to appeals which arise from the following conditions: 1. Ignorance. In this country it may be said ignorance is the mother of poverty. Indeed, ignorance is one of the worst Corms of poverty. Intelligence among the masses, coupled with true religion, would soon abolish it. Whatever is lacking of knowledge of God, of what He has promised, of what He has made for us, of what we can do for ourselves, must be supplied. It was an observation of Dean Stanley that we ought to teach the heathen how to count three before attempting to instruct them as to the doctrine of the Trinity. The great Preacher was the great rreacl~ei. also. If there be the greatest ignorance South, the appeal from the South to us to remember the poor is urgent and imperative. 2. Poverty. Where a large proportion of the people can neither read nor write, there nothing but a fractional supply for human wants is to be expected. Inadequate buildings meagerly furnished, insufficient clothing for the young, lack of medical care and neglect of the aged and infirm these are evil conditions only too common all over the South, rendering much that ministers to a thrifty and manly character impossible, as things are now. Where there is the greatest sickness, privation and want, there apostles to the poor have legitimate field for labor. Is there any such field in our country as that presented at the South? 3. Vice. It is admitted that ignorance and poverty beget vice. Ac- cording to recent statistics, gathered from the whole country, it is shown

Remember the Poor Editorial 165-166

IP~rnentber the Poor. 165 the people. Rev. Zachariali Simmons takes up the pastoral work. Three delegates from Strieby and Troy had walked 130 miles for want of money to pay the railroad fare. rrhree new school-house churches were reported those of Pekin, Oaks and Hulisboro, the last two having been dedicated by the Field Superintendent on the Saturday and Sunday previous. Ser- mons were preached by Revs. D. D. Dodge, G. S. Smith (Moderator), J. E. Roy and Z. Simmons. Deacon Henry Clay Jones, of Raleigh, made a flaming temperance speech, claiming that 60,000 Prohibition voters held the balance of power, which, as a third party, could and should over- master the 100,000 majority that went against home protection. REMEMBER THE POOR. When Paul and Barnabas were about to set forth to labor among the heathen, Cephas, James and John gave them the right hand of fellowship with a charge included in these words: Only that they would remem- her the poor. how they should do it had been indicated by him who said of his own labors the poor have the gospel preached to them. The expression the poor is comprehensive. All human wants relate to it. The poverty of some, however, is more complete than that of others, and the poorest have early, if not the first, claim to attention. The Pauls and Barnabases of our times may justly listen to appeals which arise from the following conditions: 1. Ignorance. In this country it may be said ignorance is the mother of poverty. Indeed, ignorance is one of the worst Corms of poverty. Intelligence among the masses, coupled with true religion, would soon abolish it. Whatever is lacking of knowledge of God, of what He has promised, of what He has made for us, of what we can do for ourselves, must be supplied. It was an observation of Dean Stanley that we ought to teach the heathen how to count three before attempting to instruct them as to the doctrine of the Trinity. The great Preacher was the great rreacl~ei. also. If there be the greatest ignorance South, the appeal from the South to us to remember the poor is urgent and imperative. 2. Poverty. Where a large proportion of the people can neither read nor write, there nothing but a fractional supply for human wants is to be expected. Inadequate buildings meagerly furnished, insufficient clothing for the young, lack of medical care and neglect of the aged and infirm these are evil conditions only too common all over the South, rendering much that ministers to a thrifty and manly character impossible, as things are now. Where there is the greatest sickness, privation and want, there apostles to the poor have legitimate field for labor. Is there any such field in our country as that presented at the South? 3. Vice. It is admitted that ignorance and poverty beget vice. Ac- cording to recent statistics, gathered from the whole country, it is shown 16v~ Southern ifanufactures. that the illiterate classes commit more than ten times their pro rata of crime. The missionary must stay the progress of vice, drying up its. sources as best he may, and uncapping the fountains of life. To do this he must impart knowledge and preach the gospel. If, in consequence of the ignorance and poverty of the people South, there is vice and crime unparalleled in the annals of our country; if these things combined commtitute a poverty unknown elsewhere in the land when estimated by its extent, then those who seek the poorest will not neglect the millions in the Southern States. It is our work, as an Association, to do what we can to render these people the help needful. Will not the friends of Christ help us remem- ber the poor? _______________________________ CHRIsTIAN EDUCATORS IN COUNCIL is the title of a pamphlet of 266 pages, giving full report of sixty addresses by American educators at Ocean Grove last August, arranged topically as follows: I. Education and Malls Improvement. II. Illiteracy in the United States. III. National Aid to Common Schools. IV. The Negro in America. V. Illiteracy, Wealth, Pauperism, and Crime. VI. The American Indian Problem. VII. The American Mormon Problem. VIII. Education in the South since the War. IX. Christ in American Education. Tables: Illiterate and Educa- tional Status, United States 1880 Rev. J. C. llartzell, D.D., the editor and compiler, purposes to issue a second edition for general circulation.. He may be addressed at the Methodist Book Concern, New York. We know of no one document of equal value, on the subjects discussed. The price is one dollar. SOUTHERN MANUFACTURES. An account of the Southern manufacturing and mining enterprises for January and February is given in the Aian~factarers Record, and illus- trates the growing thrift of these industries in the South. Kentucky shows the largest aggregate, which foots up ~6,851,000. Alabama is second with 5,210,000 ; Virginia, 3,830,000 ; Texas, 3,593,000 ; Georgia, 2,074,000; Maryland, 2,015,000 ; North Carolina, 1,227,000 ; West Vir- ginia, 916,000 ; South Carolina, 904,000 ; Tennessee, 846,000, and the other States a little less than 500,000 each. The cotton mills begun since January will cost over ~325,000, and will add more than a hundred thousand spindles to the number now in the South. The Eagle and Phzenix Mills, Columbus, Ga., intend to erect a new structure at the cost of ~1,000,000. At Rome, Ga., and at Birmingham, Ala., new cotton mills to cost ~l00,000 each are about to be erected. Confidence, which can only spring from intelligence and Christianity, is the one thing need- ful in order to secure the capital wanted for the development of the vast manufacturing interests of the southern portion of our country.

Christian Educators in Council Editorial 166

16v~ Southern ifanufactures. that the illiterate classes commit more than ten times their pro rata of crime. The missionary must stay the progress of vice, drying up its. sources as best he may, and uncapping the fountains of life. To do this he must impart knowledge and preach the gospel. If, in consequence of the ignorance and poverty of the people South, there is vice and crime unparalleled in the annals of our country; if these things combined commtitute a poverty unknown elsewhere in the land when estimated by its extent, then those who seek the poorest will not neglect the millions in the Southern States. It is our work, as an Association, to do what we can to render these people the help needful. Will not the friends of Christ help us remem- ber the poor? _______________________________ CHRIsTIAN EDUCATORS IN COUNCIL is the title of a pamphlet of 266 pages, giving full report of sixty addresses by American educators at Ocean Grove last August, arranged topically as follows: I. Education and Malls Improvement. II. Illiteracy in the United States. III. National Aid to Common Schools. IV. The Negro in America. V. Illiteracy, Wealth, Pauperism, and Crime. VI. The American Indian Problem. VII. The American Mormon Problem. VIII. Education in the South since the War. IX. Christ in American Education. Tables: Illiterate and Educa- tional Status, United States 1880 Rev. J. C. llartzell, D.D., the editor and compiler, purposes to issue a second edition for general circulation.. He may be addressed at the Methodist Book Concern, New York. We know of no one document of equal value, on the subjects discussed. The price is one dollar. SOUTHERN MANUFACTURES. An account of the Southern manufacturing and mining enterprises for January and February is given in the Aian~factarers Record, and illus- trates the growing thrift of these industries in the South. Kentucky shows the largest aggregate, which foots up ~6,851,000. Alabama is second with 5,210,000 ; Virginia, 3,830,000 ; Texas, 3,593,000 ; Georgia, 2,074,000; Maryland, 2,015,000 ; North Carolina, 1,227,000 ; West Vir- ginia, 916,000 ; South Carolina, 904,000 ; Tennessee, 846,000, and the other States a little less than 500,000 each. The cotton mills begun since January will cost over ~325,000, and will add more than a hundred thousand spindles to the number now in the South. The Eagle and Phzenix Mills, Columbus, Ga., intend to erect a new structure at the cost of ~1,000,000. At Rome, Ga., and at Birmingham, Ala., new cotton mills to cost ~l00,000 each are about to be erected. Confidence, which can only spring from intelligence and Christianity, is the one thing need- ful in order to secure the capital wanted for the development of the vast manufacturing interests of the southern portion of our country.

Southern Manufactures Editorial 166-167

16v~ Southern ifanufactures. that the illiterate classes commit more than ten times their pro rata of crime. The missionary must stay the progress of vice, drying up its. sources as best he may, and uncapping the fountains of life. To do this he must impart knowledge and preach the gospel. If, in consequence of the ignorance and poverty of the people South, there is vice and crime unparalleled in the annals of our country; if these things combined commtitute a poverty unknown elsewhere in the land when estimated by its extent, then those who seek the poorest will not neglect the millions in the Southern States. It is our work, as an Association, to do what we can to render these people the help needful. Will not the friends of Christ help us remem- ber the poor? _______________________________ CHRIsTIAN EDUCATORS IN COUNCIL is the title of a pamphlet of 266 pages, giving full report of sixty addresses by American educators at Ocean Grove last August, arranged topically as follows: I. Education and Malls Improvement. II. Illiteracy in the United States. III. National Aid to Common Schools. IV. The Negro in America. V. Illiteracy, Wealth, Pauperism, and Crime. VI. The American Indian Problem. VII. The American Mormon Problem. VIII. Education in the South since the War. IX. Christ in American Education. Tables: Illiterate and Educa- tional Status, United States 1880 Rev. J. C. llartzell, D.D., the editor and compiler, purposes to issue a second edition for general circulation.. He may be addressed at the Methodist Book Concern, New York. We know of no one document of equal value, on the subjects discussed. The price is one dollar. SOUTHERN MANUFACTURES. An account of the Southern manufacturing and mining enterprises for January and February is given in the Aian~factarers Record, and illus- trates the growing thrift of these industries in the South. Kentucky shows the largest aggregate, which foots up ~6,851,000. Alabama is second with 5,210,000 ; Virginia, 3,830,000 ; Texas, 3,593,000 ; Georgia, 2,074,000; Maryland, 2,015,000 ; North Carolina, 1,227,000 ; West Vir- ginia, 916,000 ; South Carolina, 904,000 ; Tennessee, 846,000, and the other States a little less than 500,000 each. The cotton mills begun since January will cost over ~325,000, and will add more than a hundred thousand spindles to the number now in the South. The Eagle and Phzenix Mills, Columbus, Ga., intend to erect a new structure at the cost of ~1,000,000. At Rome, Ga., and at Birmingham, Ala., new cotton mills to cost ~l00,000 each are about to be erected. Confidence, which can only spring from intelligence and Christianity, is the one thing need- ful in order to secure the capital wanted for the development of the vast manufacturing interests of the southern portion of our country. ParagraphJo/in F. SlalerBenefactions. 167 THE EARLY DAWN is the title of a paper published at Good hope Sta- lion, Sherbro Island, under the management of Rev. Mr. Gomer, the colored Superintendent of the Mendi and Shengay Missionq, now in charge of the United Brethren in Christ. THE EARLY DAWN is welcomed. A TURN IN THE ROAD. Goy. McDaniel, of Georgia, has commuted the death sentences of two negroes. One of these, it is said, had no fair chance of defense, and the other killed the invader of his domestic peace, for which offence the Governor said he would never allow a man to be hanged. It is to Mr. McDaniels credit that this clemency was exercised in full view of the desperate efforts which have been made for more than a year to save from the gallows one Turner, a man of influential family, for whose crime there was no excuse. All recourses of appeal to the courts having been exhausted, rrurHer~s friends are bringing every pressure to bear to have the Governor give him a negros chance, but that official has decided to let the law take its course. JOHN F. SLATER. The death of Mr. Slater, which occurred at Norwich, Conn., May 6, removes one of our foremost philanthropists. His well-known gift of a million dollars for the emancipated race in America was made after years of converse with eminent scholars, statesmen, capitalists and Christian philanthropists. The act was in every sense deliberate. His successful business career, extending over many years, his knowledge of men, gained by hi~ relations with business interests in the great centers of trade; by his employment of large numbers of laborers; by his observations while traveling at home and abroad gave him opportunity to reach the best conclusions as to what people in our land were the most needy, and where the gifts would yield the most abundant results. He took a business mans view of the subject, and has left an expression of judgment, supported by a princely benefaction, of great value to others who are prayerfully considering how they may best promote the interests of Christian civilization. Modest, consistent, digni- fled, courteous, a regular attendant at a Congregational church, a good ieighbor, a good citizen belovedsuch was John F. Slater. He has left a name better and more enduring than his great riches. BEN EFACTIO N S. The late Lucius J. Knowles bequeathed ~5,OOO to Doane College, Ne- braska, and $10,000 to Carlton College, Minnesota. A professorship at Williams College, in honor of Dr. Mark Hopkins, has been provided for by subscriptions amounting to $25,000.

The Early Dawn Editorial 167

ParagraphJo/in F. SlalerBenefactions. 167 THE EARLY DAWN is the title of a paper published at Good hope Sta- lion, Sherbro Island, under the management of Rev. Mr. Gomer, the colored Superintendent of the Mendi and Shengay Missionq, now in charge of the United Brethren in Christ. THE EARLY DAWN is welcomed. A TURN IN THE ROAD. Goy. McDaniel, of Georgia, has commuted the death sentences of two negroes. One of these, it is said, had no fair chance of defense, and the other killed the invader of his domestic peace, for which offence the Governor said he would never allow a man to be hanged. It is to Mr. McDaniels credit that this clemency was exercised in full view of the desperate efforts which have been made for more than a year to save from the gallows one Turner, a man of influential family, for whose crime there was no excuse. All recourses of appeal to the courts having been exhausted, rrurHer~s friends are bringing every pressure to bear to have the Governor give him a negros chance, but that official has decided to let the law take its course. JOHN F. SLATER. The death of Mr. Slater, which occurred at Norwich, Conn., May 6, removes one of our foremost philanthropists. His well-known gift of a million dollars for the emancipated race in America was made after years of converse with eminent scholars, statesmen, capitalists and Christian philanthropists. The act was in every sense deliberate. His successful business career, extending over many years, his knowledge of men, gained by hi~ relations with business interests in the great centers of trade; by his employment of large numbers of laborers; by his observations while traveling at home and abroad gave him opportunity to reach the best conclusions as to what people in our land were the most needy, and where the gifts would yield the most abundant results. He took a business mans view of the subject, and has left an expression of judgment, supported by a princely benefaction, of great value to others who are prayerfully considering how they may best promote the interests of Christian civilization. Modest, consistent, digni- fled, courteous, a regular attendant at a Congregational church, a good ieighbor, a good citizen belovedsuch was John F. Slater. He has left a name better and more enduring than his great riches. BEN EFACTIO N S. The late Lucius J. Knowles bequeathed ~5,OOO to Doane College, Ne- braska, and $10,000 to Carlton College, Minnesota. A professorship at Williams College, in honor of Dr. Mark Hopkins, has been provided for by subscriptions amounting to $25,000.

A Turn in the Road Editorial 167

ParagraphJo/in F. SlalerBenefactions. 167 THE EARLY DAWN is the title of a paper published at Good hope Sta- lion, Sherbro Island, under the management of Rev. Mr. Gomer, the colored Superintendent of the Mendi and Shengay Missionq, now in charge of the United Brethren in Christ. THE EARLY DAWN is welcomed. A TURN IN THE ROAD. Goy. McDaniel, of Georgia, has commuted the death sentences of two negroes. One of these, it is said, had no fair chance of defense, and the other killed the invader of his domestic peace, for which offence the Governor said he would never allow a man to be hanged. It is to Mr. McDaniels credit that this clemency was exercised in full view of the desperate efforts which have been made for more than a year to save from the gallows one Turner, a man of influential family, for whose crime there was no excuse. All recourses of appeal to the courts having been exhausted, rrurHer~s friends are bringing every pressure to bear to have the Governor give him a negros chance, but that official has decided to let the law take its course. JOHN F. SLATER. The death of Mr. Slater, which occurred at Norwich, Conn., May 6, removes one of our foremost philanthropists. His well-known gift of a million dollars for the emancipated race in America was made after years of converse with eminent scholars, statesmen, capitalists and Christian philanthropists. The act was in every sense deliberate. His successful business career, extending over many years, his knowledge of men, gained by hi~ relations with business interests in the great centers of trade; by his employment of large numbers of laborers; by his observations while traveling at home and abroad gave him opportunity to reach the best conclusions as to what people in our land were the most needy, and where the gifts would yield the most abundant results. He took a business mans view of the subject, and has left an expression of judgment, supported by a princely benefaction, of great value to others who are prayerfully considering how they may best promote the interests of Christian civilization. Modest, consistent, digni- fled, courteous, a regular attendant at a Congregational church, a good ieighbor, a good citizen belovedsuch was John F. Slater. He has left a name better and more enduring than his great riches. BEN EFACTIO N S. The late Lucius J. Knowles bequeathed ~5,OOO to Doane College, Ne- braska, and $10,000 to Carlton College, Minnesota. A professorship at Williams College, in honor of Dr. Mark Hopkins, has been provided for by subscriptions amounting to $25,000.

John F. Slater Editorial 167

ParagraphJo/in F. SlalerBenefactions. 167 THE EARLY DAWN is the title of a paper published at Good hope Sta- lion, Sherbro Island, under the management of Rev. Mr. Gomer, the colored Superintendent of the Mendi and Shengay Missionq, now in charge of the United Brethren in Christ. THE EARLY DAWN is welcomed. A TURN IN THE ROAD. Goy. McDaniel, of Georgia, has commuted the death sentences of two negroes. One of these, it is said, had no fair chance of defense, and the other killed the invader of his domestic peace, for which offence the Governor said he would never allow a man to be hanged. It is to Mr. McDaniels credit that this clemency was exercised in full view of the desperate efforts which have been made for more than a year to save from the gallows one Turner, a man of influential family, for whose crime there was no excuse. All recourses of appeal to the courts having been exhausted, rrurHer~s friends are bringing every pressure to bear to have the Governor give him a negros chance, but that official has decided to let the law take its course. JOHN F. SLATER. The death of Mr. Slater, which occurred at Norwich, Conn., May 6, removes one of our foremost philanthropists. His well-known gift of a million dollars for the emancipated race in America was made after years of converse with eminent scholars, statesmen, capitalists and Christian philanthropists. The act was in every sense deliberate. His successful business career, extending over many years, his knowledge of men, gained by hi~ relations with business interests in the great centers of trade; by his employment of large numbers of laborers; by his observations while traveling at home and abroad gave him opportunity to reach the best conclusions as to what people in our land were the most needy, and where the gifts would yield the most abundant results. He took a business mans view of the subject, and has left an expression of judgment, supported by a princely benefaction, of great value to others who are prayerfully considering how they may best promote the interests of Christian civilization. Modest, consistent, digni- fled, courteous, a regular attendant at a Congregational church, a good ieighbor, a good citizen belovedsuch was John F. Slater. He has left a name better and more enduring than his great riches. BEN EFACTIO N S. The late Lucius J. Knowles bequeathed ~5,OOO to Doane College, Ne- braska, and $10,000 to Carlton College, Minnesota. A professorship at Williams College, in honor of Dr. Mark Hopkins, has been provided for by subscriptions amounting to $25,000.

Benefactions Editorial 167-168

ParagraphJo/in F. SlalerBenefactions. 167 THE EARLY DAWN is the title of a paper published at Good hope Sta- lion, Sherbro Island, under the management of Rev. Mr. Gomer, the colored Superintendent of the Mendi and Shengay Missionq, now in charge of the United Brethren in Christ. THE EARLY DAWN is welcomed. A TURN IN THE ROAD. Goy. McDaniel, of Georgia, has commuted the death sentences of two negroes. One of these, it is said, had no fair chance of defense, and the other killed the invader of his domestic peace, for which offence the Governor said he would never allow a man to be hanged. It is to Mr. McDaniels credit that this clemency was exercised in full view of the desperate efforts which have been made for more than a year to save from the gallows one Turner, a man of influential family, for whose crime there was no excuse. All recourses of appeal to the courts having been exhausted, rrurHer~s friends are bringing every pressure to bear to have the Governor give him a negros chance, but that official has decided to let the law take its course. JOHN F. SLATER. The death of Mr. Slater, which occurred at Norwich, Conn., May 6, removes one of our foremost philanthropists. His well-known gift of a million dollars for the emancipated race in America was made after years of converse with eminent scholars, statesmen, capitalists and Christian philanthropists. The act was in every sense deliberate. His successful business career, extending over many years, his knowledge of men, gained by hi~ relations with business interests in the great centers of trade; by his employment of large numbers of laborers; by his observations while traveling at home and abroad gave him opportunity to reach the best conclusions as to what people in our land were the most needy, and where the gifts would yield the most abundant results. He took a business mans view of the subject, and has left an expression of judgment, supported by a princely benefaction, of great value to others who are prayerfully considering how they may best promote the interests of Christian civilization. Modest, consistent, digni- fled, courteous, a regular attendant at a Congregational church, a good ieighbor, a good citizen belovedsuch was John F. Slater. He has left a name better and more enduring than his great riches. BEN EFACTIO N S. The late Lucius J. Knowles bequeathed ~5,OOO to Doane College, Ne- braska, and $10,000 to Carlton College, Minnesota. A professorship at Williams College, in honor of Dr. Mark Hopkins, has been provided for by subscriptions amounting to $25,000. 168 General Notes. rrhe New York University is to receive $5,000 from the estate of the late Augustus Schell, and the New York Historical Society $5,000. Mrs. Louisa L. Vought, besides other gifts to the Protestant Episcopal Church, left $10,000 for work among the colored people South, and $1,000 for the Indians. 1-larvard College is to receive $5,000 for the astronomical observatory connected with that institution, from the estate of the late Thomas G. Appleton. The Yale Corporation has voted to accept $50,000 from the Frederick Marquand fund for a chapel for the use of the Coliege Youn~ Mens Christian Association. Knox College is to receive about $60,000 from the estate of the late H. II. hitchcock, of Galesburg, Ill. Mrs. Oswald Ottendorfer, of New York, bequeathed 50,000 for a Ger- man teachers seminary in Milwaukee. lion. John R. Bodwell, of Hallowell, Me., gives $1,000 toward the new building for Industrial School for Girls in that city. Persons d~sirous to kelp where kelp is most needed, to help where it will (10 most to promote national prosperity and true religion, may well con- .nder the question of emdo?ments fr the educational institutions qf the A. jlJJ A. ____________ GENERAL NOTES AFRICA. The two brothers Denhardt, already known by their previous explo- rations, are preparing an expedition to the Dana, which they will reas- cend to reach Kenia. Th~ Universities Mission has constructed for the eastern side of Nyassa a steamer which will bear the name of Charles Janson, a mission- ary recently deceased. Messrs. Taylor and Jacques, missionaries at Saint Louis, have made in the Onalo, inhabited by emigrants and the Wolofs mussulmen, a jour- ney of exploration with a view to the extension of their field of activity. The French Consul at Tangier has interdicted his French subjects, and the mussulmen placed under his protection, from buying, selling or possessing the slaves of the Maroc. His example has been followed by the representatives of other powers. General Bacouch, a great proprietor in Tunis, encourages, in a do- main of many thousands of acres, the cnltivation of a plant imported -from Java, which may replace the cotton of America. Messrs. Lindi~er and Von der Broock, in the service of the International

General Notes Editorial 168-171

168 General Notes. rrhe New York University is to receive $5,000 from the estate of the late Augustus Schell, and the New York Historical Society $5,000. Mrs. Louisa L. Vought, besides other gifts to the Protestant Episcopal Church, left $10,000 for work among the colored people South, and $1,000 for the Indians. 1-larvard College is to receive $5,000 for the astronomical observatory connected with that institution, from the estate of the late Thomas G. Appleton. The Yale Corporation has voted to accept $50,000 from the Frederick Marquand fund for a chapel for the use of the Coliege Youn~ Mens Christian Association. Knox College is to receive about $60,000 from the estate of the late H. II. hitchcock, of Galesburg, Ill. Mrs. Oswald Ottendorfer, of New York, bequeathed 50,000 for a Ger- man teachers seminary in Milwaukee. lion. John R. Bodwell, of Hallowell, Me., gives $1,000 toward the new building for Industrial School for Girls in that city. Persons d~sirous to kelp where kelp is most needed, to help where it will (10 most to promote national prosperity and true religion, may well con- .nder the question of emdo?ments fr the educational institutions qf the A. jlJJ A. ____________ GENERAL NOTES AFRICA. The two brothers Denhardt, already known by their previous explo- rations, are preparing an expedition to the Dana, which they will reas- cend to reach Kenia. Th~ Universities Mission has constructed for the eastern side of Nyassa a steamer which will bear the name of Charles Janson, a mission- ary recently deceased. Messrs. Taylor and Jacques, missionaries at Saint Louis, have made in the Onalo, inhabited by emigrants and the Wolofs mussulmen, a jour- ney of exploration with a view to the extension of their field of activity. The French Consul at Tangier has interdicted his French subjects, and the mussulmen placed under his protection, from buying, selling or possessing the slaves of the Maroc. His example has been followed by the representatives of other powers. General Bacouch, a great proprietor in Tunis, encourages, in a do- main of many thousands of acres, the cnltivation of a plant imported -from Java, which may replace the cotton of America. Messrs. Lindi~er and Von der Broock, in the service of the International (Jeneral Notes. 169 African Association, have set out from Zanzibar for the Congo, taking with them 200 negroes to replace those whose term of engagement has expired. According to the Natal ilfEercantile Advertiser, the Germaji Govern- ment has charged M. A. Schultz, of Durban, with making an exploration with a view to establishing a series of commercial statims as far as Zam- beze and the Congo. He will be accompanied by a surveyor and a geologist. --M. Lagarde has been charged with proceeding to the limits of the Territory of Obock, in connection with M. Connean, Commander of the int~rnet. This same ship carries out the members of a scietitific mission sent to the Choa. It bears presents to King iXEndik. James Roxburgh, the engineer appointed to accompany the sections ot the steamer Bonne Nouvelle, has announced to the London Missionary Society his safe arrival at Liendw6 upon the borders of Tanganyika. the place designed to launch the vessel. He met there Capt. lore and Mr. Swan, who will immediately commence the reconstruction of the boat. Major Machado, who has been at Pretoiia with Portuguese engineers to make the plan of the railroad upon the Territory of Transvaal, has received orders from Lisbon to proceed to Lorenzo-Marquez to confer with the engineers sent by the Portuguese Government, to the end that they may commence the work from the Bay of iDelogoa to the frontier of Transvaal. The Bulletin of Colonial inquiry announces that ten army surgeons from Africa have formed an association for the establishment of French colonies in the district of Saida, 171 kilometers to the south of Oran. Each shareholder will furnish a capital of 6,000 francs, and the society will be conducted in an economical manner, but with the best conditions for starting. According to the Arab journal iVoussret, the Negous has ordered the Governor of Axoum to hold ready provisions, and beasts of burden, as also ammunition, so that they may have means of passage with the army to the coast to take possession of the territories which Egypt has laid open to them. THE CHINESE. The Bapti8t Chinese Mission, Portland, Oregon, has over two hundred Chinese connected with it, several of whom are women and children. Seventy different Chinese have been connected with the school at Santa Cruz, Cal. Five of the pupils have been baptized and received to the Congregational Church. Two more will soon be baptized. This little company of Chinese Christians is full of life, of prayer and of eager libei- ality. About forty Chinamen are under instruction in Philadelphia in connec 170 General Notes. tion with the Sunday Schools of the Episcopal Church. They have under- taken to send thirty dollars annually to endow a bed in the hospital at Wuchang, China. The Chinese Young Mens Christian Association in Oakland, Cal., co-operates in preparing converted Chinamen for church membership~ Converts in the Sunday-schools are referred to the officers of the Asso- ciation, who are themselves Chinamen. After six months probation the candidates are brought before the Church Committee by the Y. M. C. A. and the officers of the Sunday-school, and, if report is favorable, they are received into the Church. As to the yellow races, says the Spectator, who ought to be just lazier than Europeans, they beat them altogether. We su opose there are indolent Chinese, but the immense majority of that vast people have an unparalleled power of work, care nothing about hours, and, so long as they are paid, will go on with a dogged steady persistence in toil for six- teen hours a day such as no European can rival. No English ship-carpen- ter will work like a Chinese, no laundress will wash as many clothes, and a Chinese compositor would be very soon expelled for over-toil by an En- glish chapel of the trade. THE INDIANS. At some points the Government has issued to Indians what are called scholars rations, in order to assure school attendance, accompanying teaching with gifts of loaves and fishes almost literally. Agent Miles, of the Osage Indians has secured the passage of a law cutting off annuities from all Osage children between seven and fourteen~ who do not attend school. These Indians have a Congress of their own. The Indian children of Forest Grove, Oregon, publish a paper edited by themselves, called The Indian Citizen. It is in the intere~t of the Forest Grove school. The Presbyterians commenced their work in Kansas by the establish- ment of a Mission among the Indians. They now have 300 churches in that state. The Indian boys at the Hampton Institute have a debating society for the purpose of encouraging each other in speaking English. The topic for the first night, over which two exercised their powers in the new language was, Shall we allow the white men in our reservation ? There is also a debating society among the girls in Winona Lodge. A Canadian Indian was recently seized by a party of masked Amen- cans and hanged within the borders of the Dominion, in British Columbia, and the matter having come to the ears of the Government at Ottawa the question has been considered, and satisfaction is to be demanded of the United States Government. The Indians. 171 TilE IiNDIAiN~. I3ERTHOLD, DAKOTA - ERRITORY. THE DAKOTA INDIANS. it was my rare good fortune last summer to spend nearly a month in a trip of investigation among the Dakota Indians. A record of observations thus made may perhaps be of interest. Across the Missouri, in Northern Nebraska, is a reservation about twelve miles square on which are located the Santees. These Indians came originally from Minnesota, and were concerned in the terrible New Ulm massacre there. This was years ago. After that bloody outbreak a large number of Indians were im- prisoned. While thus incarcerated they were deeply moved by the truths of religion. The long and faithful labors of Drs. Riggs and Williamson bore fruit, and very many were truly converted. These Minnesota Indians were subsequently removed, a portion to the Sisseton Agency, a portion to Flandreau, and a portion to the Santee Agency. At this last-named spot the Indians are practically civil- ized. They wear the white mans dress; they cultivate farms of their own; they sustain two churches, one Episcopal and one Congregational, the latter having its excellent native pastor and an outlying chapel where the native deacons conduct meetings in turn; they have recently, to the number of fifty, taken up land under the homestead laws and now own them in fee simple. There are three boarding chools on the reservation, one sustained by the American Missionary Association and in the charge of the Rev. A. L. Riggs, another sustained by the Episcopalians, Sr 5EV. ADDISON P. POSTEE. INDIAN FAMILY AT FORT

Rev. Addison P. Foster Foster, Addison P., Rev. The Dakota Indians The Indians 171-181

The Indians. 171 TilE IiNDIAiN~. I3ERTHOLD, DAKOTA - ERRITORY. THE DAKOTA INDIANS. it was my rare good fortune last summer to spend nearly a month in a trip of investigation among the Dakota Indians. A record of observations thus made may perhaps be of interest. Across the Missouri, in Northern Nebraska, is a reservation about twelve miles square on which are located the Santees. These Indians came originally from Minnesota, and were concerned in the terrible New Ulm massacre there. This was years ago. After that bloody outbreak a large number of Indians were im- prisoned. While thus incarcerated they were deeply moved by the truths of religion. The long and faithful labors of Drs. Riggs and Williamson bore fruit, and very many were truly converted. These Minnesota Indians were subsequently removed, a portion to the Sisseton Agency, a portion to Flandreau, and a portion to the Santee Agency. At this last-named spot the Indians are practically civil- ized. They wear the white mans dress; they cultivate farms of their own; they sustain two churches, one Episcopal and one Congregational, the latter having its excellent native pastor and an outlying chapel where the native deacons conduct meetings in turn; they have recently, to the number of fifty, taken up land under the homestead laws and now own them in fee simple. There are three boarding chools on the reservation, one sustained by the American Missionary Association and in the charge of the Rev. A. L. Riggs, another sustained by the Episcopalians, Sr 5EV. ADDISON P. POSTEE. INDIAN FAMILY AT FORT I7 The Indians. under the urisdiction of Bishop Hare, and a third snpported by the Govern- ment, of which Rev. Charles Seccombe, a Congregationalist, is principal. The work in all these schools is admirable. The children r~ neat, intelligent, at- tractive, orderly, and studious, and while not as far advanced nor as qnick, will compare f- vorably with the child- ren of schools among white people. The development of Indian character under tbese Christianizing influences was remar ably shown in a visit to one of the cottages on the mission. Here dw dl one of t~e native teachers, her mother and grandmother. The aged grandmother in her whole appearance bespoke the wild Indian. Gray and bent with age, she loved best to sit on the floor in a corner, after the fashion f her people. The mother, a comely matron of perhaps forty-five, was evi- dently,. more cultivated, was lady-like ~- z in her appearance, and had lines of thoughtfulness on her thin face. The work of civilization had made great advance in her. But the daughter, a 0 young lady of eighteen, well educated, knowing only the ways of civilization, o was as thoroughly refined and bright and attractive as the young ladies of our own Christian homes. At Oahe, fifteen miles west of Pierre, Dakota Territory, is a second mission station, under 1 charge of the Ameri- can Missionary Association. Up and down the river, on what is known as the Peoria Bottom, are perhaps a hundred families of Indians, each living on their own homesteads, off reservation limits, cultivating their farms, dwelling in comfortable log-houses, dressed in civil- ized garb and showing as much neat- ness and industry as the average white man. These people are recognized as citizens and are voters. They have a neat chapel, a native pastor, sustain admirable prayer~meeting5a womans prayer-meeting among themand live good reputable lives. In this spot and at Santee Agency the Indian is seen at like Indians. 173 his best. Life and property are respected, the land is fairly tilled, the homes are happy, intelligence is general, and religion is the universal motive-power. On the west side of the Missouri in Dakota lies the great Sioux Reservation, containing 8,000 Indians at the Pine Ridge Agency, nearly 8,000 at the Rosebud Agency, 1,500 of the Lower Brul6 Indians, 3,000 along the Cheyenne River and northward, and nearly 4,000 on the Standing Rock Agency. It was my fortune to visit a number of villages on the Cheyenne, Morrow, and Grand Rivers and at Standing Rock. The Indians at these places are all wildthat is, still wear blankets, breech-cloths, and leggings, feathers and geegaws, do little toward cultivating the land, and are ignorant heathen. A Sabbath in a village on the Cheyenne showed what wild indians were. The morning opened with two men disguised in buffalo-skins with the heads on, running through the village. They had had a dream, were supposed to be possessed of spirits, and as they chased the villagers all ran from them, aifrighted lest some witchcraft be wrought by them. Presently the church-bell rang at the missionarys tent, and fifty Indians came in, gandy in paints and wampum, ornaments, and dangling queues tied up with mink-skins, the chief wearing a broken-down beaver hat with a faded weed upon it, and the rest supplied with fans of eagles wings, pipes, and other accompani- ments of Indian gentlemen. They listened with occasional grunts of approval during worship, and filed out at the close with a cordial handshake, one remain- ing, named from his height Touch-the-Clouds, to say that he felt the importance of this new way, and that he wished for himself and his people schools and churches. This was encouraging, but as the evening came on there set up a hideous noise; a dance was in progress, and all night long a relay of three Indians kept up the hideous and monotonous tom-tom of their kettle-drums, while the shrill scream of the women pierced the air. WIGWAMS AMONG THE SIOUX. 174 The Indians. The next morning were things equally painful. A young Indian woman, with four children to care for, put away by her cruel husband for another wife, came to beg the missionarys influence to secure for her Government rations. A tent hard by was visited, where the family, in accordance with Indian superstitions, were gathering, and had been for a year or two, all sorts of valuable articles for presents in Lonor of some deceased member of the household, intending by-and-by to distribute all these things, leaving themselves beggared. And last of all, in a neighboring village were seen three men and a boy. clad with a few feathers in their hair, and yellow ochre on their bodies, going through mummeries in the sight of a large company. They were making mystery, whatever that may be. At Standing Rock were Sitting Bull and Chief Gall, with th4r bands. Not many years ago they had been on the war path; they were concerned in the Custer massacre ; but now they are in wholesome awe of the Government and dependent on overnment favor for daily bread. Consequently they are orderly and peace- able, and though a few years since it would have been dangerous for three unarmed men to pass through their reservations, it was perfectly safe last summer INDIAN GIRLS AT SANTEE NORMAL TRAINING SCHOOL. The Indians. for a missionary speaking the Indian language and his friench. A third class of Jndian~ was found at Fort Berthold. This reserva- tion is a hundred miles north of Bismarek, Da- kota Territory, on th east side of the Missouri. There are three small tribes combined in one large village for protec- tion against their ancient enemies the Sioux, name- ly, the Arickarees, the Maudans, and the Grcs Ventres. These ~Jndians have latterly made great advances in civilization. They have 800 acres un- dEr cultivation, all look- ing admirably and well fenced in, and they are taking great pride in their work and asking for more land to culti- vate. They have com- fortable homes, or lodges, as they are called, made in an octagonal form, of logs completely covered with earth. They are eagerly obtaining from the Government such comforts of civilization as they canreapers, cooking-stoves, baking-powder, and the like. And yet this people display some of the grossest elements of savagery. Polygamy is common. The disgusting scaffold burials still go on, and the air in the nei,hborhood of the village is sometimes foul from the adjacent cemetery. Buffalo heads and poles with red streamers, as offerings or invo~ations to spirits, surmount many of the lodges and bear witness to the heathenism of the people. Many of the men are terribly scarred on the shoulders, breast and arms with the cruel practices of the sun dance. Men and women alike wear the dress of their sava,.~e life. There has been as yet little success from schools or church work. Few care for schools, and the attendance at the mission chapel is not large. The fault, however, is not with the devoted missionaries, Rev. C. L. Hall and his helpers of the American Missionary Association, whose faithfulness is unsur- passed, but with b~ d white men who visit the village. For years these Indians have been brought in contact with some of the worst influences of civilization, and in consequence the women have become gross, the men have lost their sense of honor, and the people are manifestly more degraded and harder to reach than the wild Indians on the Sioux Reservation. After observation of these three types of Indians, the Christianized, the wild and the polluted, certain conclusions were inevita bie. 1. There is a natural nobility in the Indian character. The Indian is debased by heathenism and his wild life, lazy, improvident, filthy, obscene and cruel; .~nd INvmAIN IN INAilVb DRESS. FORT nERTHOLD. 176 The Indians yet he is well endowed by nature with brains and heart and conscience. He is clear-headed a n d generous; he is often af- fectionate in his fam- ily; he is civil capable of war. be corning 2. There,. industrious, as elsewhere, conscientious, the gospel scholarly, an~ proves the most thoroughly conse- efficient instrumen crated. If his wild tality. The United States life has affected him un- Coverument is doing a favorably, it has I~D1AN WOMAN Ai~ (~! iFErHOID noble work for not done him the the elevation of INI)IAN LODGE AT FORT I3ERTHOLD. same kind of harm that slavery has to the col- ored man. He is not crushed in spirit and ambition as was the colored slave at the time of the The Indians. 177 SANTEE INDIANS TEN YEARS AGO. the race by introducing the agencies of civilization. The Indian agents in Dakota are, as a rule, noble men, vieing pith the missionaries in endeavors to benefit the race. The Board of Indian Commissioners are deserving of all praise for their great services. The present system of Government management in establishing schools, in encouraging agriculture, in discountenancing savage practices, in stimulating the home-life, is most admirable. But Christian efforts are yet more, efficacious. It is where the gospel has sway the longest, or has been the chief influence, that the Indians are the most elevated. 3. It cannot be questioned tba~ we have come to a new stage in Indian affairs. A last there is throughout the country almost COli plete control of the wild Indians. The day of Indian wars is over. We may very likely never have another. Now that the buffalo has largely disappeared, the Indian is dependent on the Government supplies for food and clothing, unless, like the white man, he resorts to agriculture. In consequence, without any large display of military force, the Indian agents are able to preserve excellent order on the reservations. The Indians feel their dependence and recognize the power of the Government. If fairly treated by the white man they will give us little trouble hereafter. It is easy to see that modifications in their condition, all looking toward civilization, are constantly taking place. They are giving up their Indian dress. It is now rare to find an Indian whose dress is not in some way conformed to the white 1178 The Indians. mans. They are learning the ccmforts of civilization through the supplies from Go eminent, and welcome the frame house, the sugar and syrup, the flour and beans, the tools and clothing which come to them from this source. They feel the pressure of the white population crowding upon them from every side. T hey see their wild life is a thing of the past, and while there are selfish, vicious, su per stitious and conservative influences strongly at work against the change, still the chan~e goes on. Their more thoughtful men, perceiving the necessity of the change and recognizing its ad -antage. are urging the establishment of schools a nd churches among them. There can be little doubt that as these proces ses continue the tribal relation will eventually cease, the reservation system will be abandoned, the Indian will come under ordinary laws, he will be assigned land in severalty, will cultivate it for his support, and become a citizen. Already this is. true of many Indians, and the day is not far distantI venture to prophesy that it is within the next twenty years when, if th se in- the Indian till ly absorbed white that as arate he will be lost to sight, and the Indian question will be a question n 0 more. A word now in explanation of the illustrations ac- companying thi article. An Indian chief is prominent in the first cut. His son is on horseback beside him. His wives and younger children are seat- ~d on the ground. The in- fluence of civilization already appears in the dress of these people and in their use of cattle. The second cut represents a small portion of the large burying-ground at Fort Berthold. The wigwams in the third cut are mostly of skin, but generally can- vas furnished by the Gov- INDIAN IN NATIVE DRESS, FORT BERTHOLD. eminent is now used. The arrange ment of poles and the desolate appearance of the tents scattered here and there are true to life. In the sixth cut the heavy earrings and necklace are of wampum and very valuable. The dress, while cut in Indian fashion, is, like nearly all that the Indians now wear, furnished by the Government. The Indian in the fifth cut wears his hair long and tied up in two queues, with mink-skin pendants. His constant companion, a pipe of red pipe-clay, is in his lap. The lodge in the seventh cut admirably represents the peculiar homes of Fort Berthold Indians. The Indians. 179 INDIAN BOYS AT SANTEE NORMAL TRAINING SCHoOL It is very large, and sometimes divided into several rooms inside. It is well constructed as a protection againt the severe winters of Northern Dakota. On the top of the lodge an Indian is standing. For many years the Indians of Fort Berthold have been accustomed thus to look out across I he Missouri. on the watch, lest their ancient enemies, the Sioux, steal upon them unaware. Beside the Indian may be seen the wicker framcwurk of a bull boator, skin coracle. 180 The Indians. DAUGHTERS OF INDIAN CHIEF POOR WOLF. The Indians can seize these in a moment, run with them on their heads to the river, and paddle across the Missouri with ease after a deer or a buffalo. In the foreground is a travoir, or Indian wagon, made of two poles with a pouch of leather thongs slung between them. A pony rather than a dog ordinarily drags this. Another cut represents the Santee Indian as he was a few years ago. He now lives in a comfortable log-house, or often in a frame house given him by the Government. In the last cut are very good likenesses of two girls who are now at the Normal jfraining School sustained by the American Missionary Associates at Santee. They are pure-blooded Indians. Their father is a chief at Fort Berthold, who has turned Vfrom his wild life to become a regular attendant at church and a thoughtful imitator of the white mans ways. Two other cuts represent groups of school-children at Santee, all Indians. The artist has not exaggerated the bright and attractive look upon their faces. They come from all parts of Dakota and the Santee Reservation. In the ninth cut is represented an Indian who, with a white luaus shirt, retains his native leggings, blanket, necklace and tomahawk. Porty-Ji?e Years in Washington Territory. 181 FORTY-FIVE YEARS IN WASHINGTON TERRITORY. REV. CUSHING RELLS, D.D. From August. 1838, to Sept., 1833, a period of more than 45 consecutive years, I was a resident of what is now Oregon and Washington Territory. I spent the greater part of those years in what is included in Washington Territory. I was employed during the first ten years in mission w3rk under the patronage of the American Board in behalf of the Spokane Indians. The massacre of Marcus Whitman, M.D., and others in the Walla Walla Valley, Nov., 1847, was followed by war which necessitated the removal in 1848 of all Protestants from the mission field east of the Cascade Mountains. By military proclamation, June, 1348, the country named was declared closed against mission- aries. It remained thus eleven years. Jane, 1859, by military proclamation, the Walla Walla country was declared open for settlement. In July of that year I, as agent of the. A. B. C. F. M., xvent to Walla Walla to look after their interests. Standing beside the grave of the distinguished patriot and martyr, Dr. Whitman, I purposed to attempt the erection of a monument to his memory in the form of a school of high Christian character. Tne following Spring, 1860, I commenced work in ftJfihlment of the plan named. Daring the next 12 years the execution of that plan was with me all-controlling. In pursu- ance of said object I recently returned to my native New England. During my sojourn in Walla Walla from 18~0 to 1872 1 was favored with oppor- tunities for the measurable prosecution of evangelistic work among the Spokane Indians. In May, 1872, my house at the place formerly occupied by Dr. Whitman was consumed by fire. My elder son had previously been nominated by the American Missionary Asso- ciation as Indian agent and confirmed by Government. Previous to his taking charge the Lords day had been distinguished for the performance of outlandish wickedness. With the new agent there was change of employ~s. A weekly prayer meeting was appointed and conducted. With a good degree of constancy it has been continued to the present time. A Sunday-school was organized. It is continued with sustained interest. Soon after the burning of my house in Walla Walla, Agent Eells hastened thither and took his mother to his home. Early the following autumn I joined dear ones at Skokomish. A new departure was named. In pursuance thereof, with the interpreter, a devout Indian, I conducted divine service at the Indian village. It was continued with gratifying results. In July, 1874, a church composed of whites and Indians was organized. I was chosen pastor. About that time my younger son, Rev. Myron Eells, arrived at Skokomish, with the intention of making a brief stop. To me my early Indian charge, the Spokanes, together with the sparse white settlements in the vicinity, were attractive. I resigned the charge at Skokomish. It wascommitte d to Rev. M. Eells. The seed of tbe word cast among Spokane Indians did not spring up quickly. It had slow growth, but a rich harvest has been gathered. But I may not enlarge. From my experience and observation the so-calb~d peace policy, when fairly tested, is a success. Connected therewith the ideas and workof the A. M. A. are specially applicable to efforts for the elevation of the Indian. In my judg- ment the vexed Indian problem may thereby be solved*solved to the mutual profit of our Government and the Indian.

Rev. Cushing Eells, D.D. Eells, Cushing, Rev., D.D. Forty-five Years in Washington Territory The Indians 181-182

Porty-Ji?e Years in Washington Territory. 181 FORTY-FIVE YEARS IN WASHINGTON TERRITORY. REV. CUSHING RELLS, D.D. From August. 1838, to Sept., 1833, a period of more than 45 consecutive years, I was a resident of what is now Oregon and Washington Territory. I spent the greater part of those years in what is included in Washington Territory. I was employed during the first ten years in mission w3rk under the patronage of the American Board in behalf of the Spokane Indians. The massacre of Marcus Whitman, M.D., and others in the Walla Walla Valley, Nov., 1847, was followed by war which necessitated the removal in 1848 of all Protestants from the mission field east of the Cascade Mountains. By military proclamation, June, 1348, the country named was declared closed against mission- aries. It remained thus eleven years. Jane, 1859, by military proclamation, the Walla Walla country was declared open for settlement. In July of that year I, as agent of the. A. B. C. F. M., xvent to Walla Walla to look after their interests. Standing beside the grave of the distinguished patriot and martyr, Dr. Whitman, I purposed to attempt the erection of a monument to his memory in the form of a school of high Christian character. Tne following Spring, 1860, I commenced work in ftJfihlment of the plan named. Daring the next 12 years the execution of that plan was with me all-controlling. In pursu- ance of said object I recently returned to my native New England. During my sojourn in Walla Walla from 18~0 to 1872 1 was favored with oppor- tunities for the measurable prosecution of evangelistic work among the Spokane Indians. In May, 1872, my house at the place formerly occupied by Dr. Whitman was consumed by fire. My elder son had previously been nominated by the American Missionary Asso- ciation as Indian agent and confirmed by Government. Previous to his taking charge the Lords day had been distinguished for the performance of outlandish wickedness. With the new agent there was change of employ~s. A weekly prayer meeting was appointed and conducted. With a good degree of constancy it has been continued to the present time. A Sunday-school was organized. It is continued with sustained interest. Soon after the burning of my house in Walla Walla, Agent Eells hastened thither and took his mother to his home. Early the following autumn I joined dear ones at Skokomish. A new departure was named. In pursuance thereof, with the interpreter, a devout Indian, I conducted divine service at the Indian village. It was continued with gratifying results. In July, 1874, a church composed of whites and Indians was organized. I was chosen pastor. About that time my younger son, Rev. Myron Eells, arrived at Skokomish, with the intention of making a brief stop. To me my early Indian charge, the Spokanes, together with the sparse white settlements in the vicinity, were attractive. I resigned the charge at Skokomish. It wascommitte d to Rev. M. Eells. The seed of tbe word cast among Spokane Indians did not spring up quickly. It had slow growth, but a rich harvest has been gathered. But I may not enlarge. From my experience and observation the so-calb~d peace policy, when fairly tested, is a success. Connected therewith the ideas and workof the A. M. A. are specially applicable to efforts for the elevation of the Indian. In my judg- ment the vexed Indian problem may thereby be solved*solved to the mutual profit of our Government and the Indian. 182 The Chinese. TilE Ci-IliNESE. LETTER FROM OAKLAND, CAL. BY REV. GRO. MOQAR, D. D. There is little more for me to do in noting down my observation of the work of A. M. A. among the Chinese here than to indorse the statements made by the Rev. Dr. McLean in the Apri] number of this magazine. As far as the school work for the Chinese in the English language is concerned, the honor of beginning it belongs, I think, to Mrs. Elizabeth L. Lynde, now deceased, a member of the First Congregational Church in this city at the time. Her heart, which was sin- gularly alert in behalf of the neglected and unfortunate, set her in the year 1867 to teaching two or three Chinese at her house. These were servants in fam~1ies. Meantime the boy employed in my own housesince favorably known as our chief helper in missionary work, Jee Gainwas spelling out, by the aid of my little girls and their mother, the mysteries of our English language, and little by little learning the great mystery of godliness. Interest deepened in the two or three who were thus drawn together. So. Mrs. Lyndes little class was trans- ferred to our chapel, and soon became a prominent and hopeful department of our Sunday-school. It was a rare pleasure given me to receive, in 1870, the first three Chinamen known as admitted to membership by confession of faith in an English-speaking church in this land. For several years I had the opportunity of. direct participation in this new mis- sionary movement, often taking my place as teacher of the n~w alphabet and guide to the pronunciation of many unphonetic words. At first there was novelty about it and it was comparatively easy to obtain even the numerous teachers which this work requires. But as the novelty wore off it became more difficult to find and keep volunteers in sufficient numbers. Besides, a demand arose for more than the hour of the Sunday-school service. The eagerness to learn and the in- creasing acquisilion of some called for a more constant and continuous drill. So has come about the system of schools carried on, under the American Missionary~ Associations appropriations and our California gifts, by the Cabfornia Chinese Mission.~~ I bear glad witness to the large measure of devotion with which this work has been conducted. It is precisely the kind of work to bring out the best qualities of Christian character in those who are responsibly engaged in it. The motives for engaging in it drawn from any other than the purest Christian fountains are few indeed. The men and women, who, within my knowledge, have given their time and heart to it, have long been among my evidences of Christianity. To the poor the Gospel has been preached by them. Several of those most interested during the early years, as superintendents or teachers, have been laid aside or have gone home. But there can be no doubt that the Master has said to them, In- asmuch as ye did it unto the least of my disciples, ye have done it unto me. For this is pre-eminently the work which makes its appeal to the few. To sus- tain it pecuniarily as well as otherwise, must pertain to those who give, hoping for nothing in kind again. Those here who would give, perhaps, to help Africans on the Congo, cannot always be appealed to in behalf of this cause. A worthy Chris- tian friend who has charge of a Sunday-school consulted me about a gift he was interesting his scholars to make to some missionary. Whom could I suggest? It was natural, being on this Pacific sea, to suggest a laborer in northern China. It

Rev. Geo. Mooar, D.D. Mooar, Geo., Rev., D.D. Letter from Oakland, Cal The Chinese 182-183

182 The Chinese. TilE Ci-IliNESE. LETTER FROM OAKLAND, CAL. BY REV. GRO. MOQAR, D. D. There is little more for me to do in noting down my observation of the work of A. M. A. among the Chinese here than to indorse the statements made by the Rev. Dr. McLean in the Apri] number of this magazine. As far as the school work for the Chinese in the English language is concerned, the honor of beginning it belongs, I think, to Mrs. Elizabeth L. Lynde, now deceased, a member of the First Congregational Church in this city at the time. Her heart, which was sin- gularly alert in behalf of the neglected and unfortunate, set her in the year 1867 to teaching two or three Chinese at her house. These were servants in fam~1ies. Meantime the boy employed in my own housesince favorably known as our chief helper in missionary work, Jee Gainwas spelling out, by the aid of my little girls and their mother, the mysteries of our English language, and little by little learning the great mystery of godliness. Interest deepened in the two or three who were thus drawn together. So. Mrs. Lyndes little class was trans- ferred to our chapel, and soon became a prominent and hopeful department of our Sunday-school. It was a rare pleasure given me to receive, in 1870, the first three Chinamen known as admitted to membership by confession of faith in an English-speaking church in this land. For several years I had the opportunity of. direct participation in this new mis- sionary movement, often taking my place as teacher of the n~w alphabet and guide to the pronunciation of many unphonetic words. At first there was novelty about it and it was comparatively easy to obtain even the numerous teachers which this work requires. But as the novelty wore off it became more difficult to find and keep volunteers in sufficient numbers. Besides, a demand arose for more than the hour of the Sunday-school service. The eagerness to learn and the in- creasing acquisilion of some called for a more constant and continuous drill. So has come about the system of schools carried on, under the American Missionary~ Associations appropriations and our California gifts, by the Cabfornia Chinese Mission.~~ I bear glad witness to the large measure of devotion with which this work has been conducted. It is precisely the kind of work to bring out the best qualities of Christian character in those who are responsibly engaged in it. The motives for engaging in it drawn from any other than the purest Christian fountains are few indeed. The men and women, who, within my knowledge, have given their time and heart to it, have long been among my evidences of Christianity. To the poor the Gospel has been preached by them. Several of those most interested during the early years, as superintendents or teachers, have been laid aside or have gone home. But there can be no doubt that the Master has said to them, In- asmuch as ye did it unto the least of my disciples, ye have done it unto me. For this is pre-eminently the work which makes its appeal to the few. To sus- tain it pecuniarily as well as otherwise, must pertain to those who give, hoping for nothing in kind again. Those here who would give, perhaps, to help Africans on the Congo, cannot always be appealed to in behalf of this cause. A worthy Chris- tian friend who has charge of a Sunday-school consulted me about a gift he was interesting his scholars to make to some missionary. Whom could I suggest? It was natural, being on this Pacific sea, to suggest a laborer in northern China. It Bureau of Womans Work. 183 was amusing to see how quickly he dropped my suggestion as if it were something very hot. Why, it would not do at all to mention China in that school. It would kill his darling missionary proposition completely. This illustrates not by any means a universal feeling here, but a feeling which is quite too prevalent. And there are many who would help to teach the Mongolians if they were to be taugh where they belong, who would be almost offended to be asked to help in their edu- cation here. So all the more admirable, in the face of public sentiment here, is it that so many noble workers and givers have been found to sustain this work. For is not this, of all others, the enterprise which takes the gold right out of the country ? I overheard an intelligent gentleman, a member of Congress, and born in my native Massachusetts, express the duly considered opinion that the Chinese mind is so organized that it cannot be expected to entertain the Christian ideas. It illustrated the sad fact that it takes a long time for even Americans to entertain and be molded by those ideas. This gentleman might easily have found scores of humble servants and laborers of this unassimilable race in his own city who had come as truly in the power of Him, who is the Truth, as any of us. For it is the testimony of all who are acquainted with the facts that as large a proportion of those Chinese who take the Christian name adorn the doctrine as do those who take that name from among the Caucasian families. Indeed, the proportion may, perhaps, be larger. For what can ordinarily induce a Chinaman to espouse the Christian standing here unless it be the genuine appreciation of Christian truth and the response of his heart to the love of God as shown in the cross of Christ? BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. MISS D. E. EMERSnN, SECRETARY. Our readers will recall an article issued in this department of the April Missionary entitled A Plan with Reasons. We are happy to report that a good many cheering words in approval of the plan have reached us, and not a few of a practical character. We select from the latter the following FROM NEW YORK. I have received a delightful letter from our teacher at the Santee Agency, and our Committee are much pleased with her account of her work. I have directed our Treasurer to send to your A. M. A. Treasurer the first quarterly payment on account of the $150 appropriated, and trust it will reach you in due season. Our payments will be made hereafter May 1, Aug. 1 and Nov. 1, as we are dependent on our weekly collections, and hence cannot pay oftener than quarterly. Inclosed find $40 for two shares in support of a missionary teacher, from whom we may receive a monthly letter. FROM MASSAcHUSETTS. Inclosed please find $20. Our Ladies Benevolent Society wish to take one share in the expense of a lady missionary teacher, from whom we shall enjoy letters, hoping in this way to call out more interest in the work. A recent circular from you was read to our ladies by our pastors wife, to whom it was sent. We have no separate organization for the Am. Miss. Assoc.

Letter from the Secretary Bureau of Woman's Work 183-184

Bureau of Womans Work. 183 was amusing to see how quickly he dropped my suggestion as if it were something very hot. Why, it would not do at all to mention China in that school. It would kill his darling missionary proposition completely. This illustrates not by any means a universal feeling here, but a feeling which is quite too prevalent. And there are many who would help to teach the Mongolians if they were to be taugh where they belong, who would be almost offended to be asked to help in their edu- cation here. So all the more admirable, in the face of public sentiment here, is it that so many noble workers and givers have been found to sustain this work. For is not this, of all others, the enterprise which takes the gold right out of the country ? I overheard an intelligent gentleman, a member of Congress, and born in my native Massachusetts, express the duly considered opinion that the Chinese mind is so organized that it cannot be expected to entertain the Christian ideas. It illustrated the sad fact that it takes a long time for even Americans to entertain and be molded by those ideas. This gentleman might easily have found scores of humble servants and laborers of this unassimilable race in his own city who had come as truly in the power of Him, who is the Truth, as any of us. For it is the testimony of all who are acquainted with the facts that as large a proportion of those Chinese who take the Christian name adorn the doctrine as do those who take that name from among the Caucasian families. Indeed, the proportion may, perhaps, be larger. For what can ordinarily induce a Chinaman to espouse the Christian standing here unless it be the genuine appreciation of Christian truth and the response of his heart to the love of God as shown in the cross of Christ? BUREAU OF WOMANS WORK. MISS D. E. EMERSnN, SECRETARY. Our readers will recall an article issued in this department of the April Missionary entitled A Plan with Reasons. We are happy to report that a good many cheering words in approval of the plan have reached us, and not a few of a practical character. We select from the latter the following FROM NEW YORK. I have received a delightful letter from our teacher at the Santee Agency, and our Committee are much pleased with her account of her work. I have directed our Treasurer to send to your A. M. A. Treasurer the first quarterly payment on account of the $150 appropriated, and trust it will reach you in due season. Our payments will be made hereafter May 1, Aug. 1 and Nov. 1, as we are dependent on our weekly collections, and hence cannot pay oftener than quarterly. Inclosed find $40 for two shares in support of a missionary teacher, from whom we may receive a monthly letter. FROM MASSAcHUSETTS. Inclosed please find $20. Our Ladies Benevolent Society wish to take one share in the expense of a lady missionary teacher, from whom we shall enjoy letters, hoping in this way to call out more interest in the work. A recent circular from you was read to our ladies by our pastors wife, to whom it was sent. We have no separate organization for the Am. Miss. Assoc. 184 Alabama Womans Miss. Association. but our ladies contribute something to its fundsthough probably not enough to take a full share in the support of a teacher. Encouraged by what you say in the circular, we write to ask that we may be included in the list of those to whom monthly letters will be sent, as promised to those who take one or more shares. We are small and few, but the interest is genuine, and we want to increase it.. Our contribution goes into the general fund. FROM MINNESOTA. Last week, on a very stormy day, with less than twenty ladies present, the subject of taking shares in the support of a missionary teacher was introduced, and a little over $40 pledged, to be paid before October. I felt very much encour- aged, and shall do all I can to increase the amount, though I am too much of a strangerhaving been here but a yearto have any idea what we can raise. You promised us letters from our missionary if we took but one of the $20 shares; so we shall hope to receive them. After another month I hope to send you word about a much larger pledge. Ours is a country church, laboring under the disadvantage of constant deple- tion of our younger members; the twin cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis are close by, and our broad frontier also attracts strongly. Last year a determined few, by great exertion, raised almost $100 for division among the Am. Board, A. H. M. S. and A. M. A. The outlook is not encouraging for this year, and, as a regular correspondent might add interest to our small meeting, we voted yester- day to take one share; and should we succeed better than we hope, our rule of division will give you one-third, whatever the amount may be. We need more prayer for warm hearts and the open hand. FROM OHIO. We have been reading A Plan, with the Reasons, and like it much. We have a class of young girls in our church who ought to be in missionary work. Can you give us a little fuller account of the work? and do you have teachers among the poor white women of the South? Please let us hear soon from you; we want an object to work for. We may not be able to do very much, but would like to do something. ALABAMA WOMANS MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. MISS M. K. LUNr. The annual meeting of the Alabama Womans Missionary Association was held in the prayer-room of the Congregational church in Montgomery, Monday. March 31. The devotional exercises were conducted by the President of the Association, Mrs. H. S. De Forest, who gave the opening address, welcoming the members of the local societies, now numbering seven. The reports of the Secretaries and delegates showed an increase of interest,. labor, and funds collected, as well as a constant growth in missionary intelligence. Nearly all the societies have remembered the foreign work and the Indians, in addition to their own needs and people, and have shown a deep interest in the advancement of Christian education. Mrs. Ragland, the wife of one of the Talladega theologians, read a paper upon Home Influence, the prominent points of which were filial obedience, the import- ant place the wife, mother, and daughter fill in the home, and the importance of training the daughter in domestic duties. Mrs. Ash, whose husband was an acceptable pastor in one of the A. M. A..

Miss M. K. Lunt Lunt, M. K., Miss Alabama Woman's Missionary Association Bureau of Woman's Work 184-185

184 Alabama Womans Miss. Association. but our ladies contribute something to its fundsthough probably not enough to take a full share in the support of a teacher. Encouraged by what you say in the circular, we write to ask that we may be included in the list of those to whom monthly letters will be sent, as promised to those who take one or more shares. We are small and few, but the interest is genuine, and we want to increase it.. Our contribution goes into the general fund. FROM MINNESOTA. Last week, on a very stormy day, with less than twenty ladies present, the subject of taking shares in the support of a missionary teacher was introduced, and a little over $40 pledged, to be paid before October. I felt very much encour- aged, and shall do all I can to increase the amount, though I am too much of a strangerhaving been here but a yearto have any idea what we can raise. You promised us letters from our missionary if we took but one of the $20 shares; so we shall hope to receive them. After another month I hope to send you word about a much larger pledge. Ours is a country church, laboring under the disadvantage of constant deple- tion of our younger members; the twin cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis are close by, and our broad frontier also attracts strongly. Last year a determined few, by great exertion, raised almost $100 for division among the Am. Board, A. H. M. S. and A. M. A. The outlook is not encouraging for this year, and, as a regular correspondent might add interest to our small meeting, we voted yester- day to take one share; and should we succeed better than we hope, our rule of division will give you one-third, whatever the amount may be. We need more prayer for warm hearts and the open hand. FROM OHIO. We have been reading A Plan, with the Reasons, and like it much. We have a class of young girls in our church who ought to be in missionary work. Can you give us a little fuller account of the work? and do you have teachers among the poor white women of the South? Please let us hear soon from you; we want an object to work for. We may not be able to do very much, but would like to do something. ALABAMA WOMANS MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. MISS M. K. LUNr. The annual meeting of the Alabama Womans Missionary Association was held in the prayer-room of the Congregational church in Montgomery, Monday. March 31. The devotional exercises were conducted by the President of the Association, Mrs. H. S. De Forest, who gave the opening address, welcoming the members of the local societies, now numbering seven. The reports of the Secretaries and delegates showed an increase of interest,. labor, and funds collected, as well as a constant growth in missionary intelligence. Nearly all the societies have remembered the foreign work and the Indians, in addition to their own needs and people, and have shown a deep interest in the advancement of Christian education. Mrs. Ragland, the wife of one of the Talladega theologians, read a paper upon Home Influence, the prominent points of which were filial obedience, the import- ant place the wife, mother, and daughter fill in the home, and the importance of training the daughter in domestic duties. Mrs. Ash, whose husband was an acceptable pastor in one of the A. M. A.. Sunday-school Work at Touqalo~. churches, and who not long since was called home, read a paper, giving a com- prehensive history of the work of the American Missionary Association in the South, relating incidents connected with the earlier teachings, and showing how the work had broadened, and brought into the ranks the colored people. Mrs. Andrews, of Talladega, prepared a paper on the Origin and History of Our Alabama Movement in Womans Work, read by Miss Partridge, giving a full development of the organization and growth of the society during its seven years existence, and shoWing how much greater results are accomplished by organized effort and unity of action, and advising that the relation of this society as an auxiliary to the W. H. M. A. of Boston be severed and become allied to the Wo- mans Bureau of New York, which has the Southern field under its special care; referring also to the interest, courtesy and sympathy which the Boston society had always shown toward the Alabama branch. Mrs. 0. F. Curtis, of Emerald Grove, Wis., was present, who has two sons in the South as missionaries and one on the foreign fieldRev. W. W. Curtis, of Japan who addressed the meeting on the condition of the women and girls in that coun- try; what is being done by the missionaries to lead them to Christ; also speaking of the hindrances to the Christian religion. This interesting meeting could not fail to awaken a deeper interest in the hearts of all present, and we believe that no one left without feeling that she had gained a new impulse to renewed consecration and work for the Master. SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK AT TOUGALOO. MISS JOSEPHINE KELLOGG. The Sunday-school of this Institution has alwaysunder the present manage- ment at leastbeen considered one of the most important, if not the most important means of grace and spiritual enlightenment. The power of sustained attention and consecutive thought is greatly lacking in all untrained minds; hence the superiority of the hand-to-hand question-and-answer method of the class-room over the sermon as a means of informing the mind and clearing away the rub- bish of superstition and the misapprehensions of meaning, derived from the ignorant preachers who have been in many cases the only previous expounders of the word, and resulting also from a very vague and limited understanding of the language of the Bible, the preachereven the teacher. It would be impossible for one new to the work to even grasp at the distorted images and superstitious misconceptions connected with religious subjects in the minds ef the more ignorant colored people without the free interchange of personal conversation. So for years the Sunday-school has been placed at the head of the Sabbath services here; and given the forenoon, the review by the Superintendent occupying the time of a short sermon, with the lesson for the day, already explained and impressed by the several teachers, for its text. Later in the day class prayer-meetings are held, and here young Christians learn to take up the cross of bearing testilnony for Christ, and making audible prayer for them- selves and others. Many of the scholars feel these meetings to be very valuable At the close of the school year a Sunday-school Convention is held, and it is urged as a duty upon all Christian students who go out to teach that they should organize and conduct Sabbath schools in connection with their day schools. We have recently received two donations of library books, so that we now have enough to go once around, and we loan them out each Sarihy. W~ aW g ~ 1~5

Miss Josephine Kellogg Kellogg, Josephine, Miss Sunday-school Work at Tougaloo The South 185-186

Sunday-school Work at Touqalo~. churches, and who not long since was called home, read a paper, giving a com- prehensive history of the work of the American Missionary Association in the South, relating incidents connected with the earlier teachings, and showing how the work had broadened, and brought into the ranks the colored people. Mrs. Andrews, of Talladega, prepared a paper on the Origin and History of Our Alabama Movement in Womans Work, read by Miss Partridge, giving a full development of the organization and growth of the society during its seven years existence, and shoWing how much greater results are accomplished by organized effort and unity of action, and advising that the relation of this society as an auxiliary to the W. H. M. A. of Boston be severed and become allied to the Wo- mans Bureau of New York, which has the Southern field under its special care; referring also to the interest, courtesy and sympathy which the Boston society had always shown toward the Alabama branch. Mrs. 0. F. Curtis, of Emerald Grove, Wis., was present, who has two sons in the South as missionaries and one on the foreign fieldRev. W. W. Curtis, of Japan who addressed the meeting on the condition of the women and girls in that coun- try; what is being done by the missionaries to lead them to Christ; also speaking of the hindrances to the Christian religion. This interesting meeting could not fail to awaken a deeper interest in the hearts of all present, and we believe that no one left without feeling that she had gained a new impulse to renewed consecration and work for the Master. SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORK AT TOUGALOO. MISS JOSEPHINE KELLOGG. The Sunday-school of this Institution has alwaysunder the present manage- ment at leastbeen considered one of the most important, if not the most important means of grace and spiritual enlightenment. The power of sustained attention and consecutive thought is greatly lacking in all untrained minds; hence the superiority of the hand-to-hand question-and-answer method of the class-room over the sermon as a means of informing the mind and clearing away the rub- bish of superstition and the misapprehensions of meaning, derived from the ignorant preachers who have been in many cases the only previous expounders of the word, and resulting also from a very vague and limited understanding of the language of the Bible, the preachereven the teacher. It would be impossible for one new to the work to even grasp at the distorted images and superstitious misconceptions connected with religious subjects in the minds ef the more ignorant colored people without the free interchange of personal conversation. So for years the Sunday-school has been placed at the head of the Sabbath services here; and given the forenoon, the review by the Superintendent occupying the time of a short sermon, with the lesson for the day, already explained and impressed by the several teachers, for its text. Later in the day class prayer-meetings are held, and here young Christians learn to take up the cross of bearing testilnony for Christ, and making audible prayer for them- selves and others. Many of the scholars feel these meetings to be very valuable At the close of the school year a Sunday-school Convention is held, and it is urged as a duty upon all Christian students who go out to teach that they should organize and conduct Sabbath schools in connection with their day schools. We have recently received two donations of library books, so that we now have enough to go once around, and we loan them out each Sarihy. W~ aW g ~ 1~5 1s~6 Childrens Page. ally have papers to distribute, sent us by kind and careful Sunday-school scholars in the North who make their papers do double duty. If some school changing song-books would send our school a hundred or more well-preserved copies of those they lay aside, it would be a gift highly appreciated. One of our neighbors is a good Mother in Israel, who has always taken a warm interest in this institution in all its departments and appreciated its uplifting influence upon her people. She belongs to one of the branches of the Methodist Church, and felt that she wanted something done for the improvement and revival of interest in the schools of that denomination in the vicinity. Accordingly, she worked up a S. S. Convention among them last Fall, and invited Mr. Pope and some others of us to go and help to make it profitable. We could not get off until after dinner and might as well not have gone at all. Soon after our entrance a young man introduced a resolution that superintendents and teachers be compelled to be at their schools at the hour set for opening. One of the preachers rose and said that teachers could not be compelled, and moved as an amendment that they be acquired to come promptly. Then ensued a long, windy, wordy controversy on compelling and acquir- ing. Seeing no prospect of a conclusion we withdrew. The good auntie who had invited us followed us out in deep humiliation. I said, we are sorry to go without contributing something to the interest of the meeting, but this is such a waste of time, there is no coming to the point. Thats jus so, dear. she said, but that their ignrance. Ignrance does waste time, honey. Ignrance cant come to a pint. That last sentence struck me as a piece of epigrammatic wisdom. CHILDRENS PAGE. WONG NINGS IDEAS AS EXPRESSED By HIMSELF. [Wong Ning is no imaginary character. He is a real flesh-and-blood Chinese boy, living in San Francisco, and much interested in the new and many sided life going on about him. So we are glad to give you, in his own words, a few of his observations on American life and manners.] My name is Wong Ning. I born on home China, come to this country when thirteen years old, and been here now seven year. Little boy have very hard time on home China. Have to get up and go to school at six oclockvery early thatcome home, get breakfast at eight oclock, and lunch at twelve oclock; then stay till six oclock in the day. I no think Amer- ican boy like that! Little girl no go to school at all! Very funny, that! Have one big house, on home China, where all the girls go every day; learn to sew, make the pretty things, the flowers, the birds. every- thing! by the needle. Little girl no speak to the boyno! never! on home China. On home China every one like the mother very much; give everything to she. If a China boy no like the mother, no work hard for she, no send she every- thingOh! horrible! very bad! All the sons marry, bring home the wife to wait on she. Not like the wife so much as the mother, on home China. The womanthe wife, the mother, the little girlall work in the housesew, cook, make the cloth, everything! When they make the dinner or the lunch, set the table very nice, put on everything; then run behind the cur- tain (no have any door on home China), and then the manthe father, the son, the little boyall come in, sit down, eat the dinner; eat him all up. Pretty soon, by and by, the womanthe mother, the wife, the little girlcome quiet, lift up

Wong Ning's Ideas: As Expressed by Himself Children's Page 186-187

1s~6 Childrens Page. ally have papers to distribute, sent us by kind and careful Sunday-school scholars in the North who make their papers do double duty. If some school changing song-books would send our school a hundred or more well-preserved copies of those they lay aside, it would be a gift highly appreciated. One of our neighbors is a good Mother in Israel, who has always taken a warm interest in this institution in all its departments and appreciated its uplifting influence upon her people. She belongs to one of the branches of the Methodist Church, and felt that she wanted something done for the improvement and revival of interest in the schools of that denomination in the vicinity. Accordingly, she worked up a S. S. Convention among them last Fall, and invited Mr. Pope and some others of us to go and help to make it profitable. We could not get off until after dinner and might as well not have gone at all. Soon after our entrance a young man introduced a resolution that superintendents and teachers be compelled to be at their schools at the hour set for opening. One of the preachers rose and said that teachers could not be compelled, and moved as an amendment that they be acquired to come promptly. Then ensued a long, windy, wordy controversy on compelling and acquir- ing. Seeing no prospect of a conclusion we withdrew. The good auntie who had invited us followed us out in deep humiliation. I said, we are sorry to go without contributing something to the interest of the meeting, but this is such a waste of time, there is no coming to the point. Thats jus so, dear. she said, but that their ignrance. Ignrance does waste time, honey. Ignrance cant come to a pint. That last sentence struck me as a piece of epigrammatic wisdom. CHILDRENS PAGE. WONG NINGS IDEAS AS EXPRESSED By HIMSELF. [Wong Ning is no imaginary character. He is a real flesh-and-blood Chinese boy, living in San Francisco, and much interested in the new and many sided life going on about him. So we are glad to give you, in his own words, a few of his observations on American life and manners.] My name is Wong Ning. I born on home China, come to this country when thirteen years old, and been here now seven year. Little boy have very hard time on home China. Have to get up and go to school at six oclockvery early thatcome home, get breakfast at eight oclock, and lunch at twelve oclock; then stay till six oclock in the day. I no think Amer- ican boy like that! Little girl no go to school at all! Very funny, that! Have one big house, on home China, where all the girls go every day; learn to sew, make the pretty things, the flowers, the birds. every- thing! by the needle. Little girl no speak to the boyno! never! on home China. On home China every one like the mother very much; give everything to she. If a China boy no like the mother, no work hard for she, no send she every- thingOh! horrible! very bad! All the sons marry, bring home the wife to wait on she. Not like the wife so much as the mother, on home China. The womanthe wife, the mother, the little girlall work in the housesew, cook, make the cloth, everything! When they make the dinner or the lunch, set the table very nice, put on everything; then run behind the cur- tain (no have any door on home China), and then the manthe father, the son, the little boyall come in, sit down, eat the dinner; eat him all up. Pretty soon, by and by, the womanthe mother, the wife, the little girlcome quiet, lift up Receipts. the curtain. If he all gone, can come eat; if no, can not come. Yes! Sure! I go to school at night, learn to read and write; I think English very hard. I been work for the Jew family, the Irish family, and the Spanish family. I think my English get too much funnyso many kinds of language. Now I work for the American family; like it more better. I been here so long, and go to school so much, that I understand the English more better than China. Very funny that! When my cousin, at the wash- house, send me the letter to ccme take dinner with he, he have to write it in English, and the lady I work for, she laugh very much. I get one letter this morning. (My Arnerican name Charley). Here the letter: Mr. Chily, you Please come to Kum Lee this evening to take dinder, because Lee chong go to home China this week. Ah Do and Ah Sing all come in to if soon as you can good by WoNGVoo. I know plenty stories about on home China. You ever hear about Kong foo 187 too ?American call him Confucius- he very great man. Maybe you like, I tell you one story~ He live about two, three thousand year ago, yes! sure! He travel every city. teach Chinamanthat very good. One city he no camethat Canton one very big place inside three big walls.. Kong-foo-too, or Confucius, he come to Canton, and try to come in the gate very big gate. One little boy there seven years old. I think that little boy too smart. He making play of a little city, and build- ing three little walls around it, all the same like Canton. He took up too much room, and talk too smart, so that. Confucius cannot get in. He watch him a little while, then he say, I guess Canton all right; this boy can teach Canton. I go some other place. That very bad! Next year that boy diedvery strange that! So Can- ton never get any teaching, not from boy, not from Kong-foo-too. I think not very good for little boy to be too smart.St. Nicholas. RECEIPTS FOR APRIL, 1584. MAINE, $257 77. Augusta. J. S. (5 of which for In- dian Work, Hamoton N. & A. Inst.) to const., REV. ARTHUR F. SKEELE L. M. Belfast. Miss A. L. McDowell, for Sel- ma,Ala Bluehill. cong. Ch Brewer. First Cong. Cli. and Soc Camden. R. nowers, 20; Abner Howe and wife, 3; Jonas Howe, SOc.; Mrs. Myra A. Mansfield, 3.50; E. D. Mans- field, 3 Gorham. First Cong. Cli. and Soc Gorham. ~ab. 5db., by J. S. Hiuckley, for Student Aid. Selnia, Ala Limington. A. B. Lyman. Cong. Cli. and Soc Macbias. Center St. Cong. Cli Portland. Fourth Cong. Cb. and Soc... Saint Albans. Rev. Win. S. Sewall Scarborough. A friend in Cong. Cli South Berwick. Mrs. J. H. Hod~dens S.S. Class,for Student Aid, Talladega C South Berwick, Ladies of Cong. Cli., Bbl. ot C ,for Wilmington, N. C. Woodfords. Yarmoutliville. Rev. A. Lorin~ NEW HAMPSHIRE, $237.16. Amherst. Cong. Cli $30 00 1 00 5 00 15 00 30 00 65 83 26 42 2 00 5 50 5 00 7 00 3 00 50 00 10 00 1 00 1 00 3 82. Colebrook. E. C. Hinsdale. Cong. Cli. and Soc Keene. First Cong. Sab. 5db., for Sob. Sch. Work Lyndeborough. Cong. Cli. and Soc Marlborough. Cong. Cli. and Soc . Mason. Cong. Cli Milford. Willing Workers, for Student Aid, Tougaloo U New Boston. (30 of which for Cal. Chinese M.) New Ipswich. A. N. Townsend Nortliwood. Dea. J. J. Cate, for Student Aid, Fisk U Peterborough. Ladies Circle Union Cong. C., for Freight Winchester. Cong. Sab. Sch VERMONT, $716.94. Cambridge. Mr. and Mrs. M. Safford... Cambridge. Friends, by Mrs S. P. Wheelock, Box of C., for Tougaloo U.; Friend. 2,for Freight Dorset. Womens H. NI. Soc., for Stu: dent Aid, Atlanta U Greensliorough. Cong. Cli and Soc.... Jimaica. Mrs. William Hastings Manchester. Miss Ellen Hawley 70, for Student Aid, 25, for repairing Piano, Tolladega C $2 00 13 54 15 42. 2 50 15 40 6 00 50 OG 100 00 I 00 1 00 2 04 22 44 38 52. - 00 15 00 1850 5 00 95 00

Receipts for April, 1884 187-192

Receipts. the curtain. If he all gone, can come eat; if no, can not come. Yes! Sure! I go to school at night, learn to read and write; I think English very hard. I been work for the Jew family, the Irish family, and the Spanish family. I think my English get too much funnyso many kinds of language. Now I work for the American family; like it more better. I been here so long, and go to school so much, that I understand the English more better than China. Very funny that! When my cousin, at the wash- house, send me the letter to ccme take dinner with he, he have to write it in English, and the lady I work for, she laugh very much. I get one letter this morning. (My Arnerican name Charley). Here the letter: Mr. Chily, you Please come to Kum Lee this evening to take dinder, because Lee chong go to home China this week. Ah Do and Ah Sing all come in to if soon as you can good by WoNGVoo. I know plenty stories about on home China. You ever hear about Kong foo 187 too ?American call him Confucius- he very great man. Maybe you like, I tell you one story~ He live about two, three thousand year ago, yes! sure! He travel every city. teach Chinamanthat very good. One city he no camethat Canton one very big place inside three big walls.. Kong-foo-too, or Confucius, he come to Canton, and try to come in the gate very big gate. One little boy there seven years old. I think that little boy too smart. He making play of a little city, and build- ing three little walls around it, all the same like Canton. He took up too much room, and talk too smart, so that. Confucius cannot get in. He watch him a little while, then he say, I guess Canton all right; this boy can teach Canton. I go some other place. That very bad! Next year that boy diedvery strange that! So Can- ton never get any teaching, not from boy, not from Kong-foo-too. I think not very good for little boy to be too smart.St. Nicholas. RECEIPTS FOR APRIL, 1584. MAINE, $257 77. Augusta. J. S. (5 of which for In- dian Work, Hamoton N. & A. Inst.) to const., REV. ARTHUR F. SKEELE L. M. Belfast. Miss A. L. McDowell, for Sel- ma,Ala Bluehill. cong. Ch Brewer. First Cong. Cli. and Soc Camden. R. nowers, 20; Abner Howe and wife, 3; Jonas Howe, SOc.; Mrs. Myra A. Mansfield, 3.50; E. D. Mans- field, 3 Gorham. First Cong. Cli. and Soc Gorham. ~ab. 5db., by J. S. Hiuckley, for Student Aid. Selnia, Ala Limington. A. B. Lyman. Cong. Cli. and Soc Macbias. Center St. Cong. Cli Portland. Fourth Cong. Cb. and Soc... Saint Albans. Rev. Win. S. Sewall Scarborough. A friend in Cong. Cli South Berwick. Mrs. J. H. Hod~dens S.S. Class,for Student Aid, Talladega C South Berwick, Ladies of Cong. Cli., Bbl. ot C ,for Wilmington, N. C. Woodfords. Yarmoutliville. Rev. A. Lorin~ NEW HAMPSHIRE, $237.16. Amherst. Cong. Cli $30 00 1 00 5 00 15 00 30 00 65 83 26 42 2 00 5 50 5 00 7 00 3 00 50 00 10 00 1 00 1 00 3 82. Colebrook. E. C. Hinsdale. Cong. Cli. and Soc Keene. First Cong. Sab. 5db., for Sob. Sch. Work Lyndeborough. Cong. Cli. and Soc Marlborough. Cong. Cli. and Soc . Mason. Cong. Cli Milford. Willing Workers, for Student Aid, Tougaloo U New Boston. (30 of which for Cal. Chinese M.) New Ipswich. A. N. Townsend Nortliwood. Dea. J. J. Cate, for Student Aid, Fisk U Peterborough. Ladies Circle Union Cong. C., for Freight Winchester. Cong. Sab. Sch VERMONT, $716.94. Cambridge. Mr. and Mrs. M. Safford... Cambridge. Friends, by Mrs S. P. Wheelock, Box of C., for Tougaloo U.; Friend. 2,for Freight Dorset. Womens H. NI. Soc., for Stu: dent Aid, Atlanta U Greensliorough. Cong. Cli and Soc.... Jimaica. Mrs. William Hastings Manchester. Miss Ellen Hawley 70, for Student Aid, 25, for repairing Piano, Tolladega C $2 00 13 54 15 42. 2 50 15 40 6 00 50 OG 100 00 I 00 1 00 2 04 22 44 38 52. - 00 15 00 1850 5 00 95 00 188 ]?eceipt9. Manchester. Rev, and Mrs. A. C. Reed, for Student Aid, Atlanta U $25 00 Manchester. A. Hemeu~iay S ot; Milton. First Cong. Oh. and Soc 14 40 Newport. Cong. (;h. and Soc 13 65 North Cambridge. A Friend 5 00 North Ferrisburg. Cyrus W. Wicker 10 00 Norwich. John Dutwn 10 00 Rutland. Cong. Oh. and Soc 109 48 Saint Albans. M. A. Stranahan ,for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Saint Jolinshury. North Cong. Ch.. 113.23; South Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch., 6122k 17447 Springfield. Cong. Cli. M. C. Coil., for Indian M 8 69 Stockbridge. Rev. T. S. Hubbaid 10 00 Townshend. A Friend 5 00 West Brattleborough. Cong. Cli and Soc 10 23 Williston. W. L. Seymour 2 00 $626 04 LEGAcY. Grafton. Estate of Mrs. Caroiine B. Akin, by Win. Hastings, Ex 90 00 $716 94 MASSACHUSETTS, $6,300.43. Adams. Mrs. W. B. Greens Sab. Scli. Class, Cong. Cli 10 00 Amherst. First Cong. Cli 23 00 Amherst. Miss Mary H.Scott, for Read- inq Room. Tougaloo U 3 00 Andover. A Friend, 1.50, for Student Aid, Talladega, C.; Free Ch.. Bbi. of C., for Talladega, Ala., 3for Freight 4 50 Atbol. Evan. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to const. Wit SuEawoon, L. M 54 39 Boston. Central Cli. and Soc., 933.81: Old South Oh. and Soc , 429.15; Mrs. D.C. Hoiden SOc 1,363 46 Boston. Sab. nch. of Eliot Cli., 25: Mrs. C. A. Spaulding, 20, for Student Aid, Fisk U 45 00 Boston, Charlestown. Winthrop Cli. and BI~Ord. Mrs. Sarah C. Boyd, for Stu- 77 84 dent Aid, Atlanta U 10 00 Brookfield. Ladies Benevolent Soc., Cong Cli ,for Freight 2 35 Cambridge. First Cli , Shepherd Soc.. 174 50 Cambridgepoit. Pilgrim Cli. Mon. Con. CoIl 14 27 Cambridgeport. Ladies of Prospect St. Sewing Circle, Bbl. of C. and Box of Books, for Kittrell, N C. Chelsea. Arthur C. Stone and S. S. Class, First Cong.Cli., 100; Miss Annie P. James, 30, to consr. Miss SARAH L. GRANT L. M.; for Student Aid, Atlan. taU 13000 Chelsea. Ladies Union Home M. Band, for Lady Missionary, Chattanooga, Teun 60 00 Concord. Trin. Cong. Cli. and Soc 29 66 Dorchester. Secoid Cong. Cli. and Soc 109 94 East Hampton. First Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Straight U 23 00 East Hampiot. ~ Friends, for Oaks, N.C ~oo East Hampton. First Cong. Ch., for Freight 2 40 East Medway. Bhl. ot C. and S. S. Sup. plies, by S. E. Spencer, for Savannah. Ga. Enston. Cong Cli. and Soc . 12 25 Falmouth. First Cong. Cli. M. C. Coil.. 14 (10 Fall River. Central Cong. Cli 250 00 Florence. Florence Cong. Cli 24 50 Gardner. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. 11 96 Gloucester. Evan. Cong. Cli. and Soc 25 00 Goshen. Cong. Cli. and Soc 7 GO Great Barrington. First Cong. Cli $1C2 38 Great Barrington. Egliert E. Lee, for Student Aid. Atlanta U 4 00 Haverbill. A. P. Nichols, 33, for Stu- dent Aid, 15 for Furnishing Room Talladega C.; Ladies of W. H. M. Soc., Center Cli., Box of C., for Talla- dega C Haverhull. Sab. Sch. of North Cong. Oh., for Student Aid, Fisk U 25 00 Haverhull. Sew. Soc. North Cong. Cli., wf or Freight 1 51 ubbardston. Cong. Cli, and Soc 50 00 Hyde Park. Cong. Ch. and Soc 32 50 Kingston. A Friend 1 00 Lawrence. Lawrence St. Cli., A friend Bundle of C., val. 15. for Stu- dent Aid, Fisk U. and 2 for Freight.. 2 0l~ Lawrence. Bhl. of C. by Mrs. M. E. J. Bean, for Savanruh, Ga. Lee. Cong. Sab. Sch 75 00. Leicester. First Cong. Cli. and Soc.... 72 89 Lexington. Hancock Cli. and Soc 16 00 Malden. First tang. Cli. and Soc 61 62 Marblehead. Hon. J. J. H. Gregory, Bhl. garden seeds. for Talladega C. Medway. Ladies Benev. Soc., Blil. of C., val. 25. Mill River. Cong. Cli. and Soc 21 7i Natick. Cong. Cli. and Soc 40 00 Newburyport. Mrs. L. J. Case, for Stu- dent Aid. Fisk U. 5 00 Newton. Eliot Cli. and Soc 200 00 Newton Center. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 119 oa Newton Highlands. James L. Hyde, for Student Aid, Fisk U 3 00 Newtonvillc. Mrs. J. XV. Hayes 25 00 New Salem. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Norfolk. Cong. Oh. and Soc 3 80 North Adams. Cong. Oh 32 89 Northampton. First Cong. Cli., 307.67; Edwards Oh., 92.20 399 87 Nortlianipton. Edwards Cli. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Fisk U 25 00 Northampton. A. L. Williston, 20, for Student Aid, Atlanta U., and Pack age Indellible Ink. for Talladega C 20 00 Northampton. A Friend, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 17 50 North Brookfield. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 50 00 Norton. Mrs. F. B. Wheaton, for Stu- dent Aid, Fi~k U 20 00 Oakham. Mlii. of C., by S. F. Fairbanks, for Sivannali Ga Orange. Cen. dong. Cli. and Sab. Sch 26 00 Oxford. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 15 Peabody. South Cli. and Soc ]13 00 Pittsfield. A Friend 1 00 Plymouth. Church of the Pilgrimage 93 86 Rahoboth, Cong. Cli 21 54 Roxbury. Dna. Silas Potter, for Stu- dent Aid. FGk U 25 00 Salem. Girls Missionary Soc., of South Cli., for Freight 2 05 Salisbury and Amesbury. Union Evan. Cli 15 00 Somerville. Franklin St. Oh. and Soc.. 176 76 South Abington. By a Friend, to const. MRS. SALLy SOULE and Mas. MEHITABLE BRED L. Ms 100 00 South Weymouth. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc. adi to conit. MRS. EMMA J. SMITH and MRS. ALICE H. GARnNER L.Ms 4800 Sunderland. Cong. Oh. and Soc 71 89 Sunderland. Sab. Sch. Classes of Misses Belle Childs and Kittie Ames. 13.49, and of Mrs. Alice Bail. Misses Cala A. Delano and Mary L Hulahard, 14.62; for Student Aid. Atlanta U 28 11 Taunton. First Cong. Oh. and Soc 31 86 Townsend. Cong Sab. 5db 6 50 Receipts. Ware. East Cong. Ch. and Soc., 372.73 to coust. GEORGE S. HALL. CHAS. H. ALLEN, JR.. ALVAN HYDE, SARAH G. HYDE, NELLIE BULLARD and MRS. MARY E. CLEVELAND L. Ms; First Cong. Ch. andSoc.,31.76 $40451 Watertown. Phillips Sew. Circle, Bbl. of C. val. 50., for Tougaloo U. Westhorough. Ladies Freedmens Sew. Circle. BbL of C., Yal. $43.32, for Tattadega 0., 1.50 for Freight 1 50 West Brookfield. Cong. Ch. and Soc 33 05 West Gloucester. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 25 West Hampton. Cong. Cli 25 00 West Medway. Cony. Cn. and Soc.. 5 00 Westminster. First Cong. Ch. and Soc 89 15 West Roxbury. Sontli Evan. Oh. and Soc 22 29 Wihiamstown. First Cong. Oh 13 15 Wilmington. Oh. of Christ 45 63 Worcester. Piedmont Oh., 320; Union Oh. and Soc.. 181.60; Central Oh. and Soc., 85 586 60 Yarmouth Port. Ladies Sew. Cir. of First Cong. Oh. Bhl. of C., for McIn- tosh. 9a., ifor Freight 1 00 By Charles Marsh, Treas. Hampden Benev. Assn: Monson Cong. Oh. 20; Cong. Sab. 5db., 10.92, for Fisk. U., and 10.O2for (lamp toa N. ck A. Inst.; Springfield, South Oh.. 45.64; First Oh., 24.38; Westfield, First Oh., 40 151 86 LEGACY. North Brookfield. Estate of Lydia C. Dodge, by Win. P. HaskeLl $6,lSu 49 150 00 RHODE ISLAND. $27.17. $6,300 43 Little Compton. Oonr. Sab. Seli 20 00 Tiverton. Cong. Oh. Sab. 8ch 7 17 CONNECTICUT, $3,627.82. Bozrah. Cong. Oh., 4.63; Miss Hannah Maples,5 963 Bridgeport. First Cong. Cli 81 01 Canton Center. Cong. Oh. and Soc 7 37 Coventry. Second Cong. Oh 31 02 Darien. Cong. Oh 33 00 East Hampton. Mrs. Laura Skinner, for Taltadeqa C 5 00 East Hartland. Cong. Oh 17 40 East Haven. Cong. Oh 15 00 Enfield. Members of Cong. Oh. for Stu- dent Aid, Straight U 5 00 Farminglon. Cong. Oh. (175 of which from Dea. Henry D. Hawley to const. RORT. McKEE, ALEXANDER PATTERsON and HERBERT HART L. Ms.) 230 37 Franklin. Cong. Oh 9 18 Guilford. Daniel Hand 100 00 Hartford. Roland Mather. 1,000; Wind- sor Av. Cong. Oh., Mrs. Oaths me H. Hillyer. 30, to const. Mrs. SUsAN M. STOWEL.M 1,03009 Hartford. Young Ladies Mission Band, by Minnie Lewis. Box Thread, for Dakota Home. Harwinton. Cong. Oh 51 00 MendeD. Center Cong. Oh 50 00 Middletown. First Oh 55 76 New Britain. Mr.~. Norman Hart 14 00 New Canaan. John Erhardt . 2 50 Mansield. Second Cong. Oh. and Soc.. 7 t4 Mansfield Ceuter. First Cong. Oh..... . 10 00 New ~Iaven. First Oh., 200.56; Oh of the Redeemer, 176; ReV. S. W Bar- nuni. 10 copies Romanism as It Is, val. 33; ~ C.S., 2 378 56 North Manchester. Second Cong. Oh 60 00 Norwich. Park Cong. Oh. and Soc :333 77 Poqoonock. Cong. Oh 6:1 00 Ridgefield. Sab. Sch. of Cong. Oh., for Student Aid, Fisk U 19 00 I 89~ Seymour. Cong. Oh.. . . $15 00 Sherman. Cong. Oh 20 00 Southington. A Jriend, for Fort Bert hold, Dak 51) 00 South Killingly. Cong. Oh 4 00 South Windsor. First Cong. Cli 27 27 Thomaston. Cong. Oh 70 29 Vernon. Rev. Ohas. Redfield o 00 Waterbury. Prof. Win. M. Aber, for Atlanta U 10 00 West Stafford. Cong. Oh. and Soc 9 00 Whitneyx-ille. Cong. Oh., to coast ELI G. DIOKERMAN L. M 35 00 Windsor Locks. Cong. 03 . 77 68 Windsor Locks. Ladies Soc., Bbl. of C., for Tougalo~ U. . A Friend 10 00 $2,945 95 LEGAcIEs. Danbury. Estate of Mrs. H. B. Fry, by L. D. Brewster, Adrn 481 87 Eastford. Estate of Royel Warren, by J. D. Barrows. Ex 200 Co. $3,627 82 NEW YORK, $1,934.74. Brooklyn, Oh. of the Pilgrims 312 81 Binghamton. Bbl. of C. and S. S. Sup- plies, by Mrs. A. L. Webster; Mrs. Webster, 5, for Sava anah, Ga 5 00 Cohoes. Mrs. H. S. Gilbert, for Kittrell, N.C 200 City Island. Miss H. M. Hegeman, for Freight 2 00 Essex Co 75 00 Flusning. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Lady Missy 40 00 Franklin. Cong. Oh 2 50 Governeur. Thank Offering, for Ken. Mt. Work 5 00 Jainesport. Cong. Oh 6 (10 Malone. Mrs. M. K. Wead 100 00 MilIville. Cong. Oh 2 10 Munnsville. T. B. Rockwell 3 00 New York. Broadway Tab. Oh. (65 of which for Lady Missionaries) 1,121 21 New York. Sewing 8db. of Betliany Mission. Tabernacle Oh., by Miss M. S. Janes. for Santee Agency, Neb 25 00 New York. Miss II. E. Wynkoop 2 00 Norwich. Mrs. C. B. Martinfor Library Fund, Savannah, Ga 5 00 Nyack. John W. Towt 100 00 Orient. Hetty M. Wiggins 50 Owego. Box of C., for Oaks, N. C. Poughkeepsie. Cong. Sab. Seli. Box of Christmas Gfts, for Savannah, Ga. - Sidney Plains. Cong. Oh o 00 Syracuse. Mrs. Clara C. Clarke, 7.40; Nathan Cobb, S 1240 Tarrytown. A Friend 40 00 West Salainanca. Rev. Win. Hall 12 09 $1,878 61 LEGACY. Fort Covington. Estate of Reuben Mar tin by John S. Parker, Ex 56 10 NEW JERSEY, $60.00. $1,934 74 Boundbrook, Cong. Sab. Sch 15 00 East Orange. Grove St. Cong. Oh 35 00 Irvington. ReV. H. S. Underwood 5 00 Orange Valley. Cong. Oh., adi 5 00 PENNSYLVANIA, $85.00. Canton H.Sheldon Coudersport. J. S. and M. XV, Mann.. East Smithfield. Rev. C. H. Phelps.... Hermitage. W. U. Stewart Philadelphia. Thomas W. Price Philadelphia. Frederick S. Kindall, for Books, Theo. Dept. Taltadega C 10 00 5 00 O 00 .) 00 50 00 10 00 190 OHIO, $351.12. Akron. Ladies Howe Missy Soc. of Cong. Ch (adi) Aslitabula. First Cong. Oh Brooklyn. Cong. Cli. Chagrin Falls. Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db., for Indian M Chardon. Cong. Ch Cleveland. First Cong. Ch Cleve!and. Liberty Holden, 10. Dea. Horace Ford. 5. Mrs. E. H. Ladd, I, for Student Aid, Fisk U Conneaut. H. E. Pond Elyria. Mission Bands Cong. Cli.: ~Little Helpers. 15 Opportunity Club, 6. Golden Links, 4, for In- dian Girl, Santee Agency Four Corners. Cong. Cli Hudson. Ladies, by Mrs. A. C. Stevens, for Furnish~nq Reading Room, Straight U Huntsburg A. E. Millard, 10, Mrs. M. E. Millard. 5 Maryeville. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Stu. dent Aid, Talladega C Oberlin. First Cong. Cli Paddys Run. Cong. Cli Sandusky. First Cong. (h Tailmadge. Rev. Luthr Shaw Warrensville. Mrs. Mary Walkden, for Chinese M Youngstown. Two Friends. ]?ece~pts. $5 00 30 00 12 95 4 25 12 91 24 38 16 00 5 00 25 00 2 90 6 00 15 00 21 88 35 35 22 00 40 50 10 00 10 00 2 00 $301 12 LEGACY. Cardington. Estate of Wiseman C. Nichols, liy Mrs. F. C. Nichols, Ex.... 50 00 iNDIANA, $12..~0 $351 12 South Bend. H Burroughs 10 00 Sparta. John Hawksville 2 50 ILLINOIS, $518.68. Cambridge. Y. P. Missy Soc., for Stu- dent Aid. Fisk U 25 00 Cliicago. First Cong. Cli., 85.49; Soc. of Inquiry, Theo. Sem., 5.15; Millard Av. Cong. Cli., 5 95 64 Chicago. Ladies Missy Soc N. E Cong. Cli., for Lady Missy, Mobile, Ala 15 20 Chicago. South ong. Cli.. Bhl. of C.. for Mobile. Ala. Clienoa. Ladies of Cong. Oh., for Lady Missy Mobile. Ala 6 75 Galesburg. ~A Friend 25 00 Gridley. Bhl. of C. and S. S. Supplies, 3 Packages S. S. Work, by Mrs. Geo. Kent, for Savannah, Ga. Homer. Cong. Cli 5 00 Lisbon. Bhl. of C. and S. S. Supplies. by Mrs. Lewis Sherrill, for Savannah, Ga. Oak Park. Young Ladies Mission Circle, for Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Oak Park. Mr. Packards S. S. Class, for Student Aid, 2alladeg. 0 9 00 Rantoul Mrs. Antrace Pierce 10 00 Tonica. Cony. Sab. 5db., for Student Aid, Fisk U 25 00 By Mrs. E. F Williams, for Lady Mis- sionory. Little Rock, Ark.; Clilcago, Ladies of South Cong. Oh., 25; Moline, Mission Circle of Cong. Ch., 5; Stir- ling, Cong. Cli, 10 40 00 Bbl. of C., for Mobile, Ala. $306.59 LEGACY. Galesburg. Estate of Warren C. Willard, by Prof. T. R. Willard Pittsfield, E-tate of Rev. Win. Carter, by Win. C. Carter, The 25 04 187 05 $518.68 MISSOURI, $5,015.00. Sedalia. First Cong. Cli $15 00 LEGACY. St. Louis. Estate of 8. M. Edgell by Geo. S. Edgell, Ex 5.000 00 $5,015 oc~ FICHIGAN, $241.46. Alamo. Julius Hackley Clinton. Sab. 5db. of Cong. Cli., for Student Aid. Fisk U Cooper. Sab. tch. of Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Fisk U Croton. Cong. Oh Detroit. First Cong. Sab. 5db Grand Rapids. Park Cong. Sab. 5db., for Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke Inlay City. First Cong. Cli. (5.50 of whicli for Indian F.) Jackson. Mrs. H. M. Bennett Mout Zion. Cong. Cli.. for Indian M.. Nortliport. First Cong. Oh Royal Oak. By Rev. Richard Vivian, for Indian M Union. First Cong. Cli Vermontville. Cong. Cli. (adI) IOWA, $323.47. Algona. A. Zalilfen Bear Grove. Ladies of Cong. Cli, for Lady Missy, New Orleans, La., by Mrs. 0. C. Warne.. Big Rock. Cong. Oh Charles City. First Cong. Oh. and Soc.. Creston. Cong. Oh., for Lady Missy, New Qrleans, La Des Moines. Ladies of Plym. C9ng. Oh 12.50; Three Gentlemen 8; Mrs. A.A.,1; Mrs. M.,1,for Talladega 0.. Genoa Bluff. H. A. Morse, for Student Aid, Talladega C Grinnell. Cong. Cli., 13.06, and Sab. 5db.. 23.17 Grinnell. Mrs. W. B. Chamberlain, for Student Aid. Straight U McGregor. Cony Cli McGregor. Ladies Missy Soc. Cong. Cli Ottumwa. Friends, for Student Aid, Tougaloo U Tipton. Mrs. J. M. L. Daniels, 1; Mrs. M.D.C.,SOc.; S.P.D.,50c Wilton. Ladies Missy Soc. of Cong. Oh. By Mrs. J. H. Ellsworth, for Lady Mis- sionary. Yew Orleans, La.: Corning, Ladies Miss y Soc., 4; Cresco, Ladies, 4.25; Decorah, Ladies of Cong Cli., 25; Monona, Ladies of Cong Oh., 1, Mrs.W. S. Potwin, 2; Postville. Ladies, 1; Tahor, Ladies H. M. Soc., 15 By Mrs. M. G. Phillips, for Lady Missionary. New Orleans. La.: Algona Ladies, 1.50; Grinnell, Ladies, 76.20.. WISCONSIN, $203.50. Beloit. Eclipse Wind Engine Co., Feed Mill. for Ton galoo U. Eau Claire. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Lady Missy. Austin, T~x Kaukauna. Cong. Oh Lake eneva. Y. P. Benes. Soc.. for Student Aid. Fisk U Madison. Ladies of Cong. Cli., for Lady Missy, Austin. Texas Racine. Hon W. B. Erskine, for Fur- nishing ParlorStone Hoil,Straight U. Ripon. Ladies of Cong. On., for Lady .llissy, Austin, Texas Stougliten. Mrs. E. B. Sewall 10 00 1724 5 30 3 60 50 00 50 00 11 00 1 50 1 00 7 56 2 00 53 26 29 00 10,00 3 10 10 00 33 00 7 0~ 22 50 10 00 36 23 20 00 2420 9 91 2 50 2 00 3 00 52 2~ 77 70 15 00 6 50 35 00 30 00 100 00~ 16 00 1 00 Receipts. MINNESOTA, $207.01. Alexandria. First Cong. Ch $10 00 Freeborn. Cog. Ch 2 03 Minneapolis. Plymouth Cong. Oh. (8.25 of which from Dea. Cunningham), 34.01; First Cong. Oh., 10.04; Vine Coiig. Ch., 7.80 51 85 Minneapolis. By Jay Thompson, for Selma. Ala 5 00 Rochester. G. H. Swazey 4 97 Ru~hford. Cong. Ch. (5 of which for Indian M) 7 00 Winona. Cong. Oh 126 16 KANSAS, $15.50. Manhattan. William Castle, 5; Miss Mary Castle, 5 10 00 Topeka. I?uition 4 50 Wabaunsee. First Oh. of Christ 1 00 NEBRASKA, $27.30. Ashland. Cong. Oh 6 75 Buda Flat Cong. Oh 4 00 Crete. Melinda Bowen 5 00 Lincoln. K.& C 500 Maineland. Cong. Oh 1 80 Olive Branch. Cong. Oh 4 75 ARKANSAS, $19.00. Little Rock. Tuition 19 00 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, $196.00. Washington. First Cong. Oh 181 00 Washington. Lincoln Memorial Oh., 6.67, and Sab. Sch., 2.33; Woman s Aid and Mission Soc., 6 15 00 KENTUCKY, $149.25. Lexington. Tuition 86 50 Williamsburg. Tuition 62 TENNESSEE, $598.55. Chattanooga. First Cong. Oh. and Sab. Sch soo Grassy Cove. Rev. .J. Sllsby 4 50 Jonesborough. Tuluon 22 30 Knoxville. Second Cone Oh 12 00 IM2mphis. Le Nloyne Sch., Tuition 258 90 Nashville. Fisk U., Tuition 295 85 NORTH CAROLINA, $265.60. Hillsborougb. Tuition 11 50 Kittrell. Friends. hyP. N Lee 2 25 Wilmington. Tuition, 243.85; Cong. Oh., 8 251 85 SOUTH CAROLINA, $1282.65. Charleston. Tuition, $1,267.65; Cong. Oh., 13 1,282 63 GEORGIA. $660.45. Atlanta. Storrs Sch., Tuition, 230; Rent, 3; First Cong. Oh., 30 Macon. Lewis High Sch., Tuition. 164.15; Rent. 250; Conz. Oh., 12 Mclitosh. Tuition.. Savannah. Tuition, 162.80; Cong. Oh., 30 Way Cross. H. P. Stewart, for At. lanta U ALABAMA, $379.80. Athens. Tuition Mobile. Tuition Montgomery. Cong. Oh Selma. Cong. Oh Talladega. Talladega C., Tuition, 108 33~ eong. Oh., 10 MISSISi~IPPI, $901.58. Edwards. Mrs. Fanny Robinson. for Tougaloo U Hazlehurst. Mr. Cunningham, for Stu. dent Aid. Tougaloo U 191 Tougalon. Tougaloo U.. 841.40; Rent, 37.50; Cong. Oh., 18.68 $897 58 LOUISIANA, $287.00. New Orleans. Straight U., Tuition 262 00 New Orleans. Prof. W. J. McMurtry, for Student Aid, Straight U 25 00 TEXAS, $286.97. Austin. Tillotson C. & N. Inst 285 47 Austin. Live Oak 8ab. Sch., for Bibles.. 1 50 INCOMES, $18.36. Avery Estate f r Mendi M 7 44 Theological Endowment Fund, for How. ard U 10.92 Total for April $2520778 Total from Oct. 1 to April 30... . $136,652 79 FOR THE AMERICAN MI55IONARY. Subscriptions for April 44 23 Previously acknowledged 540 12 Total $584 35 FOR ENDOWMENT FUND. Providence. R. I. James Coats. 1,000; John E. Troup, 125; John McAuslan, 125; Miss Caroline Richmond, 50; for Stone Thee. Piend, Howard U 1,300 Providence~ R. I. Estate of A. D. Lock- wood, for Stone Theo. Fund, Howard U 250 Total $1,550 H. W. HuaBAnD, TREAs., 56 Reade St., N. Y. SKIN HUMORS CAN BE CURED BY GLENNS SULPHUR SOAP. SAN FRANCISCo, Feb. 16, 1883. Mr. C. N. Crittenton: DEAR SiR: I wish to call your attention to the good your Sulphur Soap has done me. For nearly fourteen years I have been trouOled with a skin humor resembling salt rheum. I have spent nearly a small fortune for doctors and medicine, but with only tempcrary relief. I commenced using your Glenns Sulphur Soap nearly two yenrs agoused it in baths and as a toilet soap daily, lily skin is 263 00 now as clear as an infant~sq and no one wQuld be able to tell that I ever 178 65 bad a skin complaint. I would not be 24 0