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The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 1 [an electronic edition] Creation of machine-readable edition. Cornell University Library 444 page images in volume Cornell University Library Ithaca, NY 1999 ABK5794-0033 /moa/amis/amis0033/

Restricted to authorized users at Cornell University and the University of Michigan. These materials may not be redistributed.

The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 1 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York Jan 1879 0033 001
The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 1, miscellaneous front pages i-ii

7 )~XXflI. No.1. TIlE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. To the Poor the Gospel is Pr~aehed. TANUABY, 1879. CONTENTS; EDITORIAL. OUR OUTLOOK FOR 1872 1 OUR APPEAL FOR THE NEW YEAR... THE LORDS WORK AND THE LORDS COMING 3 THE LONDON UNION MISSIONARY CONFERENCE 3 POLITICAL PROGrESS OF THE FREEDMEN: Rev. M. E. Strieby 4 THESE MY BRETHREN 6 FIVE TESTS OF AMERICAN CIVILIZATION: Prof. C. D. Hartrauft, D. D 7 RETURN OF REV. FLOYD SNELSON 7 ITEMS FROM THE CHURCHES 10 GEISEMAL NOTES 11 OUR QUERY COLUMN 14 THE FREEDMEN DISTRICT OF CoLUacRIARevaval in Howard University 14 VIRGINIAA Destitute County 14 ALABAMA New Church at Shelby Iron WorksTalladega a Missionary Centre.. 15 FLORENCEThin End of the WedgeFirst Thanksgiving Service 16 MISSOURIFree Schools in the State 17 AFRICA. THE MENDI MISSION-A Church OrganiEed and Dedicated at Avery 15 THE INDIANS. THE LATE INDIAR WAR AND CHRISTIANITY: Rev Myron ReNa ... 20 THE CHINESE. CONGREGATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHRISTIAN CHINESE: Rev. W. C. Pond 21 RECEIPTS 24 WORK, STATISTICS, WANTS, ETC 27 PLEASE READ, THINK, COPY AND MAIL 28 NEW YORI{: b~j the ~mevi~z ~i~xz~x~ ~ Roo~is, 56 READE STREET. Price, 50 Cents a Year, in ad~var me rican ~i~sionar~ ~s~ciation, 56 READE ~STT~EET, N. V. PRESIDENT. HON. E. S. TOBEY, Boston. VICE-PRESIDENTS. Hon. F. D. PARISH, Ohio. Hon. E. D. HOLTON, Wis. Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, Mass. Rev. STEPHEN THURSTON, D. D., Me. Rev. SAMUEL HARRIS, D. D., Ct. WM. C. CHAPIN, E sq.,R.I. Rev. W. T. EusTIs, ID. D., Mass. Hon. A. C. BARSTOW, R. I. Rev. THATCHER THAYER, D. D., R. I. Rev. RAY PALMER, ID. D., N. Y. Rev. J. M. STURTEVANT, D. D., 111. - Rev. W. W. PATTON, D. D., D. C. Hon. SEYMOUR STRAIGHT, La. HORACE HALLOCH, Esq., Mich. Rev. CYRUS W. WALLACE, ID. D., N. H. Rev. EDWARD HAWES, Ct. DOUGLAS PUTNAM, Esq., Ohio. Hon. THADDEUS FAIRBANKS, Vt. SAMUEL D. PORTER, Esq., N. Y. Rev. M. M. G. DANA, D. D., Miun. Rev. H. W. BEECHER, N. Y. Gen. 0. 0. HOWARD, Oregon. Rev. G. F. MAGOUN, D. D., Iowa. CoJ. C. G. HAMMOND, Ill. EDWARD SPAULDING, M. D., N. H. DAVID RIPLEY, Esq., N. J. Rev. WM. M. BARBOUR, D. D., Ct. Rev. W. L. GAGE, Ct. A. S. HATCH, Esq., N. Y. Rev. 3. H. FAIRCHILD, D. ID., Ohio Rev. H. A. STIMsoN, Minn. Rev. J. W. STRONG, D. D., Minn. Rev. GEORGE THACHER, LL. D., Iowa. Rev. A. L. STONE, D. D., California. Rev. G. H. ATKINSON, D. D., Oregon. Rev. J. E. RANEIN, D. D., D. C, Rev. A. L. CHAPIN, D. D., Wis. S. D. SMITH, Esq., Mass. PETER SMITH, Esq., Mass. Dea. JOHN C. WHITIN, Mass. Rev. WM. PATTON, D. D., Ct. Hon. J. B. GEINNELL, Iowa. Rev. WM. T. CARE, Ct. Rev. HORACE WINSEOW, Ct. Sir PETER COATS, Scotland. Rev. HENRY ALLON, D. D., London, Eng. WM. E. WRITING, Esq., N. Y. 3. M. PINEERTON, Esq., Mass. Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D. D., Ct. DANIEL HAND,.ESq., Ct. A. L. WILLISTON, Esq., Mass. Rev. A. F. BEARD, D. D., N. Y. FEEDERICE BILLINGS, Esq., Vt. JOSEPH CARPENTER, Esq., R. I. CORRESPONDING SECRETARY. REV. M. E. STRIEBY, D. ID., 56 Reade Street, ~I Y DISTRICT SECRETARIES. REV. C. L. WOODWORTH, Boston. REV. G. D. PIKE, New York. REV. JAS. POWELL, (Jll2Cogo. EDGAR KETCHUM, ESQ., Treasurer, N. Y. H. W. HUBBARD, ESQ., Assistant Treasurer, 1VI 171 REV. M. E. STRIEBY, ReCording Secretory. ALONZO S. BALL, A. S. BARNES, EDWARD BEECHEE, GEO. M. BOYNTON, WM. B. BROWN, EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. CLINTON B. FISH, A. P. FOSTER, E. A. GRAVES, S. B. HALLIDAY, SAML HOLMES, S. S. JOCELYN, ANDREW LESTER, CHAS. L. MEAD, JOHN H. WASHBURN G. B. WILLCOX. COMMUNICATIONS relating to the business of the Association may be addressed to either of the Secretaries as above; letters for the Editor of the American Missionary to Rev. Geo. M. Boynton, at the New York Office. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS sent to H. W. Hubbard, 56 Reade Street, New York, or, When more convenient, to ~he Branch Offices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., 112 West Washington l. Drafts or checks sent to Mr. Hubbard should be made payable to his mreasurer dollars at one time constitutes a Life Member. Specially requested to place at the head of each letter the name of their 5v and State in Which it is located.

Our Outlook for 1879 Editorial 1-2

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL. XXXIII. JANUARY, 1879. No. 1. ~mcric~tn ~is~ionarv ~3~nciation. OUR OUTLOOK FOR 1879. The review of our last years work has been so recently and so fully given in connection with the annual meeting of the Association, that it is scarcely needful for ~us to ask our rcaders to join us in another survey of what has already been ac- complished. It is more fitting, as we stand upon the threshold of the new year, to ask what are the signs of the times, and what the demands of the work before us. There are still dark clouds in the Southern sky. A mere granting of civil and political rights by formal enactment is of small importance unless the rights themselves ar& honestly allowed and faithfully accepted. The adjustment of al- leged wrongs we must leave to politicians if not to statesmen, and to courts of law if not of justice. Our work obscure and remote as it may seem, is more fun- damental and iml)ortant than that of either Congresses or courts. For by what- ever defences the Freedman may or may not be surrounded, the only safeguard of his rights must be in his fitness to exercise and his ability to maintain them. It is for us, through all the changes of the year, to keep steadily to our work. It is not checked because the winter is upon us; nor will it be over when the summer comes. It is not for this years harvesting alone that we are working; we are sub - soiling and so laboring for the permanent reclamation of these vast fields. We believe that more depends upon the moral and intellectual elevation of the Fteed- men of our land, not only in regard to their welfare, but in regard to the great questions of which they are only a factor, than upon anything which can be done for them by legislative enactment or military power. We purpose, then, to press on with the school and the church. Intelligence and virtue are the Jachin and Boaz, the two great pillars of the porch of the Temple of American citizenship and liberty. While it rests on anything else, it is uncertain and unsafe. Our lesser work at home among the Indians and Chinese will demand the same moderate but constant share of our attention as before. Our connection with the six Indian Agencies, through the Interior Department, is not a matter of expense, but mainly of time and care. If we shall be relieved from that, our missionary work will still remain and may be enlarged. And though the immigration of Chinamen has been checked to some degree, and their interest in learning English has been abated by the abuse they have received, the work has been, and is yet, too fruitful of good to be given up. 2 Our Appeal for the New Year. Our African mission has jmssed through one year under its new organization, with apparent prosperity and success. We shall need to strengthen its forces be- fore long. We shall want both the men and the means. There is work enough in our outlook and encouragement to do it. We would remind our readers as well as ourselves, that the year which is most full of sacrifice and service for the Master, is most sure of all to be A Happy Yew Year. OUR APPEAL FOR 1879. Our friends are thoroughly informed of the fact that our debt of late has been rapidly diminishing. We are sorry to say that the same thing is true of our ineome. That, too, has been growing less. We learn that this is true, also, o.f our sister societies. They, also, have noticed a falling off in their revenues. We do not like to make much ado over our troubles; but we have been very frank in acknowledg- ing our mercies, and we owe it to the work, and to those who sustain it, to tell them our perplexities as well. Our receipts for the last two months have been very inadequate for the work we have in hand. What does this mean to us with this outlook for 1879? Does it signify withdrawal from fields already under cultivation? Already the Execu- tive Committee have had under serious advisement two eases, in which it was necessary either to stop fruitful work at important points or spend a little more money. Retrenchment is easier to talk of than to accomplish. It costs as much sometimes to stop as to go on. A temporary suspension is sometimes more expen- sive than continuous work. Our teachers are engaged and our buildings are pre- pared for the year. Shall we stop the whole machinery of a great factory to save the price of the gas which lights it? That would be ruinous economy indeed. But we do not seriously believe that the friends of the three most needy races on our continent have lost heart, or hope, or means, to carry out the generous plans they have devised. These last months of 1878 have been trying alike to them and to us. Our plea is only this, that, with the new year (if the debt be not by that time altogether a thing of the past), there may be a fresh and final attack upon that enemy of our peace; and more even than this, that there may be a fuller and a steadier flow of the Lords money into our treasury for the wants of the work of 1879. We are happy to say that a goodly number of ladies whom we have asked to assume the responsibility of raising a share of $25, towards the payment of our debt, have replied favorably. The following extract from a letter sent us by on& who has been abundant in her efforts for the Freedmen, indicates the enthusi- asm and thankfulness with which some of the ladies respond: Your kind letter of November 26th found me watching in the sick room of my brother; but my heart went right up to God in gratitude that I was not for- gotten by the officers of the A. M. A., and that they still think I can do some- thing to help on this great work. I have never ceased to be interested in the work in all its length and breadth, and to do what little I can for it. The debt has occupied much of my thought. I have wanted to do something to help pay it beyond the little I could give myself. Now that I can go out under your guardianship, I will be one of two hundred to raise one share ($25), and as much more as I can. I am sure the debt will soon be paid. There should be no lack of funds to carry on this work. It is very strange our nation cannot see it and feel it too.

Our Appeal for 1879 Editorial 2-3

2 Our Appeal for the New Year. Our African mission has jmssed through one year under its new organization, with apparent prosperity and success. We shall need to strengthen its forces be- fore long. We shall want both the men and the means. There is work enough in our outlook and encouragement to do it. We would remind our readers as well as ourselves, that the year which is most full of sacrifice and service for the Master, is most sure of all to be A Happy Yew Year. OUR APPEAL FOR 1879. Our friends are thoroughly informed of the fact that our debt of late has been rapidly diminishing. We are sorry to say that the same thing is true of our ineome. That, too, has been growing less. We learn that this is true, also, o.f our sister societies. They, also, have noticed a falling off in their revenues. We do not like to make much ado over our troubles; but we have been very frank in acknowledg- ing our mercies, and we owe it to the work, and to those who sustain it, to tell them our perplexities as well. Our receipts for the last two months have been very inadequate for the work we have in hand. What does this mean to us with this outlook for 1879? Does it signify withdrawal from fields already under cultivation? Already the Execu- tive Committee have had under serious advisement two eases, in which it was necessary either to stop fruitful work at important points or spend a little more money. Retrenchment is easier to talk of than to accomplish. It costs as much sometimes to stop as to go on. A temporary suspension is sometimes more expen- sive than continuous work. Our teachers are engaged and our buildings are pre- pared for the year. Shall we stop the whole machinery of a great factory to save the price of the gas which lights it? That would be ruinous economy indeed. But we do not seriously believe that the friends of the three most needy races on our continent have lost heart, or hope, or means, to carry out the generous plans they have devised. These last months of 1878 have been trying alike to them and to us. Our plea is only this, that, with the new year (if the debt be not by that time altogether a thing of the past), there may be a fresh and final attack upon that enemy of our peace; and more even than this, that there may be a fuller and a steadier flow of the Lords money into our treasury for the wants of the work of 1879. We are happy to say that a goodly number of ladies whom we have asked to assume the responsibility of raising a share of $25, towards the payment of our debt, have replied favorably. The following extract from a letter sent us by on& who has been abundant in her efforts for the Freedmen, indicates the enthusi- asm and thankfulness with which some of the ladies respond: Your kind letter of November 26th found me watching in the sick room of my brother; but my heart went right up to God in gratitude that I was not for- gotten by the officers of the A. M. A., and that they still think I can do some- thing to help on this great work. I have never ceased to be interested in the work in all its length and breadth, and to do what little I can for it. The debt has occupied much of my thought. I have wanted to do something to help pay it beyond the little I could give myself. Now that I can go out under your guardianship, I will be one of two hundred to raise one share ($25), and as much more as I can. I am sure the debt will soon be paid. There should be no lack of funds to carry on this work. It is very strange our nation cannot see it and feel it too. The ]ord8 Work ~tnd~ the Io~ds Coming. 3 An old and faithful friend from Sag Harbor, N. Y., sends us thirty dollars to make a life member, At the same time~ he asks us to star the names of his two oldest children, who were among the first of the twenty whom he has thus added to our list. They have gone up higher. He concludes thus: I was much interested in reading the article in December number, page 887, Students Want to Batch Who will Help l I would like for my $30 to go to assist in building one of those $100 houses. Cant you get some one to add the other $70, and put up one of those dwellings for those scholars who are so anxious to get an education to teach and to preach? THE LORDS WORK AND THE LORDS CONING. One of our friends, (Rev. T. S. Robie, North Carver, Mass.,) who was at our annual meeting at Taunton, remembering doubtless that the Prophetic Conference was in session during the same days in New York City, puts the two things together thus: One comes from a meeting like that, through which glimpses are caught of opportunities for work, of openings by the Unseen Hand into spheres of service which stretch out into the future beyond the range of our human vision, with the overwhelming conviction that the Lord isnt just at present to stop the wheels of this world. It is not like the Lord to give such problems to His people, which are pressing upon this Christian nation today with such power, and which de- mand time for their solution, and then to cut the Gordian knot by the sword of His coming, as if He had met with a tangled question which He himself could not untie. Tliered, blue and white and black marble, which Divine Providence has brought into this land, tell of a building of God grander than any Persian palace, the foundations of which seem to be just being laid, rather than the com- pletion thereof to be nigh at hand. The vastness of the preparation points to the magnificence of the Lords dominion in the hearts and over the lives of men. The Book of Gods Providence is as much inspired as the Bible itself. And whoever studies the former as prayerfully as the latter, must labor hard to stifle the feeling that the clock of earth, instead of getting ready to stop, is being wound up to keep good time for a thousand years, as a prelude to that perfect righteousness which shall dwell forever on the new earth and beneath the new heavens. THE LONDON UNION MISSIONARY CONFERENCE. The London Union Missionary Conference was held in November. The Con- gregational churches of America were represented by Dr. Clark of the American Board, and Dr. 0. H. White of the Freedmens Aid Society, of London, who also represented the American Missionary Association, to which the F. A. Society is auxiliary. The last gathering of the kind in England was in 1860, at which one hundred and twenty-six delegates assembled. The sessions were mainly private, the societies represented were chiefly British, and plans were discussed rather than achievements reported. This later meeting was somewhat different in its character. Six hundred delegates were in attendance from various Lands and denominations of Christians. It was not so much a conference on methods as a comparison of results. The sessions of the week were apportioned to the work in the various lands. A great mass of information was collected, which will doubt- less be more impressive and complete in the volume of proceedings to be published, ~lian it could have been in the hearing.

The Lord's Work and the Lord's Coming Editorial 3

The ]ord8 Work ~tnd~ the Io~ds Coming. 3 An old and faithful friend from Sag Harbor, N. Y., sends us thirty dollars to make a life member, At the same time~ he asks us to star the names of his two oldest children, who were among the first of the twenty whom he has thus added to our list. They have gone up higher. He concludes thus: I was much interested in reading the article in December number, page 887, Students Want to Batch Who will Help l I would like for my $30 to go to assist in building one of those $100 houses. Cant you get some one to add the other $70, and put up one of those dwellings for those scholars who are so anxious to get an education to teach and to preach? THE LORDS WORK AND THE LORDS CONING. One of our friends, (Rev. T. S. Robie, North Carver, Mass.,) who was at our annual meeting at Taunton, remembering doubtless that the Prophetic Conference was in session during the same days in New York City, puts the two things together thus: One comes from a meeting like that, through which glimpses are caught of opportunities for work, of openings by the Unseen Hand into spheres of service which stretch out into the future beyond the range of our human vision, with the overwhelming conviction that the Lord isnt just at present to stop the wheels of this world. It is not like the Lord to give such problems to His people, which are pressing upon this Christian nation today with such power, and which de- mand time for their solution, and then to cut the Gordian knot by the sword of His coming, as if He had met with a tangled question which He himself could not untie. Tliered, blue and white and black marble, which Divine Providence has brought into this land, tell of a building of God grander than any Persian palace, the foundations of which seem to be just being laid, rather than the com- pletion thereof to be nigh at hand. The vastness of the preparation points to the magnificence of the Lords dominion in the hearts and over the lives of men. The Book of Gods Providence is as much inspired as the Bible itself. And whoever studies the former as prayerfully as the latter, must labor hard to stifle the feeling that the clock of earth, instead of getting ready to stop, is being wound up to keep good time for a thousand years, as a prelude to that perfect righteousness which shall dwell forever on the new earth and beneath the new heavens. THE LONDON UNION MISSIONARY CONFERENCE. The London Union Missionary Conference was held in November. The Con- gregational churches of America were represented by Dr. Clark of the American Board, and Dr. 0. H. White of the Freedmens Aid Society, of London, who also represented the American Missionary Association, to which the F. A. Society is auxiliary. The last gathering of the kind in England was in 1860, at which one hundred and twenty-six delegates assembled. The sessions were mainly private, the societies represented were chiefly British, and plans were discussed rather than achievements reported. This later meeting was somewhat different in its character. Six hundred delegates were in attendance from various Lands and denominations of Christians. It was not so much a conference on methods as a comparison of results. The sessions of the week were apportioned to the work in the various lands. A great mass of information was collected, which will doubt- less be more impressive and complete in the volume of proceedings to be published, ~lian it could have been in the hearing.

The London Union Missionary Conference Editorial 3-4

The ]ord8 Work ~tnd~ the Io~ds Coming. 3 An old and faithful friend from Sag Harbor, N. Y., sends us thirty dollars to make a life member, At the same time~ he asks us to star the names of his two oldest children, who were among the first of the twenty whom he has thus added to our list. They have gone up higher. He concludes thus: I was much interested in reading the article in December number, page 887, Students Want to Batch Who will Help l I would like for my $30 to go to assist in building one of those $100 houses. Cant you get some one to add the other $70, and put up one of those dwellings for those scholars who are so anxious to get an education to teach and to preach? THE LORDS WORK AND THE LORDS CONING. One of our friends, (Rev. T. S. Robie, North Carver, Mass.,) who was at our annual meeting at Taunton, remembering doubtless that the Prophetic Conference was in session during the same days in New York City, puts the two things together thus: One comes from a meeting like that, through which glimpses are caught of opportunities for work, of openings by the Unseen Hand into spheres of service which stretch out into the future beyond the range of our human vision, with the overwhelming conviction that the Lord isnt just at present to stop the wheels of this world. It is not like the Lord to give such problems to His people, which are pressing upon this Christian nation today with such power, and which de- mand time for their solution, and then to cut the Gordian knot by the sword of His coming, as if He had met with a tangled question which He himself could not untie. Tliered, blue and white and black marble, which Divine Providence has brought into this land, tell of a building of God grander than any Persian palace, the foundations of which seem to be just being laid, rather than the com- pletion thereof to be nigh at hand. The vastness of the preparation points to the magnificence of the Lords dominion in the hearts and over the lives of men. The Book of Gods Providence is as much inspired as the Bible itself. And whoever studies the former as prayerfully as the latter, must labor hard to stifle the feeling that the clock of earth, instead of getting ready to stop, is being wound up to keep good time for a thousand years, as a prelude to that perfect righteousness which shall dwell forever on the new earth and beneath the new heavens. THE LONDON UNION MISSIONARY CONFERENCE. The London Union Missionary Conference was held in November. The Con- gregational churches of America were represented by Dr. Clark of the American Board, and Dr. 0. H. White of the Freedmens Aid Society, of London, who also represented the American Missionary Association, to which the F. A. Society is auxiliary. The last gathering of the kind in England was in 1860, at which one hundred and twenty-six delegates assembled. The sessions were mainly private, the societies represented were chiefly British, and plans were discussed rather than achievements reported. This later meeting was somewhat different in its character. Six hundred delegates were in attendance from various Lands and denominations of Christians. It was not so much a conference on methods as a comparison of results. The sessions of the week were apportioned to the work in the various lands. A great mass of information was collected, which will doubt- less be more impressive and complete in the volume of proceedings to be published, ~lian it could have been in the hearing. 4 The Political Progress of the Freedmen. The character of the meetings may be inferred from the following sketch of the time devoted to the Dark Continent, in which we are especially inter- ested. We copy from the correspondent of the Christian Union: Two sessions on Tuesday were devoted to Africa and its many tribes. An Irish peer, the Earl of Cavan, presided, and the attendance of delegates and friends was large. Dr. Underhull, of the Baptist Missionary Society, discoursed on the benefits of emanci- pation, and showed what an important bearing the evangelizing of the negro race must have on the conversion of all West Africa. Sir Fowell Buxton, the son of the great advocate of emancipation forty years ago, described the three schemes now being carried out for planting new missions on the three great lakes of Central Africa. Dr. Stewart, of the Free Church Mission at Livingstonia, on Lake Nyassa, described the principle and the plan of the missionary institution at Lovedale, in the Cape Colony, which he has managed for several years. This is a model insti- tution, with industrial as well as educational and theological departments; and is just the thing which the native tribes of South Africa need for their enlighten- ment. Dr. Lowe, the Secretary of the Edinburgh Medical Missionary Society, also read an admirable paper on the work, methods and usefulness of medical missions generally. Several of the medical missionaries who have recently gone out to Africa were Dr. Lowes pupils. Among the effective speakers on these African missions were Dr. Waugemann, of Berlin, who described the work of the Berlin Society, especially in the Trans- vaal; Dr. White, of the Freedmens Aid Mission; the Rev. E. Schrenck, of Basle, who spoke of work in Ashantee; and the Rev. Dr. Moffat, who told the Confer- ence about his Bechuanas, and of course with his strong gray hair and his eighty- three years of age and sixty-two years of service for Christ, received an ovation at its hands. The noble presence and the stirring words of the grand old man on the African day were a striking feature in the meetings of the Conference. Such gatherings must help on the cause of Christian comity in missions, as well as broaden the views of all who are engaged in working the field under their hands. It is well to look up sometimes from our own furrow, even if we have to stop ploughing for a little, that we may realize that the field is the world, and that the harvest belongs to one Master. THE POLITICAL PROGRESS OF THE FREEDMEN. BY uzy. M. E. STRIEBY. Was it wise to give the ballot to the ex-slaves? The answer that came in the hour it was given, from the Congress that gave it, from the Northern people that sustained it, and from the colored people that enjoyed it, was an emphatic and enthusiastic Yes! The answer that came at that hour from the Southern white man was in a suppressed voice, and was an execration hissed out between grinding teeth. Since that hour the voice of the Southern white man has grown firmer, and, as it came up from misgoverned South Carolina and Louisiana, has rounded out into a full-toned No! Nay, more, it has been re-echoed from the North, and re- cently with special emphasis from the lips of one of the purest Christian scholars on the heights of Christian learning in New England. What answer do I give? Unhesitatingly, Yes! I say nothing about the mere party reason given either then or since, for I do not write as a partisan. I put the wisdom of the ballot on more substantial grounds. 1. It saved the Freedmen from being again reduced to slavery. Vagrant laws

Rev. M. E. Strieby Strieby, M. E., Rev. Political Progress of the Freedmen Editorial 4-6

4 The Political Progress of the Freedmen. The character of the meetings may be inferred from the following sketch of the time devoted to the Dark Continent, in which we are especially inter- ested. We copy from the correspondent of the Christian Union: Two sessions on Tuesday were devoted to Africa and its many tribes. An Irish peer, the Earl of Cavan, presided, and the attendance of delegates and friends was large. Dr. Underhull, of the Baptist Missionary Society, discoursed on the benefits of emanci- pation, and showed what an important bearing the evangelizing of the negro race must have on the conversion of all West Africa. Sir Fowell Buxton, the son of the great advocate of emancipation forty years ago, described the three schemes now being carried out for planting new missions on the three great lakes of Central Africa. Dr. Stewart, of the Free Church Mission at Livingstonia, on Lake Nyassa, described the principle and the plan of the missionary institution at Lovedale, in the Cape Colony, which he has managed for several years. This is a model insti- tution, with industrial as well as educational and theological departments; and is just the thing which the native tribes of South Africa need for their enlighten- ment. Dr. Lowe, the Secretary of the Edinburgh Medical Missionary Society, also read an admirable paper on the work, methods and usefulness of medical missions generally. Several of the medical missionaries who have recently gone out to Africa were Dr. Lowes pupils. Among the effective speakers on these African missions were Dr. Waugemann, of Berlin, who described the work of the Berlin Society, especially in the Trans- vaal; Dr. White, of the Freedmens Aid Mission; the Rev. E. Schrenck, of Basle, who spoke of work in Ashantee; and the Rev. Dr. Moffat, who told the Confer- ence about his Bechuanas, and of course with his strong gray hair and his eighty- three years of age and sixty-two years of service for Christ, received an ovation at its hands. The noble presence and the stirring words of the grand old man on the African day were a striking feature in the meetings of the Conference. Such gatherings must help on the cause of Christian comity in missions, as well as broaden the views of all who are engaged in working the field under their hands. It is well to look up sometimes from our own furrow, even if we have to stop ploughing for a little, that we may realize that the field is the world, and that the harvest belongs to one Master. THE POLITICAL PROGRESS OF THE FREEDMEN. BY uzy. M. E. STRIEBY. Was it wise to give the ballot to the ex-slaves? The answer that came in the hour it was given, from the Congress that gave it, from the Northern people that sustained it, and from the colored people that enjoyed it, was an emphatic and enthusiastic Yes! The answer that came at that hour from the Southern white man was in a suppressed voice, and was an execration hissed out between grinding teeth. Since that hour the voice of the Southern white man has grown firmer, and, as it came up from misgoverned South Carolina and Louisiana, has rounded out into a full-toned No! Nay, more, it has been re-echoed from the North, and re- cently with special emphasis from the lips of one of the purest Christian scholars on the heights of Christian learning in New England. What answer do I give? Unhesitatingly, Yes! I say nothing about the mere party reason given either then or since, for I do not write as a partisan. I put the wisdom of the ballot on more substantial grounds. 1. It saved the Freedmen from being again reduced to slavery. Vagrant laws The Political Progres8 of the Freedmen. were passed, which confined them to the plantations on which they had engaged to work, the end of which would have been a serfdom attaching them to the soil. The ballot saved them from this. 2. It gave the Freedmen and the South a free school systema greater boon than Southern legislation ever gave them beforea boon without which all else would have been well-nigh in vain. That system was modeled after the best pat- terns at the North, and although it has been somewhat modified and enfeebled in practical operation, is yet a solid corner-stone in the foundation of the new super- structure which the South is rearing. 3. The ballot gave the Freedman a sense of self-respect, and commanded for him the respect of others. To him it was an education and an inspiration. It gave him the standing of a man among men, and.prompted him to become worthy of his position. It was a power to him in the early days of his freedom, when he needed every help to sustain him in that freedom; and to-day, though it is held in check and almost useless, yet it is a slumbering giant, and is watched with re- spectful caution by the whites. For who can tell what such a slumbering power might do if aroused At present the black voter is politically conquered. The white mans gov- ernmentis established, and it is the purpose of the white man that it shall re- main so. This has been easily attained in the States where the white majority is undoubted. In the few States where the blacks are in the majority, the white man is determined to rule, peaceably if he can, forcibly if he must. The Chisholni murder and the Hamburg massacre are but samples of the methods that will be resorted to if the effort is pushed.persistently to restore the supremacy of the black man in politics. When we remember how that supremacy in those States was abused, how can we ask the restoration if the abuse must again follow? The problem is difficult. It can be solved only hy one formula. The black man must be protected in his political rights, and he~ must be so enlightened as to use and not abuse those rights. There will be mo permanent advantage from a mere partisan triumph of the black man. If achieved, as matters now stand, bayonets will again be needed to sustain it, and will become once more a source of angry discussion at the North and of concentrated bitterness at the South. The experiment may again be necessary; but a far better thing should be speedily, steadily and effi- ciently pushed forwardthe training of the colofed voter for an intelligent and responsible manhood and citizenship. If every colored voter could be accompanied to the polls by a file of soldiers armed with muskets, his ballot would represent the musket and not the man. But if he becomes a property owner, with all the interest ia the welfare of the com- munity which property gives; if he is educated and can take an intelligent interest in the welfare of the community ; and if he acquires a weight of character that challenges respect, he will need no soldiers to guard him to the polls, and his vote will represent the man and not the musket. When the black man shall reach such a position he conquers caste-prejudice and wipes out the color-line in politics. Color is significant only as it represents condition. Change the condition and the color is of no consequence. With that change the white and black men at the South will divide on politics as white men do at the North, from diffuring views as to the best measures to promote public weal. Look on this picture An armed and organized mob is breaking up a political gathering of the blacks and their friends, and in the background are the 6 These ify Brethren. overawed Freedmen retiring from the polls. Look, also, on this picture: A com~ pany of United States soldiers are keeping guard over a body of legislators, mostly black, who, with reckless rascality, are tquandering the public funds, to the ruin of the State and the disgrace of the nation. Turn not from these pictures with indifference, for they are no fancy sketches; nay, face them, for the history of at least two States of this Union is liable to be a perpetual oscillation between the two. But now look on this picture: A colored man is tilling his land, adorning his home, and gathering around him the refinements of life. Near by is the school-house, where his children, with hundreds of others, are receiving the instruction of skil- ful teachers, and not far off is the church edifice where that man and his neighbors worship God under the ministration of a well educated and pious minister. Which picture do we choose not as a matter of artistic preference, but as the practical model for patriotic work l The only safety is to extend that last picture till it shall cover the whole canvas and blot out the other two. In that way only can a life and death struggle between two irreconcilable forces be avoided. THESE MY BRETHREN. In the Saviours great Inasmuch there is the power of personality. I was an hungered; I was thirsty; I was naked; I was a stranger; I was sick; I was in prison. It was Christ in the person of these suffering and lowly ones; and ser- vice done to them was done to Him. He might well have stopped there. But the marvel of His personal identification with them is in the relationship which He claims between Himself and them these my brethren. Oh, the touching con- descension to name them by this title! What we do for these humble and deso- late ones we are not only doing for our Lord, but for the brethren of our Lord. He takes it as a special favor to Hims~f. And this service is graduated to the lowest capacityit is service done to only one of the least of these. The standard is not that we should serve the mass of these Uis brethren, but any one of them, according to the measure of our ability, even down to a single act done to one of them in the right spirit and as a revelation of a character in which we delight. Then the obligation runs up to as great a number as our opportunity and our ability may reach. The intervention of organic efficiency greatly multiplies the duty and the privi- lege of the individual. The American Missionary Association, as has been potently said, is set for the care of the three despised races in our country. Though the Indianand the Negro and the Chinaman are the objects of prejudice and violence and injustice and hatred on the part of our people, nevertheless Christ speaks of them as among these my brethren ; and the prayers an4 the sympathy, and the service and the giving of substance in their behalf He counts as rendered to Him. This organization cannot discharge any ones personal duty, but its instrumentality is offered to all who would use it in the discharge of indi- vidual obligation to Christ and to His brethren. Its opportunities belong to all who would use them, and by these a single Christian mayreach not only unto one of the least of these, but unto many. At the Great Day, when the Master shall surprise you, humble Christian, with a benediction for service rendered to His brethren among these despised ones, and you deprecatingly answer, when and where, his revealing response may bewhen you reached them with your prayers and your substance through that Association which offered you its means of operation. And surely all its workers among

These My Brethren Editorial 6-7

6 These ify Brethren. overawed Freedmen retiring from the polls. Look, also, on this picture: A com~ pany of United States soldiers are keeping guard over a body of legislators, mostly black, who, with reckless rascality, are tquandering the public funds, to the ruin of the State and the disgrace of the nation. Turn not from these pictures with indifference, for they are no fancy sketches; nay, face them, for the history of at least two States of this Union is liable to be a perpetual oscillation between the two. But now look on this picture: A colored man is tilling his land, adorning his home, and gathering around him the refinements of life. Near by is the school-house, where his children, with hundreds of others, are receiving the instruction of skil- ful teachers, and not far off is the church edifice where that man and his neighbors worship God under the ministration of a well educated and pious minister. Which picture do we choose not as a matter of artistic preference, but as the practical model for patriotic work l The only safety is to extend that last picture till it shall cover the whole canvas and blot out the other two. In that way only can a life and death struggle between two irreconcilable forces be avoided. THESE MY BRETHREN. In the Saviours great Inasmuch there is the power of personality. I was an hungered; I was thirsty; I was naked; I was a stranger; I was sick; I was in prison. It was Christ in the person of these suffering and lowly ones; and ser- vice done to them was done to Him. He might well have stopped there. But the marvel of His personal identification with them is in the relationship which He claims between Himself and them these my brethren. Oh, the touching con- descension to name them by this title! What we do for these humble and deso- late ones we are not only doing for our Lord, but for the brethren of our Lord. He takes it as a special favor to Hims~f. And this service is graduated to the lowest capacityit is service done to only one of the least of these. The standard is not that we should serve the mass of these Uis brethren, but any one of them, according to the measure of our ability, even down to a single act done to one of them in the right spirit and as a revelation of a character in which we delight. Then the obligation runs up to as great a number as our opportunity and our ability may reach. The intervention of organic efficiency greatly multiplies the duty and the privi- lege of the individual. The American Missionary Association, as has been potently said, is set for the care of the three despised races in our country. Though the Indianand the Negro and the Chinaman are the objects of prejudice and violence and injustice and hatred on the part of our people, nevertheless Christ speaks of them as among these my brethren ; and the prayers an4 the sympathy, and the service and the giving of substance in their behalf He counts as rendered to Him. This organization cannot discharge any ones personal duty, but its instrumentality is offered to all who would use it in the discharge of indi- vidual obligation to Christ and to His brethren. Its opportunities belong to all who would use them, and by these a single Christian mayreach not only unto one of the least of these, but unto many. At the Great Day, when the Master shall surprise you, humble Christian, with a benediction for service rendered to His brethren among these despised ones, and you deprecatingly answer, when and where, his revealing response may bewhen you reached them with your prayers and your substance through that Association which offered you its means of operation. And surely all its workers among Five [L~8t8 of American Civilization. 7. these outcast peoples, in the ostracism and opposition and hatred which confront them, may even in this life have their abundant recompense in this, that they are serving those whom the Master owns as these my brethren. FIVE TESTS OF AMERICAN CIVILIZATION. Notes of an Address at the Annual Meeting. BY PROF. c. D. HARTRANFT, D. D., HARTFORD CONN. (1.) The Indians, the Negroes and the Chinese I regard as the divinely ap- pointed agents by which the principles that underlie American civilization are to be finally tested. Every utterance on the Fourth of July, from the Declaration of Independence till this hour, has made the right of a8ylum. a pre-eminent feature of American civilization. So whenever a man has been impelled by the dictates of his conscience to leave his native land and seek a foreign shore, that he might not be compelled to live in false alliance with the Church and worship God in a way he did not elect; whenever a man, full of noble impulses, has felt, the hope- lessness of his life, so far as any ambitious scheme was concerned; or the education of his childrena man feeling the tyranny of continuous labor, without the pos- sibility of accumulationthis man has ever been gladly welcomed to America. So the Puritan, so the Huguenot, so the Dutchman, so the Lutheran whatever a mans religious training, America has given him hearty greeting. Even the atheist and the infidel have found a refuge under the folds of this flag. America has welcomed them to the shadow of her pines and palmettoes and to her golden Pacific. But what a niggardly right of asylum does she give to the poor Negro, as he is emancipated from his bonds; and to the wretched Indian, whom she shuts up in Western territories; and, most of all, to the poor Chinaman, as he comes from his joss-house, with the instincts of a higher civilization impelling him from the stagnation of centuries to the shores of the Pacific! It behooves us to inquire whether this precious right of asylum is to be denied to the weaker races; whether we are going to lose this peculiar feature of our nation, that throws its broad land open to the world. Is it not true now, as in the past, that this is a vast sanctuary, and that if a man lays hold of the horns of its altar, there shall be nothing to drag him from his possession of freedom? He stands on holy ground. In the British islands, the races that have appeared in its history have been amalgamatedwelded by the mace and the battle-axe. In France, the various tribes and races that, one after another, possessed that land, were woven together, in warp and woof, by fire and blood. In Germany, the Prussians have brought together that great mass of people as one, through bitter and tremendous wars, the echoes of which have scarce died away. America pro- poses a far different solution. She recognizes the nobility of the characteristics developed by the various races. She wants the African, the Chinaman, the Teutonall racesto labor side by side; to develop not only her wealth and pros- perity, but, most of all, the typical American humanity. American civilization can better endure the savagery of the Indian, the ignor- ance and brutality of the Negro, and the semicivilization of the Chinese, than it can afford to fraternize with a civilization that is impregnated with a spirit of ec- clesiasticism, or endure the philosophies of St. Louis or the Internationals. Rather is it for us to overcome these forces that are the outcroppings of centuries of Roman development, as well as those of Indian or Chinese or Negro semi- civilization.

Prof. C. D. Hartranft, D.D. Hartranft, C. D., Prof., D.D. Five Tests of American Civilization Editorial 7-10

Five [L~8t8 of American Civilization. 7. these outcast peoples, in the ostracism and opposition and hatred which confront them, may even in this life have their abundant recompense in this, that they are serving those whom the Master owns as these my brethren. FIVE TESTS OF AMERICAN CIVILIZATION. Notes of an Address at the Annual Meeting. BY PROF. c. D. HARTRANFT, D. D., HARTFORD CONN. (1.) The Indians, the Negroes and the Chinese I regard as the divinely ap- pointed agents by which the principles that underlie American civilization are to be finally tested. Every utterance on the Fourth of July, from the Declaration of Independence till this hour, has made the right of a8ylum. a pre-eminent feature of American civilization. So whenever a man has been impelled by the dictates of his conscience to leave his native land and seek a foreign shore, that he might not be compelled to live in false alliance with the Church and worship God in a way he did not elect; whenever a man, full of noble impulses, has felt, the hope- lessness of his life, so far as any ambitious scheme was concerned; or the education of his childrena man feeling the tyranny of continuous labor, without the pos- sibility of accumulationthis man has ever been gladly welcomed to America. So the Puritan, so the Huguenot, so the Dutchman, so the Lutheran whatever a mans religious training, America has given him hearty greeting. Even the atheist and the infidel have found a refuge under the folds of this flag. America has welcomed them to the shadow of her pines and palmettoes and to her golden Pacific. But what a niggardly right of asylum does she give to the poor Negro, as he is emancipated from his bonds; and to the wretched Indian, whom she shuts up in Western territories; and, most of all, to the poor Chinaman, as he comes from his joss-house, with the instincts of a higher civilization impelling him from the stagnation of centuries to the shores of the Pacific! It behooves us to inquire whether this precious right of asylum is to be denied to the weaker races; whether we are going to lose this peculiar feature of our nation, that throws its broad land open to the world. Is it not true now, as in the past, that this is a vast sanctuary, and that if a man lays hold of the horns of its altar, there shall be nothing to drag him from his possession of freedom? He stands on holy ground. In the British islands, the races that have appeared in its history have been amalgamatedwelded by the mace and the battle-axe. In France, the various tribes and races that, one after another, possessed that land, were woven together, in warp and woof, by fire and blood. In Germany, the Prussians have brought together that great mass of people as one, through bitter and tremendous wars, the echoes of which have scarce died away. America pro- poses a far different solution. She recognizes the nobility of the characteristics developed by the various races. She wants the African, the Chinaman, the Teutonall racesto labor side by side; to develop not only her wealth and pros- perity, but, most of all, the typical American humanity. American civilization can better endure the savagery of the Indian, the ignor- ance and brutality of the Negro, and the semicivilization of the Chinese, than it can afford to fraternize with a civilization that is impregnated with a spirit of ec- clesiasticism, or endure the philosophies of St. Louis or the Internationals. Rather is it for us to overcome these forces that are the outcroppings of centuries of Roman development, as well as those of Indian or Chinese or Negro semi- civilization. 8 live Tests of American civilization. This right of asylum involves another thingthe right of a man to say, I will leave this land and go to another the right to migrate if he does not find things subservient to him. We once hailed the Irishman to come and build our rail- roads. We welcome the German now, as he comes and terraces our mountains and teaches us how to garden. We welcome the Frenchmanwe welcome all. But we say, Lo! poor Indian, go West. East of the Appalachian is too good for you; we want it. Go West; go West. We will give no rest to the soles of your feet. Do we want the Black Hills? Migrate I We will surround you with a cordon of soldiers and a cordon of Government agents, who will eat the life out of you. Keep on, poor ignorant, keep on! As to the African, there are not a few Americans, even in this day, who think a righteous solution of the African question is to ship them all off to the dark continent. So far as the American Colonization Society keeps in view education and other Christian instrumentalities, I bid them God-speed; but if. they desire to send the Negro out of the country, I say, No! a thousand times, No! Let us solve the problem right here where God has placed them. And we say to the Chinese, as he comes upon his ship, Turn your prow back towards the Flowery Kingdom; dont touch our golden West. Is that the spirit that welcomes the Irishman, the German, the Italian, the Frenchman? Why not give as broad an opening to the Chinaman as to the Irishman? (2.) In the next place, God is testing that principle which is set forth in the preamble of our Constitutionthe right of a man to pursue happiness in such a way as he may elect, provided he does no wrong to his neighbor. And I opine that although happiness involves the pursuit of higher aims, it begins on the basis of labor. Labor is the essential element of American civilization. If I labor, then I have the right of choice to enter into whatever labor I please. No matter whether I am an adept or not, circumstances will give the verdict. With the right of choice of a mans calling comes the right of competition. Carry it to its extreme, if you please. If there are fifty-two thousand clerks, I have a right to become the fifty-two thousand and first, and starve. Then, after the inherent right of labor follows the right to such property as I may accumulate. What I may produce, that is mine absolutely, and no man can touch it. Here we are brought face to face with this tremendous question between Irish and German I~abor, and the low-priced labor of either the Negro or the Chinaman. But, Ameri- can citizens and Christians, if we respect the right of a man to exercise such func- tions as God has given him in such way as his conscience may dictate, and to choose his own occupation, shall we not defend this right of labor, and the right to pursue happiness as each may elect, and in the face of Communism, defend the right of the Chinese to enter the market and compete with all labor of whatever nationality? (3.) There is a third right or principle put to the testthat every man is equal before the law. Wfiether he be Jew or Gentile, Irishman or German, Negro or Chinaman, he is the equal of all men before God. But what justice can a China- man get out of a Hoodlum court? What justice has the Negro got out of a South- ern court? To the establishment of that justice we must bend our energies, for it - is vital to our institutions that a man before the law is equal with his neighbor. If you have broken the shackles of the Negro, break those of the Indian. If he outrages the law, try him by process of the law and make him amenable, but deal with him as a citizen. I opine that we shall arrive at this, sooner or later. Of course this includes with it the privilege of every one to enter public life, pro- vided he proves his capacity. -h Five ]ie.st8 of American Civilization. 9 (4.) But there is another principle being tested, and that is the right of education. It is a settled point in the development of American civilization, that education is essential to the proper discipline of the citizensome degree, at least, of element- ary education. Now when, according to the census of 1870, in the States of Mississippi and Texas, 96 per cent. of the colored people were thoroughly ignor- ant; and when in another State, 95 per cent. were completely ignorant; in another, 93 per cent.; in two others, 91 per cent.; and in a last one, 90 per cent.; 88 per cent. of the entire colored people of the South being in perfect ignorance ;does it not behoove us to have a law for compulsory education if we hope to have true culture and citizenship? Was our late President far from right when he brought forward this idea? What salvation is there for the Southern States unless uni- versal education shall be carried into effect? As the right to enter into competi- tion is inherent as much as the right of choice in labor, so we regard the right of choice of ones religion. The whole way should be made open for the highest ac- quisition of intellectual and moral knowledge. (5.) So, too, our Protestant Christianity is under test. And here we are encoun- tered at once by the fact that Christians still cultivate the caste spirit. If the Jew drew such a subtle line between himself and the Gentile, the white Christian draws a similar line between himself and the black Christian. If the Greek con- sidered himself to be of such high intelligence that he classed all others as bar- barians, Christians allow their prejudices to make the same broad distinctions be- tween different classes of humanity, which it was the office of Jesus Christ blessed he His name !to obliterate and utterly extinguish. That prejudice, that caste spirit which Christians cultivate in the North to an extent that amounts to social ostracism, must be broken down, if we would maintain Protestant Christi- anity. Further, this question connects itself with the true missionary spirit. The best way to evangelize China is to evangelize the Chinese as they come to the Pacific Coast. The best way to evangelize Africa is to evangelize the African Negro of the South. Over against Protestant Christians in the South and the Chinese on the Pacific is that dark power which has involved the world in hope- less contentions. There stands the Jesuit with his deep, treacherous features, his characterless casuistry, and his sacrifice of all things else to glorify the Church of Rome, no matter what may be the result on his country. That subtle power which permeates our political institutions with such great magnitude and force, stands face to face with Protestanisra in the Southwith the Negro question, the Chinese question, and the Indian question. If we are to serve Protestant Christianity, we must free ourselves of caste, and learn to love the African and the Chinaman at our doors. It is easy to speak well of the Chinnman away off in Chinato have an overflow of sympathy for the poor African away in the dark continent; but it is a very different thing to have sympathy for them in this country. The spirit of the Gospel of Jesus Christ must actuate us and lead us to this. These, then, are the five great principles that underlie American civilization principles that are being tested by these three races or nationalities. Our profes- sions are large. Let us live up to them in these five great principles. It is Lord Bacon who says that When hempe is spun, England is done meaning that when Henry, Elizabeth, Mary, Philip and Edward had passed away, England would be done. We may say that jf these five principlesthe right of asylum, the right of labor, of political freedom, of education, and free play to Protestant Christianity be doneAmerica is done. God save the State! And what is the agencyor one agencyby which that may be accomplished? 10 Return of Rev. lloyd Snelson. The American Missionary Association, because it gives us Christian education. Because it brings together the college, the church and the home. And will not your devotion to a pure Christianity, free from the spirit of caste, and filled with the spirit of genuine love, manifest itself by your support of such an Associatidn? May we not gauge your feelings in regard 10 these five principles by the support you give to such a society? May we not implore you that as you value the rights of property and free government you array yourself solidly against Communism and its allyRomanism; because ihese are craftily working together. Would you behold free Protestant Christianity established in this country? Then give your support to this Association, that these three races may prove us to be a people who love liberty in its deepest significance as liberty in Christ. RETURN OF REV. FLOYD SNELSON. Just after the annual meeting xve learned that the health of Mrs. Snelson was in such condition as to make her speedy return from the Mendi Mission, West Africa, a probable necessity. Her husband has arrived with herself, their children, and those of Dr. James, whose wife had died abroad. The change of climate and of occupation has already proved of great benefit to her. It is a great disappoint- ment to us all to lose so soon the earnest and discreet service of the head of our Mendi Mission. Whether he will he able to return or not is still an unsettled ques- tion. But these experiences nrc teaching us some valuable lessons. First of them is this, that we must send no men or women to the West Coast of Africa without submitting them to a severe 1)hysical examination, such as is required for enlist- ment into the army or as a prerequisite to a life insurance policy. For we find that upon those who went from this country in thoroughly sound health, with no weakness from previous disease or tendency to sl)ecial complaints, the climate has bad little or no bad effect; but where there was any such predisposition or impair- ment of physical vigor, the malarial heats of the West coast have hastened its rapiil development. We send no more recruits, then, without medical attestation to their soundness of body, in addition to the testimony we have heretofore re- quired as to their intellectual and spiritual health. Mr. Snelson lirmogs much valuable information from the field, which we hope to lay before our readers at an eary day. NEWS AND ITEMS FROM THE CHURCHES. MAcox, G ~. Rev. Stanley E. Lathrop, who was graduated eight years ago from the Chicizo Theological Seminary, commenced pastoral work at Macon, December 1st. He ~ rites: I am quite agreeably surprised with everything thus fnr. 1 slid I (10 i lie hiest I eon for this people, with Gods help. MARIETTA, (4~. -The school prospers, and, with two other schools, is exerting a marked iii ~ie on the people. The Sunday-school and literary society are hot Ii iloiiig g(iOil uovk. MARION, ALA. - Re. Geo. E. Hill writes: Our church has received from the Sun (lay-sc boil at Weymouth, Mass,, Coltons large missionary map, and I have lid tie pleasure ot inroilueing my people to a view of the worldthe field of nnssiiins. Ilicy pripiuse to contribute monthly to the cause. Our Sunday-school is lilbag up.

Return of Rev. Floyd Snelson Editorial 10

10 Return of Rev. lloyd Snelson. The American Missionary Association, because it gives us Christian education. Because it brings together the college, the church and the home. And will not your devotion to a pure Christianity, free from the spirit of caste, and filled with the spirit of genuine love, manifest itself by your support of such an Associatidn? May we not gauge your feelings in regard 10 these five principles by the support you give to such a society? May we not implore you that as you value the rights of property and free government you array yourself solidly against Communism and its allyRomanism; because ihese are craftily working together. Would you behold free Protestant Christianity established in this country? Then give your support to this Association, that these three races may prove us to be a people who love liberty in its deepest significance as liberty in Christ. RETURN OF REV. FLOYD SNELSON. Just after the annual meeting xve learned that the health of Mrs. Snelson was in such condition as to make her speedy return from the Mendi Mission, West Africa, a probable necessity. Her husband has arrived with herself, their children, and those of Dr. James, whose wife had died abroad. The change of climate and of occupation has already proved of great benefit to her. It is a great disappoint- ment to us all to lose so soon the earnest and discreet service of the head of our Mendi Mission. Whether he will he able to return or not is still an unsettled ques- tion. But these experiences nrc teaching us some valuable lessons. First of them is this, that we must send no men or women to the West Coast of Africa without submitting them to a severe 1)hysical examination, such as is required for enlist- ment into the army or as a prerequisite to a life insurance policy. For we find that upon those who went from this country in thoroughly sound health, with no weakness from previous disease or tendency to sl)ecial complaints, the climate has bad little or no bad effect; but where there was any such predisposition or impair- ment of physical vigor, the malarial heats of the West coast have hastened its rapiil development. We send no more recruits, then, without medical attestation to their soundness of body, in addition to the testimony we have heretofore re- quired as to their intellectual and spiritual health. Mr. Snelson lirmogs much valuable information from the field, which we hope to lay before our readers at an eary day. NEWS AND ITEMS FROM THE CHURCHES. MAcox, G ~. Rev. Stanley E. Lathrop, who was graduated eight years ago from the Chicizo Theological Seminary, commenced pastoral work at Macon, December 1st. He ~ rites: I am quite agreeably surprised with everything thus fnr. 1 slid I (10 i lie hiest I eon for this people, with Gods help. MARIETTA, (4~. -The school prospers, and, with two other schools, is exerting a marked iii ~ie on the people. The Sunday-school and literary society are hot Ii iloiiig g(iOil uovk. MARION, ALA. - Re. Geo. E. Hill writes: Our church has received from the Sun (lay-sc boil at Weymouth, Mass,, Coltons large missionary map, and I have lid tie pleasure ot inroilueing my people to a view of the worldthe field of nnssiiins. Ilicy pripiuse to contribute monthly to the cause. Our Sunday-school is lilbag up.

News and Items from the Churches Editorial 10-11

10 Return of Rev. lloyd Snelson. The American Missionary Association, because it gives us Christian education. Because it brings together the college, the church and the home. And will not your devotion to a pure Christianity, free from the spirit of caste, and filled with the spirit of genuine love, manifest itself by your support of such an Associatidn? May we not gauge your feelings in regard 10 these five principles by the support you give to such a society? May we not implore you that as you value the rights of property and free government you array yourself solidly against Communism and its allyRomanism; because ihese are craftily working together. Would you behold free Protestant Christianity established in this country? Then give your support to this Association, that these three races may prove us to be a people who love liberty in its deepest significance as liberty in Christ. RETURN OF REV. FLOYD SNELSON. Just after the annual meeting xve learned that the health of Mrs. Snelson was in such condition as to make her speedy return from the Mendi Mission, West Africa, a probable necessity. Her husband has arrived with herself, their children, and those of Dr. James, whose wife had died abroad. The change of climate and of occupation has already proved of great benefit to her. It is a great disappoint- ment to us all to lose so soon the earnest and discreet service of the head of our Mendi Mission. Whether he will he able to return or not is still an unsettled ques- tion. But these experiences nrc teaching us some valuable lessons. First of them is this, that we must send no men or women to the West Coast of Africa without submitting them to a severe 1)hysical examination, such as is required for enlist- ment into the army or as a prerequisite to a life insurance policy. For we find that upon those who went from this country in thoroughly sound health, with no weakness from previous disease or tendency to sl)ecial complaints, the climate has bad little or no bad effect; but where there was any such predisposition or impair- ment of physical vigor, the malarial heats of the West coast have hastened its rapiil development. We send no more recruits, then, without medical attestation to their soundness of body, in addition to the testimony we have heretofore re- quired as to their intellectual and spiritual health. Mr. Snelson lirmogs much valuable information from the field, which we hope to lay before our readers at an eary day. NEWS AND ITEMS FROM THE CHURCHES. MAcox, G ~. Rev. Stanley E. Lathrop, who was graduated eight years ago from the Chicizo Theological Seminary, commenced pastoral work at Macon, December 1st. He ~ rites: I am quite agreeably surprised with everything thus fnr. 1 slid I (10 i lie hiest I eon for this people, with Gods help. MARIETTA, (4~. -The school prospers, and, with two other schools, is exerting a marked iii ~ie on the people. The Sunday-school and literary society are hot Ii iloiiig g(iOil uovk. MARION, ALA. - Re. Geo. E. Hill writes: Our church has received from the Sun (lay-sc boil at Weymouth, Mass,, Coltons large missionary map, and I have lid tie pleasure ot inroilueing my people to a view of the worldthe field of nnssiiins. Ilicy pripiuse to contribute monthly to the cause. Our Sunday-school is lilbag up. General Notes. 11 MONTGOMERY, ALA.ReV. Flavel Bascom, iD.D., who commenced work for the winter December 1st, writes: My first impressions are very favorable. Mv heart is drawn out toward the people, and I expect to enjoy my work for theiui very much. SELMA, ALA.ReV. C. B. Curtis has gone from Burlington, Wis., to the charge of the church here. SHELBY, ALA.A Congregational church was organized Oct~ber 10th, by Rev. G. W. Andrews, of the Theological Department of Talladega College, consisting of twenty-one members (twelve men and nine women). Rev. J. D. Smith, a grad- uate of Talladega Theological Department, is pastor. GENERAL NOTES. The Freedmen. Over 3,000 people attended the Agricultural Fair for colored people held at Talladega, Ala., in November, under the auspices of the college. Stock, farm products, cookery, needle and fancy work, flowers and pictures, were brought in for exhibition. Contests were held in athletic sports, and in spelling, declaim- ing, etc., between students of the different schools. Soveral hundred white peo- ple attended, and showed their interest by acting as judges on the committees with the colored people. The fair was kept entirely free from all the objection- able features which so often mar our State fairs, and indeed was opened with prayer, and, after the addresses and award of premiums, closed with the Doxology. Dr. Rust, the Corresponding Secretary of the Freedmens Aid Society of thu Al. E. Church, reports that its work during this year has never been exceeded in any year of its history. It has erected more school edifices, more commodious and commanding; educated more teachers, prepared more ministers, led more souls to Christ, and set in operation more streams of elevating influence, done more and better work for Christ and humanity, than in any like period before,~ The financial statement for the year ending July 1,1878, gives its total receipts for the year as $63, 403, and its expenditures, mainly for salaries and board of teachers and educational expenses, including $3,000 paid on its debt, at the same. The society has aided in the establishment of five chartered institutions having full collegiate powers, three theological and two niedical schools, also chartered, and ten other educational institutions. Dr. Ruffner, Superintendent of Public Instruction in Virginia, claims that $850, 000 was collected from the people and set apart by law for the support of the common schools, and charges that this, with the interest, has been diverted from its proper use and applied to the ordinary expenses of the State Government. A national colored Baptist educational convention was held last summer at Nashville, Tenn. In an address published by them they offer heartfelt thanks to Northern Baptists, who alone have helped them to what educational facilities they have enjoyed. To the Southern white Baptists they are grateful for the good resolutions they have passed in fm or of the black man. They urge the colored Baptists to support their own publishing house, newspaper, and the edu cational enterprises of the American Baptist Homo ALission Soci ty. Public sentiment has almost effaced the color line in Virginia; given politi- cal ircedora and safety in North Carolina; and created a power~ ~l party of

General Notes Editorial 11-14

General Notes. 11 MONTGOMERY, ALA.ReV. Flavel Bascom, iD.D., who commenced work for the winter December 1st, writes: My first impressions are very favorable. Mv heart is drawn out toward the people, and I expect to enjoy my work for theiui very much. SELMA, ALA.ReV. C. B. Curtis has gone from Burlington, Wis., to the charge of the church here. SHELBY, ALA.A Congregational church was organized Oct~ber 10th, by Rev. G. W. Andrews, of the Theological Department of Talladega College, consisting of twenty-one members (twelve men and nine women). Rev. J. D. Smith, a grad- uate of Talladega Theological Department, is pastor. GENERAL NOTES. The Freedmen. Over 3,000 people attended the Agricultural Fair for colored people held at Talladega, Ala., in November, under the auspices of the college. Stock, farm products, cookery, needle and fancy work, flowers and pictures, were brought in for exhibition. Contests were held in athletic sports, and in spelling, declaim- ing, etc., between students of the different schools. Soveral hundred white peo- ple attended, and showed their interest by acting as judges on the committees with the colored people. The fair was kept entirely free from all the objection- able features which so often mar our State fairs, and indeed was opened with prayer, and, after the addresses and award of premiums, closed with the Doxology. Dr. Rust, the Corresponding Secretary of the Freedmens Aid Society of thu Al. E. Church, reports that its work during this year has never been exceeded in any year of its history. It has erected more school edifices, more commodious and commanding; educated more teachers, prepared more ministers, led more souls to Christ, and set in operation more streams of elevating influence, done more and better work for Christ and humanity, than in any like period before,~ The financial statement for the year ending July 1,1878, gives its total receipts for the year as $63, 403, and its expenditures, mainly for salaries and board of teachers and educational expenses, including $3,000 paid on its debt, at the same. The society has aided in the establishment of five chartered institutions having full collegiate powers, three theological and two niedical schools, also chartered, and ten other educational institutions. Dr. Ruffner, Superintendent of Public Instruction in Virginia, claims that $850, 000 was collected from the people and set apart by law for the support of the common schools, and charges that this, with the interest, has been diverted from its proper use and applied to the ordinary expenses of the State Government. A national colored Baptist educational convention was held last summer at Nashville, Tenn. In an address published by them they offer heartfelt thanks to Northern Baptists, who alone have helped them to what educational facilities they have enjoyed. To the Southern white Baptists they are grateful for the good resolutions they have passed in fm or of the black man. They urge the colored Baptists to support their own publishing house, newspaper, and the edu cational enterprises of the American Baptist Homo ALission Soci ty. Public sentiment has almost effaced the color line in Virginia; given politi- cal ircedora and safety in North Carolina; and created a power~ ~l party of 12 (}ene,al Notes. Independents in Georgia; and it will bring South Carolina to her senses in time. Moral forces require more time and patience than physical force. Ghri stian (hi ton. Two colored students of Mr. Spurgeons Pastors College, Rev. Messrs. Richardson and Johnson, with their wives, have left England as missionaries to Central Africa. They were all freed slaves from this country. The Rev. Alfred Saher, English Baptist Missionary at the Cameroons, West Africa, has translated the Bible into the language of the people, and now reports upwards of 2,000 converts. The Indians, Mr. Wheeler writes from Keshena Agency, Wisconsin, of the second success- ful Agricultural Fair among the Menomonees. About 200 entries of corn and pota- toes were made, with other vegetables, grains and grasses in abundance. The displays of womans work and of live stock were very fine. A ploughing match was held. About $200 was expended in premiums, voted from the tribal funds for that purpose. Advantage was taken of the opportunity for giving instruction in the arts of agriculture, and for exhorting them to keep their children faithfully in the schools. Such gatherings both prove and promote progress. Brig. Gen. Pope reports that the late outbreak of the Cheyennes was caused by starvation. He says of the Indians in general: If they are left with the means to go to war, as is the custom, we simply sleep on a volcano. Unless, therefore, ample, and above all, regular supplies of food can be guaranteed to the Indians, I am compelled, in justice to the Government and the frontier settlers, to ask that more troops be sent to the agencies in the Indian Territory, and that at least two of the posts in Western Kansas be largely reinforced by cavalry. I have also to ask that any Indians sent from the North into this department be disarmed and dismounted before being sent here, so that they can be placed in the same condi- tion as the Indians with whom they are to live. Major Mizener reports more in detail :The causes which led to the leaving of the Northern Cheyennes may be summed up as follows: They were disappointed in the country. Their rations were poor and entirely insufficient. They were home-sick, despondent and disappointed, and were anxious to get back to a coun- try better known to them, and where game was to be had, while here they did not have enough to eat. General Sheridan attributes our Indian wars to two classes of causes; the first being the constant encroachment upon the lands of the Indians, sacredly guaran- teed to them by treaty, and the constant removal of the tribes to distant reserva- tions, in which they are again troubled by the tide of immigration. He says no other nation in the world would have attempted the reduction of these wild tribes, and occupation of their country, with less than 60,000 or 70,000 men. Secretary Schurz affirms that the real cause of Indian wars has been the breaking of treaties. He recites an exhaustive history of Indian wars to show that this has been the case, and that very few of the wars have arisen from the maladministration of agents. Gen. Sherman, in his annual report, declares that many of the Indians prefer death to agricultural toil; that to convert them from a nomadic into a pastoral race is the first and fundamental problem; that each tribe must be dealt with ac General Note8. cording to its own nature; that whatever department of the Government is charged with this work, must be intrested with large discretion to adapt its measures to emergencies. He traces the Indian wars generally to broken promises, insufficient rations and impending starvation. Of the joint committee to which the transfer of the Indians to the War De- partment is referred, the three members of the Senate are from Nebraska, Kentucky and Illinois; of the five members of the House, but one comes from as far East as this. The committee, therefore, represents communities that favor the army. It is understood that the Indians themselves do not desire the change; that the army does not want the responsibility; yet that it will probably be done, unless the Presi- dent interferes, because the Indian ring desires it, and because the army makes it a point of honor. The Chinese. The First Church in San Francisco, Dr. Stones, has just opened a,~ new and well-appointed room in the basement for its mission and Chinese Sunday-school. The Petaluma Church has also enlarged its lecture-room for the use of its Chinese school. As the Chinese children are not permitted to enter the San Francisco public schools, those who have embraced Christianity are taught in the Union Mission in the old Globe Hotel. The school has two sessions, one of which is conducted by an American lady, the other by Hung Mung Chung, who is a fine Chinese scholar and a man of much dignity and scholarly attainments, said to be a lineal descend- ant of Confucius. During the past year Hung Mung Chung was baptized and be came a member of the Protestant Church for Chinese. He teaches the children the Chinese classics and the maxims and precepts of Confucius. Each session of the school is closed by singing and repeating the Lords Prayerin the morning in Eaglish, in the afternoon in Chinese. The San Francisco Chinamen contributed $1,200 to the yellow fever sufferers of the South. The sand-lot meetings have not yet reported the amount of their collections. The Chinese Sunday-school in Chicago has been in existence nearly six months, with an average attendance of fourteen scholars. It is said that the num- ber can be largely increased if teachers can be procured. Rev. W. P. Paxson, Superintendent of the missionary work of the American S. S. Union in their Southwestern Department, says: One striking event in my missionary work has been the organization of a Chinese Sunday-school in St. Louis. ~ Mr. Ha Shan Sin was baptized last Sabbath by Rev. E. D. Murphy at the Immanuel Presbyterian Chapel of this city. The young man is about twenty-two years old, was born in San Francisco, though he has spent most of his life in China. rf his is the sixth of the Chinamen that have been received into the churches of this city, Three have been enrolled among the members of the Fourth Avenue Presbyterian Church, Dr. Howard Crosbys. The first Chinaman was admitted to citizenship in the United States by nat- uralization, last week, and we count the event an auspicious one just at this time. The man is Wong Ah Lee; by trade he is a cigar-maker, and his wife,is an Irish- woman. With a view, mainly, to make a case which can be carried up to a con- 14 Revival in howard UniversityA Destitute County. clusive decision from the highest court, the Judge here ruled that a Chinaman is either white or black, and so must come in. Californias ruling has been that a Mongolian is neither white or black, and so cannot come in. Uongregationalist~ December 4, OUR QUERY COLUMN. QuerySouth of the Ohio River the work of caring for the sick falls to the colored peo- pie. During the past weeks there has heen greater demand for skilled nurses than for com- petent teachers. How can A. M. A. schools prepare their students for this important profession? What is the hest method of instructing pupils, in a knowledge of the simpler details concerning the proper care of the sick? TEAcHER. We shall be glad to have full answers to this important inquiry from those who have had experience. It calls attention to a most important part of the teachers work. Meanwhile, we would suggest that the Hampton Sanitary Tracts may be found very useful for distribution, or to be read to older pupils and parents. The first three can be obtained by addressing the Hampton Tract Editing Com- mittee, Hampton Institute, Va. The cost is five cents apiece, or four dollars a. hundred copies. They are entitled: No. 1, The Health Laws of Moses; No. 2, Preventable Diseases; No. 8, Duty of Teachers. This last seems to bo exactly addressed to the case in hand. THE FREEDMEN. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, Revival in Howard University. REV. WM. w. PATTON, D.D., PRESIDENT. You will be glad to hear that there is much religious interest in our institution at the present time. It has been gradu- ally coming on all the autumn but was greatly aided by the week of prayer held by the Young Mens Christian Associ- ation of the University in concert with other Associations. Some ten or twelve of the students think that they have be- gun the new life lately, and we look for further good results. This is highly en- couraging, as showing that in addition to the educational advantages which gather around our location, spiritual blessings may also be received. We desire the prayers of all Christians that the work may be continued with power. Our the- ological students have been deeply in- terested in tke meetings for prayer, and have rendered valuable aid. VIRGINIA. A Destitute County. The following extinct from a letter by an esteemed friend in a central county in Virginia is suggestive of the many dark places throughout the South yet un- reached by the school or the church: The field in this county alone is an ample one. The colored population of the county largely exceeds the white, and the yearly ratio of increase is in excess of the white. A half generation has passed since the era of emancipation, and it is melancholy, indeed, to any Christian mind and heart, to contemplate how rapidly this portion of the population, in the very heart of one of the oldest States in the Union, is crowding the broad road to perdition; how, in the en- tire absence of all organized efforts foi- elemental education and proper religious instruction, they are relapsing into semi- heathenism. There is not to-day a sin- gle school of any kind or chanicter for

Our Query Column Editorial 14

14 Revival in howard UniversityA Destitute County. clusive decision from the highest court, the Judge here ruled that a Chinaman is either white or black, and so must come in. Californias ruling has been that a Mongolian is neither white or black, and so cannot come in. Uongregationalist~ December 4, OUR QUERY COLUMN. QuerySouth of the Ohio River the work of caring for the sick falls to the colored peo- pie. During the past weeks there has heen greater demand for skilled nurses than for com- petent teachers. How can A. M. A. schools prepare their students for this important profession? What is the hest method of instructing pupils, in a knowledge of the simpler details concerning the proper care of the sick? TEAcHER. We shall be glad to have full answers to this important inquiry from those who have had experience. It calls attention to a most important part of the teachers work. Meanwhile, we would suggest that the Hampton Sanitary Tracts may be found very useful for distribution, or to be read to older pupils and parents. The first three can be obtained by addressing the Hampton Tract Editing Com- mittee, Hampton Institute, Va. The cost is five cents apiece, or four dollars a. hundred copies. They are entitled: No. 1, The Health Laws of Moses; No. 2, Preventable Diseases; No. 8, Duty of Teachers. This last seems to bo exactly addressed to the case in hand. THE FREEDMEN. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, Revival in Howard University. REV. WM. w. PATTON, D.D., PRESIDENT. You will be glad to hear that there is much religious interest in our institution at the present time. It has been gradu- ally coming on all the autumn but was greatly aided by the week of prayer held by the Young Mens Christian Associ- ation of the University in concert with other Associations. Some ten or twelve of the students think that they have be- gun the new life lately, and we look for further good results. This is highly en- couraging, as showing that in addition to the educational advantages which gather around our location, spiritual blessings may also be received. We desire the prayers of all Christians that the work may be continued with power. Our the- ological students have been deeply in- terested in tke meetings for prayer, and have rendered valuable aid. VIRGINIA. A Destitute County. The following extinct from a letter by an esteemed friend in a central county in Virginia is suggestive of the many dark places throughout the South yet un- reached by the school or the church: The field in this county alone is an ample one. The colored population of the county largely exceeds the white, and the yearly ratio of increase is in excess of the white. A half generation has passed since the era of emancipation, and it is melancholy, indeed, to any Christian mind and heart, to contemplate how rapidly this portion of the population, in the very heart of one of the oldest States in the Union, is crowding the broad road to perdition; how, in the en- tire absence of all organized efforts foi- elemental education and proper religious instruction, they are relapsing into semi- heathenism. There is not to-day a sin- gle school of any kind or chanicter for

Rev. Wm. W. Patton, D.D., President Patton, Wm. W., Rev., D.D., President District of Columbia--Revival in Howard University The Freedmen 14

14 Revival in howard UniversityA Destitute County. clusive decision from the highest court, the Judge here ruled that a Chinaman is either white or black, and so must come in. Californias ruling has been that a Mongolian is neither white or black, and so cannot come in. Uongregationalist~ December 4, OUR QUERY COLUMN. QuerySouth of the Ohio River the work of caring for the sick falls to the colored peo- pie. During the past weeks there has heen greater demand for skilled nurses than for com- petent teachers. How can A. M. A. schools prepare their students for this important profession? What is the hest method of instructing pupils, in a knowledge of the simpler details concerning the proper care of the sick? TEAcHER. We shall be glad to have full answers to this important inquiry from those who have had experience. It calls attention to a most important part of the teachers work. Meanwhile, we would suggest that the Hampton Sanitary Tracts may be found very useful for distribution, or to be read to older pupils and parents. The first three can be obtained by addressing the Hampton Tract Editing Com- mittee, Hampton Institute, Va. The cost is five cents apiece, or four dollars a. hundred copies. They are entitled: No. 1, The Health Laws of Moses; No. 2, Preventable Diseases; No. 8, Duty of Teachers. This last seems to bo exactly addressed to the case in hand. THE FREEDMEN. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, Revival in Howard University. REV. WM. w. PATTON, D.D., PRESIDENT. You will be glad to hear that there is much religious interest in our institution at the present time. It has been gradu- ally coming on all the autumn but was greatly aided by the week of prayer held by the Young Mens Christian Associ- ation of the University in concert with other Associations. Some ten or twelve of the students think that they have be- gun the new life lately, and we look for further good results. This is highly en- couraging, as showing that in addition to the educational advantages which gather around our location, spiritual blessings may also be received. We desire the prayers of all Christians that the work may be continued with power. Our the- ological students have been deeply in- terested in tke meetings for prayer, and have rendered valuable aid. VIRGINIA. A Destitute County. The following extinct from a letter by an esteemed friend in a central county in Virginia is suggestive of the many dark places throughout the South yet un- reached by the school or the church: The field in this county alone is an ample one. The colored population of the county largely exceeds the white, and the yearly ratio of increase is in excess of the white. A half generation has passed since the era of emancipation, and it is melancholy, indeed, to any Christian mind and heart, to contemplate how rapidly this portion of the population, in the very heart of one of the oldest States in the Union, is crowding the broad road to perdition; how, in the en- tire absence of all organized efforts foi- elemental education and proper religious instruction, they are relapsing into semi- heathenism. There is not to-day a sin- gle school of any kind or chanicter for

Virginia--A Destitute County The Freedmen 14-15

14 Revival in howard UniversityA Destitute County. clusive decision from the highest court, the Judge here ruled that a Chinaman is either white or black, and so must come in. Californias ruling has been that a Mongolian is neither white or black, and so cannot come in. Uongregationalist~ December 4, OUR QUERY COLUMN. QuerySouth of the Ohio River the work of caring for the sick falls to the colored peo- pie. During the past weeks there has heen greater demand for skilled nurses than for com- petent teachers. How can A. M. A. schools prepare their students for this important profession? What is the hest method of instructing pupils, in a knowledge of the simpler details concerning the proper care of the sick? TEAcHER. We shall be glad to have full answers to this important inquiry from those who have had experience. It calls attention to a most important part of the teachers work. Meanwhile, we would suggest that the Hampton Sanitary Tracts may be found very useful for distribution, or to be read to older pupils and parents. The first three can be obtained by addressing the Hampton Tract Editing Com- mittee, Hampton Institute, Va. The cost is five cents apiece, or four dollars a. hundred copies. They are entitled: No. 1, The Health Laws of Moses; No. 2, Preventable Diseases; No. 8, Duty of Teachers. This last seems to bo exactly addressed to the case in hand. THE FREEDMEN. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, Revival in Howard University. REV. WM. w. PATTON, D.D., PRESIDENT. You will be glad to hear that there is much religious interest in our institution at the present time. It has been gradu- ally coming on all the autumn but was greatly aided by the week of prayer held by the Young Mens Christian Associ- ation of the University in concert with other Associations. Some ten or twelve of the students think that they have be- gun the new life lately, and we look for further good results. This is highly en- couraging, as showing that in addition to the educational advantages which gather around our location, spiritual blessings may also be received. We desire the prayers of all Christians that the work may be continued with power. Our the- ological students have been deeply in- terested in tke meetings for prayer, and have rendered valuable aid. VIRGINIA. A Destitute County. The following extinct from a letter by an esteemed friend in a central county in Virginia is suggestive of the many dark places throughout the South yet un- reached by the school or the church: The field in this county alone is an ample one. The colored population of the county largely exceeds the white, and the yearly ratio of increase is in excess of the white. A half generation has passed since the era of emancipation, and it is melancholy, indeed, to any Christian mind and heart, to contemplate how rapidly this portion of the population, in the very heart of one of the oldest States in the Union, is crowding the broad road to perdition; how, in the en- tire absence of all organized efforts foi- elemental education and proper religious instruction, they are relapsing into semi- heathenism. There is not to-day a sin- gle school of any kind or chanicter for New Church at Shelby Iron Work.s. them within the limits of the county (which may be safely estimated to con- tam five thousand souls of all ages and sexes of the colored race), except the Sabbath-school which has been taught by the writer. ALABAMA. ~Tew Church at Shelby Iron Works-Talla dega a Missionary Centre. REV. G. W. ANDREWS, TALLADEGA. A Congregational church of twenty-one members was organized Oct. 10th, at Shelby Iron Works, Alabama. This is the fifteenth Congregational ohurch planted by the A. M. A. in this State. Eight of them are in the vicinity of Tal- ladega College, the most distant being forty miles away. They are the out- growth of the mission work carried on by the teachers and pupils of the college. This new church at Shelby begins its existence under most favorable circum- stances, most of its members being pres- ent or former pupils of the college. All are colored people; two are preparing for the ministry; one has been a student at Oberlin, Ohio; one was for some time a resident of Hartford, Ct., and more re- cently of Columbus, Ohio, a graduate of the high school there and a former pupil here; one is principal of an academy of ten years standing at Shelby and a grad- uate from Talladega. With two or three exceptions, all of them have for some years been trained in our Sunday-schools. The Shelby Iron Company is in hearty sympathy with the movement; the Super- intendent, himself a Methodist, coming into the preliminary meeting and saying publicly that the Iron Company would look with peculiar favor on this church should it be organized, recognizing as it did the necessity for more intelligent Christian instruction for the colored people. The sectarian walls, which in the South are built heaven-high, have in this particular place been badly shat- tered. There is no outspoken opposition on the part of the colored people, as in every other place known to me. The different denominations wor~hip in the same building, the lower, story being de- voted to the school and the upper one to the churches. The Iron Company own about two-thirds of the building, the original cost being three thousand dollars. I suppose there are a million of dollars invested by the Shelby Iron Company at this place, mostly owned in the North. One owner is an honored member of the Centre Church, Hartford, Ct.; another, of the Park St. Church, Boston; another is a Massachusetts man well known among iron men both in this country and abroad. The Superintendent is a noble Christian man from Illinois, and was a colonel in the recent war. Sev- eral of the local managers are from the North, some are from the South. Most of the workmen, white and colored, who stand all day side by side, are gathered from the surrounding region. Here the North and South meet and learn to know and love each other. The Iron Company is helping to solve the great national problem no less truly than missionary schools and churches. It seems to me sometimes that its entire business is car- ried on as a kind of missionary enter- prise on the broadest basis. Owning thirty thousand acres of land immediate- ly about the Iron Works, it exet cises a wholesome restraint over all classes. Nothing seems to be overlooked; the church, the school, the home, the village morals, the town adornments and the State, are all cared for. Talladega College, a college only in name yet, is the rallying point for our missionary work in this State. It is just such a college as a missionary college should be, its whole work as a school being subordinate to the church. It is a training school, patterned after the missionary colleges of the American Board. Its grand aim is to raise up a native ministry so as to plant churches, and through them carry an intelligent

Rev. G. W. Andrews Andrews, G. W., Rev. Alabama--New Church at Shelby Iron Works--Talladega A Missionary Centre The Freedmen 15-16

New Church at Shelby Iron Work.s. them within the limits of the county (which may be safely estimated to con- tam five thousand souls of all ages and sexes of the colored race), except the Sabbath-school which has been taught by the writer. ALABAMA. ~Tew Church at Shelby Iron Works-Talla dega a Missionary Centre. REV. G. W. ANDREWS, TALLADEGA. A Congregational church of twenty-one members was organized Oct. 10th, at Shelby Iron Works, Alabama. This is the fifteenth Congregational ohurch planted by the A. M. A. in this State. Eight of them are in the vicinity of Tal- ladega College, the most distant being forty miles away. They are the out- growth of the mission work carried on by the teachers and pupils of the college. This new church at Shelby begins its existence under most favorable circum- stances, most of its members being pres- ent or former pupils of the college. All are colored people; two are preparing for the ministry; one has been a student at Oberlin, Ohio; one was for some time a resident of Hartford, Ct., and more re- cently of Columbus, Ohio, a graduate of the high school there and a former pupil here; one is principal of an academy of ten years standing at Shelby and a grad- uate from Talladega. With two or three exceptions, all of them have for some years been trained in our Sunday-schools. The Shelby Iron Company is in hearty sympathy with the movement; the Super- intendent, himself a Methodist, coming into the preliminary meeting and saying publicly that the Iron Company would look with peculiar favor on this church should it be organized, recognizing as it did the necessity for more intelligent Christian instruction for the colored people. The sectarian walls, which in the South are built heaven-high, have in this particular place been badly shat- tered. There is no outspoken opposition on the part of the colored people, as in every other place known to me. The different denominations wor~hip in the same building, the lower, story being de- voted to the school and the upper one to the churches. The Iron Company own about two-thirds of the building, the original cost being three thousand dollars. I suppose there are a million of dollars invested by the Shelby Iron Company at this place, mostly owned in the North. One owner is an honored member of the Centre Church, Hartford, Ct.; another, of the Park St. Church, Boston; another is a Massachusetts man well known among iron men both in this country and abroad. The Superintendent is a noble Christian man from Illinois, and was a colonel in the recent war. Sev- eral of the local managers are from the North, some are from the South. Most of the workmen, white and colored, who stand all day side by side, are gathered from the surrounding region. Here the North and South meet and learn to know and love each other. The Iron Company is helping to solve the great national problem no less truly than missionary schools and churches. It seems to me sometimes that its entire business is car- ried on as a kind of missionary enter- prise on the broadest basis. Owning thirty thousand acres of land immediate- ly about the Iron Works, it exet cises a wholesome restraint over all classes. Nothing seems to be overlooked; the church, the school, the home, the village morals, the town adornments and the State, are all cared for. Talladega College, a college only in name yet, is the rallying point for our missionary work in this State. It is just such a college as a missionary college should be, its whole work as a school being subordinate to the church. It is a training school, patterned after the missionary colleges of the American Board. Its grand aim is to raise up a native ministry so as to plant churches, and through them carry an intelligent 16 Talladega a JlLi8sionary Centre. gospel to the masses. We are not espe- cially afraid that there will be any lack of school-teachers. With our eye fixed steadily on our missionary work, enough who cannot attain to the Chris- tian ministry will become teachers, and they, catching the spirit of the institu- tion, will become missionary teachers. It is surprising to see how this spirit has taken possession of our pupils. There is scarcely one who goes into the country to teach who does not organize his Sabbath- school as promptly as his day-school, and pursue it with even more interest. It is the first thing he reports on his return. Hundreds are converted by this means Bibles, tracts, religious literature, and light are spread in all directions; thus are constantly carried forward many Sabbath-schools, and through them a glorious pioneer Christian work, Out of this work have grown eight churches, so near to the college as to be its special care, and in which a hundred conversions are reported for the summer just ended. Of the twenty pupils in the Theologi- cal department, all have been reaping in this missionary field durhig the summer vacation, about one-half as preachers. The home church takes a lively interest in them during their absence. Prayer is made to God without ceasing in their behalf, and often interested members go out to aid them in their revival meetings. Letters are constantly received from them to be read at the monthly missionary concert, and public thanksgiving is ren- dered for the good work they report. Thus is maintained a lively interest in Christian missions and Christian work. There has been an evident increase of interest in our mission churches about the college this summer ; all but one report revivals of greater or less power one reports thirty-two additions by con- fession ; four report the completion of their houses of worship, free of debt houses hitherto unplastered and other- wise much exposed, but now neat and comfortable, and everybody is happy over it. One is building a new house of worship unlike any of the others; it is built of logs, large and commodious. One poor fellow was so intent on pushing forward to completion his house of wor- ship, that he expended all his salary for the summer, and then pawned his Sun- day clothes. On his return to school he reports twenty-three conversions, his house of worship completed, but no money in his pocket. If ever there was a man worthy of aid, he is. He is now in my back-yard sawing wood. You will hear from him some day. These young prophets of the Lord are making rapid progress in the knowledge of the Bible and the system of theology, and wherever they go, are beginning to be recognized by all classes as well qualified to break the Bread of Life to their people. I am glad to report that tl)e white people, seeing. the character and efilcien- cy of these young men, are coming to understand and appreciate our work. I believe they heartily approve what we are doing. I have repeatedly experi- enced their hospitality this summer, and had many conversations with them relating to our mission here. From the president of a well-known college, down to the poor man who did not know his letters, I have found nothing but ap- proval. The time is not far distant when this approval will be more out- spoken and pronounced. When the Christiaa men of the South and your missionary workers from the North understand each other, from that day they are one in Christian work. We bless God for this new feast of love. Pray that no political excitement may interrupt the growing good feeling. The Thin End of the WedgeA First Thanksgiving Service. BEv. WILLIAM H. ASH, FLoHHNcE. Our work here in Florence is the thin end of the wedge, and with sufficient facilities, the smiles of the

Rev. William H. Ash Ash, William H., Rev. Florence--Thin End of the Wedge--A First Thanksgiving Service The Freedmen 16-17

16 Talladega a JlLi8sionary Centre. gospel to the masses. We are not espe- cially afraid that there will be any lack of school-teachers. With our eye fixed steadily on our missionary work, enough who cannot attain to the Chris- tian ministry will become teachers, and they, catching the spirit of the institu- tion, will become missionary teachers. It is surprising to see how this spirit has taken possession of our pupils. There is scarcely one who goes into the country to teach who does not organize his Sabbath- school as promptly as his day-school, and pursue it with even more interest. It is the first thing he reports on his return. Hundreds are converted by this means Bibles, tracts, religious literature, and light are spread in all directions; thus are constantly carried forward many Sabbath-schools, and through them a glorious pioneer Christian work, Out of this work have grown eight churches, so near to the college as to be its special care, and in which a hundred conversions are reported for the summer just ended. Of the twenty pupils in the Theologi- cal department, all have been reaping in this missionary field durhig the summer vacation, about one-half as preachers. The home church takes a lively interest in them during their absence. Prayer is made to God without ceasing in their behalf, and often interested members go out to aid them in their revival meetings. Letters are constantly received from them to be read at the monthly missionary concert, and public thanksgiving is ren- dered for the good work they report. Thus is maintained a lively interest in Christian missions and Christian work. There has been an evident increase of interest in our mission churches about the college this summer ; all but one report revivals of greater or less power one reports thirty-two additions by con- fession ; four report the completion of their houses of worship, free of debt houses hitherto unplastered and other- wise much exposed, but now neat and comfortable, and everybody is happy over it. One is building a new house of worship unlike any of the others; it is built of logs, large and commodious. One poor fellow was so intent on pushing forward to completion his house of wor- ship, that he expended all his salary for the summer, and then pawned his Sun- day clothes. On his return to school he reports twenty-three conversions, his house of worship completed, but no money in his pocket. If ever there was a man worthy of aid, he is. He is now in my back-yard sawing wood. You will hear from him some day. These young prophets of the Lord are making rapid progress in the knowledge of the Bible and the system of theology, and wherever they go, are beginning to be recognized by all classes as well qualified to break the Bread of Life to their people. I am glad to report that tl)e white people, seeing. the character and efilcien- cy of these young men, are coming to understand and appreciate our work. I believe they heartily approve what we are doing. I have repeatedly experi- enced their hospitality this summer, and had many conversations with them relating to our mission here. From the president of a well-known college, down to the poor man who did not know his letters, I have found nothing but ap- proval. The time is not far distant when this approval will be more out- spoken and pronounced. When the Christiaa men of the South and your missionary workers from the North understand each other, from that day they are one in Christian work. We bless God for this new feast of love. Pray that no political excitement may interrupt the growing good feeling. The Thin End of the WedgeA First Thanksgiving Service. BEv. WILLIAM H. ASH, FLoHHNcE. Our work here in Florence is the thin end of the wedge, and with sufficient facilities, the smiles of the Iike Thin. End of the WedgeA Fir8t Tkank8giving Service. 17 Master, and patience in its workers, great good will result. The services are well attended, and sometimes the house is dis- agreeably filled, and we are without the proper means of ventilation. The mein- bers of the church begged me to express for them to the Association their sincere and heartfelt gratitude for the new organ sent them; it has increased the interest of our services greatly. Last Thursday, Nov. 28, the first Thanksgiving service ever held in this place among the colored people was observed in our church; therefore it has a history in connection with our work here. I made it a union service, inviting the Baptists and Metho- dists to worship with us. This congrega- tion of Baptists, Methodists, and Con- gregationalists worshipped as though Christ was the Head of the Church, in- stead of any one of the denominations present. The service was solemn and intelligent. It truly seemed that the Lord was in His holy temple. After ser- vice a gentleman of about sixty or sev- enty years of age said, I have been here forty years, but I never heard of such a thing as a Thanksgiving service among the colored people. This is the dawn of a new age. Pray for us. MISSOUFU. Free Schools in the State. REV. J. E. ROY, D. D., FIELD SUPERINTENDENT. This noble Western State, plowed by war and sowed to freedom, is now com- ing on with harvests of temporal and moral prosperity. As I have been going over its territory, looking after the five school-houses of the Association, I have been delighted with the evidences of progress in the free school system. It is a great joy to see in these cities and towns the new, large, two-story brick school-houses of modern style and fur- nishing. The system works more slowly into the back settlements. But in a Kansas City paper I see it stated that in the country places of Jackson County there are one hundred and fifty of these schools. At Warrensburg I saw the im- posing three-story stone edifice of the State Normal School, built by that town and its county of Johnson, and now oc- cupie~ byfour hundred pupils from every part of the State. Special provision is made in the law for its enforcement in behalf of free schools for the colored children. These are managed by the same school board and are supported from the same tax fund. These officers are compelled to provide schools wherever there are fif- teen of such scholars in the district. If they fail to do it, it is the duty of the Superintendent to require it to be done. I met one case where the out-districts declined to co-operate with the Board in this matter, when only a threatened ap- peal to the Superintendent brought them to terms. I have been gratified to see the heartiness with which the five boards I have dealt with are pushing the free school system in behalf of blacks as well as whites. Nor have I been deceived, as some may imagine. The Lincoln Institute at the Capitol, as a Normal School for colored teachers, receives an annual appropriation from the State of $5,000. A democratic edi- tor told me that that was considered as a matter of honor, and that so there was no danger of its being discontinued. This institution of sacred name had also a sacred origin. For its founding, the 62d and 65th Regiments of U. S. colored infantry, when discharged from service in January, 1866, contributed a fund of $6, 379. The Freedmens Bureau fur- nished $8,000; the Western Sanitary Commission, $2,000; and agents Beal and Lane raised $2,000. The building is of brick, 60x70 feet, three stories high, a comely structure crowning a hill just out of Jefferson City. Its current catalogue enrolls 123 students. It is controlled by a local board, of which the Governor and State Superintendent are e~r-officio members. Revs, R. D. Foster and M. Henry Smith have served

Rev. J. E. Roy, D.D., Field Superintendent Roy, J. E., Rev., D.D., Field Superintendent Missouri--Free Schools in the State The Freedmen 17-18

Iike Thin. End of the WedgeA Fir8t Tkank8giving Service. 17 Master, and patience in its workers, great good will result. The services are well attended, and sometimes the house is dis- agreeably filled, and we are without the proper means of ventilation. The mein- bers of the church begged me to express for them to the Association their sincere and heartfelt gratitude for the new organ sent them; it has increased the interest of our services greatly. Last Thursday, Nov. 28, the first Thanksgiving service ever held in this place among the colored people was observed in our church; therefore it has a history in connection with our work here. I made it a union service, inviting the Baptists and Metho- dists to worship with us. This congrega- tion of Baptists, Methodists, and Con- gregationalists worshipped as though Christ was the Head of the Church, in- stead of any one of the denominations present. The service was solemn and intelligent. It truly seemed that the Lord was in His holy temple. After ser- vice a gentleman of about sixty or sev- enty years of age said, I have been here forty years, but I never heard of such a thing as a Thanksgiving service among the colored people. This is the dawn of a new age. Pray for us. MISSOUFU. Free Schools in the State. REV. J. E. ROY, D. D., FIELD SUPERINTENDENT. This noble Western State, plowed by war and sowed to freedom, is now com- ing on with harvests of temporal and moral prosperity. As I have been going over its territory, looking after the five school-houses of the Association, I have been delighted with the evidences of progress in the free school system. It is a great joy to see in these cities and towns the new, large, two-story brick school-houses of modern style and fur- nishing. The system works more slowly into the back settlements. But in a Kansas City paper I see it stated that in the country places of Jackson County there are one hundred and fifty of these schools. At Warrensburg I saw the im- posing three-story stone edifice of the State Normal School, built by that town and its county of Johnson, and now oc- cupie~ byfour hundred pupils from every part of the State. Special provision is made in the law for its enforcement in behalf of free schools for the colored children. These are managed by the same school board and are supported from the same tax fund. These officers are compelled to provide schools wherever there are fif- teen of such scholars in the district. If they fail to do it, it is the duty of the Superintendent to require it to be done. I met one case where the out-districts declined to co-operate with the Board in this matter, when only a threatened ap- peal to the Superintendent brought them to terms. I have been gratified to see the heartiness with which the five boards I have dealt with are pushing the free school system in behalf of blacks as well as whites. Nor have I been deceived, as some may imagine. The Lincoln Institute at the Capitol, as a Normal School for colored teachers, receives an annual appropriation from the State of $5,000. A democratic edi- tor told me that that was considered as a matter of honor, and that so there was no danger of its being discontinued. This institution of sacred name had also a sacred origin. For its founding, the 62d and 65th Regiments of U. S. colored infantry, when discharged from service in January, 1866, contributed a fund of $6, 379. The Freedmens Bureau fur- nished $8,000; the Western Sanitary Commission, $2,000; and agents Beal and Lane raised $2,000. The building is of brick, 60x70 feet, three stories high, a comely structure crowning a hill just out of Jefferson City. Its current catalogue enrolls 123 students. It is controlled by a local board, of which the Governor and State Superintendent are e~r-officio members. Revs, R. D. Foster and M. Henry Smith have served 18 A Church Organized and Dedicated at Avery. as principals the most of the time since it was opened in 1SZ1. The Association has its five schooL houses at Troy, Fuiton, Westport, War- rensburg and Lebanon. These were uro- cured in part by aid from the Freedmens Bureau in 18679. They were at first run by teachers sent from the North, but were gradually taken up by the local school boards. I find them all in such use now. Three will probably be sold to those boards at their present low valu- ation. Two will be sold to local col- ored Methodist churches, as the schools require larger and better houses, which the authorities intend to build. These houses have also been used all the time as places of worship by the colored people. The seven or eight colored teachers iu these schools were educated in Lincoln, Fisk, and kindred institu- tions. I have found them young people of character, and of tact in handling their schools. They have to be exam- ined. They receive from $35 to $4.5 a month, about the same as white common- school teachers. The A. M. A. has done the work of initiation. By this tour of inspection I am deeply convinced of the wisdom of the A. M. A. in putting its strength upon Normal and Collegiate institutions, and so doing a wholesale business. Raise up teachers and send them back into the country. Raise up the men and women for the professions and for the higher walks of social life. That is the work. AFRICA. A CHURCH ORGANIZED AND DEDICATED AT AVERY A meeting of Counsel and Advice was convened September 29th at Avery Station, by order of Rev. Floyd Sad- son, and, on solicitation of the minister in charge, Rev. A. E. Jackson, to or- ganize and dedicate a church to God. Owing to our inability to reach Avery on Saturday in time to hold preliminary exercises, examination of candidates for admission, etc., this part of our duty was deferred till Sunday morning. This, with our other duties, made our pro- gramine for the day quite full. Early Sunday morning the Board met in the church to begin the labors of the day. The sun shone brightly, yet we could but feel that many round us were groping in darkness, without any clear idea of Him in whose image they are made. Brother Snelson was elected moderator, and A. P. Miller secretary. Brother Gomer, General Agent of Shen- gay Mission, who favored us with his pre~ence, otfeted prayer. Guide me, oh! Thou great Jehovah! was sung. In absence of letter missive, the minis- ter in charge gave his reasons why a church should be established or organ- ized at Avery. He spoke of the will- ingness of the people to receive the story of the Cross; said that some came far to hear God palaver, and express their joy in being permitted so to do. Brother Hallock, the interpreter (native), and Brother Wise, were asked several questions. Their reasons were clear and very satisfactory. It seems evident that the industrial work at this station, which gives employment to many, is a means of good both to mission and peo- l)le. It was deemed fit to organize a church at Avery, to be known as the Second Congregational Church of the Mendi Mission. By Ii oclock, at the ringing of the second bell, the chapel was crowded with nativei, for the most part in native costume. Brother Snelson spoke to them through an interpreter, telling them the object of our coming together. The candidates for admission to the S

The Mendi Mission--A Church Organized and Dedicated at Avery Africa 18-20

18 A Church Organized and Dedicated at Avery. as principals the most of the time since it was opened in 1SZ1. The Association has its five schooL houses at Troy, Fuiton, Westport, War- rensburg and Lebanon. These were uro- cured in part by aid from the Freedmens Bureau in 18679. They were at first run by teachers sent from the North, but were gradually taken up by the local school boards. I find them all in such use now. Three will probably be sold to those boards at their present low valu- ation. Two will be sold to local col- ored Methodist churches, as the schools require larger and better houses, which the authorities intend to build. These houses have also been used all the time as places of worship by the colored people. The seven or eight colored teachers iu these schools were educated in Lincoln, Fisk, and kindred institu- tions. I have found them young people of character, and of tact in handling their schools. They have to be exam- ined. They receive from $35 to $4.5 a month, about the same as white common- school teachers. The A. M. A. has done the work of initiation. By this tour of inspection I am deeply convinced of the wisdom of the A. M. A. in putting its strength upon Normal and Collegiate institutions, and so doing a wholesale business. Raise up teachers and send them back into the country. Raise up the men and women for the professions and for the higher walks of social life. That is the work. AFRICA. A CHURCH ORGANIZED AND DEDICATED AT AVERY A meeting of Counsel and Advice was convened September 29th at Avery Station, by order of Rev. Floyd Sad- son, and, on solicitation of the minister in charge, Rev. A. E. Jackson, to or- ganize and dedicate a church to God. Owing to our inability to reach Avery on Saturday in time to hold preliminary exercises, examination of candidates for admission, etc., this part of our duty was deferred till Sunday morning. This, with our other duties, made our pro- gramine for the day quite full. Early Sunday morning the Board met in the church to begin the labors of the day. The sun shone brightly, yet we could but feel that many round us were groping in darkness, without any clear idea of Him in whose image they are made. Brother Snelson was elected moderator, and A. P. Miller secretary. Brother Gomer, General Agent of Shen- gay Mission, who favored us with his pre~ence, otfeted prayer. Guide me, oh! Thou great Jehovah! was sung. In absence of letter missive, the minis- ter in charge gave his reasons why a church should be established or organ- ized at Avery. He spoke of the will- ingness of the people to receive the story of the Cross; said that some came far to hear God palaver, and express their joy in being permitted so to do. Brother Hallock, the interpreter (native), and Brother Wise, were asked several questions. Their reasons were clear and very satisfactory. It seems evident that the industrial work at this station, which gives employment to many, is a means of good both to mission and peo- l)le. It was deemed fit to organize a church at Avery, to be known as the Second Congregational Church of the Mendi Mission. By Ii oclock, at the ringing of the second bell, the chapel was crowded with nativei, for the most part in native costume. Brother Snelson spoke to them through an interpreter, telling them the object of our coming together. The candidates for admission to the S A Church Organized and Dedicated at Avery. Church were then called forward. A Scripture were read by A. P. Miller. charge to keep I have was sung by The services of organization and dedica- the congregation. Prayer was offered tion were combined, owing to want of by Brother Snelson, after which the time. Brother Snelson spoke through missionary hymn, From Greenlands the interpreter, and told the candidates icy mountains, was sung; and as it was what their step meantturning from being sung, each missionary, as he death unto life. The church, too, he looked upon the sable congregation, said, we had come together to dedicate could but feel that the harvest is plen- to God and His service. Brother Suel- teous, but the laborers are few. son preached, choosing Luke xii. 32, as The roll was then called by Brother his textFear not, little flock, for it Jackson; after which the candidates is your Fathers good pleasure to give were examined, and by vote of the Council you the kingdom. A comparison eighteen were received into full mem- was made between the people to bership. Some of the candidates were whom these words were spoken and not received because of not being legally these our benighted brethren. The married. They were instructed to at- promises of God were dwelt upon. We tend to this matter, and then they might must trust in him for salvation. The be received into the church. They are dedicatory prayer was then offered by to remain under watch-care until this Rev. A. P. Miller. A hymn was sung. obligation is met. After examination of The right hand of fellowship was given candidates, Brother Snelson spoke to by Bro. A. E. White. The address was them about things peculiar to their delivered by Rev. J. Gomer. The countryslavery, polygamy, etc. The Lords supper was then celebrated; meeting was then dismissed to meet at Brothers Gomer and Jackson presided. 7 p~ M. Brother Gomer, who has for It was a solemn scene. The Doxology years known our work, expressed his was sung, and the benediction pro- astonishment at seeing so large a con- nounced by A. P. Miller. The meeting ~reoatic)n assembled in the house of God was one long to be remembered. One at timis place, and at the good order more stronghold is now erected in this kept throughout the exercises. Some of land of night to tear down the powers those received were old members, while of darkness. We have all reason to others were new converts, among whom thank God for His blessings thus far. were three chiefs, Peah Carle, Carray A better day is dawning for these be- Phemah, and Sci ~ These men ex- nighted, long-neglected sons of Africa. ercise a vast influence over their people, Brother Gomer says that more labor- and their being reached makes the ers (colored) are wanted in his mission. reaching of their people easier. We, too, in a work so vast, can but ask The people assembled at the ringing God to prepare such as are needed for a of the second bell. Praise God from work so difficult. Whom all blessings flow was sung. We ask the prayers of all lovers of Brother Snelson then led the congrega- mankind that the work begun here may tion in the Lords Prayer. A hymn was not only succeed, but that its influence sung, after which the Rev. J. Gomer may be far-reaching. offercd prayer. Alas! and did my REV. FLOYD SNELsoN, ilfoderator. Saviour bleed? was sung. Portions of REV. A. P. MILLER, Secretary. 20 The Late Indian War and Uhri8tianity. THE INDIANS. THE LATE INDIAN WAR AND CHRISTiANiTY. the late war, Christians may have to REV. MYRON EELLS, SEOEOMISH, WASHING- bear a part of the blame. TON TERRITORY. We have had another Indian war, and Notwithstanding all this, some laurels as usual, there has been a cry in favor o~ have been added by the late war to the turning the Indians over to the War Christian work which has been done Department. There are some, however, among the Indians. One who wishes to be understood has written a letter of us who will persist in seeing some- thing favorable to Christianity and the 1)resent policy even in this war, and we think we have our reasons for it. I do not propose, at present, to thor- oughly discuss the causes of the war, for I am not well enough acquainted with them to do so intelligently. Some will lay the blame on Government, some on a Christian policy, and some on the Indians. Perhaps all may have to bear a part. Although I believe that the Government has often treated the In- dians wrongfully, yet a long course of observation has convinced me that the Indians are not all saints, and when the Government is often crooked, either in- tentionally or unintentionally, and two crooked sticks come together, there is almost always sure to be trouble. The published statements of General Crook, who is not supposed to be very sentimental in his feelings toward the Indians, and who was at the Fort Hall Agency at the beginning of the war, implicates the Government severely. A residence of nearly three years in Idaho, 18711874, in the very region of the war, led me to believe that very lit- tle was energetically done for Christian- izing those Indians. This has been true at some Agencies. Their annual reports show that while the Government open- ed wide the doors for Christian work, when the present policy was adopted, and said, We will give you opportunity, encouragement and aid, if you will only send the Indians missionaries, yet that Christians have failed to take hold of the work as they ought to have done. If this was true of the Indians engaged in in which he speaks very harshly against the Christian workers on the Yakama Reservation, where Father Wilbur, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, has been successfully laboring for sixteen years. Tie says: The present reserva- tion system is a failure in every respect. We, who daily come in contact with the Indians, cannot be made to believe that prayer-books, praying generals, and Methodist preachers, (or any other preachers,) are a good safeguard against the tomahawk and the scalping-knife and the pseudo - philanthropists, the Christian-mongers of the East, who are paying thousands to send missionaries among these barbarians, would do us a favor if they would keep them away; and if the U. S. Government would be less influenced in its conduct toward the Indians by the advocates of Christianity, our wives and children might be annually spared the sight of murdered husbands and fathers. So far we have been loyal, while Indians, with passes from Wilbur and other Agents, have been on the war- path. We have reliable information that some of the dead Indians found after the battles near Pendleton had on their persons passes from Wilbur. Now it is probably a fact that some of the Umatilla Indians, and perhaps a few of the Yakamas, were engaged in aiding the enemy. There are always some renegade Indians connected with each tribe, as well as white renegades and tramps. As tribes, however, they did not engage in the war, and compara- tively few individuals did. In the Indian war of 18556, before

Rev. Myron Eells Eells, Myron, Rev. The Late Indian War and Christianity The Indians 20-21

20 The Late Indian War and Uhri8tianity. THE INDIANS. THE LATE INDIAN WAR AND CHRISTiANiTY. the late war, Christians may have to REV. MYRON EELLS, SEOEOMISH, WASHING- bear a part of the blame. TON TERRITORY. We have had another Indian war, and Notwithstanding all this, some laurels as usual, there has been a cry in favor o~ have been added by the late war to the turning the Indians over to the War Christian work which has been done Department. There are some, however, among the Indians. One who wishes to be understood has written a letter of us who will persist in seeing some- thing favorable to Christianity and the 1)resent policy even in this war, and we think we have our reasons for it. I do not propose, at present, to thor- oughly discuss the causes of the war, for I am not well enough acquainted with them to do so intelligently. Some will lay the blame on Government, some on a Christian policy, and some on the Indians. Perhaps all may have to bear a part. Although I believe that the Government has often treated the In- dians wrongfully, yet a long course of observation has convinced me that the Indians are not all saints, and when the Government is often crooked, either in- tentionally or unintentionally, and two crooked sticks come together, there is almost always sure to be trouble. The published statements of General Crook, who is not supposed to be very sentimental in his feelings toward the Indians, and who was at the Fort Hall Agency at the beginning of the war, implicates the Government severely. A residence of nearly three years in Idaho, 18711874, in the very region of the war, led me to believe that very lit- tle was energetically done for Christian- izing those Indians. This has been true at some Agencies. Their annual reports show that while the Government open- ed wide the doors for Christian work, when the present policy was adopted, and said, We will give you opportunity, encouragement and aid, if you will only send the Indians missionaries, yet that Christians have failed to take hold of the work as they ought to have done. If this was true of the Indians engaged in in which he speaks very harshly against the Christian workers on the Yakama Reservation, where Father Wilbur, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, has been successfully laboring for sixteen years. Tie says: The present reserva- tion system is a failure in every respect. We, who daily come in contact with the Indians, cannot be made to believe that prayer-books, praying generals, and Methodist preachers, (or any other preachers,) are a good safeguard against the tomahawk and the scalping-knife and the pseudo - philanthropists, the Christian-mongers of the East, who are paying thousands to send missionaries among these barbarians, would do us a favor if they would keep them away; and if the U. S. Government would be less influenced in its conduct toward the Indians by the advocates of Christianity, our wives and children might be annually spared the sight of murdered husbands and fathers. So far we have been loyal, while Indians, with passes from Wilbur and other Agents, have been on the war- path. We have reliable information that some of the dead Indians found after the battles near Pendleton had on their persons passes from Wilbur. Now it is probably a fact that some of the Umatilla Indians, and perhaps a few of the Yakamas, were engaged in aiding the enemy. There are always some renegade Indians connected with each tribe, as well as white renegades and tramps. As tribes, however, they did not engage in the war, and compara- tively few individuals did. In the Indian war of 18556, before California chinese Mission.. 21 Father Wilbur went among these same Yakamas, they were the leading spirits, and it was the most wide-spread war which has ever devastated this coast. If they and the Umatillas had joined in this war, it would have been far more terrible than it has been. Inducements were not wanting to lead them into it. It is said on good authority that two thousand horses were offered them by the ho~tiles if they would join them, and yet they re- fused. An army officer in command of one of the battles said that some of those Indians did nobly in aiding our soldiers to gain the victory. It may l)e said that they had too much permanent property in homes and farms, to allow them to engage in the war; for they knew that if they should do so, they would certainly in the end lose it all. This is undoubtedly so; and yet when Father Wilbur went among them they had none of this kind of property, but only movable property which they could carry with them even in war, as the Bannocks have done. It is a fact that Christianity gave them this property. It may again be said that they were thoroughly whipped in 18556 and were afraid to engage in war again. They were thus whipped, and the remembrance of it may, even now, do them good. But in 18623 Gen. Crook, the noted Indian fighter, just as thoroughly thrashed the Indians in Idaho, in precisely the same region where the late war was carried on, and the praise of his effectual work is still in the mouths of the old citizens. This was seven years later than the Yakama way, and so much fresher in the minds of the Indians. No, it was evidently Christianity which prevented their join- ing in the war. Gen. Howard, too, has added new lau- rels to his reputation. It must be remem- bered that he is the principal one of our generals who has not been in favor of the transfer of the Indians to the War Department. This praying general has prosecuted the war with such vigor that the strong papers with strong arguments have sustained him, and almost invari- ably those who went with him in his rough marches have defended him, such as newspaper correspondents, scouts and the like, and the stay at homes have been about the only ones who have found fault. His recent conference with the Umatilla Indians since the war has shown such firmness, justice and Christianity as to win for him very many friends among those who previously opposed him, thus showing again that Christian- ity is the way of dealing with the Indi- ans. So Christianity has won its laurels even in this war. THE CHINESE. CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION. Auxiliary to the American ~i53ionary Association. PRESIDENT: Rev. J. K. McLean, D. B. VICE-PRESIDENTS: Rev. A. L. Stone, B. D., Thomas c. welderspoon, Rsq., Rev. P. K. Noble, Hon. F. F. Low, Rev. I. El. Dwinell, I). D., Hon. Samnel cross, Rev. S. H. Willey, B. B.. Edward P. Flint, E~q., Rev. J w. Rough, LI. D., Jacob S. Taber, Req. DIRECTORS: Rev. George Mojar, D. D., Hon. El. D. Sawyer, Rev. El. P. Baker, James M. Haven, Esq., Rev. Joseph nowell, Rev. John Kimball, K. P. Sanford, Esq. SECRETARY: Rev. w. c. Pond. TREASURER: El. Palache, Esq. THE CONGREGATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHRiS- of banding the converts together for TIAN CHINESE. mutual fellowship, for instruction, and Its Origin and Organization; for test-work; for it seemed unwise, WI~I. C. POND, SAN FRANCISCO. considering the difficulties under which Soon after our work among the Chi- we must labor in determining the genu- nese began to yield results in souls ap- ineness of the conversions, to bring parently converted, I felt the necessity them at once to baptisnl and the church.

Rev. Wm. C. Pond Pond, Wm. C., Rev. Congregational Association of Christian Chinese The Chinese 21-24

California chinese Mission.. 21 Father Wilbur went among these same Yakamas, they were the leading spirits, and it was the most wide-spread war which has ever devastated this coast. If they and the Umatillas had joined in this war, it would have been far more terrible than it has been. Inducements were not wanting to lead them into it. It is said on good authority that two thousand horses were offered them by the ho~tiles if they would join them, and yet they re- fused. An army officer in command of one of the battles said that some of those Indians did nobly in aiding our soldiers to gain the victory. It may l)e said that they had too much permanent property in homes and farms, to allow them to engage in the war; for they knew that if they should do so, they would certainly in the end lose it all. This is undoubtedly so; and yet when Father Wilbur went among them they had none of this kind of property, but only movable property which they could carry with them even in war, as the Bannocks have done. It is a fact that Christianity gave them this property. It may again be said that they were thoroughly whipped in 18556 and were afraid to engage in war again. They were thus whipped, and the remembrance of it may, even now, do them good. But in 18623 Gen. Crook, the noted Indian fighter, just as thoroughly thrashed the Indians in Idaho, in precisely the same region where the late war was carried on, and the praise of his effectual work is still in the mouths of the old citizens. This was seven years later than the Yakama way, and so much fresher in the minds of the Indians. No, it was evidently Christianity which prevented their join- ing in the war. Gen. Howard, too, has added new lau- rels to his reputation. It must be remem- bered that he is the principal one of our generals who has not been in favor of the transfer of the Indians to the War Department. This praying general has prosecuted the war with such vigor that the strong papers with strong arguments have sustained him, and almost invari- ably those who went with him in his rough marches have defended him, such as newspaper correspondents, scouts and the like, and the stay at homes have been about the only ones who have found fault. His recent conference with the Umatilla Indians since the war has shown such firmness, justice and Christianity as to win for him very many friends among those who previously opposed him, thus showing again that Christian- ity is the way of dealing with the Indi- ans. So Christianity has won its laurels even in this war. THE CHINESE. CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION. Auxiliary to the American ~i53ionary Association. PRESIDENT: Rev. J. K. McLean, D. B. VICE-PRESIDENTS: Rev. A. L. Stone, B. D., Thomas c. welderspoon, Rsq., Rev. P. K. Noble, Hon. F. F. Low, Rev. I. El. Dwinell, I). D., Hon. Samnel cross, Rev. S. H. Willey, B. B.. Edward P. Flint, E~q., Rev. J w. Rough, LI. D., Jacob S. Taber, Req. DIRECTORS: Rev. George Mojar, D. D., Hon. El. D. Sawyer, Rev. El. P. Baker, James M. Haven, Esq., Rev. Joseph nowell, Rev. John Kimball, K. P. Sanford, Esq. SECRETARY: Rev. w. c. Pond. TREASURER: El. Palache, Esq. THE CONGREGATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHRiS- of banding the converts together for TIAN CHINESE. mutual fellowship, for instruction, and Its Origin and Organization; for test-work; for it seemed unwise, WI~I. C. POND, SAN FRANCISCO. considering the difficulties under which Soon after our work among the Chi- we must labor in determining the genu- nese began to yield results in souls ap- ineness of the conversions, to bring parently converted, I felt the necessity them at once to baptisnl and the church. 22 California Chinese iJhsszOfl. Yet they must not be left quite outside the fold, and I proposed to them the or- ganization of The Ghinese Christian Class, into which any Chinese might come who, in the judgment of those already members of the class, had begun to believe in Christ. This class was to have frequent meetings for prayer and for instruction in the Bible; its mem- bers were to maintain a fraternal watch- fulness over each other, and were to be baptized only when, through a proba- tion of at least six months, they had proved to be steadfast and true. This class at first comprised only such Chinese as had been led to Christ through the work of the Third Congregational Church in this city, of which I was then the pastor. Afterwards it was found desirable to receive to membership the Chinese connected with other congrega- tions, and to enlarge somewhat the scope or design of the class. It was therefore reorganized under its present name but with the same principles and conditions of membership. Some of the benefits, in the way of mutual aid and protection, which the heathen Chinese seek to secure through their Six Com- panies, our Christian Chinese who have renounced all connection with the Six Companies, gain through this Associa- tion. Its rooms are their places of re- sort; a sort of home. They have made a little beginning towards a library of Chinese works, mainly religious, written by the missionaries. The regulations of this Association, prepared by the Chi- nese, without assistance or suggestion, so far as I kno~v, from any American, have been translated for me into En~- lish, and will be printed in full in our Annual Report. I quote here the 2d, 3d, 6th, and 8th Articles: 2d. Any one who desires to become a member of this Association must for- sake idolatry and all bad habits, and prove himself to be a follower of Christ. He must bring references from one or more members. His name must be brought before the Society a week before he can be admitted, and he is received upon a vote of two-thirds of the mem- bers. He must himself sign his name, and pay the sum of two dollars as en~ trance fee, and twenty-five cents every three months, this money being used to defray the expenses of the Association. He is expected to do all he can to bring in new members, and to lead his coun- trymen to Christ. 3d. The members are expected to take part in the meetings for worship, giving counsel and encouragement to one another. If any member does wrong, he is to be kindly entreated and led back to the right 2 6th. If any member continue in the violation of the regulations of the Asso- ciation, after three successive remon- strances, he must be expelled from the Association. If he afterwards repent and desire to come back, he is admitted without an entrance fee; his admittance depending upon the sincerity of his re- pentance, as judged by the members of the Association. 8th. If any member desire to go back to China, he must give notice to the As- sociation one month beforehand. He must not go until he has paid all lii~ debts here. If he is really obliged to go before he can pay his debts, he must find some one who will be security for him. There are now four Branch Associa- tions, two in San Francisco, one in Oak- land, and one in Sacramento, Each branch supports itself and is governed by its own officers. There are threePresi- dent, Vice-President, and Secretary who also acts as Treasurer. The statistics of these Branches are as follows: Oak- land, 36 members, one expelled, five gone to China, 11 baptized; total con- tributions, $472. 20, of which $117.23 was for Bible and missionary work in California and China. Sacramento, 14 members; contributions, $103. 80. San Francisco, 82 members, four expelled, California Chinese iJflisszon. 23 two gone to Chiom, 10 baptized; con- tributions, $~351.00, of which $178.00 were for Bible and missionary work. Bethany (San Francisco), 9 members, 3 baptized; contributions $244. 50, of which $71.00 were for Bible and mission- ary purposes. There are besides these, 23 members belonging to the Central As- sociation, who on account of their places of residence are not yet identified with any Branch, so that the total mem- bership is 104. Of these 33 were re- ceived the past year. The total amount contributed for all purposes was $1,181.50. Besides this company of 164, there are 30 or more Chinese who have been con- verted, as we hope, at Santa Barbara, San Leandro, Stockton and elsewhere, in connection with our schools; and be- sides the contributions above reported, there has been raised at Petaluma, Stock- ton and elsewhere, certainly not less than $100. When we consider the poverty of these young men, the smallness of their wages, the drafts made upon them for parents and others dependent upon them in China, then this .$1, 300 which they have contributed during the past year for the nurture of their own Christian life, or for the salvation of others, grows to its true proportionsin our view, a token of real Christian heroism. I quote the closing sentences of the statement written for me by the Secre- tary of the Association: No death has occurred during the past year. Our Heavenly Father has greatly prospered us, forwhichwereturnHim hearty thanks. We are grateful that He has put into our hearts a desire to have our parents and countrymen in China brought to a knowledge of the Christian religion. We are endeavoring to open a Chapel in Chuck Hum, China, and if we only had means, could open as many as we desire. Most all the letters that are sent to China by members of the Association contain something about the Christian religion, and urging the people at home to discard idols and believe in the Saviour. OUR LAST MONTHS WORK, as I reviewed it in the monthly reports, saddened me, and brought over me the first big wave of discouragement which I have felt since I entered on this service. The enrolment and the attendance were both much less than I expected, and some of our smaller schools seemed ready to die. I quote from one of these reports as an example: You will see that the average is very low, and I am afraid it will be still lower. The boys seem to have lost their interest in the school, and I am afraid that I am losing mine. It is very discouraging to me, after doing a hard days work (for I am working very hard just now), to walk three-fourths of a mile and then have but one or two come to the school. Thank God there are one or two faithful ones. * * * Now, Mr. Pond, I have laid the case before you, and I ask your prayers in be- half of this little school struggling tokeep alive, and for the teacher also, that he may not weary in well-doing, but that God will help him bear this cross and try to save, at least, one soul. To receive letter after letter like that, while it draws out ones love and prayer for the writer, sets one also to asking, Where is the Lord, and what will become of our work at this rate l But before the reports were all in, news came that siv, st least, during the month, had forsaken their idols and appeared to have become dis- ciples of Christ, and we thanked God and took courage. Brethren, pray for us. Receipts. RECEIPTS FOI~ NOVEMBEIR, 1373. MAINE, $163.74. Belfast. First Cong. Cli. and Soc $3 00 Biddeford. Second Cong. Ch. and Soc. (of which $25.65 for Student Aid, Atlanta U.) $61.97Second Cong. Sali. Soli. $20, for Student Aad, Atlanta U 71 97 Castine. Mrs. Lucy S. Adams. $10. (adi) to const. REV. LEWIS J. THoMAs, L. M. W. H. W., 50c 10 50 Farmington. Cong. Cli. and Soc 19 07 Hallowell. Mrs. Flagg, $10; H. K. Baler, $5; for Printing Press, Talladega, Ala. (Incorrectly ack. in Dec. number.) Searsport. First Cong. Soc 25 00 Thomaston. Matt. vi. 3 .... 10 00 Wells. B. Maxwell 15 00 Wilton. Cong. Cli 9 20 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $217.75. Amherst. First Cong. Cli. and Soc Candia Village. Jona. Martin Concord. Ladies of North Cli., bbS. of C.... Exeter. First Cong. Ch. and Soc. $27. Friends in Second Cong. Cli. $12, for a Teacher Hinsdale. Cong. Cli. and Soc Keene. Mrs. Win. W Kensington. Friends for N. II. Memorial but., Wilmington, N. C Milford. Peter and Cynthia S. Burns, $10; First Cong. Cli. and Soc. $23 New Ipswich. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (of Which $27. for Wilmington Memeroal Inst.) $31.41; Procreds of 16th Annual Fair, held by Children of Cong. Cli. $12 Plainfield. Mrs. Bannab Stevens, for N. H. Memorial Inst., Wilmington, N. C, and to const. TENNY K. PAGE, L. M Plymouth. Cong. Cli. and Soc Thorntons Ferry. Individuals, by Mrs. H. N. Eaton Warner. Cong. Cli. and Soc VERMONT, $244.22. Burlington. M. C. Torrey Charlotte. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to conat. JOSEPH S. SHAW, L. M Chelsea. Cong. Cli. and Soc l4ewhury. P. W;Ladd Norwich. Mrs. S. J. Kellogg Ripton. Cong. Cli. and Soc Saint Jolinsliury. Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Blod. gett, to conat. REV. WILLIAM P. BENNETT, L. M Stowe. Cong. Cli. to const. ALBERT H. CHENEY, LII Tunliridge. Cong. Cli. and Soc West Enoshurgh. Henry FaSSett West Fairlee. Cong. Cli. $12; A Friend $1 Westtord. Cong. Cli. and Society West Westminster. Cong. ~h Windliam. Cong. Cli. 12.54; Rev. D. N. Goodrich, $2 Woodatock. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 9 00 5 00 19 00 7 37 50 6 70. 53 00 43 41 30 00 15 16 4 00 4 61 5 00 37 60 17 00 5 00 2 00 27 00 30 00 43 43 2 59 5 00 13 00 10 00 12 45 14 54 13 61 MASSACHUSETTS, $4,329.83. Andover. Mrs. Jonathan Poor, $15.50. A Friend, $4.00, for Straight U 19 50 Berkley. Cong. Cli 25 68 Boston. Shawmut Cong. Cli. and Soc. ($25 of which for W;lmingt.sa, N. C.) 654 51 Boston. $15.00; A Friend, 75 c.; S. D. Smith. 2 organs, vaL $200.... 15 75 Boston Highlands. Immanuel CliSabSohool 20 11 Camliridgerort. Ladies Miss. Soc. Pilgrim Cong. Cli., $30.00, to const. Mrs. W. A. WAND, L. M.; Prospect St. Cong. Sob. School, 412.34 $42 34 Brimfield. Ladies Benev. Soc., bhl. of C... Brookline. E. H. C 2 00 Danvers Centre. Cong.Sah.Schfor Straight U 25 00 Dorchester. A Friend, 1 00 Easthampton. Payson Cong. Sab. Sob 50 00 Enfield. Edward Smith 200 00 Fitchbnrgli. Cal. Cong. Cli. and Soc 158 00 Fitchhurgli. J. A. Coun, for Student Aid, Al. lanta U so oo Florence. Florence Cli 110 00 Foxhorougli. Cong. Sab. Sob. $5.40; W. P. P., SOc 5 90 Framingliam. Ladies of Pl3m. Cli., 2 libls. of C. Georgetown. Sab. Sob. Class in Memorial Cli io Co Globe Village. Ryan. Cli 34 76 Harvard. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $27.75 ; Carrie S. Dixon, $10, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 37 15 Harwich. Ladies of Cong. Cli. 2 blils. of C. for Marion, Ala. Holbrook. Winthrop Cong. Cli 48 34 Holden. Mrs. J. T so Jamaica Plain. Central Cong. Cli. in part.. 340 48 Lawrence. Central Cong. Sab. 5db. for Straight U 10 00 Lee. Cong. Sob. 5db 75 00 Leominster. Cong. Cli. and Soc 23 23 Lexington. Hancock Cong. Church 12 43 Littleton. Ladies of Cong. Cli., lilil. of C.... Lowell. Kirk St. Cong. Cli. (F. F. Battles) 50 00 Lunenburg. Friend.... 5 00 Lynufield Centre. Cong. Cli. (adl) 25 Maiden. W. A. Wilde, $25, for bell, Atlanta, Ga.; H.R.B.$l 2000 Medileld. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc., to const. ONo. F. KERN and MISS AUGUSTA P. ADAMS, L. Ms 60 00 Milford. Con. Sali. Solifer Chinese Al 19 00 Mililiin y. Ladies Benev. Soc. half libl. of bedding, for Atlanta U. Myrickeville Precinct. Cong. Sab. 5db 20 00 Natick. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 110 83 New Bedford. Trin. Cong. Cli 49 74 Newlinryport. No. Cong. Cli. and Soc 28 27 Newton. Eliot Cong. Cli. and Soc 140 73 Norfolk. Friends~ $20, for Woodbridge, N. C.; Cong. Sab. Cli. $8; Cong. Cli. and Soc. $6.75 34 73 Nortliampton. W 100 00 Nortlibridge. Pliebe S. Marsh s 00 North Brcokfield. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. 50 00 Norwich. Mrs. S. J. Kellogg, pkg. of C. Norwood. Mrs. H. N. Fuller 5 00 Oxlord. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 19 50 Peabody. South Cong. Sab. Scb.for Straight U 2500 Pepperell. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 00 Phillipston. Ladies Money. Soc. bhl. 01 C. Itehobotli. Cong. Cli 12 00 Rodliport. John Parsons 3 00 Rutland. Cong. Cli. and Soc Salem. South Cong. Sab. Soli. for Straight 00 U 2500 Scotland. James M. Leonard 2 00 South Amherst. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Southampton. Cong. Cli. $14; Benj. N. Norton $3 17 00 Soutlibridge. Cong. Cli. and Soc 38 55 Southuleld. ~Friends, $1.10 and pIg. S. S. hooks 1 10 South Hadley. First Cong. Cli. and Soc.... 34 00 Springfield. Memorial Cli 24 48 Tewksbury. Cong. Cli. and Soc 41 25 24

Receipts for November, 1878 24-27

Receipts. RECEIPTS FOI~ NOVEMBEIR, 1373. MAINE, $163.74. Belfast. First Cong. Cli. and Soc $3 00 Biddeford. Second Cong. Ch. and Soc. (of which $25.65 for Student Aid, Atlanta U.) $61.97Second Cong. Sali. Soli. $20, for Student Aad, Atlanta U 71 97 Castine. Mrs. Lucy S. Adams. $10. (adi) to const. REV. LEWIS J. THoMAs, L. M. W. H. W., 50c 10 50 Farmington. Cong. Cli. and Soc 19 07 Hallowell. Mrs. Flagg, $10; H. K. Baler, $5; for Printing Press, Talladega, Ala. (Incorrectly ack. in Dec. number.) Searsport. First Cong. Soc 25 00 Thomaston. Matt. vi. 3 .... 10 00 Wells. B. Maxwell 15 00 Wilton. Cong. Cli 9 20 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $217.75. Amherst. First Cong. Cli. and Soc Candia Village. Jona. Martin Concord. Ladies of North Cli., bbS. of C.... Exeter. First Cong. Ch. and Soc. $27. Friends in Second Cong. Cli. $12, for a Teacher Hinsdale. Cong. Cli. and Soc Keene. Mrs. Win. W Kensington. Friends for N. II. Memorial but., Wilmington, N. C Milford. Peter and Cynthia S. Burns, $10; First Cong. Cli. and Soc. $23 New Ipswich. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (of Which $27. for Wilmington Memeroal Inst.) $31.41; Procreds of 16th Annual Fair, held by Children of Cong. Cli. $12 Plainfield. Mrs. Bannab Stevens, for N. H. Memorial Inst., Wilmington, N. C, and to const. TENNY K. PAGE, L. M Plymouth. Cong. Cli. and Soc Thorntons Ferry. Individuals, by Mrs. H. N. Eaton Warner. Cong. Cli. and Soc VERMONT, $244.22. Burlington. M. C. Torrey Charlotte. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to conat. JOSEPH S. SHAW, L. M Chelsea. Cong. Cli. and Soc l4ewhury. P. W;Ladd Norwich. Mrs. S. J. Kellogg Ripton. Cong. Cli. and Soc Saint Jolinsliury. Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Blod. gett, to conat. REV. WILLIAM P. BENNETT, L. M Stowe. Cong. Cli. to const. ALBERT H. CHENEY, LII Tunliridge. Cong. Cli. and Soc West Enoshurgh. Henry FaSSett West Fairlee. Cong. Cli. $12; A Friend $1 Westtord. Cong. Cli. and Society West Westminster. Cong. ~h Windliam. Cong. Cli. 12.54; Rev. D. N. Goodrich, $2 Woodatock. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 9 00 5 00 19 00 7 37 50 6 70. 53 00 43 41 30 00 15 16 4 00 4 61 5 00 37 60 17 00 5 00 2 00 27 00 30 00 43 43 2 59 5 00 13 00 10 00 12 45 14 54 13 61 MASSACHUSETTS, $4,329.83. Andover. Mrs. Jonathan Poor, $15.50. A Friend, $4.00, for Straight U 19 50 Berkley. Cong. Cli 25 68 Boston. Shawmut Cong. Cli. and Soc. ($25 of which for W;lmingt.sa, N. C.) 654 51 Boston. $15.00; A Friend, 75 c.; S. D. Smith. 2 organs, vaL $200.... 15 75 Boston Highlands. Immanuel CliSabSohool 20 11 Camliridgerort. Ladies Miss. Soc. Pilgrim Cong. Cli., $30.00, to const. Mrs. W. A. WAND, L. M.; Prospect St. Cong. Sob. School, 412.34 $42 34 Brimfield. Ladies Benev. Soc., bhl. of C... Brookline. E. H. C 2 00 Danvers Centre. Cong.Sah.Schfor Straight U 25 00 Dorchester. A Friend, 1 00 Easthampton. Payson Cong. Sab. Sob 50 00 Enfield. Edward Smith 200 00 Fitchbnrgli. Cal. Cong. Cli. and Soc 158 00 Fitchhurgli. J. A. Coun, for Student Aid, Al. lanta U so oo Florence. Florence Cli 110 00 Foxhorougli. Cong. Sab. Sob. $5.40; W. P. P., SOc 5 90 Framingliam. Ladies of Pl3m. Cli., 2 libls. of C. Georgetown. Sab. Sob. Class in Memorial Cli io Co Globe Village. Ryan. Cli 34 76 Harvard. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $27.75 ; Carrie S. Dixon, $10, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 37 15 Harwich. Ladies of Cong. Cli. 2 blils. of C. for Marion, Ala. Holbrook. Winthrop Cong. Cli 48 34 Holden. Mrs. J. T so Jamaica Plain. Central Cong. Cli. in part.. 340 48 Lawrence. Central Cong. Sab. 5db. for Straight U 10 00 Lee. Cong. Sob. 5db 75 00 Leominster. Cong. Cli. and Soc 23 23 Lexington. Hancock Cong. Church 12 43 Littleton. Ladies of Cong. Cli., lilil. of C.... Lowell. Kirk St. Cong. Cli. (F. F. Battles) 50 00 Lunenburg. Friend.... 5 00 Lynufield Centre. Cong. Cli. (adl) 25 Maiden. W. A. Wilde, $25, for bell, Atlanta, Ga.; H.R.B.$l 2000 Medileld. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc., to const. ONo. F. KERN and MISS AUGUSTA P. ADAMS, L. Ms 60 00 Milford. Con. Sali. Solifer Chinese Al 19 00 Mililiin y. Ladies Benev. Soc. half libl. of bedding, for Atlanta U. Myrickeville Precinct. Cong. Sab. 5db 20 00 Natick. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 110 83 New Bedford. Trin. Cong. Cli 49 74 Newlinryport. No. Cong. Cli. and Soc 28 27 Newton. Eliot Cong. Cli. and Soc 140 73 Norfolk. Friends~ $20, for Woodbridge, N. C.; Cong. Sab. Cli. $8; Cong. Cli. and Soc. $6.75 34 73 Nortliampton. W 100 00 Nortlibridge. Pliebe S. Marsh s 00 North Brcokfield. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. 50 00 Norwich. Mrs. S. J. Kellogg, pkg. of C. Norwood. Mrs. H. N. Fuller 5 00 Oxlord. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 19 50 Peabody. South Cong. Sab. Scb.for Straight U 2500 Pepperell. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 00 Phillipston. Ladies Money. Soc. bhl. 01 C. Itehobotli. Cong. Cli 12 00 Rodliport. John Parsons 3 00 Rutland. Cong. Cli. and Soc Salem. South Cong. Sab. Soli. for Straight 00 U 2500 Scotland. James M. Leonard 2 00 South Amherst. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Southampton. Cong. Cli. $14; Benj. N. Norton $3 17 00 Soutlibridge. Cong. Cli. and Soc 38 55 Southuleld. ~Friends, $1.10 and pIg. S. S. hooks 1 10 South Hadley. First Cong. Cli. and Soc.... 34 00 Springfield. Memorial Cli 24 48 Tewksbury. Cong. Cli. and Soc 41 25 24 .L?eceqds. Taunton. Winslow Oh. and Soc. $40 81 Trni~o. Rev.E.W.N 100 Westborough. Freedmens Mission Aosa., 3 bbls. of 0., one of which for Atlanta U.. Waitinsville. Cong. Oh. and Soc 1,158 50 Winchendon. Sab. Sch. of First Cong. Oh. $9.64; Gao. Cummings, $10 19 64 Winchester. Stephen Cutter 5 00 West Newton. Second Cong. Oh. and Soc.. 35 11 Worcester. Union Oh., $60.62; Old So. Cong. Oh., $54.36 114 98 RHODE ISLAND, $198.93. Central Falls. Cong. Cli 73 95 Providence. A friend, $100; Josiah Chapin, $25 125.00 CONNECTICUT, $893.73. Ansonia. Cong. Oh 32 00 Ashford. Cong. Oh. and Soc 6 00 Avon. Cong. Oh. and Soc 120 00 Black Rogk. Mrs. J. P. Britten 5 00 Coichester. Rev. 5G. Willardfor Straight U. 20 00 East Haddam. 0. Higgins 5 00 East Woodstock. H. C 25 Endeld. First Cong. Oh 14 74 Fair Haven. First O~mg. Oh 28 00 Georgetown. Cong. Oh 12 00 Glastenbury. Cong. Oh 150 00 Groton. Cong. Sab. Sch 15 46 Guilford. First Cong. Oh. and Soc 25 00 Hartford. Pearl St. Cong. Oh. $88.50 Wind- sor Ave. Cong. Oh. $27.60.~Mrs. Ohas. F. Howard, $21, for Howard U. . 139 10 Kensington. Cong. Sab. Sch 1 00 Lebanon. First Oh. and South Soc. $18; Betsy Metcalf, $10. Meriden. Johns XV. Yale Milford. Rev. Gao. H. Griffin. $5; Albert Baldwin, $5 Lucy B. Miles, $10,for Print. ing Press, Taltadega, Ala. (incorrectly ack. in Dec. number.) New Canaan. Cong. Oh. and Soc 13 so New Hartford. First Cong. Sab. Sch., John Richards Bible Chaos. $5; Rev. F. H. Adams Bible Class, $5, for Student Aid, Fisk U 10 00 New Haven. College St. Oh. and Soc 20 00 North Granby. First Cong. Oh 5 os Norwalk. First Cong. Oh 36 86 Plantsville. Oon~. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, At,anta U 50 00 Stamford. First Cong. Oh 26 52 Thomaston. Cong. Oh 20 15 West Haven. Cong. Oh. and Soc 20 00 West Meriden. H. C 1 00 Wethersfield. Horace Savage 2 00 Winchendon. Coll. by I. A. Bronson 15 00 Woodbnry. North Cong. Oh 17 00 . A Friend, 50 00 NEW YORK, $877.45. AdamsBasin. L.D 1 00 Brooklyn. J. Davenport 50 00 Buffalo. W. G. Bancroft. . .. 200 00 Clyde. ESTATE of T. Grimshaw, by A. fraver. Ex 100 00 Crown Point. Second Cong. Oh 6 00 Derby. Mrs. J. B 1 00 Franklin. Cong. Oh. and Soc 27 66 Hancock. Cong. Oh 25 Hopkinton. Cong. Oh. and Soc 9 00 Ithaca. Mrs. H. Selby and others 1 50 Lockport. H. W. Nichols 5 00 Madison. G. H. H 51 Newark Valley. Cong. Oh 26 13 New York. Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Dodge, for Student Aid, Atlanta U., $200; E. S., 40c.. 200 40 Norwich. A Friend, $20; Mrs. R. A. B. $1 21 00 Nunda. Four Ladies of Presh. Oh., bbl of c. and $1 for Freaght 100 Oriskany. A. Halsey, Mrs. L. B. Porter, and Rev. S. F. Porter, $5 ea 15 00 Paris. Val. Pierce $12, Mrs. Pierce $5 17 03 Penn Yan. Chas. C. Sheppard 3150 00 Randolph. Mats. DzaeAaaaus SHELDON. to const. herself L. lvi 30 00 Utica. Bethesda Welsh Cong. Oh 10 00 . A Friend, ~ NEW JERSEY, $71.-. Boonton. Mrs. W. G. L 1 00 Montclair. First Cong. Oh., for Student Aid, Hampton Inst 70 00 PENNSYLVANIA, $31.00. Centre Road. J. A. Scovel 5 00 Newcastle. Mrs. J. W 1 00 Pittsburgh. Third Presh. On. Sab. Sri., for Student Aid, Talladega C 25 00 OHIO, $144.80. Berca. First Cong Oh 2 50 Brownhelm. Cong. Oh 16 80 Cleveland. M.H.B 50 East Cleveland. Mrs. Mary Walkden 2 00 Ediubnrg. Cong. Oh 19 00 Hndson. Cong. Oh 20 00 Lenox. Balance Subscription, for Tougaloo Inst., by Nelson French 4 50 Mecbanicstown. S. M 1 00 Medina. Cong. Oh. and So., hal. to const. W. F. EccLEsvose and T. E. RowE, L. Ms. 50 cts. additional for Tougaloo U 15 50 Nelson. Dea. Harvey Pike 5 00 Rochester. Cong. Oh 4 00 Twinsburgh. L.W.andR.F.Green 400 Wellington. First Cong. Oh. and Soc. 50 00 28 00 INDIANA, $5.00. 5 00 Kokoma. Cong. Oh ILLINOIS, $112.91. Chicago. Ladies Miss. Soc Delavan. R. Houghton Evanston. Cong. Oh Galesburg. ECTATE Warren 0. Willard, by Prof. T. R. Willard Hunthey. Rev. D. C Kewanee. Mrs. 0. E. Ohapin, for Student Aid, Atlanta U. Nora. G. W. Warner Rantoul. Cong. Oh Rockford. Mrs. Penfield, for Student Aid. Tatladeqa C Princeton. Mrs. J. T. Wells 5 00 5 00 8 00 42 03 14 00 100 5 00 10 00 2 88 10 00 15 00 MICHIGAN, $497.19. Ann Arbor. Dea. Sylvester Morris 5 00 Cross Village. Mrs. A. A. C 50 Detroit. First Cong. Oh 293 56 East Riverton. Mrs. J. Barnes 10 00 Hudson. individuals 3 50 Hillsdale. J. W. Ford 2 00 Jackson. Mrs. R. M. Bennett 1 50 Kalamazoo. First Cong. Sab Sch., $5.19; Friends, $3.30 8 49 Lodi. Eli Benton 40 00 Olivet. Win. J. Hickok, $10 for Camp Nel- son. $5 for Emerson Inst., $5 for Indian M. and $5 for Chinese M 25 00 Niles. Dr. James Lewis 5 00 Port Huron. First Cong. Oh 34 00 Romeo. Cong. Oh 35 42 Saint Olair. Cong. Oh 22 22 Vienna. Union Cong. Oh 11 00 IOWA, $185.48. Anamosa. Cong. Oh Castahia. W. H. Baker and family, to const. Mas. HANNAH WILLIAMs, L. M Davenport. Capt. A. E. Adams, for Scholar- ship. Tatladega C Ek River. Cong. Oh Iowa Falls. Cong. Oh Maquoketa. Missionary Soc. of Cong. Oh... 13 83 35 00 50 00 3 00 8 00 20 04 25 26 Receipts. Monona. Cong. Cli. $ 6 00 Monticello. Childrens Band 20 Riceville. Girls Miss. Soc 10 90 Stacyville. Cong. Cli 14 21 Traer. Womans Miss. Soc 10 00 Waterloo. Ladies Miss. Soc 12 30 WISCONSIN, $29.68. Beloit. First Cong. Cli., bale of C for Mont- gosaery, Ala Geneva Lake. W. H. H Fort Atkinson. Cong. Cli Waupun. Cong.Soc 50 15 18 14 00 KANSAS, $3.50. Russell. S. H. Falley 2 50 Solomon City. M. W. E 1 00 MINNESOTA, $90.33. Lake City. Sab. Scli. and Friends, for Straight U Minneapolis. Plymouth Cli Hawley. Adna Colburn, Sr., $20; Adna Colburn, Jr., $10 WASHINGTON TERRITORY, $22.96. Skokomish. Cong. Cli. of Christ White River. Cong. Cli NEBRASKA, $5.00. Silver. Melinda Bowen MISSOURI, $4.00. Warrensburg. Rent . 41 00 19 33 30 00 18 10 4 86 5 00 4 00 MARYLAND, $280.00. Baltimore. Rev. Geo. Morris, $200 for a leacher, and $Sofor a Student, Fisk U 280 00 GEORGIA, $230.66. Atlanta. Atlanta University 113 00 Brunswick. School Children, by S B. Morse, for Mendi M 1 17 Savannah. Beach Inst 115 60 Woodville. Pil,,rim Cli., for Mendi Al 89 NORTH CAROLINA, $28.76. Newborn. C.E.W 50 Raleigh. Washington Sch 21 50 Wilmington. Cong. Cli 2 76 SOUTH CAROLINA, $262.66. Charleston. Avery Inst 262 66 CALIFORNIA, $40.00. Oakville. A. A. Bancroft 40 00 CANADA, $15.04. Toronto. Mrs. J. Thom ($5 of which for Cat. Chinese M.) 15 04 Total 8,983.64 Total from Oct. 1st to Nov. 30th $15,835.30 H. W. HUBBARD, Asst Treas. RECEIVED FOR DEBT. Amherst, N. H. L. and L. K. Melendy 1000 00 East Woodstock, Coun. Rev. E. H. Pratt... 1 00 New Britain, Conn. Mrs. Norman Hart.... 25 00 Wilton, Conn. Rev. S. J. M. Merwin 50 00 Wilton, Conn. Miranda B. Merwin 25 00 Andover, Mass. Free Cong. Cli. and Soc.... 13 00 Florence, Mass. A. L. W. 500 110 Foxhorough, Mass. A. L. Payson $ 1 00 MaIden, Mass. Cong. Cli. and Soc 159 55 Lakeville, Mass. Cong. Cli. and Soc., to const. Mas. CAROLINE L. WARn, L. M 34 11 Pittsfield, Mass, Second Cong. Sab. Scli 5 00 Scotland, Mass. A Friend 2 011 West Barustable, Mass. Rev. B. Paine 5 00 Albany, N. Y. Mrs. M. M. Learned 25 00 Cllfton Springs, N. F. Mrs. Andrew Pierce 25 00 Fairport, N. F. Mrs. J. E. Howard 25 00 Fairport, N. F. Mrs. Garry Brooks 25 00 New York, N. F. 25 00 Pean Yan, N. Y. Mrs. D. B. Prosser 25 00 Rochester, N. Y. Gen. A. W. Riley 25 00 Sackeits Harbor, N. Y. Mrs. Anar H. Barnes 30 00 Centre Road, Penn. J. A. Scovel 5 00 Belpre, Ohio. Cong. Cli 5 00 Fort Recovery, Ohio. M. W. Diggs 5 00 Paddys Run, Ohio. Sarah Wilkin 5 00 Painsville, Ohio. Mrs. C. C. Beardslee 4 00 Oberlin, Ohio. Pros. J. H. Fairchild 10 00 Michigan City, Ind. Correction. J. C. Had- dock, $5. (Nov. number) should read Mrs. Clara W. Peck, $5. Buds, Ill. J. B. Stuart 10 00 Chicago, Ill. Prof. G. N. Boardman 5 00 Geneseo, Ill. P. H. Taylor 5 00 Providence, Ill. Correction. Mrs. H. B. Gulliver, $6. (Nov. number) should read A few Friends, $6. Wethersfield, Ill. Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Kellogg 5 00 Alamo, Micli. Julius Hackley.... 20 00 Broadhead, Wis. Mrs. W. W. Matter 3 50 Milwaukee, Wis. Mrs. James Baker 5 00 Patch Grove, Wis. M. A. Garsich 1 00 Whitewater, Wis. Mrs. R. Coburn 1 00 Natal, South Africa. Mrs. Abbie T. Wilder. 10 00 Trio: 2,125.16 Previously acknowledged in Oct. receipts... 4,659.04 Total 6,784.20 FOR TILLOTSON NORMAL AND COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, AUSTIN, TEXAS. Wells, Me. Mrs. B. A. Maxwell 15 00 East Hartford, Coon. H. L. Goodwin 50 00 Hartford, Coun. Mrs. John Olmetead 50 00 Hebron, Coun. B. A. Bissell 5 00 Hebron, Coun. Dea. Jasper Porter 5 00 Sing Sing, N. Y. Mrs. Harriet M. Cole, to const. CORNELIA M. COLE, L. M 30 00 Syrsepse, N. Y. Mrs. Sarah T. Salisbury... 50 00 Oberlin, Ohio. Mrs. C. C. Wheat 5 00 Olivet, Mich. Win. B. Palmer 200 00 Individuals 5 00 Total 415 00 Previously acknowledged in Oct. receipts.. 190 00 Total 605 00 FOR YELLOW FEVER FUND. Thetford, Vt. Sarah J. Rugg 2 00 Portland, Coun. First Cong. Cli 41 92 Andover, Mass. Chapel Cli. and Soc. $64.15, and Sab. Sch. $15 . 79 55 Troy, N. Y. Little Mary and Margaret Cushman and Mamma 1 00 Orwell, N. Y. A few Friends in Cong. Cli., by Rev. F. N.Greeley 1200 Orange, N. J. Trinity Cong. Ch. Sab. Sch.. 10 00 Tabor, Iowa. Cong. Cli 6 40 152 87 Previously acknowledged in Oct. receipts... 154 17 Total 307 04. ENDOWMENT FUND. Norwood, Mass. ESTATE of Samuel Morrill, by Edward H. Morrill, Ex 500 00 IVdrk, Statistics, Wants, & c. AIM AND WORK. To preach the Gospel to the poor. It originated in a sympathy with the almost friendless slaves. Since Emancipation it has devoted its main efforts to preparing the FREEDMEN for their dnties as citizens and Christians in America and as missionaries in Africa. As closely related to this, it seeks to benefit the caste-persecnted CHINESE in America, and to co-operate with the Government in its hnmane and Christian policy towards the INDIANS. It has also a mission in AFRIcA. STATISTICS. CHURCHES: In the SouthIn Ya. 1; N. C., 5; S.C.,2; Ga., 12; Ky.,7; Tenn., 4;Ala., 13; La., 12; Miss., 1; Kansas, 2 Texas, 5. Africa, 1. Among the Indians, 1. Total 66. INSTITUTIONS FOUNDED, FOSTERED OR SUSTAINED IN THE SouTH.Ghartered: Hampton, Va.; Berea, Ky.; Talladega. Ala.; Atlanta, Ga.; Nashville, Tenn.; Tougaloo, Miss.; New Orleans, La.; and Anstin, Texas, S. Graded or Normal Schools: at Wilmington, Raleigh, N. C.; Charleston, Greenwood, S. C.; Macon, Atlanta, Ga.; Montgomery, Mobile, Athens Selma, Ala.; Memphis, Teon., 11. Other Schools, 18. Total 37. TEACHERS, MISSIONARIES AND ASSISTANTSAmong the Freedmen, 231; among the Chinese, 17; among the Indians, 17; in Africa, 14. Total, 279. STUDENTSIn Theology, 88; Law, 17; in College Conrse, 106; in other stndies, 7,018. Total, 7,229. Scholars, taught by former pupils of our schools, estimated at 100,000. INDIANS under the care of the Association, 13,000. WANTS. 1. A steady INCREASE of regular income to keep pace with the growing work in the South. This increase can only be reached by regular and larqer contributions from the churches the feeble as well as the strong. 2. ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS for our higher educational institutions, to accommodate the in- creasing numbers of students; MEETING HOUSES, for the new churches we are organiHing; MORE MINISTERS, cultured and pious, for these churches. 3. HELP FOR YOUNG MEN, to be educated as ministers here and missionaries to Africa a pressing want. Before sending boxes, always correspond with the nearest A. M. A. office, as below. NEW Yoax... .H. W. Hubbard, Esq., 56 Reade Street. BosToN Rev. C. L. Woodwortli, Room 21, Congregational House. CHICAGO Rev. Jas. Powell, 112 West Washington Street. MAGAZINE. This MagaEine will be sent, gratuitously, if desired, to the Missionaries of the Association; to Life Members; to all clergymen who take up collections for the Association; to Super- intendents of Sabbath Schools; to College Libraries; to Theological Seminaries; to Societies of Inquiry on Missions; and to every donor who does not prefer to take it as a subscriber, and contributes in a year not less than five dollars. Those who wish to remember the AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION in their last Will and Testament, are earnestly requested to use the following FORM OF A BEQUEST. I BEQUEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of dollars in trust, to pay the same in days after my decease to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treas- urer of the American Missionary Associations of New York City, to be applied, under the direction of the Executive Committee of the Association, to its charitable uses and purposes. The Will should be attested by three witnesses [in some States three are requiredin other States only two], who should write against their names, their places of residence [if in cities, their street and number]. The following form of attestation will answer for every State in the Union: Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said [A. B.] as his last Will and Testament, in presence of us, who, at the request of the said A. B., and in his presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses. In some States it is required that the Will should be made at least two months before the death of the testator.

Work, Statistics, Wants, Magazine, Form of a Bequest 27-28

IVdrk, Statistics, Wants, & c. AIM AND WORK. To preach the Gospel to the poor. It originated in a sympathy with the almost friendless slaves. Since Emancipation it has devoted its main efforts to preparing the FREEDMEN for their dnties as citizens and Christians in America and as missionaries in Africa. As closely related to this, it seeks to benefit the caste-persecnted CHINESE in America, and to co-operate with the Government in its hnmane and Christian policy towards the INDIANS. It has also a mission in AFRIcA. STATISTICS. CHURCHES: In the SouthIn Ya. 1; N. C., 5; S.C.,2; Ga., 12; Ky.,7; Tenn., 4;Ala., 13; La., 12; Miss., 1; Kansas, 2 Texas, 5. Africa, 1. Among the Indians, 1. Total 66. INSTITUTIONS FOUNDED, FOSTERED OR SUSTAINED IN THE SouTH.Ghartered: Hampton, Va.; Berea, Ky.; Talladega. Ala.; Atlanta, Ga.; Nashville, Tenn.; Tougaloo, Miss.; New Orleans, La.; and Anstin, Texas, S. Graded or Normal Schools: at Wilmington, Raleigh, N. C.; Charleston, Greenwood, S. C.; Macon, Atlanta, Ga.; Montgomery, Mobile, Athens Selma, Ala.; Memphis, Teon., 11. Other Schools, 18. Total 37. TEACHERS, MISSIONARIES AND ASSISTANTSAmong the Freedmen, 231; among the Chinese, 17; among the Indians, 17; in Africa, 14. Total, 279. STUDENTSIn Theology, 88; Law, 17; in College Conrse, 106; in other stndies, 7,018. Total, 7,229. Scholars, taught by former pupils of our schools, estimated at 100,000. INDIANS under the care of the Association, 13,000. WANTS. 1. A steady INCREASE of regular income to keep pace with the growing work in the South. This increase can only be reached by regular and larqer contributions from the churches the feeble as well as the strong. 2. ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS for our higher educational institutions, to accommodate the in- creasing numbers of students; MEETING HOUSES, for the new churches we are organiHing; MORE MINISTERS, cultured and pious, for these churches. 3. HELP FOR YOUNG MEN, to be educated as ministers here and missionaries to Africa a pressing want. Before sending boxes, always correspond with the nearest A. M. A. office, as below. NEW Yoax... .H. W. Hubbard, Esq., 56 Reade Street. BosToN Rev. C. L. Woodwortli, Room 21, Congregational House. CHICAGO Rev. Jas. Powell, 112 West Washington Street. MAGAZINE. This MagaEine will be sent, gratuitously, if desired, to the Missionaries of the Association; to Life Members; to all clergymen who take up collections for the Association; to Super- intendents of Sabbath Schools; to College Libraries; to Theological Seminaries; to Societies of Inquiry on Missions; and to every donor who does not prefer to take it as a subscriber, and contributes in a year not less than five dollars. Those who wish to remember the AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION in their last Will and Testament, are earnestly requested to use the following FORM OF A BEQUEST. I BEQUEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of dollars in trust, to pay the same in days after my decease to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treas- urer of the American Missionary Associations of New York City, to be applied, under the direction of the Executive Committee of the Association, to its charitable uses and purposes. The Will should be attested by three witnesses [in some States three are requiredin other States only two], who should write against their names, their places of residence [if in cities, their street and number]. The following form of attestation will answer for every State in the Union: Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said [A. B.] as his last Will and Testament, in presence of us, who, at the request of the said A. B., and in his presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses. In some States it is required that the Will should be made at least two months before the death of the testator. 28 The A ~nerican JLli88zoflary. PLEASE READ THIS AND THINK ABOUT IT. Thc American Missionary is printed and circulated for the information of its constituency, and to keep alive their fractical interest in the work of the Association. It costs money to Jre~are and send to its readers so large an edition as we find necessary. THE SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS ONLY FIFTY CENTS A YEAR. A large number of its readers come within the classes who are entitled to it free. If others who desire to read it will send 50 cents to ~ay for thuir Magazine, beside their gifts for the mis- siona~y work, it will not only cease to be in any sense an expense to the treasury, but a source of revenue. Is the re~juest below, then, too great a favor to ask? PLEASE COPY THIS FORM AND MAIL IT. 7anuary 1st, 1879. H. W. HUBBARD, Es1,, Asst Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New York. Enclosed, please find Fifty Gents, subscri~t ion for TILE AMERICAN MISSIONARY, for the year 1879. Send the same to the following address. Sigrned with your NAME, Your TOWN, Your COUNTY And STATE (in full).

Please Read This and Think about It 28

28 The A ~nerican JLli88zoflary. PLEASE READ THIS AND THINK ABOUT IT. Thc American Missionary is printed and circulated for the information of its constituency, and to keep alive their fractical interest in the work of the Association. It costs money to Jre~are and send to its readers so large an edition as we find necessary. THE SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS ONLY FIFTY CENTS A YEAR. A large number of its readers come within the classes who are entitled to it free. If others who desire to read it will send 50 cents to ~ay for thuir Magazine, beside their gifts for the mis- siona~y work, it will not only cease to be in any sense an expense to the treasury, but a source of revenue. Is the re~juest below, then, too great a favor to ask? PLEASE COPY THIS FORM AND MAIL IT. 7anuary 1st, 1879. H. W. HUBBARD, Es1,, Asst Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New York. Enclosed, please find Fifty Gents, subscri~t ion for TILE AMERICAN MISSIONARY, for the year 1879. Send the same to the following address. Sigrned with your NAME, Your TOWN, Your COUNTY And STATE (in full).

Please Copy This Form and Mail It 28-32

28 The A ~nerican JLli88zoflary. PLEASE READ THIS AND THINK ABOUT IT. Thc American Missionary is printed and circulated for the information of its constituency, and to keep alive their fractical interest in the work of the Association. It costs money to Jre~are and send to its readers so large an edition as we find necessary. THE SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS ONLY FIFTY CENTS A YEAR. A large number of its readers come within the classes who are entitled to it free. If others who desire to read it will send 50 cents to ~ay for thuir Magazine, beside their gifts for the mis- siona~y work, it will not only cease to be in any sense an expense to the treasury, but a source of revenue. Is the re~juest below, then, too great a favor to ask? PLEASE COPY THIS FORM AND MAIL IT. 7anuary 1st, 1879. H. W. HUBBARD, Es1,, Asst Treasurer, 56 Reade Street, New York. Enclosed, please find Fifty Gents, subscri~t ion for TILE AMERICAN MISSIONARY, for the year 1879. Send the same to the following address. Sigrned with your NAME, Your TOWN, Your COUNTY And STATE (in full). (~9) Postage Free in the United States. DAILY TRIBUNE, 1 year $10 00 SEMI-WEEKLY TRIBUNE, 1 year 3 00 Five copies, 1 year, to one Post Office 14 00 Ten copies, 1 year, to one Post Office, and one free copy 28 00 WEEKLY TRIBUNE. One copy, 1 year. .$2 00 WEEKLY TRIBUNE.Ten copies, 1 year. $14 00 Five copies, 1 year, 8 25 Twenty copies, 1 year 25 00 Any nnmber of copies above 20 at die same rate. Additions to clnbs may be made at any time. Remit by P. 0. order or in registered letter. PREMIUMS TO FRIENDS SENDING LOCAL CLUBS: FOR A CLUB OF 5 WEEKLIESAny five TRIBUNE NOVELS. FOR A CLUB OF 10 WEEKLIES.An extra CO~~ of TuE WEEKLY, or a COPY Of the Greeley Memorial volume, in cloth, or any eight of the THE TRIBUNE Novels. FOR A CLUB OF 20 WEEKLIES.THE SEMI-WEEKLY TRIyIUNE, or one extri WEEKLY and either Mr. Greeleys Political Economy, or What I Know of Farming ($1.50 each at retail). 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The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 2 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York Feb 1879 0033 002
The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 2, miscellaneous front pages 32A-32B

VOL. XXXIII. No.2. THE AMERICAN ~IISSIONARy. To the Poor the Gosp 0 Preached. FEBBUAB~ 1879. UOA27JxLzVi ~ EDITORIAL. PARAGRAPHS 33 OuR CONCERT OF ]ISIAyER - 34 THE MISSIONS IN CENTRAL AFRICA - How THE COLL GE DISIEcTS AND TRANSMUTES NATURAL FORCES: Rev. E. H. Merrill, D.D PURITANISM AND THE DESPISED RACES: 1i~v. C. 31. Sonthgate RE-DEDICATION OF THE BEACH INSI ITUTE: Rev. J. E. Roy, D.D 41 ITEMS FROM THE FIELD 42 GENERAL NOTES 4:1 NEW APPOINTMENTS. THE SOUTISESIN FIELD 45 AMONG THE CHINESEAMONG THE INDlANS MENDI MISSION, WEST AFRiCA 49 THE FREEDMEN. NORTH CAROLINAA Working CbnrebBible Christians 50 GEORGIAA New ConferenCe OrgaDiled 50 There is Life in the Old LaRd Yet. 51 Home Life Among the NegroesAn mci deDt 52 ALABAIIIATeSIiIRODy as to Progress Already MadeThe Silnation and Equipment. ... 52 TENNESSEE Le Moyne Library SUnday- school Work Generoes GiviDg Not Dying Gothelp Wanted 53 Freedosos Day 54 CIIILDRENS PAGE so RECEIPTS WORK, STATiSTICS, WANTS, ETC 62 NEW YOUI{: ROOMS, 56 READE STREET. Price, 50 Cents a Year, in advance. meric~tn on ~ 4s~nci zttinn 56 REAIDE STREET, N. V. PRESIDENT. HoN. E. S. TOBEY, Boston. VICE-PRESIDENTS. Hon. F. D. PARISH, Ohio. Hon. E. P. HOLTON, Wis. Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, Mass. Rev. STEPHEN THIJESTON, D. D., Me. Rev. SAMUEL HARRIS, D. D., Ct. War. C. CHAPIN, Esq., R. I. Rev. XV. T. EUSTIS, D. D., Mass. Hon. A. C. BARSTOW, R. I. Rev. THATCHER THAYER, D. D., R. I. Rev. RAY PALMER, D. D., N. Y. Rev. J. M. STURTEvANT, D. D., Ill. Rev. W. W. PATTON, D. D., D. C. Hon. SEYMOUR STRAIGHT, La. HORACE HALLOCK, Esq., Mich. Rev. CYRUS W. WALLACE, D. D., N. H. Rev. EDWARD HAWES, Ct. DOUGLAS PUTNAM, Esq., Ohio. Hon. THADDEUS FAIRBANKS, Vt. SAMUEL D. PORTER, Esq., N. Y. Rev. M. M. G. DANA, D. D., Minn. Rev. H. W. BEECIIER, N. Y. Gen. 0. 0. HOWARD, Oregon. Rev. G. F. MAGOUN, D. D., IowR. Col. C. G. HAMMOND, Ill. EDWARD SPAULDING, M. D., N. H. DAVID RIPLEY, Esq., N. J. Rev. WM. M. BARBOUR, D. D., Ct. Rev. W. L. GAGE, Ct. A. S. HATCH, Esq., N. Y. Rev. J. H. FAIRCHILD, P. D., Ohio Rev. H. A. STIHsoN, Minn. Rev. J. W. STRONG, P. P., Minn. Rev. GEORGE THACHER, LL. P., Iowa. Rev. A. L. STONE, P. P., California. Rev. G. H. ATKINSON, P. P., Oregon. Rev. J. E. RANEIN, P. P., D. C. Rev. A. L. CHAPIN, P. P., Wis. S. D. SMITH, Esq., Mass. PETER SMITH, Esq., Mass. Dea. JOHN C. WHITIN, Mass. Rev. WM. PATTON, P. D., Ct. Hon. J. B. GRINNELL, Iowa. Rev. WM. T. CARE, Ct. Rev. HORACE WINSLOW, Ct. Sir PETER COATS, SCotland. Rev. HENRY ALLON, P. P., London, Eng. WM. E. WRITING, Esq., N. V. J. M. PINKERTON, Esq., Mass. Rev. F. A. NOBLE, P. D., Ct. DANIEL HAND,.ESq., Ct. A. L. WILLISTON, Esq., Mass. Rev. A. F. BEARD, P. P., N. V. FREDERICK BILLINGS, Esq., Vt. JOSEPH CARPENTER, Esq., R. I. CORRESPONDING SECRETARY. REV. M. E. STRIEBY. P. P., 56 1-teade Street, N. Y DISTRICT SECRETARIES. REV. C. L. WOODWORTH, Boston. REV. G. P. PIKE, New York. REV. JAS. POWELL, ChiCago. EDGAR KETCHUM, ESQ., Treasurer, N. Y H. W. HUBBARD. ESQ., Assistant Treasurer, N~ Y. REV. M. E. STRIEBY, ReCording Secretary. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. ALONHO S. BALL, A. S. BARNES, EDWARD BEECHER, GRO. M. BOYNTON, War. B. BROWN, CLINTON B. FISH, A. P. FOSTER, E. A. GRAVES, S. B. HALLIDAY, SAML HOLMES, S. S. JOCELYN, ANDREW LESTER, CHAS. L. MEAD, JOHN H. WASHBURN, G. B. WILLCOX. COMMUNICATIONS relating to the business of the Association may be addressed to either of the Secretaries as above; letters for the Editor of the Alnerican Missionarys to Rev. Geo. M. Boynton, at the New York Office. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS may be sent to H. W. Hubbard, 56 Reade Street, New York, or, when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., 112 West Washington Street, Chicauo, Ill. Drafts or checks sent to Mr. Hubbard should be made payable to his order as Assistant Treasurer. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a Life Member. Correspondents arc specially requested to place at the head of each letter the name of their Post Office, and the Oounty and State in which it is located.

Paragraphs Editorial 33-34

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL. XXXIII. FEBRUARY, 1879. No. 2. 4----- We are happy to greet our elder sister, The Missionary Herald, or perhaps we should name a more venerable relative yet, as in the seventy-fifth year of its age it renews its youth. Always valuable, it promises in future to be more full of infor- mation as to the work of the American Board, and more comprehensive in its view of the missionary work at large, while it enlivens its page~ with illustrations and adds a bright department for the young folks. We welcome our brother Strong to the editorial chair, and the Herald to its future, and we trust ever-increasing, career of usefulness. A new Sunday School Jubilee Concert Exercise, relating to the work of the American Missionary Association, has been prepared by the Rev. G. D. Pike, upon the basis of one arranged by Rev. A. E. Winship, of Massachusetts. This is brought down to date as to its facts and figures, and will be accompanied by a brief for the use of those who are to lead and to make addresses, giving facts in greater detail, and incidents as material with which to make the meetings of deeper interest. The paper includes Jubilee Songs and statements in regard to the work for the meetings. Any Sabbath-school wishing a supply of this exercise will be fur- nished gratuitously with the number required, by applying to Rev. G. D. Pike, at the New York office, 56 Reade Street. The Christian At Woric concludes a long and appreciative notice of Dr. Striebys recently published address upon the Work of Half a Generation, with the following paragraph: The impetus which has been given to educational efforts in the Southern States owes its existence to the work of the American Missionary Association and kindred societies. They scattered through the South an army of enthusiastic practical educators, who, at all principal points, established schools. The work of these societies is laying broad and deep the foundations for the real elevation of the Freedmen. They lay them in the Christian character of their schools; in the higher education they furnish, which the States do not give, and in the well-trained army of teachers they prepare for the Freedmen, thus supplying one of the most urgent wants recognized by both whites and blacks alike, if there were no2other results 34 Our Concert of Prayer. from the labors of these societies, the teachers they have trained, and who are now instructing more than two hundred thousand pupils, would fully vindicate their claim to the confidence and gratitude of both the North and South. OUR CONCERT OF PRAYER. It has been our custom for many years to appoint a day and hour in which all who are engaged in the work of the Association might unite in earnest prayer to God for His blessing upon one another and upon the common interests. The noti- fication has been sent to all the workers in the various fields in the South. It has been frequently the case that the time selected has been during the progress ~of the annual meeting, so that the assembled friends of the Association have united with the officers, missionaries and teachers in this sweet hour of prayer. This year, however, our schools were so much delayed in their opening, and our workers from returning to the South, by the yellow fever, that this concert of prayer could not be held before the beginning of the new year. On Monday of the week of prayer an hour was fixed at which the executive committee and officers in New York, the teachers and pupils in the various schools, the pastors and the people of their charge, might all assemble, each in the midst of their own respon- sibilities, and pray for a blessing on the work begun and to be prosecuted through the year. It was pleasant to feel that we were mingling the incense of our petition and praise with the great cloud which was ascending from all parts of Protestant Christendom during this week of prayer. We came from this still hour, in the midst of the busy, bustling city, realizing more than we are wont, that after all it is not the drive and tear of eager human life on which we depend for success, but the loving heart of God, which moves with unseen arm the doors of opportunity which swing on noiseless hinges at His touch; that it is He alone who gives the wisdom to direct and the strength to achieve; that He turns the hearts of men as the rivers of water are turned. We have been accustomed to make our pleas for help to those whom we be- lieved the Lords heart had touched, that there might not fail us a supply of men and means; and our requests have not been in vain, but have been answered with generous liberality. But, brethren, when we have come to you to ask your help, we have followed the example of the good governor of Jerusalem, and have first prayed to the God of heaven; and when you have responded, we have recognized, as he did, that you have granted us according to the good hand of our God upon us. Perplexing questions come up from week to week for settle- ment and wise decision. Thank God we may go to Hun and plead His promise to give us light on the way. With all our need of men and means to carry on the work which the Lord has entrusted to this agency, we recognize still more our constant need of that Divine help which alone can never fail us. Dear fellow-workers in this special field, let the spirit and the practice of this week of prayer go with us through the year. Let those who manage, those who do the detail work, and those who furnish the supplies, all pray for themselves, each other and the work. We shall work bet- ter if we pray. We shall give more graciously as well as generously if we pray. We shall pray such prayers as God most willingly will hear and answer, if we give and work for the things for which we ask. Our dependence for the year to come may well be expressed in the words of the good man, to whom we have referred already, The God of heaven He will prosper us; therefore, we His servants will arise and build.

Our Concert of Prayer Editorial 34-35

34 Our Concert of Prayer. from the labors of these societies, the teachers they have trained, and who are now instructing more than two hundred thousand pupils, would fully vindicate their claim to the confidence and gratitude of both the North and South. OUR CONCERT OF PRAYER. It has been our custom for many years to appoint a day and hour in which all who are engaged in the work of the Association might unite in earnest prayer to God for His blessing upon one another and upon the common interests. The noti- fication has been sent to all the workers in the various fields in the South. It has been frequently the case that the time selected has been during the progress ~of the annual meeting, so that the assembled friends of the Association have united with the officers, missionaries and teachers in this sweet hour of prayer. This year, however, our schools were so much delayed in their opening, and our workers from returning to the South, by the yellow fever, that this concert of prayer could not be held before the beginning of the new year. On Monday of the week of prayer an hour was fixed at which the executive committee and officers in New York, the teachers and pupils in the various schools, the pastors and the people of their charge, might all assemble, each in the midst of their own respon- sibilities, and pray for a blessing on the work begun and to be prosecuted through the year. It was pleasant to feel that we were mingling the incense of our petition and praise with the great cloud which was ascending from all parts of Protestant Christendom during this week of prayer. We came from this still hour, in the midst of the busy, bustling city, realizing more than we are wont, that after all it is not the drive and tear of eager human life on which we depend for success, but the loving heart of God, which moves with unseen arm the doors of opportunity which swing on noiseless hinges at His touch; that it is He alone who gives the wisdom to direct and the strength to achieve; that He turns the hearts of men as the rivers of water are turned. We have been accustomed to make our pleas for help to those whom we be- lieved the Lords heart had touched, that there might not fail us a supply of men and means; and our requests have not been in vain, but have been answered with generous liberality. But, brethren, when we have come to you to ask your help, we have followed the example of the good governor of Jerusalem, and have first prayed to the God of heaven; and when you have responded, we have recognized, as he did, that you have granted us according to the good hand of our God upon us. Perplexing questions come up from week to week for settle- ment and wise decision. Thank God we may go to Hun and plead His promise to give us light on the way. With all our need of men and means to carry on the work which the Lord has entrusted to this agency, we recognize still more our constant need of that Divine help which alone can never fail us. Dear fellow-workers in this special field, let the spirit and the practice of this week of prayer go with us through the year. Let those who manage, those who do the detail work, and those who furnish the supplies, all pray for themselves, each other and the work. We shall work bet- ter if we pray. We shall give more graciously as well as generously if we pray. We shall pray such prayers as God most willingly will hear and answer, if we give and work for the things for which we ask. Our dependence for the year to come may well be expressed in the words of the good man, to whom we have referred already, The God of heaven He will prosper us; therefore, we His servants will arise and build. The illissions in Central Africa. 35 THE MISSIONS IN CENTRAL AFRICA. When Livingstone entered upon his life work in Africa, not quite forty years ago, Kuruman was the farthest inland station; since then great things have been done for Africa. Dividing that part of Africa which lies south of the equa- tor into three equal parts of twelve degrees each, we find that Kuruman falls with- in the southernmost division, or South Africa. In the second division, or South- Central Africa, lie Lake Ngami and most of Lake Nyassa, both of which were dis- covered by Dr. Livingstone. In the third division, Central Africa, extending from 9 degrees to 3 degrees south latitude, lies Lake Tanganyika, discovered by Burton and Speke in 1858. To the north of Tanganyika are several lakes, the largest of which is the Victoria Nyanza. The Victoria Nyanza was discovered by Speke in 1858, and circumnavigated by Stanley in 1875. It lies between the 32d and 35th parallels of longitude from Greenwich, and extends from 2~ degrees south latitude to the north of the equator by the fraction of a degree. Its superficial area is 21,500 square miles, being nearly as large as Lake Michigan, and 100 fath- oms will not measure its deepest waters. The lake is in a direct line about 520 miles from the east coast, and~about 1,600 miles from the west coast. Ujiji, on the eastern shore of Tanganyika, is 625 miles from the east coast, in a direct line. These great lakes, Nyassa, Tanganyika and Nyanza, afford excellent facilities for missionary operations. They make the torrid heat of the equatorial sun tolera- ble; they cause rains which produce a luxuriant vegetation; and their broad, deep waters enable the missionaries to travel swiftly from point to point by steamer, bringing them within easy communication with various and distant tribes. The first of these great inland missions was established by the Free Church of Scotland. The discoveries of Livingstone had drawn the attention of the Church to interior Africa as early as 1861, and some correspondence was had with the great traveller, who recommended the shores of Lake Nyassa as affording an excellent site for a new mission. It was not until 1875, however, when Living- stones Last Journals had bcen published, and had created a great enthusiasm for the redemption of Africa, that the Free Church definitely decided to under- take the enterprise. The money asked for, $50, 000, was soon rais5d. The pio- neer party left Scotland early in the Spring of 1875, and arrived at its destina- tion in the following October. The route was up the Zambesi River to the Murchi- son Cataracts, the steamer and goods being carried around the cataracts by 800 porters, and launched again in the Shir6 River, reaching the lake in two days from the cataracts. The whole distance is about 400 miles. Later in the year the second party, under Dr. Stewart, the head of the mission, started for the lake. The site of the mission station, Livingstonia, was chosen on Cape Maclear, at the southern end of the lake. Buildings were put up at once, and attempts made to secure the friendship of the natives, few of whom manifested any hostility. Trips were made to the northern and western shores of the lake, and no opposition was encountered anywhere. The missionaries say no real obstacle to the success of the mission presents itself. It has been found, however, that Livingstonia will have to be abandoned. It has a good harbor, but the soil is poor and the land lies low, and is too circumscribed to sustain a large population. Besides, the tsetse fly, that destroyer of cattle, has appeared. A new site is to be chosen, and an. expedition is searching for one on the west coast, about 145 miles north of Livingstonia, among a people of Zulu origin, called the Maviti. The Maviti inhabit a high table land, and are quite numerous.

The Missions in Central Africa Editorial 35-37

The illissions in Central Africa. 35 THE MISSIONS IN CENTRAL AFRICA. When Livingstone entered upon his life work in Africa, not quite forty years ago, Kuruman was the farthest inland station; since then great things have been done for Africa. Dividing that part of Africa which lies south of the equa- tor into three equal parts of twelve degrees each, we find that Kuruman falls with- in the southernmost division, or South Africa. In the second division, or South- Central Africa, lie Lake Ngami and most of Lake Nyassa, both of which were dis- covered by Dr. Livingstone. In the third division, Central Africa, extending from 9 degrees to 3 degrees south latitude, lies Lake Tanganyika, discovered by Burton and Speke in 1858. To the north of Tanganyika are several lakes, the largest of which is the Victoria Nyanza. The Victoria Nyanza was discovered by Speke in 1858, and circumnavigated by Stanley in 1875. It lies between the 32d and 35th parallels of longitude from Greenwich, and extends from 2~ degrees south latitude to the north of the equator by the fraction of a degree. Its superficial area is 21,500 square miles, being nearly as large as Lake Michigan, and 100 fath- oms will not measure its deepest waters. The lake is in a direct line about 520 miles from the east coast, and~about 1,600 miles from the west coast. Ujiji, on the eastern shore of Tanganyika, is 625 miles from the east coast, in a direct line. These great lakes, Nyassa, Tanganyika and Nyanza, afford excellent facilities for missionary operations. They make the torrid heat of the equatorial sun tolera- ble; they cause rains which produce a luxuriant vegetation; and their broad, deep waters enable the missionaries to travel swiftly from point to point by steamer, bringing them within easy communication with various and distant tribes. The first of these great inland missions was established by the Free Church of Scotland. The discoveries of Livingstone had drawn the attention of the Church to interior Africa as early as 1861, and some correspondence was had with the great traveller, who recommended the shores of Lake Nyassa as affording an excellent site for a new mission. It was not until 1875, however, when Living- stones Last Journals had bcen published, and had created a great enthusiasm for the redemption of Africa, that the Free Church definitely decided to under- take the enterprise. The money asked for, $50, 000, was soon rais5d. The pio- neer party left Scotland early in the Spring of 1875, and arrived at its destina- tion in the following October. The route was up the Zambesi River to the Murchi- son Cataracts, the steamer and goods being carried around the cataracts by 800 porters, and launched again in the Shir6 River, reaching the lake in two days from the cataracts. The whole distance is about 400 miles. Later in the year the second party, under Dr. Stewart, the head of the mission, started for the lake. The site of the mission station, Livingstonia, was chosen on Cape Maclear, at the southern end of the lake. Buildings were put up at once, and attempts made to secure the friendship of the natives, few of whom manifested any hostility. Trips were made to the northern and western shores of the lake, and no opposition was encountered anywhere. The missionaries say no real obstacle to the success of the mission presents itself. It has been found, however, that Livingstonia will have to be abandoned. It has a good harbor, but the soil is poor and the land lies low, and is too circumscribed to sustain a large population. Besides, the tsetse fly, that destroyer of cattle, has appeared. A new site is to be chosen, and an. expedition is searching for one on the west coast, about 145 miles north of Livingstonia, among a people of Zulu origin, called the Maviti. The Maviti inhabit a high table land, and are quite numerous. 36 ZIiYie J11288i0fl8 in Central Africa. Of course, but little actual mission work has been performed thus far. The mission has no permanent home, and time is required for preparation. Sunday services have been held from the first, and a school with a fair attendance is carried on. A great deal has been accomplished, however, in suppressing the slave trade. Formerly thousands of slaves were sent across the lake from Juml)es, who is a Mohammedan, but the Arab traders have now left the lake and gone inland to carry on their nefarious business. Two members of the mission, Dr. Laws and Capt. Elton, have died, and all have had the fever. A short distance to the south of Livingstonia, and closely connected with it, is Blantyre, the mission of the church of Scotland. It has a very favorable loca- tion in the Shir6 hills. It is high, cool, well wooded, a stream is near, it has good~soil, and an iron mine. Until last year the evangelistic work was performed by a missionary from Livingstonia, but now an ordained missionary is in charge. The gardeners have a large tract under cultivation, and Blantyre is evidently to become the centre of a large population. The natives are gathering around it, they are very friendly, and they are giving more attention to the cultivation of the soil. The school has many promising scholars. The second mission established in Central Africa was that of the Church Mis- sionary Society on the Victoria Nyanza. November 15, 1875, a London paper printed a letter from Stanley calling for Christian missionaries to enter Mtesas country, Uganda. Three days later the Church Missionary Society received a let- ter from An Unprofitable Servant, offering $25,000 for such a mission. Shortly afterward another anonymous contribution of the same amount was received, the society having meanwhile decided to undertake the mission. The mission party left the coast at Bagamoyo, in 1876, in four divisions the first on July 14, the second on July 29, the third on the last of August, and the fourth on September 14. After crossing the Wami River, the expedition took the route of Mr. Roger Price, of the London Missionary Society, to Mpwapwa. From Mpwapwa the route was west and north to Unyanyembe; thence north to Kagei, at the southern end of the lake, the advance party reaching that point in January, 1877, the journey of 800 miles being performed in about six months, without serious mishap. One of the party, Dr. Smith, died on the way of fever. The provisions were stored at Kagei, but Ukerewe Island, in the southern part of the lake, was made the basis of operations. Lieutenant Smith and the Rev. C. T. Wilson proceeded to the northern shore of the lake, entering Rubaga, the capital of Mtesas kingdom Uganda, on June 30. They were received with great favor by Mtesa, who is the ruler of a powerful people. Lieutenant Smith remained with Mr. Wilson a month, and then returned to Ukerewe to assist Mr. ONeill in preparing for removal. Mr. Wilson was well provided for at first by Mtesa, and had a house near the palace, but the chiefs and the Arabs used their influence against the missionary, and the supplies of food grew smaller and less frequent, and at last Mr. Wilson was informed that he must remove farther from the palace. He had, however, free access to the king and held divine services every Sunday in the palace, the king himself often taking part in them. Several of the Uganda boys were gathered into a school, and were found to be bright and quick to learn. Late in December, Mr. Wilson had news of a disaster on the lake, and hastened south to find that Lieutenant Smith and Mr. ONeill had been murdered by Lukongehs people in a dispute raised by an Arab trader about a dhow. Finding that the stores at Kagei were almost exhausted, Mr. How the Oollege Directs and Transmutes Natural Forces. 3? Wilson went on to Unyanyembe, whence he returned to Uganda, arriving at Ru~ baga March 26, 1878. The last letters received from him by way of the Nile speak hopefully of the future. The caravan, with the hulk of the goods, has made very slow progress. Porters by the rhousaad were required to convey them, and porters in Africa are arrant villains. At the latest accounts the caravan was still some distance from the lake. A reinforcement for Uganda was sent out at the be- ginning of 1878, of three young students of the Church Missionary College, and a medical missionary, by way of the Nile. The latest news from them stated that they reached Berber in July. One of their number had been sun-struck and was compelled to return. Thus far $65,000 has been received for the Nyanza mission; also a large part of a fund of $50,000 asked for by the society last April for the support of it, The liberal donor who gave $25, 000 for the Nyanza Mission offered the Lon- don Missionary Society the same sum for a mission on Lake Tanganyika. March 15, 1876, the Society resolved to undertake the mission. The Rev. Roger Price, who was commissioned to ascertain what was the best route to the interior, found that by starting from Saadani, wagons could be used as far as Mpwapwa, and that the costly and vexatious system of porterage could thus be avoided so far. Four ordained missionaries,- one scientific man, and one builder, left London in March, 1877, as the first contingent of the expedition. At Saadani they divided, four starting July 25, and the rest with the caravan in October. In March the expedition reached Kirasa, forty-five miles east of Mpwapwa, where they left the wagons and employed porters. They reached their destination August 23, hav- ing been thirteen months on the journey from the coast, in consequence of unex- pected obstacles and vexatious delays. The letters announcing the arrival were only forty-five days on the route to the coast, and only thirty-three thence to Lon- don. A high and healthy camping place was chosen near Ujiji. The caravan ha8 not yet reached the lake. The history of these missions is yet to be made. None of them can be said to be fully established yet. Buildings are to be erected, languages are to be learned, the country is to be explored, and the ways of the people are to be studied, before much can be done in declaring the Gospel. The missions are well situated. The country around them is thickly peopled, and great opportuniti~s are opening to them. Much good has already been done in checking the slave trade, in opening lines of legitimate commercial traffic, and in inducing the natives to cultivate the soil. Other missions will be established in due time. The English Baptists are prospecting for a new mission up the Congo, and Lake Bangweolo, west of Lake Nyassa, and south of Lake Tanganyika, called by Livingstone a paradise, will be- come the centre of another great mission. Thus from the South, the East and the West, Christian missions are approaching the heart of Africa. Before many years we may hope to see a chain of stations across the continent, and another from Lake Ngami to the equator. The tribestouch each other like drops of water, and when one of them is moved by the Gospel, those which surround it will be agi- tated. Thus will Christianity take posscssion of Africa. HOW THE COLLEGE DIRECTS AND TRANSMUTES NATURAL FORCES. Address at the Annual Meeting, BY PRESIDENT EDWARD H. MERRILL, D.n., RIPON, WISCONSIN. I wish simply to emphasize a single thought, viz., that these institutions of higher learning have their chief use as being aids to direct force. When you have mentioned what these higher institutions have done for individualswhen

President Edward H. Merrill, D.D. Merrill, Edward H., President, D.D. How the College Directs and Transmutes Natural Forces Editorial 37-39

How the Oollege Directs and Transmutes Natural Forces. 3? Wilson went on to Unyanyembe, whence he returned to Uganda, arriving at Ru~ baga March 26, 1878. The last letters received from him by way of the Nile speak hopefully of the future. The caravan, with the hulk of the goods, has made very slow progress. Porters by the rhousaad were required to convey them, and porters in Africa are arrant villains. At the latest accounts the caravan was still some distance from the lake. A reinforcement for Uganda was sent out at the be- ginning of 1878, of three young students of the Church Missionary College, and a medical missionary, by way of the Nile. The latest news from them stated that they reached Berber in July. One of their number had been sun-struck and was compelled to return. Thus far $65,000 has been received for the Nyanza mission; also a large part of a fund of $50,000 asked for by the society last April for the support of it, The liberal donor who gave $25, 000 for the Nyanza Mission offered the Lon- don Missionary Society the same sum for a mission on Lake Tanganyika. March 15, 1876, the Society resolved to undertake the mission. The Rev. Roger Price, who was commissioned to ascertain what was the best route to the interior, found that by starting from Saadani, wagons could be used as far as Mpwapwa, and that the costly and vexatious system of porterage could thus be avoided so far. Four ordained missionaries,- one scientific man, and one builder, left London in March, 1877, as the first contingent of the expedition. At Saadani they divided, four starting July 25, and the rest with the caravan in October. In March the expedition reached Kirasa, forty-five miles east of Mpwapwa, where they left the wagons and employed porters. They reached their destination August 23, hav- ing been thirteen months on the journey from the coast, in consequence of unex- pected obstacles and vexatious delays. The letters announcing the arrival were only forty-five days on the route to the coast, and only thirty-three thence to Lon- don. A high and healthy camping place was chosen near Ujiji. The caravan ha8 not yet reached the lake. The history of these missions is yet to be made. None of them can be said to be fully established yet. Buildings are to be erected, languages are to be learned, the country is to be explored, and the ways of the people are to be studied, before much can be done in declaring the Gospel. The missions are well situated. The country around them is thickly peopled, and great opportuniti~s are opening to them. Much good has already been done in checking the slave trade, in opening lines of legitimate commercial traffic, and in inducing the natives to cultivate the soil. Other missions will be established in due time. The English Baptists are prospecting for a new mission up the Congo, and Lake Bangweolo, west of Lake Nyassa, and south of Lake Tanganyika, called by Livingstone a paradise, will be- come the centre of another great mission. Thus from the South, the East and the West, Christian missions are approaching the heart of Africa. Before many years we may hope to see a chain of stations across the continent, and another from Lake Ngami to the equator. The tribestouch each other like drops of water, and when one of them is moved by the Gospel, those which surround it will be agi- tated. Thus will Christianity take posscssion of Africa. HOW THE COLLEGE DIRECTS AND TRANSMUTES NATURAL FORCES. Address at the Annual Meeting, BY PRESIDENT EDWARD H. MERRILL, D.n., RIPON, WISCONSIN. I wish simply to emphasize a single thought, viz., that these institutions of higher learning have their chief use as being aids to direct force. When you have mentioned what these higher institutions have done for individualswhen 38 How the College Direct8 and Tran8mutes Natural Force8. you have followed the individuals to their work in their various fields, you have oniy begun to tell the story of their importance. If you go up into Wisconsin, along the lower Fox river, you will see one of the finest water-powers in the world. It is often called the Merrimac of the West. I dont know how long that water- power has been there unappropriated. It was there when the Mound builder was there. God proffered it to him with all its resources, and asked him to improve it; but failing to regard the heavenly admonition, he passed away, leaving but few traces behind; only a few rude instruments and pieces of pottery. All other marks of him are gone. After him came the Indian. He also has passed, to all intents and purposes. Then came the Anglo-Saxon in blood and the Puritan in civilization and culture, and applying his inventive ingenuity to the banks of this river, he set the water-wheel, and the wheel has converted the power of the river into product, and the product has turned into property, and~the property into in- telligence, and the intelligence under this same productive ingenuity of the Puri- tan has turned into morality, and that into religion. So we have this great native force, directed to the account of the kingdom of God, transmuted into higher forces for His glory. Now, my friends, the higher institutions of learning in the midst of these great original forces all about us in the new communities are that product of inventive ingenuity which turns these forces to account, giving them direction and trans- muting them from the lower to the higher. The local church cannot do it. Indi- vidual labor cannot do it. The institution of higher learning is the only thing that can accomplish it. More than this, not only does this higher institution planted in new fields turn to account the force which already existed, but it has the power of enlarging this force and creating new forces, and after creating, transmuting them and turning them to the account of the kingdom of God. The institutions of this Association in the South not only create an enthusiasm and desire for learning, but they are turning the money acquired and the material prosperity attained by our colored brethren into those higher influences which effect the upbuilding of the kingdom of God. That is what these colleges are for. It is impossible now to amplify the thought, but I wish in connection with it to name three particulars. And first, it is entirely possible for us, in heeding the Scripture admonition to preach the gospel to every creature, to neglect those great and overwhelming forces in new communities which are sweeping the youth away. I read in a Providence paper last Saturday evening that there are no infidel books published in the Welsh language. I know those Welsh people well. This state- ment may be true; but meanwhile, forces outside of them which they cannot con- trol are threatening to sweep their youth away into the gulf of materialism and atheism in the new communities. The children speak English, and are thus led into the outside drift. The second point is this: It is wise to put our directive force where the power is. It is utterly impossible to build institutions in the State of Massachusetts or in New England that will answer the purpose for the South. The children of this world build their water-wheel where their water-power is. The children of light sometimes build their water-wheel where the power is not, or where it has already been appropriated. We must put healthy, strong institutions into the South. They are worth even more than the local churches we are planting. They stand in need of support. The local churches give them character.. Third, I think we have need of a larger Christian sagacity in the distribution of funds for this purpose. In my appeals for educational work, no one has heard me say I would have less money given for older institutions, I believe there can ]~Uritafli8rn, and the De8pisecl Races. be a wiser distribution of money with reference to the kingdom of God. Any one looking upon this field will tell you that one dollar put into an institution of learning in the Southern fieldconditions being as they are, these forces being yet undirectedone dollar in one of these institutions will often accomplish more than one hundred in an old one. I have told people frequentlyand I believe those who have studied this problem will assent to itthat one dollar for a Christian college in the Western field, will accomplish more than ten put into some of the older institutions. What I say then is, that if we wish to have a larger sagacity, if we wish to give our money with wiser heed to results, we shall put more into those institutions on the Southern field which are to determine what the South shall be ; we shall put more into those institutions in the great Mississippi valley which are to determine what the Mississippi valley shall be, and which, two gener- ations hence, are to determine what this continent shall be. Let not less be given to the old; but, my friends, the most economical giving is the money given to your higher institutions in the South and in all our new communities. PURITANISM AND THE DESPISED RACES. Address at the Annual Meeting. DY BEv. cX M. SOUTHC*ATE, DEDHAM, MASS. What I have to say will be upon this point: Why Puritanism is especially fitted to elevate the despised races. I say Puritanism; I might say Congregationalism; but that word sometimes means a polity, while this means something higherclear thinking, strong believing, pure living, solemn and earnest acting; that spiritual life, in a word, which expresses itself in Congregation ahism, not anything developed by its machinery. (1). It has peculiar power and fitness to elevate the despised races. First, because we know so little of the capacity of either of these races. In the geog- raphies of twenty years ago the centre of Africa was marked Unexplored Region. The race that dwells there is still unexplored. When we say Persia, Greece, Rome, the word represents not only a people but an idea. Each of these nations has flashed forth before the world and left its mark upon it. But of Africa we have heard nothing; it has not displayed itself or impressed itself upon the world outside. It has given nothing of civilization or religion. And so of the Indians. Of their predecessors we learn much from the mounds they built; of themselves we know little. We know more of the former from their graves, than of the latter from their lives. The Chinese we have called our antipodes, in spirit as well as locality, and let them go at that, with this meager record, that grown men spend their lives in carving toys and find their pleasure in smoking opium. To lift up these races we want that power which conquered the conquerors of Rome, and put the destiny of the world into the hands of the Anglo-Saxon. We want the power which shall convince them of manhood within and God above, and bring them face to face with the Almighty. (2). We want Puritanism brought to these despised races, because there is in them such a tendency to degradation. This is seen abundantly in all of them; let us speak of it especially among the Freedmen. The Association has no feelings of mere romance in doing its work. Those who have been engaged in it for years look with open eyes on depths of degradation which you at a dis- tance can hardly comprehend. In the cities, the colored people are influenced by the civilization around them. In some cases they have made excellent progress by

Rev. C. M. Southgate Southgate, C. M., Rev. Puritanism and the Despised Races Editorial 39-41

]~Uritafli8rn, and the De8pisecl Races. be a wiser distribution of money with reference to the kingdom of God. Any one looking upon this field will tell you that one dollar put into an institution of learning in the Southern fieldconditions being as they are, these forces being yet undirectedone dollar in one of these institutions will often accomplish more than one hundred in an old one. I have told people frequentlyand I believe those who have studied this problem will assent to itthat one dollar for a Christian college in the Western field, will accomplish more than ten put into some of the older institutions. What I say then is, that if we wish to have a larger sagacity, if we wish to give our money with wiser heed to results, we shall put more into those institutions on the Southern field which are to determine what the South shall be ; we shall put more into those institutions in the great Mississippi valley which are to determine what the Mississippi valley shall be, and which, two gener- ations hence, are to determine what this continent shall be. Let not less be given to the old; but, my friends, the most economical giving is the money given to your higher institutions in the South and in all our new communities. PURITANISM AND THE DESPISED RACES. Address at the Annual Meeting. DY BEv. cX M. SOUTHC*ATE, DEDHAM, MASS. What I have to say will be upon this point: Why Puritanism is especially fitted to elevate the despised races. I say Puritanism; I might say Congregationalism; but that word sometimes means a polity, while this means something higherclear thinking, strong believing, pure living, solemn and earnest acting; that spiritual life, in a word, which expresses itself in Congregation ahism, not anything developed by its machinery. (1). It has peculiar power and fitness to elevate the despised races. First, because we know so little of the capacity of either of these races. In the geog- raphies of twenty years ago the centre of Africa was marked Unexplored Region. The race that dwells there is still unexplored. When we say Persia, Greece, Rome, the word represents not only a people but an idea. Each of these nations has flashed forth before the world and left its mark upon it. But of Africa we have heard nothing; it has not displayed itself or impressed itself upon the world outside. It has given nothing of civilization or religion. And so of the Indians. Of their predecessors we learn much from the mounds they built; of themselves we know little. We know more of the former from their graves, than of the latter from their lives. The Chinese we have called our antipodes, in spirit as well as locality, and let them go at that, with this meager record, that grown men spend their lives in carving toys and find their pleasure in smoking opium. To lift up these races we want that power which conquered the conquerors of Rome, and put the destiny of the world into the hands of the Anglo-Saxon. We want the power which shall convince them of manhood within and God above, and bring them face to face with the Almighty. (2). We want Puritanism brought to these despised races, because there is in them such a tendency to degradation. This is seen abundantly in all of them; let us speak of it especially among the Freedmen. The Association has no feelings of mere romance in doing its work. Those who have been engaged in it for years look with open eyes on depths of degradation which you at a dis- tance can hardly comprehend. In the cities, the colored people are influenced by the civilization around them. In some cases they have made excellent progress by Puritani8m and the De& pised J?aces. themselves, as in the old Dorchester settlement in Liberty County, Georgia. But as a rule, when left alone, there is a terrible settling downwards. It is seen in Louisiana on remote sugar plantations, where their cabins, if before the war like cattle-pens, are now pest-houses; in Mississippi swamps, where their worship is fetichism and their lives savagery. ~lavery was a great leveler; it leveled many down, but it also leveled many up in physical condition. I sat one memorable week, day after day, in company with teachers who had spent eight or ten year& in hard work with these people. As they gave their accounts of those outside their influence, it seemed like standing on a jutting crag at night, an inky sky above, an inky sea below, and wave after wave rolling in, black, with scarce a gleam of brightness. No ecclesiastical polity, no scenic shows, can do anything for a people sinking like this. We need a faith which grasps with intense reality the fact that sin leads to remediless destruction; that it needed the Son of God to die for its victims, and believes the Son of God did die for them; and with these convictions is not afraid of any darkness He bids it enlighten, or any devils He bids it cast out. (3). We want, again, the power of Puritanism for these despised races, because it has done so much for them. We heard words of hearty praise this after- noon telling of the success of the work. They told hardly enough. But these efforts should be redoubled. We want more institutions like those at Atlanta, New Orleans, Charleston, and the other large Southern cities, where high culture and intelligence rule. The scholarship can be compared without fear with simi- lar grades at the North. I never heard in our boasted common schools such reci- tations as I have heard from boys as black as the blackest. I know what Yale and Harvard and Dartmouth can show; but in Greek and Latin those colored students can rival their excellence. The culture in morals and manners is at least not inferior, nor the religious instruction less fruitful. The report from the churches shows as large and as healthy success as we can show here. The young men and women in these institutions have an intense longing to be at work for the Master. The desperate condition of their race rests upon them like a pall. God is making them His prophets and speaking through them, and sending re- demption. It is Puritanism which has done this. It seems to have been put upon us to prove what Christianity can do for these races. Our fathers came to this land, breaking the winters silence with hymns of lofty cheer. After them came the negro, with groanings inexpressible and clank- ing of chains. Then the Chinaman, famine pressing him. Let us not forget that it was the great famine in Ireland which drove one hundred and fifty thousand emigrants to this country in a single year, almost as many as had gone out in a decade before; now, ten million Chinese have died of starvation, and a few seek this land that God gave to fugitives. These races, which have never done anything for themselves, nor had anything good done for them, which have been the tool, the victim, the plaything, the despair of civilization, are now brought face to face with usus, with our indisputable Anglo-Saxon conceit, which cannot bear that others should differ from us, backed by Northern grit and Western energy, stirred by a solemn conviction that we have a destiny to fulfil in this matter, in- spired by that command to preach Christ to dying men. Puritanism, as embodied in this Congregational Missionary Association, proposes to have a hand in shaping the fate of these races. One of the earliest pictures in the annals of the world is that of an altar. Around it stand three brothers; behind them the ark and the deluge; in their Re-dedication of the Beach institute. midst the sacrifice of gratitude and consecration; before them the bow of promise en the face of the retreating storm. Ages pass on. The three brothers become three races. One goes to the East and hides himself behind his wall. One goes to the South and hides himself behind deserts and jungles. The third goes to the West, and becomes the torch-bearer to flash the light of Ohrists glory over all Europe. In forty centuries they girdle the earth and come together once more npon its opposite side. Behind two of the brothers, little but the deluge. Behind the third, the ark. In their midst the great sacrifice, the cross of Christ. And before themin the name of Puritanism, in the name of this Association, shall it not be saidbefore them ALL, the bow of heavenly promise. RE-DEDICATION OF, THE BEACH INSTITUTE. 11EV. J. E. ROY, D. D. The rebuilding of the holy and beautiful house which was burned up with fire, nnd its dedication, as now recalled by the current Sunday-school lessons, have found a counterpart in the replacing and reconsecrating of this temple of learn- ing by the American Missionary Association for the ex-cjrptive8 of this city. In February last, under unexplained circumstances, it was burned. Rev. R. F. Mark- ham, the pastor, instead of going North for his needed recuperation, remained through the heat of summer to play the part of Ezra in rebuilding. This was ac- complished so that the Institute was opened on time, October 1st. It is a comely structure, 60x SO, two stories high, adjoining the Home~~ that was saved. Prof. B. F. Koons, at the public service, reported that he had now four accom- plished lady assistants, Misses Twitchell, Daly, Markham and Ferris, and 290 pu- pils, including those of the night school. He also stated that the object of the teachers was to afford the advantages of higher education to those who desire to go beyond the public school course; that it was their purpose not to influence the pupils as to any change in their denominational relations; and that they were not to seek any diversion in political matters. He would also say to their white breth- ren that their sympathy and co-operation were earnestly invited in this work, as it is purely a Christian and missionary enterprise. Mr. Markham offered the prayer of dedicatiou. Several colored ministers were present and participated. The Field Superintendent made an address upon The Bible religion a teaching religion in the family, the church and the school. The singing was accompanied by a new nine-stop American Organ, presented by Mr. S. D. Smith, president of that manufacturing company in Boston. I find in the South many of these souvenirs of his practical interest in this work. He must be a happy man if he knows anything of the amount of joy which his benevo- lence brings to these lowly ones, who are yet so fond of music, and so gifted in it, too. In the evening, after a sermon, the Lords Supper was administered at the Con- gregationat Church. To-night there is to be the regular monthly meeting of the colored Sunday-school workers of all denominations in the city. This is a very useful and enthusiastic affair. To-morrow night we are to have a lecture upon the growth of our country, to b3 illustrated by the big map of the same. While I write, the colored militia, to the number of ten companies, ir~ gay uniform, with glorious mUsic, are having their annual parade at the Park, their own Georgia ar- tillery firing the salute of thirty-eight guns. This afternoon, at three oclock, we are to join with the Executive Committee at New York,and all the A. M. A~

Rev. J. E. Roy Roy, J. E., Rev. Re-Dedication of the Beach Institute Editorial 41-42

Re-dedication of the Beach institute. midst the sacrifice of gratitude and consecration; before them the bow of promise en the face of the retreating storm. Ages pass on. The three brothers become three races. One goes to the East and hides himself behind his wall. One goes to the South and hides himself behind deserts and jungles. The third goes to the West, and becomes the torch-bearer to flash the light of Ohrists glory over all Europe. In forty centuries they girdle the earth and come together once more npon its opposite side. Behind two of the brothers, little but the deluge. Behind the third, the ark. In their midst the great sacrifice, the cross of Christ. And before themin the name of Puritanism, in the name of this Association, shall it not be saidbefore them ALL, the bow of heavenly promise. RE-DEDICATION OF, THE BEACH INSTITUTE. 11EV. J. E. ROY, D. D. The rebuilding of the holy and beautiful house which was burned up with fire, nnd its dedication, as now recalled by the current Sunday-school lessons, have found a counterpart in the replacing and reconsecrating of this temple of learn- ing by the American Missionary Association for the ex-cjrptive8 of this city. In February last, under unexplained circumstances, it was burned. Rev. R. F. Mark- ham, the pastor, instead of going North for his needed recuperation, remained through the heat of summer to play the part of Ezra in rebuilding. This was ac- complished so that the Institute was opened on time, October 1st. It is a comely structure, 60x SO, two stories high, adjoining the Home~~ that was saved. Prof. B. F. Koons, at the public service, reported that he had now four accom- plished lady assistants, Misses Twitchell, Daly, Markham and Ferris, and 290 pu- pils, including those of the night school. He also stated that the object of the teachers was to afford the advantages of higher education to those who desire to go beyond the public school course; that it was their purpose not to influence the pupils as to any change in their denominational relations; and that they were not to seek any diversion in political matters. He would also say to their white breth- ren that their sympathy and co-operation were earnestly invited in this work, as it is purely a Christian and missionary enterprise. Mr. Markham offered the prayer of dedicatiou. Several colored ministers were present and participated. The Field Superintendent made an address upon The Bible religion a teaching religion in the family, the church and the school. The singing was accompanied by a new nine-stop American Organ, presented by Mr. S. D. Smith, president of that manufacturing company in Boston. I find in the South many of these souvenirs of his practical interest in this work. He must be a happy man if he knows anything of the amount of joy which his benevo- lence brings to these lowly ones, who are yet so fond of music, and so gifted in it, too. In the evening, after a sermon, the Lords Supper was administered at the Con- gregationat Church. To-night there is to be the regular monthly meeting of the colored Sunday-school workers of all denominations in the city. This is a very useful and enthusiastic affair. To-morrow night we are to have a lecture upon the growth of our country, to b3 illustrated by the big map of the same. While I write, the colored militia, to the number of ten companies, ir~ gay uniform, with glorious mUsic, are having their annual parade at the Park, their own Georgia ar- tillery firing the salute of thirty-eight guns. This afternoon, at three oclock, we are to join with the Executive Committee at New York,and all the A. M. A~ 42 Items from the Field. workers in the annual concert of prayer for the blessing of God upon this scheme of evangelism. The week of prayer is to be observed in the white churches by a union service, held at night by rotation, in their several places of worship. ITEMS FROM THE FIELD. CHARLESTON, S. 0.The first convention of the Charleston Teachers Union met at Avery Institute January 2d, 3d and 4th. Essays were read on the Art of Teaching; the Culture of the Intellect; How to Teach; Incentives to Study; Our Duty as Teachers; Our Common Schools; the Mind its own Educator ; the Best Methods of Discipline; Classification; Vacations; Mind and Matter; and the Drama as a Means of Education. Many of these varied themes were treated by graduates of Avery Institute. General discussions wese also participated in on Prizes, Moral Instruction in Schools, and Whats the use of Schools l It must have been a busy and stimulating three days meeting. MIDWAY, GA.Arrangement has been made whereby Rev. Floyd Snelson has resumed the pastoral charge of his old church at Midway. Rev. Joseph E. Smith, who had served as pastor during the absence of Mr. Snelson in Africa, and who by his cultured ministry had won the people greatly, has gracefully retired from the pulpit, and will receive immediate appointment to another fielQ. SAVANNAH, GA.Mr. Markham wrote some time ago: There is progress here, and I can see the result of our work in Savannah just as easily as you can see the change made by a carpenter in planing a board. Though we have had hard work, rough times, and many head winds, still there is progress. More than five hundred children are gathered into the Sabbath Schools of our churches in and around Savannah. CHILDERSBURG, ALA.The church had a Christmas supper to help procure a bell for the church. The pastor wants us to ask our friends to aid in the en- deavor. SHELBY IRON Woxxs, ALA.A Bible Concert Exercise and a magnificent Christmas Tree on Christmas day. Solid foundations for church work are being laid. Three inquirers. NASHVILLE, TENN.FISK UNIVER5ITY.The last Annual Catalogue showed a total attendance~of 338. Of these, 25 were studying theology, 26 were in the College, 54 in the College Preparatory, 11 in the Higher Normal, 153 in the Normal Department, and 95 in the Model School. Notwithstanding the hard times, this was the most successful year in the history of the University. Cor- respondence was had with 108 teachers, who were then or had been formerly students in the Institution, and it was found that they had taught during 1877 nine thousand three hundred and thirty-two pupils. Many of the teachers taught in two separate districts during the year, as the public schools, in most places, are continued only from three to five months. Total salary received $18,643.53. Ninety-four of these teachers superintended or taught in Sunday-schools, and reported a total attendance of 7,7~0. They also stated the number of conver- sions in day and Sunday-schools at 371. These statistics represent but a part of the actual teaching done by persons educated at Fisk University, for there was no means of learning the address of many of the early students. THE INDIANSSISSETON AGENCY. The Manual Labor Boarding School has 56 scholars, more than can be comfortably accommodated. The scholars and par

Items from the Field Editorial 42-43

42 Items from the Field. workers in the annual concert of prayer for the blessing of God upon this scheme of evangelism. The week of prayer is to be observed in the white churches by a union service, held at night by rotation, in their several places of worship. ITEMS FROM THE FIELD. CHARLESTON, S. 0.The first convention of the Charleston Teachers Union met at Avery Institute January 2d, 3d and 4th. Essays were read on the Art of Teaching; the Culture of the Intellect; How to Teach; Incentives to Study; Our Duty as Teachers; Our Common Schools; the Mind its own Educator ; the Best Methods of Discipline; Classification; Vacations; Mind and Matter; and the Drama as a Means of Education. Many of these varied themes were treated by graduates of Avery Institute. General discussions wese also participated in on Prizes, Moral Instruction in Schools, and Whats the use of Schools l It must have been a busy and stimulating three days meeting. MIDWAY, GA.Arrangement has been made whereby Rev. Floyd Snelson has resumed the pastoral charge of his old church at Midway. Rev. Joseph E. Smith, who had served as pastor during the absence of Mr. Snelson in Africa, and who by his cultured ministry had won the people greatly, has gracefully retired from the pulpit, and will receive immediate appointment to another fielQ. SAVANNAH, GA.Mr. Markham wrote some time ago: There is progress here, and I can see the result of our work in Savannah just as easily as you can see the change made by a carpenter in planing a board. Though we have had hard work, rough times, and many head winds, still there is progress. More than five hundred children are gathered into the Sabbath Schools of our churches in and around Savannah. CHILDERSBURG, ALA.The church had a Christmas supper to help procure a bell for the church. The pastor wants us to ask our friends to aid in the en- deavor. SHELBY IRON Woxxs, ALA.A Bible Concert Exercise and a magnificent Christmas Tree on Christmas day. Solid foundations for church work are being laid. Three inquirers. NASHVILLE, TENN.FISK UNIVER5ITY.The last Annual Catalogue showed a total attendance~of 338. Of these, 25 were studying theology, 26 were in the College, 54 in the College Preparatory, 11 in the Higher Normal, 153 in the Normal Department, and 95 in the Model School. Notwithstanding the hard times, this was the most successful year in the history of the University. Cor- respondence was had with 108 teachers, who were then or had been formerly students in the Institution, and it was found that they had taught during 1877 nine thousand three hundred and thirty-two pupils. Many of the teachers taught in two separate districts during the year, as the public schools, in most places, are continued only from three to five months. Total salary received $18,643.53. Ninety-four of these teachers superintended or taught in Sunday-schools, and reported a total attendance of 7,7~0. They also stated the number of conver- sions in day and Sunday-schools at 371. These statistics represent but a part of the actual teaching done by persons educated at Fisk University, for there was no means of learning the address of many of the early students. THE INDIANSSISSETON AGENCY. The Manual Labor Boarding School has 56 scholars, more than can be comfortably accommodated. The scholars and par General Notes. ents show an unprecedented interest. iDuring three months past not one child has run away from the school. This has never happened before. Several Indians have recently come into the office desiring to send their children to the Manual Labor Boarding School, and we have been obliged to refuse them admittance. The Good Will School is also crowded, 46 scholars26 being regular boarders. Mrs. Renville has 28 scholars in her day-school, as many as can be managed. These three schools are now all full, and it is estimated that there are over 150 children of school-going age on the reservation who have no opportunity to attend school. SANTABARBARA, CAL.The Chinese Missioa held its fourth annual meeting on Sunday, December 15. The darkness of the evening did not prevent a large attend- ance. The report of the Secretary showed good work done. Nearly sixty Chi- nese have attended the school for a longer or a shorter period during the year. The average attendance, however, has been a little less than twenty. The exer- cises by the pupils, consisting of recitations of Scripture and the singing of hymns in English and Chinese, were listened to with much interest. Addresses were made by Rev. Dr. Hough and Rev. W. C. Pond. Judge Huse is the Presi- dent, and B. B. Williams, Esq., the Secretary, of this auxiliary for the ensuing year.Pacific, December 26. GENERAL NOTES. The Freedmen. The sum total of the money reported as sent for yellow fever relief to the South is as follows: Contributed by the North $1,069,000 Contributed by the South (including $85,000 by St. Louis) 251,000 Contributions from foreign lands 39,000 Total money contributions from all sources . . . . . $1,859,000 The total value of contributions, including clothing and supplies, will aggregate about $2,000,000. THE COLORED MAN DURING THE YELLOW FRYER.It gives us genuine satis- faction to be able to publish the following impartial testimony to the courage and faithfulness of the colored people during the yellow fever. Says the Memphis Avalanche: Men worth hundreds of thousands of dollars have left their prop- erty in charge of blacks, and never provided a dollar for their support. They faithjully guarded the property of their employers. And yet if the Citizens Relief Committee cut off the supplies from the servants of these rich men, what in Gods name will they do ? The Nashville American, speaking of their conduct during the prevalence of the yellow fever, remarks: If the negro is found to be true and reliable when he is entrusted with the grave responsibilities of citizenship, if he discharges faithfully the duties devolved upon him, and shows, in such trying times, that he may be entrusted with the preservation of order and the guarding of homes from the criminal classes even of his own race, it will go far towards giving new views on this subject. Col. Keating, of the Memphis Appeal, indig- nantly repels a charge by Dr. Ramsay, seriously damaging to the character of the colored yellow fever nurses in Memphis, and warmly declares: The statement is a libel upon the negroes of Memphis, who have stood by us nobly as policemen and soldiers. Chief Athey has resolved to recommend that the colored citizens be represented on the police force in proportion to population. Nor did they fail to furnish their quota of physicians, among whom were two former students of

General Notes Editorial 43-45

General Notes. ents show an unprecedented interest. iDuring three months past not one child has run away from the school. This has never happened before. Several Indians have recently come into the office desiring to send their children to the Manual Labor Boarding School, and we have been obliged to refuse them admittance. The Good Will School is also crowded, 46 scholars26 being regular boarders. Mrs. Renville has 28 scholars in her day-school, as many as can be managed. These three schools are now all full, and it is estimated that there are over 150 children of school-going age on the reservation who have no opportunity to attend school. SANTABARBARA, CAL.The Chinese Missioa held its fourth annual meeting on Sunday, December 15. The darkness of the evening did not prevent a large attend- ance. The report of the Secretary showed good work done. Nearly sixty Chi- nese have attended the school for a longer or a shorter period during the year. The average attendance, however, has been a little less than twenty. The exer- cises by the pupils, consisting of recitations of Scripture and the singing of hymns in English and Chinese, were listened to with much interest. Addresses were made by Rev. Dr. Hough and Rev. W. C. Pond. Judge Huse is the Presi- dent, and B. B. Williams, Esq., the Secretary, of this auxiliary for the ensuing year.Pacific, December 26. GENERAL NOTES. The Freedmen. The sum total of the money reported as sent for yellow fever relief to the South is as follows: Contributed by the North $1,069,000 Contributed by the South (including $85,000 by St. Louis) 251,000 Contributions from foreign lands 39,000 Total money contributions from all sources . . . . . $1,859,000 The total value of contributions, including clothing and supplies, will aggregate about $2,000,000. THE COLORED MAN DURING THE YELLOW FRYER.It gives us genuine satis- faction to be able to publish the following impartial testimony to the courage and faithfulness of the colored people during the yellow fever. Says the Memphis Avalanche: Men worth hundreds of thousands of dollars have left their prop- erty in charge of blacks, and never provided a dollar for their support. They faithjully guarded the property of their employers. And yet if the Citizens Relief Committee cut off the supplies from the servants of these rich men, what in Gods name will they do ? The Nashville American, speaking of their conduct during the prevalence of the yellow fever, remarks: If the negro is found to be true and reliable when he is entrusted with the grave responsibilities of citizenship, if he discharges faithfully the duties devolved upon him, and shows, in such trying times, that he may be entrusted with the preservation of order and the guarding of homes from the criminal classes even of his own race, it will go far towards giving new views on this subject. Col. Keating, of the Memphis Appeal, indig- nantly repels a charge by Dr. Ramsay, seriously damaging to the character of the colored yellow fever nurses in Memphis, and warmly declares: The statement is a libel upon the negroes of Memphis, who have stood by us nobly as policemen and soldiers. Chief Athey has resolved to recommend that the colored citizens be represented on the police force in proportion to population. Nor did they fail to furnish their quota of physicians, among whom were two former students of General .N~te8. the Central Tennessee College, of this city, iDrs. Key and Bass, who were ac- knowledged through the papers to have rendered efficient services, the former at Mason, and the latter at Chattanooga, Tenn. Nor were there wanting among them~ ministers ready to lay down their lives, as the deaths of the following clergymen, Mr. Madison, of New Orleans, Mr. Green, of Yicksburg, Mr. Ventris, of Tuscum- bia, Mr. Henderson, of Florence, and others, sufficiently testify.Eisk Expo8itor. The negroes who were formerly slaves of the Choctaws and Chickasaws, and who still reside among hose tribes, were emancipated by the United States, and part of the common doinain apportioned to them. The operation of the treaty has, however, been evaded. These Freedmen are deprived of citizenship, the right. to hold office and to vote; nor have their children any privilege of education under the school laws. It seems there is a ring of Indians as well as an Indian ring, and that they will not consent to have the land divided and held in severalty. This not only keeps the Freedman out of his rights, but prevents the common Indians from coming to understand their own. The Chinese. In the fifth article of thetreaty of 1868 between the United States and China~ the two governments mutually recognize, affirm and guarantee the inherent and inalienable right of man to change his home and allegiance, and also the mutual advantage of the free migration and emigration of their citizens and subjects re- spectively from the one country to the other, for purposes of curiosity, of trade, or as permanent residents. The sixth article of the same treaty says Citizens. of the United States visiting or residing in China shall enjoy the same privileges,. immunities or exemptions in respect to travel or residence as may there be enjoyed by citizens or subjects of the most favored nation; and, reciprocally, Chinese sub- jects visiting or residing in the United States shall enjoy the same privileges, immunities and exemptions in respect to travel or residence as may there be en- joyed by the citizens or subjects of the most favored nation. Treaties of the United States are recognized as part of the supreme law of the land ; and in the early and famous case of Ware vs. Hylton, 3 Dali., 199, the principle was laid down by the Supreme Court, which has ever since been fol- lowed, that any exercise of State authority inconsistent with a treaty is thereby rendered wholly void. Among the powers assigned to Congress, in the eighth section of the first article of the National Constitution, is that to establish an uniform rule of na turalization, and to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for car- rying into execution this power. Thi3 remits the whole subject as to aliens, and their admission to citizenship, to Congress, with full authority. The Legislature of California, a few years ago, tried to solve the Chinese problem by a law of exclusion; but, unfortunately for the effort, the Supreme Court of the United States, in the case of Chy Lung vs. Freeman et al., 2 Otto, 275, declared the law to be unconstitutional. Mr. Justice Miller, in stating the opinion of the Court, said The passage of laws which concern the admission. of citizens and subjects of foreign nations to our shores belongs to Congress, and not to the States. It has the power to regulate commerce with foreign nations. The responsibility for the character of those regulations, and for the manner of their execution, belongs solely to the National Government. If it be otherwise, a single State can, at her pleasure, embroil us in disastrous quarrels with other na- tions. The Court on this general ground, pronounced the law to be a nullity. New Ap}9oin?~ment8. 45 The committee of the Constitutional Convention of California having in charge the question relating to Chinese immigration have decided that it is im- possible to put into that constitution any provision that will forbid such immi- gration, and not at the same time conflict with the Constitution of the United States. The real difficulty lies in the relation of the Chinaman to the labor question. But this is not generic to him. There are Norwegians and Swedes who will save as much on as little as the Chinese. But we welcome them. We take in thousands every year of the race which especially breeds all those foul fellows hoodlums, tramps and bummers. How can we consistently refuse to welcome these others, who are patient, industrious and frugal? Shall we pass a new law that shall compel our customs officials to catechise all new-comers as to the min- imum on which they can manage to subsist, and when their estimate falls below Mr. Denis Kearneys judgment of what is the proper sum for a laboring man, pack them back again whence they came ? Con gregationalist. NEW APPOINTMENTS. 18781879. The following list presents the names and post-office addresses of those who are under appointment in the Churches, Institutions and Schools aided by the American Missionary Association, among the Freedmen in the South, the Chinese on the Pacific Coast, the Indians, and the Negroes in Western Africa. The Theo- logical Department of Howard University is snpported jointly by the Presbytery of Washington and the Am. Miss. Assoc. The Berea College and Hampton Insti- tute are under the care of their own Boardo of Trustees; but being either founded or fostered in the past by this Association, and representing the general work in which it is engaged, their teachers are included in this list. THE SOUTHERN FIELD. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. HOWARD UNIVERSITY. Theological Department. washington, D. C. Rev. Alexander Pitzer, D. D., I John G. Butler, D. B., VIRGINIA. Rev. W. W. Patton, D. D., Loreuzo Westcott, HAMPTON. Minister. NORMAL AND AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE. Instr tors and Managers. Gen. s.c. Armstrong, Gen. J. F. B. Marshall, Mr. Albert Howe, M. B. Crowell, J. B. H. Goff, capt. Henry Romeyn, Miss Ann M. Hobbs, charlotte L. Mackie, Susan B. Harrold, Mary F. Mackie, Nathalie Lord, Isabel B. Eustis, Helen w. Ludlow. Hampton, Ya. Newborgh, N. Y. Franklin, Mass. Newbnrgh, N. Y. Portland, Me. Springfield, Mass. New York city. washington, D. c. Mrs. Sophia Beck, . Orange, N. J. Miss Eleanor W. collin~ood, Hampton, Va. Mrs. Eunice c. Dixon, Miss Mary A. coe, Boston, Mass. Elizabeth P. Hyde, Brooklyn, N. Y. Margaret w. Buck, Hampton va. Jeannie I. Hincks, Carrie Watson, Emily Kimball, Mr. Albert H. Tolman, Charles G. Buck, Thomas T. Brice, James C. Bobbins, Frank D. Banks, John E. Fuller, Miss M. A. Andrue, CARIISvILLE. Teacher. Iliceville, Pa.

The Southern Field New Appointments 45-49

New Ap}9oin?~ment8. 45 The committee of the Constitutional Convention of California having in charge the question relating to Chinese immigration have decided that it is im- possible to put into that constitution any provision that will forbid such immi- gration, and not at the same time conflict with the Constitution of the United States. The real difficulty lies in the relation of the Chinaman to the labor question. But this is not generic to him. There are Norwegians and Swedes who will save as much on as little as the Chinese. But we welcome them. We take in thousands every year of the race which especially breeds all those foul fellows hoodlums, tramps and bummers. How can we consistently refuse to welcome these others, who are patient, industrious and frugal? Shall we pass a new law that shall compel our customs officials to catechise all new-comers as to the min- imum on which they can manage to subsist, and when their estimate falls below Mr. Denis Kearneys judgment of what is the proper sum for a laboring man, pack them back again whence they came ? Con gregationalist. NEW APPOINTMENTS. 18781879. The following list presents the names and post-office addresses of those who are under appointment in the Churches, Institutions and Schools aided by the American Missionary Association, among the Freedmen in the South, the Chinese on the Pacific Coast, the Indians, and the Negroes in Western Africa. The Theo- logical Department of Howard University is snpported jointly by the Presbytery of Washington and the Am. Miss. Assoc. The Berea College and Hampton Insti- tute are under the care of their own Boardo of Trustees; but being either founded or fostered in the past by this Association, and representing the general work in which it is engaged, their teachers are included in this list. THE SOUTHERN FIELD. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. HOWARD UNIVERSITY. Theological Department. washington, D. C. Rev. Alexander Pitzer, D. D., I John G. Butler, D. B., VIRGINIA. Rev. W. W. Patton, D. D., Loreuzo Westcott, HAMPTON. Minister. NORMAL AND AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE. Instr tors and Managers. Gen. s.c. Armstrong, Gen. J. F. B. Marshall, Mr. Albert Howe, M. B. Crowell, J. B. H. Goff, capt. Henry Romeyn, Miss Ann M. Hobbs, charlotte L. Mackie, Susan B. Harrold, Mary F. Mackie, Nathalie Lord, Isabel B. Eustis, Helen w. Ludlow. Hampton, Ya. Newborgh, N. Y. Franklin, Mass. Newbnrgh, N. Y. Portland, Me. Springfield, Mass. New York city. washington, D. c. Mrs. Sophia Beck, . Orange, N. J. Miss Eleanor W. collin~ood, Hampton, Va. Mrs. Eunice c. Dixon, Miss Mary A. coe, Boston, Mass. Elizabeth P. Hyde, Brooklyn, N. Y. Margaret w. Buck, Hampton va. Jeannie I. Hincks, Carrie Watson, Emily Kimball, Mr. Albert H. Tolman, Charles G. Buck, Thomas T. Brice, James C. Bobbins, Frank D. Banks, John E. Fuller, Miss M. A. Andrue, CARIISvILLE. Teacher. Iliceville, Pa. New 4ppointments. NORTH CAROLINA. WILMINGTON (P. 0. Box 207). NORMAL SCHOOL. Minister and Superintendent. Rev. D. D. Dodge, Nashua, N. H. Principal. Miss Julia C. Andrews, Miss Lucy Goodwin, E. A. Warner, H. L. Fitts, Mrs. Janet Dodge, Assistants. RALEIGH. Minister, Rev. George S. Smith, Militown, Me. Mason, N. H. Lowell, Mass. Candia,N. H. Nashua, N. H. Raleigh, N. C. Miss E. P. Hayes, Mrs. Geo. S. Smith, Rev. David Peebles, Teachers. DUDLEY. Limerick, Me. Raleigh, N. C. Minister. Dudley, N. C. Teacher. Mrs. Anna D. Peebles, Dudley, N. C. MoLEANSYILLE. Minister and Teacher. Rev. Alfred Connett, Soisberry, Ind. WOQUBRIDGE. Teacher. Mr. William Ellis, Southfield, Mass. SOUTH CAROLINA. CHARLESTON. AVERY INSTITUTE. Principal. Prof. A. W. Farnham, Hannibal, N. Y. Assislants. Mr. C. P. Van Inwegen, Cuddebackville, N.Y. Levi L. Farnham, Hannibal, N. Y. C. C. Scott, Charleston, S. C. N. A. Lawrence, Miss M. L. Phelps, Constableville, N.Y. Mrs. M. L. Brown, Charleston, S. C. Miss Monimia McKinlay, Miss H. E. Wells, Middletown, N. Y. ORANGEBUEG. 111ev. W. L. Johnson, Minister. Orangeburg, S. C. Teacher. Mrs. W. L. Johnson, GREENWOOD. BREWER NORMAL SCHOOL. Mr. J. D. Backenstose, Geneva, N. Y. Atlanta, Ga. Northboro, Mass. ATLANTA UNIVERSITY. Instructors and Managers. Rev. E. A. Ware, Prof. T. N. Chase, Rev. C. W. Francis, Horace Bumslead, Prof. J. F. Fuller, Frank W. Smith, Miss Emma C. Ware, Sosie A. Cooley, Mary E. Sands, Mrs Lucy E. Case, Miss Carrie H. Loomis, Mary L. Santley, E. F. Moore, Mrs. T. N. Chase, J. F. Fuller, Atlanta, Ga. Lincoln, Mass. Norfolk, Honek, Kansas. Saco, Me. Millbury, Mass. Hartford, Conn. New London, Ohio. Chicago, Ill. Atlanta, Ga. STORRS SCHOOL, (104 Houston St.) Principal. Miss Amy Williams, Livonia Sta., N. Y. Assistants. Miss Fannie M. Andrews, Milliown, Me. M. E. Stevenson, Bellefontaine, Ohio. F. J. Norris Atlanta, Ga. Abbie Clark. MACON. Minister. Rev. Stanley E. Latlirop, New London, Wis. LEWI5 mast 5CROOL. Teachers. Miss Christene Gilbert, Fredonia, N. Y. Hattie E. Phelps, Hannibal, N. Y. Miss S. A. Hosmer, Mr. Cosmo P. Jordan, AUGUSTA. Teacher. Augusta, Ga. MARIETTA. Teacher. Atlanta, Ga. ATHENS. Teacher. Atlanta, Ga. CUTHBERT. Teacher. Mr. Richard R. Wright, Atlanta, Ga. FORSYTH. Teacher. Mr. William F. Jackson, Atlanta, Ga. STONE MOUNTAIN. Teacher. I Mr. William C. Cra~g, Atlanta, Ga. Mr. J. G. Heichins, 46 ATLANTA. Ministers. 11ev. C. W. Francis. S. S. Ashley, GEO HIGIA. New Appointment8. GEORGIAContinued. Miss S. V. Whitic, FORT VALLEY. Teacher. Macon, Ga. BRUNSWICK. Teacher. Mr. S. B. Morse, Savannah, Ga. THOMASYI LLE. Teacher. Savannah, Ga. AMERICUS. Teacher. Milledgeville, Ga. MILLEDGEVILLE. Teacher. Mr. W. H. Harris, Mr. G. W. F. Phillips, Mr. Rohert Smith, Charleston, S. C. CARTERSVILLE. Teacher. Mr. T. C. Sheppard, SAVANNAH. Minister and Supt. of Missions. Rev. R. F. Markham, Wheaton, Ill. BEACH INSTITUTE. Principal. Sulphur Springs, 0. Mr. B. F. Koons, Chattanooga, Tenn. Assistants. Miss Adelaide Daily. Hattie Markham, Was E. H. Twichell, Amelia Ferris, Mrs. R. F. Markham, Fredonia, N. F. Wheaton, Ill. Saratoga Spgs, N.Y. Oneida, Ill,. Wheaton, Ill. WOOD VILLE. Minister and Teacher. Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke, Savannah, Ga. OGEECHEE. Minister and Teacher. Rev. John McLean, McLeansville, N. C. Miss E. W. Douglass, Decorah, Iowa. LOUISVILLE AND BELMONT. Minister. Selma, Ala. MCINTOSH, LIBERTY CO. Ministers. Rev. Jos. H. Smith, Atlanta, Ga. * Floyd Snelson, McIntosh, Ga. Teachers. John McIntosh, Jr. Savannah, Ga. Mrs. John Mcintosh, * Missionary returned rrom Arrica. Rev. Wilson Callen, Rev. J. D. Smith, ALABAM A. TALLADEGA. Minister. Rev. G. W. Andrews, Collinsville, Ct. TALLADEGA COLLEGE. Instructors and Managers. Rev. E. P. Lord, G. W. Andrews, Prof. Gao. N. Ellis, G. C. Carpenter, Mr. Warren E. Wheeler, George Atkins, Miss M. L. Sawyer, S. Ida Allen, M. A. M. Kernan, Kate A. Lord, Mrs. H. W. Andrews, Miss Emily P. Newcomh, Olivet, Mich. Coliinsville, Ct. Olivet, Mich. Indianola, Iowa. Salem, Wis. Olivet, Mich. Doxford, Mass. Rochester, N. V. Locust Valley, L. I. Olivet, Mich. Collineville, Ct. Chicago, Ill. MISSION CHURCHES. ALAUAMA FURNACE, KYMLiLGA, THE Cova, LAW soSSvsLLE. Superintendent. Rev. G. W. Andrews, Collinaville, Coun. SHELBY 11105 WORKS. Minister. Talladega, Ala. ANNISTON. Minister. Rev. Peter MoEntosh, Talladega, Ala. CHILDERSBURG. Minister. Talladega, Ma. Rev. Alfred Jones, MOBILE. Minister. EMERSON INsTITUTE. Supt. and Teachers. Rev. D. L. Hickok, Kingsville, Ohio. Miss Isahel Phelps, Oswego, N. F. May Bickok, Kingsville, Ohio. H. Jennie Stevenson, Bellefontaine, Ohio. MONTGOMERY, (P.O. Box 62.) Minister. Rev. F. Bascom, D. D Hinsdale, Ill. 5WAYNE SCHOOL. Principal. Miss Martha J. Adams, Columbus, Wis. Assistants. Miss Jane S. Hardy, May Merry, Fannie A. Wilson, Mrs. M. Hardaway Davis, Miss Anna Duncan Rev. C. B. Curtis, Rev. Gen. H. Hill, Mrs. Ceo. E. Hill, Miss Laura Hill, Shelburne, Mass. Providence, R. I. Montgomery, Ala. SELMA. Minister. Burlington, Wig. MARION. Minister. Southport, Conn. Missienaries. Southport, Conn. ATHENS. Minister. Rev. Ho race J. Taylor, IvlcMinnville, Tenn. TRINITY SCnOOL. Teachers. Miss M. F. Wells, Nettie Underwood, FLORENCE. Minister. Providence, R. I. Rev. D. L. Hickok, Kingsville, Ohio. Rev. William H. Ash, Ann Arhor, Mich. Burlington, 47 New Appointments. TENNESSEE. NASHVILLE. Ministers. Rev. Henry S. Bennett, NaShville, Tenn. Geo. W. Moore, FISK UNIVERSITY. Instructors and Managers. Rev. E. M. Cravath, Brooklyn, N. V. * A. K. Spence, Nashville, Penn. H. S. Bennett, F. A. Chase, C. C. Painter, Stafford Spgs, Conn. Mr. Edward P. Gilbert, Nashville, Tenn, John Burma, Miss Helen C. Morgan, Cleveland, Ohio. Anna M. Cahill, Binghamton, N. V. Henrietta Matson, N. Bloomfield, Ohio. E. M. Barnes, Bakersfield, Vt. Laura S. Carey, St. Johnsbury, Vt. Mrs. J. D. Lee, Bashville, Tenn. Miss Irene E. Gilbert, Fredonia, N. Y. Sarah M. Wells, Big Rapids, Mich. Sarah A. Stevens, St. Johnsbury, Vt. * Absent. Miss Mary Farrand, Dora Ford, Ypsilanti, Mich. N. Abington, Mass. MEMPHIS. Minister. Rev. W. W. Mallory, Memphis, Tenn. Missionary. Miss Hattie Milton, Romeo, Mich. LE MOYI4E SCHOOL. Prof. A. J. Steele, Princspat. Whitewater, Wis. Assistants. Miss Laura A. Parmelee, Toledo, Ohio. Emma Rand, Whitewater, Wis. Ella Woodward, Royalton, N. Y. S. M. McGill, Memphis, Tenn. CHATTANOOGA. Minister. Rev. Temple Cutler, Athol, Mass. Rev. John G. Fee, BEREA. Minister. BEBEA COLLEGE. Instructors and Managers. Rev.!E. H. Fairchild, D.D., Berea, Ky. John C. Fee, Prof. L. V. Dodge, Rev. Charles G. Fairchild, Prof. P. D. Dodge, Rev. B. S. Hunting, KENTUCKY. Miss L. A. Darling, Kate Gilbert, Anna Haylor, Etta McClelland, Clara A. Saxton, Alice E. Peck, C. W. Haynes, Beres, Ky. Sublette, Ill. Rev, John Drew, MISSISSI PPI. TOUGALOO. Minister. Rev. G. S. Pope, Strongsville, Ohio. TOUGALOO UNIVERSITY. Managers and Instructors. Rev. G. S. Pope, Strongaville, Ohio. Prof. D. I. Miner, Bavaria, Kansas. NEW ORLEANSJ Rev. W. S. Alexander, Isaac Hall, Henry Rnffin, B. James, Ministers. Miss Kate K. Koons, Orra A. Angell, Miss Mary H. Scott,. Irene C. Barnes, Mrs. G. S. Pope, D. I. Miner, Miss S. L. Emerson, LOU ISIANA. Miss H. J. Halleck, Frances Stevens, Mrs. C. E. Alexander, Pomfret, Conn. New Orleans, La. 5TRAIGHT UNIVERSITY. Instructers and Managers. Rev. W. S. Alexander, Pomfret, Coun. Prof. J. K. Cole, Lawrence, Mass. J. M. McPherron, New Orleans, La. Miss Mary J. Robinson, Lake City, Minn. Caroline Park, West Boiford, Mass. Akron, Ohio. W. Brookileld, Mass. Oberlin, Ohio. Bersa, Ky. Oberlin, Ohio. Alexander, N. Y. Oberlin, Ohio. CAMP .NELSON. Minister. Berea, Ky. Sulphur Springs, 0. Greenville, H. L Aubumndale, Mass, Greenville, H. I. Strongsville, Ohio. Bavaria, Kansas. Hallowell, Me. Success, L. I. Oswego, N. Y. Pomfret, Conn, ABBERVILLE. Minister. Rev. Charles E. Smith, New Orleans, La. NEW IBERIA. Minister. Rev. William Butler, New Theria, La. CARROLLYON. Rev. Thos. E. Elilson New Orleans, La. 48 New Aj~pointrnents. TEXAS. GOLIAD. Minister. Rev. B. C. Church, Goliad, Texas. CORPUS CHRISTI. Rev. A. J. Turner, Minister. Rev. S. M. Coles, New Haven, Conn. H ELENA. Minister. Rev. Mitchell Thompson, Goliad, Texas. Mrs. E. M. Garland, AMONG THE CHINESE. Superintendent. PETALUMA, Rev. W. C. Pond, San Francisco, Cal. Teachers. SACRAMENTO. SAN FRANCISCO, . Mr. Henry M. Pond. Mrs. M. T. Hunting. Mr. Wong Sam. J. Hackley. . Clung Ying. Mrs. C. A. Sheldon. OAKLAND, . Miss LB. Mann. Lucy Duncan. Mr. Jee Gain. SANTA BARBARA, STOCKTON, SUISUN, WOODLAND, SCHULENBURG. Minister. AUSTIN. Teacher. Schulenburg, Texas Austin, Texas. Mr. A. L. Anthony. Mrs. S. Denton. Mr. LuHaim. Mrs. C. P. Stephenson. M. C. Brown. T. W. Chamberlain. Mr. B. C. Gilbert. AMONG Red Lake Agency, Minnesota. Agent, . . . Teacher, . . . Miss M. C. Warren. Lake Superior Agency, Wis. Agent, . . Dr. Isaac L. Mahan. Teacher, . . Robert Pew. Green I?ay Agency, Wis. Agent, . . . Joseph C. Bridgman. Farmer and Teacher, W. W. Wheeler. Matron, . . . Mrs. W. W. Wheeler. Teacher, . . Miss S. B. Dresser. THE INDIANS. Ft. Berthold Agency, Dakota Territory. Agent, . . . Thomas P. Ellis. Sisseton Agency, Dakota Territory. Agent, . . . E. H. C. Hooper. Teachers, . . . (Connected with the MIs- sionofiheAB. C.F.M.) SKokomish Agency, Washington Territory. Edwin Fells. Rev. Myron Eells. (Supported by Govt.) Agent, Missionary, Teachers, Rev. A. P. Miller. A. F. Jackson. Dr. Benj. James. Mr. A. E. White. MENDI MISSION, WEST AFRICA. Missionarie8 and Asaistonts. Mrs. A. P. Miller. Rev. George N. Jewett. A. F. Jackson. Mr. Sam. H. Goodman. Mr. James Pickett. Mr. Buel Tucker. Mrs. Lucy During. 49

Among the Chinese New Appointments 49

New Aj~pointrnents. TEXAS. GOLIAD. Minister. Rev. B. C. Church, Goliad, Texas. CORPUS CHRISTI. Rev. A. J. Turner, Minister. Rev. S. M. Coles, New Haven, Conn. H ELENA. Minister. Rev. Mitchell Thompson, Goliad, Texas. Mrs. E. M. Garland, AMONG THE CHINESE. Superintendent. PETALUMA, Rev. W. C. Pond, San Francisco, Cal. Teachers. SACRAMENTO. SAN FRANCISCO, . Mr. Henry M. Pond. Mrs. M. T. Hunting. Mr. Wong Sam. J. Hackley. . Clung Ying. Mrs. C. A. Sheldon. OAKLAND, . Miss LB. Mann. Lucy Duncan. Mr. Jee Gain. SANTA BARBARA, STOCKTON, SUISUN, WOODLAND, SCHULENBURG. Minister. AUSTIN. Teacher. Schulenburg, Texas Austin, Texas. Mr. A. L. Anthony. Mrs. S. Denton. Mr. LuHaim. Mrs. C. P. Stephenson. M. C. Brown. T. W. Chamberlain. Mr. B. C. Gilbert. AMONG Red Lake Agency, Minnesota. Agent, . . . Teacher, . . . Miss M. C. Warren. Lake Superior Agency, Wis. Agent, . . Dr. Isaac L. Mahan. Teacher, . . Robert Pew. Green I?ay Agency, Wis. Agent, . . . Joseph C. Bridgman. Farmer and Teacher, W. W. Wheeler. Matron, . . . Mrs. W. W. Wheeler. Teacher, . . Miss S. B. Dresser. THE INDIANS. Ft. Berthold Agency, Dakota Territory. Agent, . . . Thomas P. Ellis. Sisseton Agency, Dakota Territory. Agent, . . . E. H. C. Hooper. Teachers, . . . (Connected with the MIs- sionofiheAB. C.F.M.) SKokomish Agency, Washington Territory. Edwin Fells. Rev. Myron Eells. (Supported by Govt.) Agent, Missionary, Teachers, Rev. A. P. Miller. A. F. Jackson. Dr. Benj. James. Mr. A. E. White. MENDI MISSION, WEST AFRICA. Missionarie8 and Asaistonts. Mrs. A. P. Miller. Rev. George N. Jewett. A. F. Jackson. Mr. Sam. H. Goodman. Mr. James Pickett. Mr. Buel Tucker. Mrs. Lucy During. 49

Among the Indians New Appointments 49

New Aj~pointrnents. TEXAS. GOLIAD. Minister. Rev. B. C. Church, Goliad, Texas. CORPUS CHRISTI. Rev. A. J. Turner, Minister. Rev. S. M. Coles, New Haven, Conn. H ELENA. Minister. Rev. Mitchell Thompson, Goliad, Texas. Mrs. E. M. Garland, AMONG THE CHINESE. Superintendent. PETALUMA, Rev. W. C. Pond, San Francisco, Cal. Teachers. SACRAMENTO. SAN FRANCISCO, . Mr. Henry M. Pond. Mrs. M. T. Hunting. Mr. Wong Sam. J. Hackley. . Clung Ying. Mrs. C. A. Sheldon. OAKLAND, . Miss LB. Mann. Lucy Duncan. Mr. Jee Gain. SANTA BARBARA, STOCKTON, SUISUN, WOODLAND, SCHULENBURG. Minister. AUSTIN. Teacher. Schulenburg, Texas Austin, Texas. Mr. A. L. Anthony. Mrs. S. Denton. Mr. LuHaim. Mrs. C. P. Stephenson. M. C. Brown. T. W. Chamberlain. Mr. B. C. Gilbert. AMONG Red Lake Agency, Minnesota. Agent, . . . Teacher, . . . Miss M. C. Warren. Lake Superior Agency, Wis. Agent, . . Dr. Isaac L. Mahan. Teacher, . . Robert Pew. Green I?ay Agency, Wis. Agent, . . . Joseph C. Bridgman. Farmer and Teacher, W. W. Wheeler. Matron, . . . Mrs. W. W. Wheeler. Teacher, . . Miss S. B. Dresser. THE INDIANS. Ft. Berthold Agency, Dakota Territory. Agent, . . . Thomas P. Ellis. Sisseton Agency, Dakota Territory. Agent, . . . E. H. C. Hooper. Teachers, . . . (Connected with the MIs- sionofiheAB. C.F.M.) SKokomish Agency, Washington Territory. Edwin Fells. Rev. Myron Eells. (Supported by Govt.) Agent, Missionary, Teachers, Rev. A. P. Miller. A. F. Jackson. Dr. Benj. James. Mr. A. E. White. MENDI MISSION, WEST AFRICA. Missionarie8 and Asaistonts. Mrs. A. P. Miller. Rev. George N. Jewett. A. F. Jackson. Mr. Sam. H. Goodman. Mr. James Pickett. Mr. Buel Tucker. Mrs. Lucy During. 49

Mendi Mission, West Africa New Appointments 49-50

New Aj~pointrnents. TEXAS. GOLIAD. Minister. Rev. B. C. Church, Goliad, Texas. CORPUS CHRISTI. Rev. A. J. Turner, Minister. Rev. S. M. Coles, New Haven, Conn. H ELENA. Minister. Rev. Mitchell Thompson, Goliad, Texas. Mrs. E. M. Garland, AMONG THE CHINESE. Superintendent. PETALUMA, Rev. W. C. Pond, San Francisco, Cal. Teachers. SACRAMENTO. SAN FRANCISCO, . Mr. Henry M. Pond. Mrs. M. T. Hunting. Mr. Wong Sam. J. Hackley. . Clung Ying. Mrs. C. A. Sheldon. OAKLAND, . Miss LB. Mann. Lucy Duncan. Mr. Jee Gain. SANTA BARBARA, STOCKTON, SUISUN, WOODLAND, SCHULENBURG. Minister. AUSTIN. Teacher. Schulenburg, Texas Austin, Texas. Mr. A. L. Anthony. Mrs. S. Denton. Mr. LuHaim. Mrs. C. P. Stephenson. M. C. Brown. T. W. Chamberlain. Mr. B. C. Gilbert. AMONG Red Lake Agency, Minnesota. Agent, . . . Teacher, . . . Miss M. C. Warren. Lake Superior Agency, Wis. Agent, . . Dr. Isaac L. Mahan. Teacher, . . Robert Pew. Green I?ay Agency, Wis. Agent, . . . Joseph C. Bridgman. Farmer and Teacher, W. W. Wheeler. Matron, . . . Mrs. W. W. Wheeler. Teacher, . . Miss S. B. Dresser. THE INDIANS. Ft. Berthold Agency, Dakota Territory. Agent, . . . Thomas P. Ellis. Sisseton Agency, Dakota Territory. Agent, . . . E. H. C. Hooper. Teachers, . . . (Connected with the MIs- sionofiheAB. C.F.M.) SKokomish Agency, Washington Territory. Edwin Fells. Rev. Myron Eells. (Supported by Govt.) Agent, Missionary, Teachers, Rev. A. P. Miller. A. F. Jackson. Dr. Benj. James. Mr. A. E. White. MENDI MISSION, WEST AFRICA. Missionarie8 and Asaistonts. Mrs. A. P. Miller. Rev. George N. Jewett. A. F. Jackson. Mr. Sam. H. Goodman. Mr. James Pickett. Mr. Buel Tucker. Mrs. Lucy During. 49 60 A Working churchA New conference Organized. THE FREEDMEN. NORTH CAROLINA. A Working ChurchBible Christians. MISS E. A. WARNER, WILMINGTON. Last Sabbath we had an unusually in- teresting communion season. Two yo~ng men united with the church; one has been a member of our day-school, both of the Sunday-school. Our daily prayer is, Lord, bring our scholars into the fold of Christ. Our church is small, but it is a working one, and its influ- ence is felt in the community. A young Methodist minister attended a course of lectures given by Mi.. Dodge, last winter, on the Christian Doctrines, and he says, Mr. Dodge taught me more than I ever knew before. The Bible seems a new book. It seems to me the people are begin- ning to feel that the Bible Christians are different from the mass of professing ones around them. I called on a sick young man; he asked me to come in and read to him. I did so from time to time until he recovered. The family said, We are ashamed to return your calls, but we will come into meeting. And they were in last Sabbath evening. I have been teaching a woman over fifty years of age to read, this summer, and now she reads quite intelligibly, and says what little she can read opens up a new world to her. I was somewhat amused Jne day when she came to the word Ilypocrite. She repeated, Hypocrite, hypocrite; I must remember that, for we have a plenty of um around us. She often comes to our meetings, because she can get such a good understanding of the Bible. GEORGIA. A New Conference Organized. REV. S. E. LATRROP, MACON. In Georgia, the Empire State of the South, a Congregational Conference now exists. It was formed at Macon, Dec. 12. Part of the churches came from the Central South Conference, which formerly covered the States of Ten- nessee, Mississippi, Alabama and North- ern Georgia. The others were members of the now defunct Southeast Georgia Conference. By uniting together in this State organization, it is hoped that the bond of fellowship nnd Christian work may be strengthened. Twelve churches were represented by pastor or delegate, including the church at Orangeburg, S. C. Three of these have white pastors from the North; the others have efficient colored ministers wl~io have been trained in the schools of the A. NI. A. Rev. Dr. Roy, of Atlanta, whom your own great State has recently given to the South for a Field Superintendent of the work among the colored people, preached a most effective opening ser- mon from the text, Jesus Christ, the same yesterday, to-day and forever. We thank the Illinois churches for their gift, for Dr. Roy is evidently the right man in the right place. He is cordially and gladly welcomed, and will have a great work to do in looking after the present sc~ttered flocks, and gathering new churchcs. The Conference was well officered by Rev. R. F. Markham, of Sa- vannah, as Moderator, and Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke, of Woodville, as Secretary; Rev. S. E. Lathrop, the newly-arrived pastor at Macon, was also chosen Statis- tical Secretary and Treasurer, with au- thority to publish the Minutes and other documents. The Macon church is a beautiful brick building, tastefully ar- ranged, upon a commanding site which overlooks most of the city. The attend- ance of Macon citizens was not so large as it would have been but for a very ex- citing municipal election which was go- ing on at the time, absorbing the enthu- siasm of most of the people. But the Congmegational church, with the Lewia

Miss E. A. Warner Warner, E. A., Miss North Carolina--A Working Church--Bible Christians The Freedmen 50

60 A Working churchA New conference Organized. THE FREEDMEN. NORTH CAROLINA. A Working ChurchBible Christians. MISS E. A. WARNER, WILMINGTON. Last Sabbath we had an unusually in- teresting communion season. Two yo~ng men united with the church; one has been a member of our day-school, both of the Sunday-school. Our daily prayer is, Lord, bring our scholars into the fold of Christ. Our church is small, but it is a working one, and its influ- ence is felt in the community. A young Methodist minister attended a course of lectures given by Mi.. Dodge, last winter, on the Christian Doctrines, and he says, Mr. Dodge taught me more than I ever knew before. The Bible seems a new book. It seems to me the people are begin- ning to feel that the Bible Christians are different from the mass of professing ones around them. I called on a sick young man; he asked me to come in and read to him. I did so from time to time until he recovered. The family said, We are ashamed to return your calls, but we will come into meeting. And they were in last Sabbath evening. I have been teaching a woman over fifty years of age to read, this summer, and now she reads quite intelligibly, and says what little she can read opens up a new world to her. I was somewhat amused Jne day when she came to the word Ilypocrite. She repeated, Hypocrite, hypocrite; I must remember that, for we have a plenty of um around us. She often comes to our meetings, because she can get such a good understanding of the Bible. GEORGIA. A New Conference Organized. REV. S. E. LATRROP, MACON. In Georgia, the Empire State of the South, a Congregational Conference now exists. It was formed at Macon, Dec. 12. Part of the churches came from the Central South Conference, which formerly covered the States of Ten- nessee, Mississippi, Alabama and North- ern Georgia. The others were members of the now defunct Southeast Georgia Conference. By uniting together in this State organization, it is hoped that the bond of fellowship nnd Christian work may be strengthened. Twelve churches were represented by pastor or delegate, including the church at Orangeburg, S. C. Three of these have white pastors from the North; the others have efficient colored ministers wl~io have been trained in the schools of the A. NI. A. Rev. Dr. Roy, of Atlanta, whom your own great State has recently given to the South for a Field Superintendent of the work among the colored people, preached a most effective opening ser- mon from the text, Jesus Christ, the same yesterday, to-day and forever. We thank the Illinois churches for their gift, for Dr. Roy is evidently the right man in the right place. He is cordially and gladly welcomed, and will have a great work to do in looking after the present sc~ttered flocks, and gathering new churchcs. The Conference was well officered by Rev. R. F. Markham, of Sa- vannah, as Moderator, and Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke, of Woodville, as Secretary; Rev. S. E. Lathrop, the newly-arrived pastor at Macon, was also chosen Statis- tical Secretary and Treasurer, with au- thority to publish the Minutes and other documents. The Macon church is a beautiful brick building, tastefully ar- ranged, upon a commanding site which overlooks most of the city. The attend- ance of Macon citizens was not so large as it would have been but for a very ex- citing municipal election which was go- ing on at the time, absorbing the enthu- siasm of most of the people. But the Congmegational church, with the Lewia

Rev. S. E. Lathrop Lathrop, S. E., Rev. Georgia--A New Conference Organized The Freedmen 50-51

60 A Working churchA New conference Organized. THE FREEDMEN. NORTH CAROLINA. A Working ChurchBible Christians. MISS E. A. WARNER, WILMINGTON. Last Sabbath we had an unusually in- teresting communion season. Two yo~ng men united with the church; one has been a member of our day-school, both of the Sunday-school. Our daily prayer is, Lord, bring our scholars into the fold of Christ. Our church is small, but it is a working one, and its influ- ence is felt in the community. A young Methodist minister attended a course of lectures given by Mi.. Dodge, last winter, on the Christian Doctrines, and he says, Mr. Dodge taught me more than I ever knew before. The Bible seems a new book. It seems to me the people are begin- ning to feel that the Bible Christians are different from the mass of professing ones around them. I called on a sick young man; he asked me to come in and read to him. I did so from time to time until he recovered. The family said, We are ashamed to return your calls, but we will come into meeting. And they were in last Sabbath evening. I have been teaching a woman over fifty years of age to read, this summer, and now she reads quite intelligibly, and says what little she can read opens up a new world to her. I was somewhat amused Jne day when she came to the word Ilypocrite. She repeated, Hypocrite, hypocrite; I must remember that, for we have a plenty of um around us. She often comes to our meetings, because she can get such a good understanding of the Bible. GEORGIA. A New Conference Organized. REV. S. E. LATRROP, MACON. In Georgia, the Empire State of the South, a Congregational Conference now exists. It was formed at Macon, Dec. 12. Part of the churches came from the Central South Conference, which formerly covered the States of Ten- nessee, Mississippi, Alabama and North- ern Georgia. The others were members of the now defunct Southeast Georgia Conference. By uniting together in this State organization, it is hoped that the bond of fellowship nnd Christian work may be strengthened. Twelve churches were represented by pastor or delegate, including the church at Orangeburg, S. C. Three of these have white pastors from the North; the others have efficient colored ministers wl~io have been trained in the schools of the A. NI. A. Rev. Dr. Roy, of Atlanta, whom your own great State has recently given to the South for a Field Superintendent of the work among the colored people, preached a most effective opening ser- mon from the text, Jesus Christ, the same yesterday, to-day and forever. We thank the Illinois churches for their gift, for Dr. Roy is evidently the right man in the right place. He is cordially and gladly welcomed, and will have a great work to do in looking after the present sc~ttered flocks, and gathering new churchcs. The Conference was well officered by Rev. R. F. Markham, of Sa- vannah, as Moderator, and Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke, of Woodville, as Secretary; Rev. S. E. Lathrop, the newly-arrived pastor at Macon, was also chosen Statis- tical Secretary and Treasurer, with au- thority to publish the Minutes and other documents. The Macon church is a beautiful brick building, tastefully ar- ranged, upon a commanding site which overlooks most of the city. The attend- ance of Macon citizens was not so large as it would have been but for a very ex- citing municipal election which was go- ing on at the time, absorbing the enthu- siasm of most of the people. But the Congmegational church, with the Lewia There i8 Life in the Old land Yet. 51 High School in its basement, taught by two experienced lady teachers from New York, has gained the respect of the whole community by the steadiness of its members and the sweet reasonable- ness of its doctrines as handed down from past generations. To those unaccustomed to deal with the Freedmen, one very noticeable thing was their intelligence, and especially their knowledge of parliamentary law as ap- plied to deliberative bodies. They are thoroughly posted in all the intricate mazes of motions, amendments, substi- tutes and privileged questions, and everytbing must be done in a strictly parliamentary way. This is, perhaps, a characteristic of the whole Southern people, white or black. They have also a good knowledge of Congregational usages, and seem to be much attached to the ways of the Pilgrim Fathers. One evening was devoted to a temper- ance meeting (a subject, by the way, which needs great attention in the South), with several earnest and spirited addresses by both white and colored speakers. The vice of drunkenness is very prevalent in this part of the coun- try, both in the churches and out of them. The fire-water has its charms for the red, white and black races alike. Even among the colored preachers of some denominations, drunkenness is by no means uncommon. Rev. Floyd Snelson, recently returned from the Mendi Mission, Africa, gave a very interesting sketch of the work among that people. Several of the (col- ored) churches of the city were supplied on Sunday by members of the Confer- ence. There is little affiliation of the white churches. Mr. John H. McLean, a promising young man of pure negro blood, was ordained by a council as a closing exercise of the Conferencea very impressive service. Sermon by Rev. S. S. Ashley, of Atlanta; charge to the candidate, Rev. R. F. Markham, of Sa- vannah ; ordaining prayer, Rev. S. E. Lathrop, of Macon; right hand of fel- lowship, Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke, of Woodville. Congregationalism in the South is not a failure. The outlook is hopeful. The tendencies of our polity to induce intelli- gence and self-control are more and more observed, and the better classes of Southern people are coming out with more strongly pronounced words of com- mendation. Men and money, patience and prayer, wisdom and work, will ele- vate the blaek man to his proper place, surely, though it may be slowly. Advance. There is Life in the Old Land Yet. JOHN MCINTOSH, JH., LIBERTY CO., GA. I came to this place in October and undertook the work neeessary to a suc- cessful beginning of my sehool duties. Several county free sehools were in ses- sion on my arrival, and I deemed it wise to visit them and urge the patronage of my school, whichIintendedopeningwhen the free schools were closed. I visited and witnessed the closing exereises of these schools, and was pleased with the progress made by some of them. The great scarcity of proper books and other school accommodations was quite mani- fest. Some of these schools had schol- ars sufficiently advanced for the Second or Third Readers, but did not have the means to purchase suitable books, and so the teachers kept them reading in the blue-back speller, and accomplished something. I succeeded in getting pupils to come to my school from one to ten miles away. I began teaching under the auspices of the American Missionary Association im- mediately at the close of the free schools, and the number of pupils and the interest in education increased rapidly. The num- ber enrolled has been large, and the average attendance good. A most de- cided improvement has been made in punctuality and the general observance of school regulations and requirements.

John McIntosh, Jr. McIntosh, John, Jr. Georgia--"There is Life in the Old Land Yet" The Freedmen 51-52

There i8 Life in the Old land Yet. 51 High School in its basement, taught by two experienced lady teachers from New York, has gained the respect of the whole community by the steadiness of its members and the sweet reasonable- ness of its doctrines as handed down from past generations. To those unaccustomed to deal with the Freedmen, one very noticeable thing was their intelligence, and especially their knowledge of parliamentary law as ap- plied to deliberative bodies. They are thoroughly posted in all the intricate mazes of motions, amendments, substi- tutes and privileged questions, and everytbing must be done in a strictly parliamentary way. This is, perhaps, a characteristic of the whole Southern people, white or black. They have also a good knowledge of Congregational usages, and seem to be much attached to the ways of the Pilgrim Fathers. One evening was devoted to a temper- ance meeting (a subject, by the way, which needs great attention in the South), with several earnest and spirited addresses by both white and colored speakers. The vice of drunkenness is very prevalent in this part of the coun- try, both in the churches and out of them. The fire-water has its charms for the red, white and black races alike. Even among the colored preachers of some denominations, drunkenness is by no means uncommon. Rev. Floyd Snelson, recently returned from the Mendi Mission, Africa, gave a very interesting sketch of the work among that people. Several of the (col- ored) churches of the city were supplied on Sunday by members of the Confer- ence. There is little affiliation of the white churches. Mr. John H. McLean, a promising young man of pure negro blood, was ordained by a council as a closing exercise of the Conferencea very impressive service. Sermon by Rev. S. S. Ashley, of Atlanta; charge to the candidate, Rev. R. F. Markham, of Sa- vannah ; ordaining prayer, Rev. S. E. Lathrop, of Macon; right hand of fel- lowship, Rev. J. H. H. Sengstacke, of Woodville. Congregationalism in the South is not a failure. The outlook is hopeful. The tendencies of our polity to induce intelli- gence and self-control are more and more observed, and the better classes of Southern people are coming out with more strongly pronounced words of com- mendation. Men and money, patience and prayer, wisdom and work, will ele- vate the blaek man to his proper place, surely, though it may be slowly. Advance. There is Life in the Old Land Yet. JOHN MCINTOSH, JH., LIBERTY CO., GA. I came to this place in October and undertook the work neeessary to a suc- cessful beginning of my sehool duties. Several county free sehools were in ses- sion on my arrival, and I deemed it wise to visit them and urge the patronage of my school, whichIintendedopeningwhen the free schools were closed. I visited and witnessed the closing exereises of these schools, and was pleased with the progress made by some of them. The great scarcity of proper books and other school accommodations was quite mani- fest. Some of these schools had schol- ars sufficiently advanced for the Second or Third Readers, but did not have the means to purchase suitable books, and so the teachers kept them reading in the blue-back speller, and accomplished something. I succeeded in getting pupils to come to my school from one to ten miles away. I began teaching under the auspices of the American Missionary Association im- mediately at the close of the free schools, and the number of pupils and the interest in education increased rapidly. The num- ber enrolled has been large, and the average attendance good. A most de- cided improvement has been made in punctuality and the general observance of school regulations and requirements. 52 ilome Life Among the Negroes Testimony as to Progress. Many have paid something toward the education of their children, and quite a number something toward procuring proper books for their children. The school is prospering, the people are taking a proper view of things, and the workers are encouraged. May our sky continue bright. Home Life Among the NegroesAn Incident. MRS. T. N. CHASE, ATLANTA. The saddest reports of home life among the negroes are gained from con- versation with our returned student teachers. One of our girls, a born lady, delicate and refined, who had always lived comfortably in the city, went out to teach for the first time this summer. Her first boarding-place was a log house of three rooms and twenty occupants. Each room contained a separate family. There were no windows or openings in the logs except the chimney and door, and of course the door must be shut at night to keep out animals. The father and mother have abed; the children (boysand girls) all nestle together on a quilt spread on the floor, in the corner, sleeping in the same filthy garments they have worn through the day. Think of trying to sleep as she had to during the intense heat of last summer in a close room with twelve persons. The first morning she told the man of the house he must get a saw and make a place for a window. He protested; so did she; said she should sit up all night and not shut her eyes to sleep unless it was done; and it was done. Need a missionary in Africa prac- tice more self-denial than this exceeding- ly neat and delicate girl in Georgia? She took a lamp with her which was a great curiosity, as the children were not accus- tomed even to a candle. At dusk the door was filled with eager eyes waiting to see her make a fire in that queer thing. She is an unusually sweet singer. It was remarkable how quickly her fine voice was recognized and appreciated by the musical intuitions of even that rude people. They came long distances to beg her to sing one more time, and often remarked, Im shore the angels cant sing no better. ALABAMA, Testimony as to Progress Already MadeThe Situation and Equipment. REv. F. BASCOM, D. D., MONTGOMERY. I am much interested in my work and in my people. I see abundant proofs of the beneficent agency of your society here. Could its influence havebeen ex- erted in like manner among all our col- ored people of the South, the problem so perplexing to politicians and philan- thropists, as to the future of this class in our country, would have been already solved. It seems to me that my neigh- bors here who have been under the in- fluence of our school and church, for these few years past, are as well pre- pared for the duties and responsibilities of freemen and citizens as are the ordi- nary farmers and mechanics at the North. I am most happily disappointed in the intelligence of the men and the culture of the women, and in the neatness and comfort of their homes. But I see this elevation of the race is accomplished by the most laborious and exhausting efforts of your eml)loyes. Dr. Bascom also writes to a friend, as appears in the Advance: We greatly enjoy our situation and work in this place. The weather is charming. We should call it the per- fection of our early autumn weather, just cool enough for comfort with a nice fire in the grate, but bright and balmy through the day, making the shady side of the street preferable at mid-day. The frost has killed the elm and mulberry leaves, but the magnolia, mock orange and fig leaves are green as ever, and the hawthorn hedges and roses make the door-yards look almost like June. Their geraniums they are protecting with tem- porary board coverings, letting them re- main out all winter.

Mrs. T. N. Chase Chase, T. N., Mrs. Georgia--Home Life Among the Negroes--An Incident The Freedmen 52

52 ilome Life Among the Negroes Testimony as to Progress. Many have paid something toward the education of their children, and quite a number something toward procuring proper books for their children. The school is prospering, the people are taking a proper view of things, and the workers are encouraged. May our sky continue bright. Home Life Among the NegroesAn Incident. MRS. T. N. CHASE, ATLANTA. The saddest reports of home life among the negroes are gained from con- versation with our returned student teachers. One of our girls, a born lady, delicate and refined, who had always lived comfortably in the city, went out to teach for the first time this summer. Her first boarding-place was a log house of three rooms and twenty occupants. Each room contained a separate family. There were no windows or openings in the logs except the chimney and door, and of course the door must be shut at night to keep out animals. The father and mother have abed; the children (boysand girls) all nestle together on a quilt spread on the floor, in the corner, sleeping in the same filthy garments they have worn through the day. Think of trying to sleep as she had to during the intense heat of last summer in a close room with twelve persons. The first morning she told the man of the house he must get a saw and make a place for a window. He protested; so did she; said she should sit up all night and not shut her eyes to sleep unless it was done; and it was done. Need a missionary in Africa prac- tice more self-denial than this exceeding- ly neat and delicate girl in Georgia? She took a lamp with her which was a great curiosity, as the children were not accus- tomed even to a candle. At dusk the door was filled with eager eyes waiting to see her make a fire in that queer thing. She is an unusually sweet singer. It was remarkable how quickly her fine voice was recognized and appreciated by the musical intuitions of even that rude people. They came long distances to beg her to sing one more time, and often remarked, Im shore the angels cant sing no better. ALABAMA, Testimony as to Progress Already MadeThe Situation and Equipment. REv. F. BASCOM, D. D., MONTGOMERY. I am much interested in my work and in my people. I see abundant proofs of the beneficent agency of your society here. Could its influence havebeen ex- erted in like manner among all our col- ored people of the South, the problem so perplexing to politicians and philan- thropists, as to the future of this class in our country, would have been already solved. It seems to me that my neigh- bors here who have been under the in- fluence of our school and church, for these few years past, are as well pre- pared for the duties and responsibilities of freemen and citizens as are the ordi- nary farmers and mechanics at the North. I am most happily disappointed in the intelligence of the men and the culture of the women, and in the neatness and comfort of their homes. But I see this elevation of the race is accomplished by the most laborious and exhausting efforts of your eml)loyes. Dr. Bascom also writes to a friend, as appears in the Advance: We greatly enjoy our situation and work in this place. The weather is charming. We should call it the per- fection of our early autumn weather, just cool enough for comfort with a nice fire in the grate, but bright and balmy through the day, making the shady side of the street preferable at mid-day. The frost has killed the elm and mulberry leaves, but the magnolia, mock orange and fig leaves are green as ever, and the hawthorn hedges and roses make the door-yards look almost like June. Their geraniums they are protecting with tem- porary board coverings, letting them re- main out all winter.

Rev. F. Bascom, D.D. Bascom, F., Rev., D.D. Alabama--Testimony as to Progress Already Made--The Situation and Equipment The Freedmen 52-53

52 ilome Life Among the Negroes Testimony as to Progress. Many have paid something toward the education of their children, and quite a number something toward procuring proper books for their children. The school is prospering, the people are taking a proper view of things, and the workers are encouraged. May our sky continue bright. Home Life Among the NegroesAn Incident. MRS. T. N. CHASE, ATLANTA. The saddest reports of home life among the negroes are gained from con- versation with our returned student teachers. One of our girls, a born lady, delicate and refined, who had always lived comfortably in the city, went out to teach for the first time this summer. Her first boarding-place was a log house of three rooms and twenty occupants. Each room contained a separate family. There were no windows or openings in the logs except the chimney and door, and of course the door must be shut at night to keep out animals. The father and mother have abed; the children (boysand girls) all nestle together on a quilt spread on the floor, in the corner, sleeping in the same filthy garments they have worn through the day. Think of trying to sleep as she had to during the intense heat of last summer in a close room with twelve persons. The first morning she told the man of the house he must get a saw and make a place for a window. He protested; so did she; said she should sit up all night and not shut her eyes to sleep unless it was done; and it was done. Need a missionary in Africa prac- tice more self-denial than this exceeding- ly neat and delicate girl in Georgia? She took a lamp with her which was a great curiosity, as the children were not accus- tomed even to a candle. At dusk the door was filled with eager eyes waiting to see her make a fire in that queer thing. She is an unusually sweet singer. It was remarkable how quickly her fine voice was recognized and appreciated by the musical intuitions of even that rude people. They came long distances to beg her to sing one more time, and often remarked, Im shore the angels cant sing no better. ALABAMA, Testimony as to Progress Already MadeThe Situation and Equipment. REv. F. BASCOM, D. D., MONTGOMERY. I am much interested in my work and in my people. I see abundant proofs of the beneficent agency of your society here. Could its influence havebeen ex- erted in like manner among all our col- ored people of the South, the problem so perplexing to politicians and philan- thropists, as to the future of this class in our country, would have been already solved. It seems to me that my neigh- bors here who have been under the in- fluence of our school and church, for these few years past, are as well pre- pared for the duties and responsibilities of freemen and citizens as are the ordi- nary farmers and mechanics at the North. I am most happily disappointed in the intelligence of the men and the culture of the women, and in the neatness and comfort of their homes. But I see this elevation of the race is accomplished by the most laborious and exhausting efforts of your eml)loyes. Dr. Bascom also writes to a friend, as appears in the Advance: We greatly enjoy our situation and work in this place. The weather is charming. We should call it the per- fection of our early autumn weather, just cool enough for comfort with a nice fire in the grate, but bright and balmy through the day, making the shady side of the street preferable at mid-day. The frost has killed the elm and mulberry leaves, but the magnolia, mock orange and fig leaves are green as ever, and the hawthorn hedges and roses make the door-yards look almost like June. Their geraniums they are protecting with tem- porary board coverings, letting them re- main out all winter. Le Afoyne Library Generous GivingNot Dying Out. 53 Our Miqsion Home is a large and commodious mansion built by a slave- holder, whose fortunes went down with the lost cause, and it was purchased by the American Missionary Association. Our school, near by, has a building which compares favorably with some of the Chicago school-houses, two stories and a good basement, the whole accom- modating from 300 to 400 pupils, with three noble white teachers and three col- ored, who have graduated from this school. I have just visited the school, and was greatly delighted. It is no dis- paragement to your excellent schools to say that, in point of order and apparent earnestness and successful work on the part of both teachers and pupils, these dusky boys and girls would not suffer in comparison. Our church here is a neat, pleasant, wooden building, and our congregation appear fully to appreciate a preachers best efforts. Their singing is, like ours, led by a good organist. Their prayer meetings are quiet and social, and very enjoyable. Our Sunday-school is flour- ishing, under a colored man for super- intendent, who is teaching in the coun- try. I enjoy my work, and hope to have a profitable winter. TENNESSEE. Le Noyne LibrarySunday-school Work. MISS LAURA A. PARMELEE, MEMPHiS. There has been some work and much time spent upon the library in labeling and cataloguing the two hundred and thirty new volumes, and arranging the whole five hundred in classes. We have nineteen popular books of science; twenty-five bright records of travel; forty-seven good histories, essays, stories, & c., of genuine worth. Many of them are already in circulation. I am confident this must gather to our support the best elements in the colored community. Some of the public school -teachers have spoken to Mr. Steele about reciting to him at night. They say they wish to review the lower branches. The arrange- ments have not been perfected. And a requelt has come that a class be formed in theology, for the benefit of young men who are obliged to work, but wish to fit themselves for preaching. Just at this ,~ime we are in a state of chaos, waiting for the holiday merry- makings to be over, that people may settle down to plans for another year. We hope for a good year in every sense of the word. As I sit by my stove writ- ing, a substantial Baptist sister is warm- ing her feet on the hearth and making arrangements with Miss Milton to hold a neighborhood prayer-meeting at her house Tuesday morning. I think the missionary work is broadening. The yellow fever fund you sent is helping to break down barriers. Generous GivingNot Dying OutHelp Wanted. REV. TEMPLE CUTLER, cHATTANOOGA. During my seven months absence from home the church managed to take care of itself with credit both to its zeal and its ability. Three months of the time it was ministered to by the Rev. G. W. Moore, a young preacher pursuing his studies at Fisk. Brother Moore gave himself most heartily to the work while here, and displayed qualities of mind and heart that give promise of great usefulness to his race. The church raised for him by its own contributions $50 per month, besides contributing nearly $50 to aid yellow fever suffer- ers in other cities in the early stage of the epidemic. The total amount of their contributions during my absence was $211.42. I do not think many of our Northern churches can show a better record, considering their income. It amounts to about $3.50 from each res- ident member. The income of our membership will not average $150 a year. Let these figures be compared

Miss Laura A. Parmelee Parmelee, Laura A., Miss Tennessee--Le Moyne Library--Sunday-school Work The Freedmen 53

Le Afoyne Library Generous GivingNot Dying Out. 53 Our Miqsion Home is a large and commodious mansion built by a slave- holder, whose fortunes went down with the lost cause, and it was purchased by the American Missionary Association. Our school, near by, has a building which compares favorably with some of the Chicago school-houses, two stories and a good basement, the whole accom- modating from 300 to 400 pupils, with three noble white teachers and three col- ored, who have graduated from this school. I have just visited the school, and was greatly delighted. It is no dis- paragement to your excellent schools to say that, in point of order and apparent earnestness and successful work on the part of both teachers and pupils, these dusky boys and girls would not suffer in comparison. Our church here is a neat, pleasant, wooden building, and our congregation appear fully to appreciate a preachers best efforts. Their singing is, like ours, led by a good organist. Their prayer meetings are quiet and social, and very enjoyable. Our Sunday-school is flour- ishing, under a colored man for super- intendent, who is teaching in the coun- try. I enjoy my work, and hope to have a profitable winter. TENNESSEE. Le Noyne LibrarySunday-school Work. MISS LAURA A. PARMELEE, MEMPHiS. There has been some work and much time spent upon the library in labeling and cataloguing the two hundred and thirty new volumes, and arranging the whole five hundred in classes. We have nineteen popular books of science; twenty-five bright records of travel; forty-seven good histories, essays, stories, & c., of genuine worth. Many of them are already in circulation. I am confident this must gather to our support the best elements in the colored community. Some of the public school -teachers have spoken to Mr. Steele about reciting to him at night. They say they wish to review the lower branches. The arrange- ments have not been perfected. And a requelt has come that a class be formed in theology, for the benefit of young men who are obliged to work, but wish to fit themselves for preaching. Just at this ,~ime we are in a state of chaos, waiting for the holiday merry- makings to be over, that people may settle down to plans for another year. We hope for a good year in every sense of the word. As I sit by my stove writ- ing, a substantial Baptist sister is warm- ing her feet on the hearth and making arrangements with Miss Milton to hold a neighborhood prayer-meeting at her house Tuesday morning. I think the missionary work is broadening. The yellow fever fund you sent is helping to break down barriers. Generous GivingNot Dying OutHelp Wanted. REV. TEMPLE CUTLER, cHATTANOOGA. During my seven months absence from home the church managed to take care of itself with credit both to its zeal and its ability. Three months of the time it was ministered to by the Rev. G. W. Moore, a young preacher pursuing his studies at Fisk. Brother Moore gave himself most heartily to the work while here, and displayed qualities of mind and heart that give promise of great usefulness to his race. The church raised for him by its own contributions $50 per month, besides contributing nearly $50 to aid yellow fever suffer- ers in other cities in the early stage of the epidemic. The total amount of their contributions during my absence was $211.42. I do not think many of our Northern churches can show a better record, considering their income. It amounts to about $3.50 from each res- ident member. The income of our membership will not average $150 a year. Let these figures be compared

Rev. Temple Cutler Cutler, Temple, Rev. Tennessee--Generous Giving--Not Dying Out--Help Wanted The Freedmen 53-54

Le Afoyne Library Generous GivingNot Dying Out. 53 Our Miqsion Home is a large and commodious mansion built by a slave- holder, whose fortunes went down with the lost cause, and it was purchased by the American Missionary Association. Our school, near by, has a building which compares favorably with some of the Chicago school-houses, two stories and a good basement, the whole accom- modating from 300 to 400 pupils, with three noble white teachers and three col- ored, who have graduated from this school. I have just visited the school, and was greatly delighted. It is no dis- paragement to your excellent schools to say that, in point of order and apparent earnestness and successful work on the part of both teachers and pupils, these dusky boys and girls would not suffer in comparison. Our church here is a neat, pleasant, wooden building, and our congregation appear fully to appreciate a preachers best efforts. Their singing is, like ours, led by a good organist. Their prayer meetings are quiet and social, and very enjoyable. Our Sunday-school is flour- ishing, under a colored man for super- intendent, who is teaching in the coun- try. I enjoy my work, and hope to have a profitable winter. TENNESSEE. Le Noyne LibrarySunday-school Work. MISS LAURA A. PARMELEE, MEMPHiS. There has been some work and much time spent upon the library in labeling and cataloguing the two hundred and thirty new volumes, and arranging the whole five hundred in classes. We have nineteen popular books of science; twenty-five bright records of travel; forty-seven good histories, essays, stories, & c., of genuine worth. Many of them are already in circulation. I am confident this must gather to our support the best elements in the colored community. Some of the public school -teachers have spoken to Mr. Steele about reciting to him at night. They say they wish to review the lower branches. The arrange- ments have not been perfected. And a requelt has come that a class be formed in theology, for the benefit of young men who are obliged to work, but wish to fit themselves for preaching. Just at this ,~ime we are in a state of chaos, waiting for the holiday merry- makings to be over, that people may settle down to plans for another year. We hope for a good year in every sense of the word. As I sit by my stove writ- ing, a substantial Baptist sister is warm- ing her feet on the hearth and making arrangements with Miss Milton to hold a neighborhood prayer-meeting at her house Tuesday morning. I think the missionary work is broadening. The yellow fever fund you sent is helping to break down barriers. Generous GivingNot Dying OutHelp Wanted. REV. TEMPLE CUTLER, cHATTANOOGA. During my seven months absence from home the church managed to take care of itself with credit both to its zeal and its ability. Three months of the time it was ministered to by the Rev. G. W. Moore, a young preacher pursuing his studies at Fisk. Brother Moore gave himself most heartily to the work while here, and displayed qualities of mind and heart that give promise of great usefulness to his race. The church raised for him by its own contributions $50 per month, besides contributing nearly $50 to aid yellow fever suffer- ers in other cities in the early stage of the epidemic. The total amount of their contributions during my absence was $211.42. I do not think many of our Northern churches can show a better record, considering their income. It amounts to about $3.50 from each res- ident member. The income of our membership will not average $150 a year. Let these figures be compared Freedoms Day. with those of some of our city churches, and we will not blush. I sometimes get a little tried with the people when I see them waste their money on tobacco and a thousand little extravagances; but I immediately feel rebuked when I compare their extravagance with that of white people. If white people gave according to their income as these poor black people do, our debt would not hang like a millstone around our neck, and the Home Missionary Society would not still groan over $30,000. I have heard it stated that the colored people are dying out. This is not the case among our people. I have been here two years and a half, and have not been called to attend a funeral of any member of our church. There have been but three deaths in the families, and two of them were yellow fever cases dur- ing my absence. Some of our members were sick, but none of them died. There were many, many cases of yellow fever among the colored people that were not reported. They held, perhaps, a super- stitious notionthe doctors would say so, at leastthat if they went to the hospital they would surely die; so they doctored themselves with herbs, and so far as I can learn not one so treated died. We are in the midst of the trying sea- son for these poor people. The cold weather is coming on; but thanks to the kind women of Yarmouth, Mass., and Skowbegan, Me.,we have a good stock of garments for the most needy. Two bar- rels have come and their contents been distributed in part. The Lord bless the generous hearts and fingers that filled them. I want to say to the friends of Tennie that she is making a grand record in school. I have another girl named Rosa for whom I bespeak an interest. If any Sunday-school or any body wants to take her off my hands, I will find another to take care of. Work done for these girls is good work. Freedoms Day. The Band of Hope in Chattanooga observed the first day of January in cel- ebrating the anniversary of the proclama- tion of Emancipation. The exercises were held in one of our largest halls, and were well attended. They con- sisted of speaking and singing, and the reading of the Proclamation. The prin- cipal address was given by Rev. Mr. Hurley, of the A. M. E. Church, and contained some excellent thoughts upon the situation of things in the South. After a brief introduction, in which he spoke of the propriety of the colored peoples observing this day as the white people had been accustomed to observe the Fourth of July, as independence day, he proceeded to name some of the bene- fits that had come to the whole country, white and black, North and Southfor we are one, and what really benefits one section, benefits allfrom the emancipa- tion of the slaves. 1. His first point related to the honor of the American name. For almost a century poets have sung and orators boasted of the national honor. The declaration of independence, that all men are born free and equ~, has been flaunted abroad as the pennant of the nation, while mil- lions of our people were being born, liv- ing aud dying in the worst form of slavery the world has ever known. In all those long years the nation lived a stupendous lie. Never was the declara- tion of independence true until Abra- ham Lincoln made it so the first day of January, 1803. It is a great benefit to the nation to be true to its professions; to have this great blot wiped out. 2. By the emancipation of the slaves, 5,000,000 pairs of hands were added to the wealth and defences of the nation no small gift. We read of a time when a nation shall be born at once. It has come. What if the ex-slave has had to be nursed All babes are nursed. Is not the babe a blessitig to the household? Even its very helplessness is a blessing,

Freedom's Day The Freedmen 54-56

Freedoms Day. with those of some of our city churches, and we will not blush. I sometimes get a little tried with the people when I see them waste their money on tobacco and a thousand little extravagances; but I immediately feel rebuked when I compare their extravagance with that of white people. If white people gave according to their income as these poor black people do, our debt would not hang like a millstone around our neck, and the Home Missionary Society would not still groan over $30,000. I have heard it stated that the colored people are dying out. This is not the case among our people. I have been here two years and a half, and have not been called to attend a funeral of any member of our church. There have been but three deaths in the families, and two of them were yellow fever cases dur- ing my absence. Some of our members were sick, but none of them died. There were many, many cases of yellow fever among the colored people that were not reported. They held, perhaps, a super- stitious notionthe doctors would say so, at leastthat if they went to the hospital they would surely die; so they doctored themselves with herbs, and so far as I can learn not one so treated died. We are in the midst of the trying sea- son for these poor people. The cold weather is coming on; but thanks to the kind women of Yarmouth, Mass., and Skowbegan, Me.,we have a good stock of garments for the most needy. Two bar- rels have come and their contents been distributed in part. The Lord bless the generous hearts and fingers that filled them. I want to say to the friends of Tennie that she is making a grand record in school. I have another girl named Rosa for whom I bespeak an interest. If any Sunday-school or any body wants to take her off my hands, I will find another to take care of. Work done for these girls is good work. Freedoms Day. The Band of Hope in Chattanooga observed the first day of January in cel- ebrating the anniversary of the proclama- tion of Emancipation. The exercises were held in one of our largest halls, and were well attended. They con- sisted of speaking and singing, and the reading of the Proclamation. The prin- cipal address was given by Rev. Mr. Hurley, of the A. M. E. Church, and contained some excellent thoughts upon the situation of things in the South. After a brief introduction, in which he spoke of the propriety of the colored peoples observing this day as the white people had been accustomed to observe the Fourth of July, as independence day, he proceeded to name some of the bene- fits that had come to the whole country, white and black, North and Southfor we are one, and what really benefits one section, benefits allfrom the emancipa- tion of the slaves. 1. His first point related to the honor of the American name. For almost a century poets have sung and orators boasted of the national honor. The declaration of independence, that all men are born free and equ~, has been flaunted abroad as the pennant of the nation, while mil- lions of our people were being born, liv- ing aud dying in the worst form of slavery the world has ever known. In all those long years the nation lived a stupendous lie. Never was the declara- tion of independence true until Abra- ham Lincoln made it so the first day of January, 1803. It is a great benefit to the nation to be true to its professions; to have this great blot wiped out. 2. By the emancipation of the slaves, 5,000,000 pairs of hands were added to the wealth and defences of the nation no small gift. We read of a time when a nation shall be born at once. It has come. What if the ex-slave has had to be nursed All babes are nursed. Is not the babe a blessitig to the household? Even its very helplessness is a blessing, Freedom8 Day. 55 educating the finest sensibilities of hu- manity. If the babe born January 1st, 1863, is nurtured aright, God alone can measure the benefits to the nation. 3. By the emancipation of the slave, a system of education was introduced to the South that insures a lasting blessing upon the whole people. The intelli- gence of a large portion of the white population before the war was not above that of the slave. If the slave had not been made free, there is no reason to suppose the condition of these poor whites would have been changed. Now a glance over the broad territory of these States, where school-houses have sprung up like magic, shows the immense ad- vantage that has come to white and black alike; and with the increase of intelligence will come increase of pros- perity and happiness to the whole na- tion. With the emancipation of the slave, the commonschool system has been forced upon the South, until now, having tasted of its sweetness, we hope it is never to be abolished. 4. Another benefit resulting from the emancipation of the slave is the moral elevation of the people. Ah! we know too well the vices that sheltered them- selves under that most accursed of all traffics. The slave was but a chattel; his level was the ox; he was like any other beast of burden, and his morals were not above his positiou. Great complaint is now made of the moral condition of the colored man. But low as it may be, every intelligent observer can perceive a vast improvement over the condition before the war. The wonder is that one virtu- ous, or truthful, or honest person could come out of 250 years of moral degrada- tion like that of American slavery. But these dark days are gone. Now there is incentive enough for us to rise. The opportunity is before us to show to the world that the vices of the past are due to our education, and not to the inherent nature of the black man. We have only to recover a lost manhood. We want faith in one another. We must believe in the possibilities that are before us as a people, and aid each other to reach them, and God will give us the victory. In closing, the speaker referred to some mistakes the colored man has made. One was too much confidence in the white man. Confidence begets depend- ence. Dependence is not good for those who would rise in the world. We must learn to trust God and our own exer- tions. We have always been dependent, and it is not strange that we have leaned upon our friends in the early days of our freedom; but now it is time for us to be- gin to act and think for ourselves. There is a destiny before us which we must achieve. Let us arise and work. An- other mistake is the scheme of emigrat- ing to some other land. This is our home as much as it is the white mans. It is our native land. The country and peo- ple that have witnessed our degradation should also witness our exaltation. After years of servitude shall we turn our backs upon glorious privileges that are now within our reach? No, my friends, we shall make a grand mistake if we follow to any extent the wild scheme of defeat- ed politicians, projected in this African exodus. Let us be content to wait until we have redeemed ourselves from the evils of 250 years of servitude by the im- provement of the advantages that God has so graciously brought to our door, before we venture into that dark conti- nent from which our fathers were torn, to be ground under the iron heel of the slave-master. Until then, Africa will be no better for us, and we will be no better for Africa. We must learn to respect our- selves before we can command the re- spect of others. May God hasten the day when the colored man shall recog- nize in his brother the character which he would have all men recognize in him- self. I do not give this as a verbatim report, but the thoughts as nearly as I can re- call them from a few notes taken at the $56 Lame Joe. time. Coming from a colored man, they show the sentiment of the more intelli- gent leaders among them. The address fits so exactly into the line of our work that I cannot refrain from giving this brief report. T. C. CHILDRENS PAGE. LAME JOE. MISS IS. WATERBURY, POLO, ILL. We were teaching a Freedmans school in Mississippi, and boarding with a Northern family on a plantation, where a few years before were four hundred slaves. One Sabbath morning we were sitting on the back piazza, sorting Sunday- school papers for the school, which was that day to begin, when Joe made his appearance from the kitchen, coming along by the porch with a limping, shuffling gait ; his only garments a shirt much too large for him and minus one sleeve, and a pair of pants hanging in tatters, the cast-off rags of an older brother. Can you read, Joe ? said the teacher, passing him a paper full of pic- tures. Not yit, maam; but brother Ben can read right smart, and hes gwine to teach me a heap o larnin, and I reckon Ise goin to read dis yere some time shore. Joe took his first lesson in learning by means of the word method, and limped off spelling the word so, and picking out all the sos in his paper. In a few days we took occasion to in- terview his mother and broach the sub- ject of his going to school; but we soon found that the chances were against him; for being the youngest of ten children, there were so many to feed and clothe, as his mother expressed it, she couldnt get to him, and he had to tote wood and water for her, while she cooked at the big house. After repeat- ed attempts to get Joe started in his education, the Yankee school maam set about clothing her prot~g~, but was soon put to her wits end to find a pat- tern for boys pants; and as tailoring was not her forte, there were several ob- stacles to be overcome. Happily, a plan was hit upon, and Joe pulled off his di- lapidated pants and went to bed, while his new clothes were cut by the use of the old ones for a pattern, and very soon the happiest boy of the Ethiopian race was a daily attendant at the school. A week or two of study passed, when the gentleman who had provided Joe with hat and book accosted him with, How do you get on, Joe? Mighty well, Colonel; done got past the picture o de ox; have shore done got past him! No pupil was more constsnt in attend- ance than our prot~g~, and with rap- id strides he passed the boys of his age, learning well whatever he was permitted to study, and in four years from the time he learned his first word on the piazza, we left him doing exam- ples in higher mathematics, before a large audience of parents and friends of education, who were delighted at his progress. Many of our pupils had come to the Good Shepherd, and with de- light told of the joy in following their newly-found Saviour; but Joe was so en- grossed with study, nothing seemed to move him, and we left him, a little sad- dened that he was, as he expressed it, yet in the outstanding army. This summer, while the yellow fever was prevailing, there came a postal from Joe, saying he had found Jesus, and taken Him for the captain of his saiva- vation; and now he loved everybody, and his teachers better than ever, and amidst all the fears about the fever he never was afraid; he was well, though his father and mother were both sick; but he didnt have any fears for this world or the next.

Miss M. Waterbury Waterbury, M., Miss Lame Joe Children's Page 56-57

$56 Lame Joe. time. Coming from a colored man, they show the sentiment of the more intelli- gent leaders among them. The address fits so exactly into the line of our work that I cannot refrain from giving this brief report. T. C. CHILDRENS PAGE. LAME JOE. MISS IS. WATERBURY, POLO, ILL. We were teaching a Freedmans school in Mississippi, and boarding with a Northern family on a plantation, where a few years before were four hundred slaves. One Sabbath morning we were sitting on the back piazza, sorting Sunday- school papers for the school, which was that day to begin, when Joe made his appearance from the kitchen, coming along by the porch with a limping, shuffling gait ; his only garments a shirt much too large for him and minus one sleeve, and a pair of pants hanging in tatters, the cast-off rags of an older brother. Can you read, Joe ? said the teacher, passing him a paper full of pic- tures. Not yit, maam; but brother Ben can read right smart, and hes gwine to teach me a heap o larnin, and I reckon Ise goin to read dis yere some time shore. Joe took his first lesson in learning by means of the word method, and limped off spelling the word so, and picking out all the sos in his paper. In a few days we took occasion to in- terview his mother and broach the sub- ject of his going to school; but we soon found that the chances were against him; for being the youngest of ten children, there were so many to feed and clothe, as his mother expressed it, she couldnt get to him, and he had to tote wood and water for her, while she cooked at the big house. After repeat- ed attempts to get Joe started in his education, the Yankee school maam set about clothing her prot~g~, but was soon put to her wits end to find a pat- tern for boys pants; and as tailoring was not her forte, there were several ob- stacles to be overcome. Happily, a plan was hit upon, and Joe pulled off his di- lapidated pants and went to bed, while his new clothes were cut by the use of the old ones for a pattern, and very soon the happiest boy of the Ethiopian race was a daily attendant at the school. A week or two of study passed, when the gentleman who had provided Joe with hat and book accosted him with, How do you get on, Joe? Mighty well, Colonel; done got past the picture o de ox; have shore done got past him! No pupil was more constsnt in attend- ance than our prot~g~, and with rap- id strides he passed the boys of his age, learning well whatever he was permitted to study, and in four years from the time he learned his first word on the piazza, we left him doing exam- ples in higher mathematics, before a large audience of parents and friends of education, who were delighted at his progress. Many of our pupils had come to the Good Shepherd, and with de- light told of the joy in following their newly-found Saviour; but Joe was so en- grossed with study, nothing seemed to move him, and we left him, a little sad- dened that he was, as he expressed it, yet in the outstanding army. This summer, while the yellow fever was prevailing, there came a postal from Joe, saying he had found Jesus, and taken Him for the captain of his saiva- vation; and now he loved everybody, and his teachers better than ever, and amidst all the fears about the fever he never was afraid; he was well, though his father and mother were both sick; but he didnt have any fears for this world or the next. .Li?eceipt8. 57 RECEIPTS MAINE, $531.65. Bangor. Central Cong. Ch. $200; Central Oh. Sab. Sch. $20; First Cong. Ch. $1,. .$224 00 Bath. T.E 50 Bethel. Ladies of First Cong. Ch. $10; Mrs. E. C. C. SOc 10 50 Blanchard. Daniel Blanchard 5 00 Blue Hill. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Cumberland. Cong. Ch. and Soc 18 00 Farmii.igton. A Friend 1 00 Hampden. Mrs. R. S. Curtis, $4; Chas. Hicks, $2 6 00 Machias. Ladies Prayer Meeting, $5; E.G. L. and Mrs. W. C. H, $1 6 00 Norridgewock. Cong. Cli. $50; Rev. B. T. $1 51 00 Portland. State St. Cong. Cli.. to const. MRs. ELIZABETH C. HINcEs and Miss CARo. LINE S. CONANT L. M.s 100 00 Portland. Ladies of Bethel Cli. $16.15, fer Talledege U., and bbl. of C; Mrs. L. D., SOc. 16 65 South Freeport. Horatio Isley, $3; Rev. H. I., SOc . 3 50 Standish. Cong. Ch 2 50 Thomaston. Cong. Ch. $1; Mrs. J. H. $1 2 00 T#psham. Cong. Cli. ano Soc 5 00 Wells. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc. $21; First Cong. Cli. and individuals, $7 32 00 Winslow. Cong. Ch 21 00 Winthrop. I. N. M 1 00 Woolwicli. Cong. Cli 13 00 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $1,974.11. Amherst. ESTATE of Eliza Kenney, by Geo. Kenney, Ex 1,515 60 Atkinson. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Auburn. Cong. Ch 9 00 Bristol. H. T. A 50 Colebrook. Cong. Sab. Soc 4 00 Concord. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 46 05 Cornish Centre. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 65 Dunbarton. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $25; and Sab. Sch. $41 66 00 Exeter. A Friend, fer Memeriat Inst., Wilmingfen, A. C., and to conet ABRAHAM A. TOWLE, Miss MART GORDON and Sin. NET H. McINTIRE L. M.s 100 00 Exeter. M. R. S 1 00 Francestown. Cong. Ch. and Soc $25; Dea. 11. B. Fisher, 5; C. B. R., SOc 30 50 Hampstead. Cong. Cli 15 85 Hancock. Mrs. Mary H Washburn 5 00 Hanover Centre. Cong. Co 9 00 Hopkinton. D. S 60 Keene. First Cong. Sab Scli.$65.33; Elisha Rand, $5; S. P. Cook, $2; SOc 72 83 Kensington. Cong. Sah. Scli 2 00 Marlborough. Ladies, b. ot C.and $2. fer Freight 2 00 Nashua. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 17 86 New Ipswich. J. W. C 50 Stratbam. Cong. Cli. and Soc 24 36 Sullivan. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Troy. M. W. Wheeler 2 50 West Lebanon. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $17.28; O.S.M.andDea.H.F. $1 1828 VERMONT, $624.92. Bradford. R. F 50 Brandon. Cong. Cli 23 17 Burlington. J. P 50 Cabot. Cong. Cli. and Soc 11 40 Cambridge. Madison Safford 89 88 Cambridge. Mrs. Mary Waterhouse, $5; John Kinsley, $5; Jesse Mudgeit, $3 13 00 Uhester. Cong. Cli. and Soc 27 00 East Hardwick. Ladies, by J. D Bell 2 25 Essex. Mrs.L.C.B 100 Hartford. Cong. Cli. and Soc 107 17 Jericho Centre. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 05 Johnson. Cong. Cli. and Soc 13 50 Ludlow. Mrs.L.H.C 100 FOR DECEMBER, 1878. Lunenburgh. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $8; Mrs. S.S.J.SOc $850 Manchester. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to consi. REV. ALBERT C. REED L. M 50 50 North Ferrisbuigh. ESTATE of Sylvia Dean, by J. M. and W. L. Dean, Executors 18 00 North Thesford. Mrs. E. G. Baxter 2 00 Peacham. Cong. Ch. and Soc 36 43 Peru. Cong. Ch. and Soc . 11 33 Pittaford. Mrs. N. P. Humphrey 10 00 Pomfret. Cong. Cli. and Soc 4 00 Richmond. Cong. Cli. and Soc 14 37 Roxbury. Cong. Cli. and Soc 12 55 Saint Johosbury. South Cong. Cli 95 06 Saxtons River. Mrs. A. C 1 00 Shelburn. James D. Duncan, bal. to coust. FANNY R. DUNCAN L. M 5 00 South Royalsion. Rev. S. K. B. P. $1; Dea. A.S.P.$1 200 Townahend. Mrs. Annie Rice 5 00 Waitsfield. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $13.71; Mrs. A. B. Fish, $5; S. H. R. $1 19 71 Weatherafleld Centre. Mrs. E. Chamberlin 5 00 Westminster. Cong. Cli 9 05 MASSACHUSETTS, $3,785.60. Acton. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 00 Andover. H. J. P. $1; Mrs. F. H. B. SOc.; Miss S. E. J. SOc 2 09 Ashburnham. Cong. Cli. and Soc 28 28 Aslifield. Ladies of Cong. Cli., blil. of C., and $2.Sofor Freight 2 50 Auburndale. Cong. Cli. and Soc 123 36 Beichertown. Mrs. R. W. Walker 5 00 Boston. S. D. Smith, $200; , $5; Mrs. N. B. Curtis, $2C0; Mt. Vernon Cli. and Soc. $155.05; Union Cli. and Soc. $82.16; Chas. Nichols, $30. to const. MRS. W. W. Fsiosr L. M.; Mrs. L. A. Bradliury, 25c... 697 21 Boston Highlands. Cong. Cli. and Soc., to coast. RET. ALBERT H. DUNNING L. Id.... 45 00 Boxhorough. Cong. Cli. and Soc 8 00 Boylaton. Ladies, bliL of C Bradford. Young Ladies of Bradford Sem.. 23 50 Brocton. Sab. Sch. Teacher, $6; A Friend, $2.50. Jbr City Missien Work, Nashville, Tenn.; Mrs. B. Sandford, Jr., libi. of C.; Porter Sab. Soli. bundle of C 8 50 Brookline. H. R. N 2 00 Bockland. A. Thayer 1 00 Cambridgeport. Pilgrim Cli. $146.25; Ladies of Pilgrim Cli. blil. of C. and $1.25 for Freight; Mrs. G. D. C. SOc 148 00 Campello. $10 for City Mission Work, Nashville, Tenn 10 00 Charlestown. Ivory Littlefield 40 00 Chelsea. First Cong. Ch. and Soc. $68.96; Third Cong. Cli. and Soc. $19.87 88 83 Coleraine. Mrs. P. B. S 1 00 Danvers. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. $92.22; Maple St. Sab. 5db. $20 . 112 22 East Bridgewater. Mrs. S. D. Shaw 3 00 Easthampton. Payson Cong. Cli 427 SIt East Weymouth. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Fitchburg. Rolistone Cong. Cli. by Mrs. C. W. Hubbard, $10; Rollstone Cong. Cli. by A Friend, $10 Freetown. Cong. Cli. and Soc Groton. Elizabeth Farnsworth Hanover. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc Harwich. 2 bbls. of C Holbrook. Mrs. C. S. Holbrook and Daugh- ter, 2 libls, ot C. and $lofor Freight 10 00 Holliston. A. W. M 51 Hopkinton. First Cong. Sab. Scli $54 Cong. Sab. 5db. $25, for Student Aid, Tel- ladega C.; Ladies, box of C Indian Orchard. Cong. Cli. and Soc Ipawich. W. H. K Jamaica Plain. A Friend, Lakeville. B. K.... 20 00 30 00 10 00 29 2S 79 00 22 S8 50 400 1 00

Receipts for December, 1878 57-62

.Li?eceipt8. 57 RECEIPTS MAINE, $531.65. Bangor. Central Cong. Ch. $200; Central Oh. Sab. Sch. $20; First Cong. Ch. $1,. .$224 00 Bath. T.E 50 Bethel. Ladies of First Cong. Ch. $10; Mrs. E. C. C. SOc 10 50 Blanchard. Daniel Blanchard 5 00 Blue Hill. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Cumberland. Cong. Ch. and Soc 18 00 Farmii.igton. A Friend 1 00 Hampden. Mrs. R. S. Curtis, $4; Chas. Hicks, $2 6 00 Machias. Ladies Prayer Meeting, $5; E.G. L. and Mrs. W. C. H, $1 6 00 Norridgewock. Cong. Cli. $50; Rev. B. T. $1 51 00 Portland. State St. Cong. Cli.. to const. MRs. ELIZABETH C. HINcEs and Miss CARo. LINE S. CONANT L. M.s 100 00 Portland. Ladies of Bethel Cli. $16.15, fer Talledege U., and bbl. of C; Mrs. L. D., SOc. 16 65 South Freeport. Horatio Isley, $3; Rev. H. I., SOc . 3 50 Standish. Cong. Ch 2 50 Thomaston. Cong. Ch. $1; Mrs. J. H. $1 2 00 T#psham. Cong. Cli. ano Soc 5 00 Wells. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc. $21; First Cong. Cli. and individuals, $7 32 00 Winslow. Cong. Ch 21 00 Winthrop. I. N. M 1 00 Woolwicli. Cong. Cli 13 00 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $1,974.11. Amherst. ESTATE of Eliza Kenney, by Geo. Kenney, Ex 1,515 60 Atkinson. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Auburn. Cong. Ch 9 00 Bristol. H. T. A 50 Colebrook. Cong. Sab. Soc 4 00 Concord. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 46 05 Cornish Centre. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 65 Dunbarton. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $25; and Sab. Sch. $41 66 00 Exeter. A Friend, fer Memeriat Inst., Wilmingfen, A. C., and to conet ABRAHAM A. TOWLE, Miss MART GORDON and Sin. NET H. McINTIRE L. M.s 100 00 Exeter. M. R. S 1 00 Francestown. Cong. Ch. and Soc $25; Dea. 11. B. Fisher, 5; C. B. R., SOc 30 50 Hampstead. Cong. Cli 15 85 Hancock. Mrs. Mary H Washburn 5 00 Hanover Centre. Cong. Co 9 00 Hopkinton. D. S 60 Keene. First Cong. Sab Scli.$65.33; Elisha Rand, $5; S. P. Cook, $2; SOc 72 83 Kensington. Cong. Sah. Scli 2 00 Marlborough. Ladies, b. ot C.and $2. fer Freight 2 00 Nashua. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 17 86 New Ipswich. J. W. C 50 Stratbam. Cong. Cli. and Soc 24 36 Sullivan. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Troy. M. W. Wheeler 2 50 West Lebanon. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $17.28; O.S.M.andDea.H.F. $1 1828 VERMONT, $624.92. Bradford. R. F 50 Brandon. Cong. Cli 23 17 Burlington. J. P 50 Cabot. Cong. Cli. and Soc 11 40 Cambridge. Madison Safford 89 88 Cambridge. Mrs. Mary Waterhouse, $5; John Kinsley, $5; Jesse Mudgeit, $3 13 00 Uhester. Cong. Cli. and Soc 27 00 East Hardwick. Ladies, by J. D Bell 2 25 Essex. Mrs.L.C.B 100 Hartford. Cong. Cli. and Soc 107 17 Jericho Centre. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 05 Johnson. Cong. Cli. and Soc 13 50 Ludlow. Mrs.L.H.C 100 FOR DECEMBER, 1878. Lunenburgh. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $8; Mrs. S.S.J.SOc $850 Manchester. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to consi. REV. ALBERT C. REED L. M 50 50 North Ferrisbuigh. ESTATE of Sylvia Dean, by J. M. and W. L. Dean, Executors 18 00 North Thesford. Mrs. E. G. Baxter 2 00 Peacham. Cong. Ch. and Soc 36 43 Peru. Cong. Ch. and Soc . 11 33 Pittaford. Mrs. N. P. Humphrey 10 00 Pomfret. Cong. Cli. and Soc 4 00 Richmond. Cong. Cli. and Soc 14 37 Roxbury. Cong. Cli. and Soc 12 55 Saint Johosbury. South Cong. Cli 95 06 Saxtons River. Mrs. A. C 1 00 Shelburn. James D. Duncan, bal. to coust. FANNY R. DUNCAN L. M 5 00 South Royalsion. Rev. S. K. B. P. $1; Dea. A.S.P.$1 200 Townahend. Mrs. Annie Rice 5 00 Waitsfield. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $13.71; Mrs. A. B. Fish, $5; S. H. R. $1 19 71 Weatherafleld Centre. Mrs. E. Chamberlin 5 00 Westminster. Cong. Cli 9 05 MASSACHUSETTS, $3,785.60. Acton. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 00 Andover. H. J. P. $1; Mrs. F. H. B. SOc.; Miss S. E. J. SOc 2 09 Ashburnham. Cong. Cli. and Soc 28 28 Aslifield. Ladies of Cong. Cli., blil. of C., and $2.Sofor Freight 2 50 Auburndale. Cong. Cli. and Soc 123 36 Beichertown. Mrs. R. W. Walker 5 00 Boston. S. D. Smith, $200; , $5; Mrs. N. B. Curtis, $2C0; Mt. Vernon Cli. and Soc. $155.05; Union Cli. and Soc. $82.16; Chas. Nichols, $30. to const. MRS. W. W. Fsiosr L. M.; Mrs. L. A. Bradliury, 25c... 697 21 Boston Highlands. Cong. Cli. and Soc., to coast. RET. ALBERT H. DUNNING L. Id.... 45 00 Boxhorough. Cong. Cli. and Soc 8 00 Boylaton. Ladies, bliL of C Bradford. Young Ladies of Bradford Sem.. 23 50 Brocton. Sab. Sch. Teacher, $6; A Friend, $2.50. Jbr City Missien Work, Nashville, Tenn.; Mrs. B. Sandford, Jr., libi. of C.; Porter Sab. Soli. bundle of C 8 50 Brookline. H. R. N 2 00 Bockland. A. Thayer 1 00 Cambridgeport. Pilgrim Cli. $146.25; Ladies of Pilgrim Cli. blil. of C. and $1.25 for Freight; Mrs. G. D. C. SOc 148 00 Campello. $10 for City Mission Work, Nashville, Tenn 10 00 Charlestown. Ivory Littlefield 40 00 Chelsea. First Cong. Ch. and Soc. $68.96; Third Cong. Cli. and Soc. $19.87 88 83 Coleraine. Mrs. P. B. S 1 00 Danvers. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. $92.22; Maple St. Sab. 5db. $20 . 112 22 East Bridgewater. Mrs. S. D. Shaw 3 00 Easthampton. Payson Cong. Cli 427 SIt East Weymouth. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Fitchburg. Rolistone Cong. Cli. by Mrs. C. W. Hubbard, $10; Rollstone Cong. Cli. by A Friend, $10 Freetown. Cong. Cli. and Soc Groton. Elizabeth Farnsworth Hanover. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc Harwich. 2 bbls. of C Holbrook. Mrs. C. S. Holbrook and Daugh- ter, 2 libls, ot C. and $lofor Freight 10 00 Holliston. A. W. M 51 Hopkinton. First Cong. Sab. Scli $54 Cong. Sab. 5db. $25, for Student Aid, Tel- ladega C.; Ladies, box of C Indian Orchard. Cong. Cli. and Soc Ipawich. W. H. K Jamaica Plain. A Friend, Lakeville. B. K.... 20 00 30 00 10 00 29 2S 79 00 22 S8 50 400 1 00 58 Receipts. Lawrence. Central Cong. Oh $35 00 Leicester. Mrs. C. C. Partridge 5 00 Littleton. Ladies, box of C Lowell. E. S. Hunt, $10 ; C. C. B., $1; Mrs. S. L. P., SOc 11 59 Lynn. Central Cong. Cli. and Soc., $25.65; First Cong. Cli. and Soc., $7.50 33 15 Maiden. First Cli. and Soc., $43.91; Rev. J.C.,50c 4441 Marlborough. W. N. H 1 00 Methuen. A. P. C 50 Merrimac. John K. Sargent 2 00 Middleborough. Cong. Cli. and Soc 8 98 Milford. B. of C Milibury. Second Cong. Ch. and Soc 13 41 Natick. First Cong. Sab. Sch., fore Teecher 50 00 New Bedford. A Lady Friend, 20 00 Newburyport. Mrs. Sarah W. Hale, $100; Philip H. Lunt, $25.50 ; Whitefield Cong. Cli., $9.70 ; Miss P. N., 60 cents 135 80 Newton. Elliot Cli. and Soc ... 17 32 North Abington. Barrel of C., and $1.50 for City Misseon Work, Nashville, Teen 1 50 Northampton. A Friend, $150; W. K. Wright, $30 180 00 North Adams. Cong. Ch 26 57 Nortliborough. Evan. Cong Cli. for Student Aid, Atlenta U 50 0~ North Brookfield. Union Cli. and Friends 46 55 Norton. Trin. Cong. Cli. and Soc., $38.85; and Sab. Sch., $15 53 85 North Leominster. Cong. Cli. and Soc 15 74 North Woburn. Cong. Cli. and Soc 14 35 Oxford. First Cong. Sab..Sch 15 28 Pepperell. Cong. Ch. by John Loring 10 00 Plymouth. C.W.P 50 Randolph. Cong. Ch. and Soc 76 37 Heading. Old South Cong. Cli 9 00 Rockland. $50 for City Mission Work, Nashville, Tenn 50 00 Royalston. Ladies Soc., 2 bliSs, of C. Salem. J. P. A Saxonville. Ladies of Edward Cli., 2 libls. C. Scitnate. Mrs. Ellen M. Green, to const. REV. WM. B. GREEN L. M 30 00 Sharon. B.of C Sheffield. First Cong. Soc 16 31 Somerville. Miss M. C. S 1 00 South Abington. Ladies Sewing Circle, $50; Miss S. H. Champney. $5; Miss C. H. Whitman, $4, for City Mission Work, Nashville, Teen 59 00 Southampton. Cong. Oh. and Soc 14 53 South Attleboro. Mrs. Harriet Draper, b. of C South Boston. Phillips Cong. Cli 51 59 South Deertield. Mrs. M. B. Richardson... 50 South Framingham. Central Cong. Cli. edt 25 00 Stockbridge. Cong. Cli 58 02 Stoughton. Mrs. B. E. Capen, $2; Cong. Cli. and Soc., $1.10 3 10 Sunderland. Dorcas Soc., for .4tlanta U 5 00 Sutton. Cong. Cli. and Soc 24 75 Topafield. Cong. Cli. and Soc 65 00 Townsend. Cong Cli. and Soc., $13.25; S.F. W.,50c 13 75 Wakefield. Cong. Cli. and Soc 90 48 Watertown. Mrs. J. G. Robinson, $1.20; Others, $1; Corban Soc. 2 blils. of C 2 20 Westhorongli. Rev. J. W. B 60 West Boylston. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $63 C. F. W. $1 64 00 Weatford. Cong. Cli. and Soc 13 00 Westfield. Miss H. B. Dickinson, $50; Mrs. J.F.. $1 51 00 West Haverhull. Cong. Cli. and Soc 6 50 West Medford. Cong. Cli., $16.48; A Friend, $5 21 48 West Medway. Cong. Sab. Sch 26 48 Westminster. Mrs. H. G. Whitney 5 00 Whitinaville. S. A. D SO Williamatown. First Cong. Cli 5 00 Wiuchendon. A Friend of the Freedmen, $50; A Friend, $5Atlanta Soc. for Atlanta !i, $4.Mrs. M. D. B., $1 60 00 Woburn. Mrs. M. J. Keyes(Memorial offering) to const. Miss R. M. LEATH, L. M 30 00 Worcester. Plymouth Cli. (of which $2 for Beree U), $48.21; A Friend, $1; Mrs. M.P.J.,SOc $4971 RHODE ISLAND, $152.76. Barrington. Cong. Cli. and Soc 50 00 Peace Dale. Cong Cli 1000 Providence. Pilgrim Cong. Cli. $89.16; Ladies, b. of C. and $2.50 for Freight; H. D. & Co., SOc.; S. P. P., 60c 92 76 CONNECTICUT, $1,478.83. Abington. Cong. Cli. (of which $1 from SC) 1000 Avon. M. E. B 1 00 Berlin. Cong. Cli 12 09 Bethel. Samuel Kyle 9 75 Branford. Cong. Cli 15 00 Bridgeport. A Friend, $25; Park St. Cong. Cli. $13; Tbeo. Quittmeyer, $5. ... 43 00 Brookfield Centre. Cong. Cli. and Soc 13 00 Clinton. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to conat. ALVA H. PIERsoN and DYRE C. MANWARREN, L. Ms 73 99 New Preston. Cong. Cli 31 00 Coichester. Mrs. M. J. U SO Collinavile. Mrs. Edward Sears, for Slu- dent Aid, Talladega C 10 00 Cornwall. Cong. Cli. $7.18; U. H. C. ...... 7 78 Danbury. Second Cong. Cli 3 00 Durham. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 30 83 Eastford. Cong. Cli. $10.69; and Sab 5db. $2.39 13 05 East Hartford. First Cong. Cli 12 00 Ellington. Edwin Talcott 5 00 Enfold. North Cong. Sab. Sch. and Soc 5 00 East Wallingford. Mrs. Benj. Hall 2 00 Greenwich. Miss Sarah Mead 100 00 Groton. Cong. Cli 6 00 Haddam. Cong. Cli 10 00 Hamden. Friends, $8; H. H. 50c 8 50 Hanover. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to conat. REV. NATHANIEL G. BONNEY and NATRAN C. BILLINGaL. Ms 6000 Hartford. Students of Then. Sem. $28.26. Mrs. Benton, $10. for City Mtssien Work, Nashville, Tenn.Mrs. J. 0. $1 39 26 Hebron. Cong. Cli 21 08 Higganum. Cong. Soc 20 00 Lebanon. L.H 1 00 Lisbon. Cong. Cli. and Soc 8 06 Madison. Cong. Cli 1 85 Middletown. First Cli 26 25 Milford. First Cli. and Soc 5 30 Milton. Cong. Cli , 5 00 Morris. Cong. Cli 7 00 Moodus. Mrs Eugene W. Chaffee, $5.00; Amass Day Chaffee, $3.56 8 S6 Mount Carmel. Cong. Sali. 52h., for Sta. dent Aid, Atlanta U so 00 New Haven. Third Cong. Cli. $22.78; Amos Townsend, $40; A Friend, $3; Individuals, $1.50, by S. S. T.; C. A. S., $1.10; Mrs. H.C., Sic 68 89 New London. First Cli., Quarterly Coil 48 90 New Milford. Cong. Cli. and Soc 58 75 Newtown. Miss E. Leavenworth 5 00 North Greenwich. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to const. MRS. MARY J. KNAPP L. M 38 66 North Stamford. Mrs. Emily Waterburys Sab. Sch. Class 5 00 Norwich Town. Firs; Cong. Cli 20 00 Old Lyme. Mrs. Mary Sill, Package of bed- ding and $lfor Freight 1 00 Plainville. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to coust. DANIEL CLARK L. M 43 00 Poquonock. A Friend 2 00 Saybrook. Second Cong. Cli 17 00 Somers. Cong. Oh. $12.85; C. B P. SOc... 13 35 South Norwalk. Mrs. G. P. A SO Soutliport. Cong. Cli 98 41 South Windsor. First Cong. Cli 25 00 Stafford. Mrs. T. H. Thresher 1 50 Stanwich. A Friend. 1 00 Stonington. Second Cong. Cli 57 00 Suffield. First Cong. th. and Soc 13 34 Taftville. Cong Cli 10 00 Thomaston. Cong. Cli 21 15 ]i?eceipt8. Thompsonville. Dennis Pease Tolland. J. L. C Washington. Mrs. S. N. and Others, $14.50:F.A. F., $1 Westfield. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to const. GEORGE E. DANIELSON L. M Westford. Cong. Oh West Hartford. Cong. Oh West Haven. Mrs. E. C. Kimball West Meriden. W E. Benham West Winsted. Second Cong: Oh Wetherefield. Cong Oh. and Soc WindsorLocks. Mrs.C. EChaffee Winsted. Cong. Oh Winthrop: Miss C. B. and Mrs. M. A. J.. $2 00 1 00 15 50 45 00 o no 68 5 00 10 00 60 23 35 15 25 00 46 94 1 00 NEW YORK, $1,191.38. Adams. Mrs.D.R.S.C 100 Alfred Centre. Mrs. Ida F. Kenyon 5 00 Binghamton. W. Halbert 5 00 Brooklyn. Clinton Av. Cong. Oh 404 28 Canandaigna. A Friend 3 00 Chateaugay. Joseph Shaw 5 00 Clifton Springs Sanitarium. H. 0 5 00 Coxsackie. P. H. Silvester 5 00 Deansville. L ~ 00 Dryden. 5. 0. C 45 Durham. Mrs. H. Ingraham 2 00 Eden. Mrs. Hannah McNett 2 00 Ellenville. Mrs. M. B. Holt 5 00 East Bloomfield. R. B. Goodwin 6 00 Fairport. Cong. Oh 40 00 Franklin. Mrs. I. H. Penfield 2 00 Fulton. A Friend. 1 00 Gaines. BEQUEST of Ellen C. Bidelman, by Charles Bidelman, Ex 200 00 Goshen. A Friend. 1 00 Jamesport. Ladies of Cong. Oh. blil. of C. Marcellus. Mrs. L. H 1 00 Mexico. M. Midlam 3 00 Moravia. Cong. Oh 3 81 Mount Vernon. I. Van Santvoord 10 00 Felts Mills. Joel A. Hnbbard 30 CO New York. Mrs. H. Ireland, $lOOfor Indian M.J. S. Holt, $10; I. M. H., $3; B. S., SOc 113 50 Niagara. First Cong. Oh 10 00 Niagara Falls. Dea. Win. H. Childs 10 00 Oriskany Falls. Joseph C. Griggs 24 00 Ovid. David W. Kinne 10 00 Palmyra. Mrs. Mary A. Woodward, $30; L. H. Foster, $3; G. G. J.,$1; A. L., $1... 37 00 Perry Centre. Ladies Renev. Soc.. $14.50; and b. of C., by Mrs. G. K. Sheldon, 8cc. 14 50 Penn Yan. First Presb. Oh.. for Student Aid, Atlanta U . 18 00 Rans mville. John Powley 5 00 Rusliford. W. W 51 Sag Harbor. Charles N. Brown, to const. Mas. JOHN H. HUNT L. M 30 00 Saratoga Springs. Nathan Hickok, $2; Mrs. A. M. W. and Mrs. S. S.. $1. .. 3 00 Spencerport. Cong. Oh. Sab. Sch 14 25 Verona. Roswell Sage 100 00 Warsaw. Cong. Oh 19 58 West Bloomfield. Cong. Oh. and Soc 28 50 West Camden. E. M. H 1 00 West Ohazy. Rev. L. Prindle 5 00 Windsor. Rev. J. S. P.. $1; Mrs. J. W., $1. 2 00 NEW JERSEY, $65.10. Avondale. G. R Newark. A Friend, $10; Individuals, by R. D. Weeks, $4.50 Westfield. Mrs. J. W. Champlin, $50, for Student Aid, Talladega 0.Mrs. J. XV. 0., SOc PENNSYLVANIA, $44. Allentown. Rev. C. 1W Canton. H. Sheldon Clark. Mrs. B. Dickson and Miss Eliza Dickson Kennett Square. H. M. D Providence. Welsh Cong. Oh. and Soc..... WestAlexander. 50 14 50 50 50 1 00 5 00 25 00 1 00 2 00 10 00 59 OHIO, $342.47. Austinburgh. Cong. Oh., for Tougcloo, Mtss $10 00 Berea. James S. Smedley 5 00 BentOn. E5TATE of Gervase Spring, by P. Hitchcock, Ex 50 00 Burton. Cong. Oh., for Tougalon, Miss 6 60 Oardington. D. C. H 50 Cincinnati. Rev. R. S. R 50 Clareudon. Mrs. and Miss Barber, for Thu- game, Miss 2 00 Cleveland. Euclid Ave. Cong. Oh., for Tou- game, Miss 20 00 Collamer. 1W. Wemple 2 00 Onyahoga Falls. Cong. Oh., $11.40; R. J. T., $1 12 40 Four Corners. First Cong. Oh 4 65 Geneva. Mrs. Susan Webster, $5; W. C. P. ~ $1 600 Greensburgh. Mrs. H. B. Harrington.~.... 10 00 Greenfield. Win. Smith 5 00 Hampden. Cong. Oh. for Tougalon, Miss 3 85 Harrison. Dr. J. D. Bowles S f~0 Hudson. D. Trowliridge 4 00 Huntsbnrgh. Cong. Oh. $13; Mr. and MIS. Q. Phelps, $4; Miss V. R. P. for Indian M., $1 18 00 Leetonia. D. A. G 1 00 Lenox. Cong. Ch.for Tougaloo, Miss 6 49 Madison. Mrs. Brewster, $2; Win. H. $1; Rev. J. 0. F., $1. for Tougaloo, Miss. Mrs. H.K.B.,$1 500 Mansfield. Miss 5. 1W. 5 50 Marietta. Rev. I. 1W. P 50 Marysville. R. L. Wilcox 1 00 Medina. Ladies Renev. Soc. for Student Aid, Tougaleo, Miss 7 60 Newark. T. 1W. and Others 1 50 North Eaton. Mrs. M. Cakes 1 00 Norwalk. Rev. A. N 1 00 Panisville. D. D 50 Radnor. Troedahewdar Welsh Cong. Oh. $12.16; Edward D. Jones, $5 17 16 Buggies. First Cong. Oh. $25.30; C. B. Ruggles, $3; Mrs. Charlotte Buggies, $2. 30 30 Sandusky. 1W. L. P 25 Saybrook. Cong. Oh., for Tougateo, Miss 5 17 Sharon Centre Miss B. L. Rogers 5 00 Strongsville. B. Lyman, $10; L. S. $1, for Tougasen, Miss 11 00 Sulphur Springs. Jacob Schoell, $5; 1W. Murphy, $2 for Tougalen, Miss 7 0 0 Twinsbnrg. Cong. Sab. Sch. for Student Aid, Atlanta U 18 00 Wardsworth. George Lyman 10 00 Wauseon. Cong. Oh 14 50 Wellington. S. R. Lanudon, $10; Rev. J. H. Daly. $5; B. F. Webster, $5; C. Phelps, $3; S. B. Wilcox, $1.10; H. W., $1; I. H. W., $l.for Tougaloo, Miss 26 50 Weislifield. Mrs. 1W. P 50 Willonghby.~ Mrs CA. 0 50 Wooster. Daniel Bates..., 2 00 INDIANA, $6. Evansville. A. L. R .... 1 00 Liber. J. B. Wells 5 00 ILLINOIS, $382.75. Chicago. First Cong. Oh. Mon. Con 25 43 Dover. Den. Geo. Wells 5 00 Farminglon. Phineas Chapman 44 00 Galesburg. ESTATE of Warren C. Willard, by Prof. T. B. Willard, Ex 6 50 Geneseo. Young Ladies Miss. Soc 8 00 Highlands. Cong. Oh, ... 25 00 Kankakee. F. S. H 1 00 Kewanee. 0. L. C 1 00 Lodi. Cong. Oh 5 00 Oak Park. Cong. Oh 27 5 Payson. Cong. Oh. ($25 of which from Rev. S. A. Wallace) 30 00 Plainfield. J. N 1 00 Polo. Mrs. P. aud daughter, for City Mis- sion Work, Nashville, Tenn 10 00 Port Byron. Ladies, by Mrs. H. for Touga- leo, Miss 2 50 60 Recen~ts. Quincy. L. Kingman $ 5 00 Ridgefield. J. Gakey . I so Rochelle. W. H. H 50 Rockford. Second Cong. Oh 151 77 Rockford. Ladies of First Cong Ch. for Student Aid, Talladega C 15 00 Roscoe. Cong. Oh. edt 1 00 Rosemoud. Cong. Oh 5 00 Turner. Mrs. R. Currier 5 00 Waikegan. Young Ladies Miss. Soc 5 00 Wheaton. J. H ... 1 00 MICHIGAN, $1,134.31. Adrian. ESTATE of Sarah M. Wolcott, by W. W. Brewster, Ex 912 17 Alpena. Miss J. F. F 50 Dexter. Dennis Warner 10 00 Flint. 1.0 100 Greenville. Cong. Oh 42 24 Joyfield. Friends, by Rev. J. S. Fisher. 12 00 Kalamazoo. First Cong. Oh, $48.67 to coust. Mas. MAnY LATTA L. M.; Mrs. H. C. B., 50 cents 49 17 Lansing. A. C. Gower 25 00 Milford. First Cong. Oh. and Soc 1 00 Morenci. Mrs. L. A. Van Antwerp 5 00 Summit. Ladies Aux. Soc 4 23 Whitehall. Cong. Oh 7 00 Vassar. Mrs. 0. W. Selden 5 00 Vermontville. Young Ladies M. and S. Soc.,for Tatladega C . 60 00 IOWA, $159.03. Bowens Prairie. Cong. Sab. Sch. concert 1 00 Chester. Cong. Oh. $19.17 Ladies of Cong. Oh., bbl. of C. for Straight U. & $2ferfreight 21 17 Des Moines. Rev. M. N. Miles and family, Thanksgiving offering 7 00 Dubuque. Cong. Oh 37 00 Fairfax. First Cong. Oh 9 00 Floris. Mary and Martha 2 00 Genoa Bluff. Cong. Oh 7 35 Grinneil. Cong. Oh 32 00 Iowa City. Annie Overholt 10 00 Lewis. Cong. Oh 11 83 Mendon. Four Mile Honse Sab. Sch 4 95 Monticello. Childrens Band,for Mendi Al 23 New Hampton. Ladies Miss. Soc 1 50 Osage. A. W 50 Parkersburgh. Cong. Oh 5 00 Shenandoah. Rev. W. P 50 Sherrills Mount. Rev. J. R 1 00 Spencer. Cong. Oh 2 00 Union. Cong. Oh 5 00 WISCONSIN, $109.87. Baraboo. Mrs. C. P 50 Beloit. Second Cong. Oh., $8.47; First Cong Oh. edt, $1 9 47 Manitowoc. Mrs. M. W. Mabbs 5 00 Milton. Cong. Oh 12 30 Milwaukee. Spring St. Cong. Oh., $34.10; Horace G. Story, $5 39 10 Pewaukee. Cong. Oh 13 00 Rockland. Thomas H. Eynon. Whitewater. Cong. Sab. Sch. for S5~4et 50 Aid, Fisk U 25 00 KANSAS, $1.00. Burlingame. A Friend, 1 00 Austin. MINNESOTA, $161.13. Cong. Ch . 23 64 Faribault. Cong. Oh 42 05 Mankato. Cong. Oh 4 20 Minneapolis. Plymouth Oh 15 23 Morris. Cong. Oh 1 33 Northfield. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Talladega C . 33 68 Plainview. Cong. Oh., $34, and Sab. Sch., $6 40 00 Saint Peter. Rev. T. S. W 1 00 NEBRASKA, $26.25. Columbus. Mrs. T. C 50 Green Island. Cong. Oh 5 00 Milford. Rev. H. A. French 5 00 Nebraska City. A Friend, $11.; Wom- ans Miss. Soc. $3K. W. S. S. Class, $l.Sofor Cat. Chinese AlLittle boys, 25c. for Dakota IndianAl 15 75 COLORADO. $17.80. Denver. First Cong. Oh. $17.30; J. L. P. StIc $17 84* MISSOURI, $35. Index. W. B. Wills, $10; Others, $2 12 00 North Springfield. Cong. Sab. Sch 10 00 Saint Louis. First Cong. Oh. adt 2 (K) Sedalia. Cong. Oh 7 00 Warrensburg. Rent 4 00 MARYLAND, $100. Baltimore. First Cong. Ch 100 OU KENTUCKY, SOc. Point IsabeL S. R. D. jar Tougatoo, Miss.... 50 TENNESSEIi, $22.40. Memphis. La Moyne Sob 22 40 NORTH CAROLINA, $142.65. Franklinton. M. A. H 1 00 Raleigh. Washington Sob 23 00 Wilmington. Normal Sob. $113; First Cong. Oh. $5.65 118 66 SOUTH CAROLINA, $289.21. Charleston. Avery Inst 280 26 GEORGIA, $575.15. Atlanta. Storrs Sch., $466.85; Atlanta Uni. varsity, $87.50 574 16 Brunswick. Risley School,forAlendi Al.... 1 00 ALABAMA, $300.25. Mobile. Emerson Inst 24 25 Montgomery. Pub. Sch. Fund 175 06 Selma. Rens,$l00; E. C. S., $1 . 101 00 MISSISSIPPI, $16.9S. Duck Hill. Friends, by R. McOutcheon, for Tougatoo, Miss 2 20 Tougaloo. Tougalon U.. $14.25; D. I. M., SOc 14 75 CALIFORNIA, $227.65. San Francisco. Receipts of the California Chinese Mission 227 66 _________ $2. A Friend 2 00 CANADA, $10. Sherbrooke. Thomas S. Morey 10 00 SCOTLAND, $50. Glasgow, 001. 5. F. Cooper, U. S. Consul, for Fisk U 50 00 Total 13,911.16 Total from Oct. lst to Dec. 31st $29,748.46 H. W. HUBBARD, Asat. Trees. RECEIVED FOR DEBT. Belfast, Me. Win. 0. Poor $5 00 Bristol, N. H. Friend, 1 00 Hanover, N. H. Rev. Samuel P. Leeds, D. D 25 00 Harrisville, N. H. D. Farwell 2 00 Manchester, N. H. Rev. C. W. Wallace, D. D 30 00 Northwood, N. H. Rev. E. B. Pike 5 00 Castleton, Vt. Rev. E. T. Hooker 5 00 Amherst, Mass. Prof. J. K. Obickering.... 25 00 Andover, Mass. South Cong Oh 5000 Attleborough, Mass. Ebenezer Carpenter to conet. Mus. ELIZABETH L. C. KETTEB, Mats. SARAH C. FonD, and Mats. ABBY P. SEAns, L. Ms 100 00 Attleborough Falls, Mass. Central Cong. Oh. and Soc 25 00 Easthampton, Mass. E. H. Sawyer, $100; Mrs. E. H. Sawyer, $100; Payson Cong. Oh. $41.62 241 62 Fall River, Mass. Third Cong. Oh 25 00 Jamaica Plain, Mass. Central Cong. Soc. ($30 of which from E. L. Tead to conet. Ray. EDWARD S. TEAD L M.) 200 00 Lawrence, Mass. Lawrence St. Oh 25 00 Milibury, Mass. Second Cong. Oh., by Rev. J. L. Ewell 50 00 Newburyport, Mass. Philip H. Lunt. . 25 00 Newburyport, Mass. Prospect St. Oh 14 32 Newton, Mass. J. K. Richardson 10 00 North Dighton, Masi. Cong. Oh 25 00 Peabody, Mass. South Oh. and Soc 100 00 Randolph, Mass. Rev. J. C. Labarre 100 00 Receipts. Reading, Ma is. A Friend. $ 5 00 South Plymouth, Mass. Rev. A8a Mann 5 00 South Weymouth, Mass. Rev. George F. Stanton 25 00 Watertown, Mass. Rev. C. L. Woodworth, to const. Miss EMMA P. WELLMAN, Miss LYDIA P. AULD, and Mus. MACIA T. CHAD SEYL. MS 10000 Watertown, Mass. Miss L. P. Auld 5 00 Wellesley, Mass. L. B. Horton 10 00 Westford, ilass. Rev. E. R. Hodgman ~ Oo Ansonia, Conn. Collected by Mrs. Mary Terry .... 25 00 Berlin, Conn. Collected byAbbyllubbard 30 00 Bridgeport, Conn. Ladies, by Mrs. C. R. Palmer 27 50 Fast Haddam, Coun. Ladies of Cong. Cli., by Mrs. F. li. McCall 25 00 Ellington, Conn. Edwin Talcott, to const. CHARLES TaLCOYT, L. M 25 00 Enfield, Coon. Sabbatb.school, by Miss A. E. Johnson 25 00 Fairfield, Coon. Christmas Greetings. 5 00 Farmington, Coun. Cong. Ch 25 00 Greenfield Hill, Conn. Cong. Cli 14 50 Groton, Conn. Collected by Mrs. M. W. Brown 26 84 Hanover, Coun. A few ladies, by Mrs. D. A. Allen 25 00 Killingly, Conn. E. F. Jenuks 5 00 Moodus, Conn. Mrs. E. W. Chaffee, to conat. AMAsA DAY CHAFFEE, L. M 25 00 New Haven, Cono. Christmas offering. 2 00 New London, Conn. Ladies 01 Second Cong. Ch 25 (10 New Milford. Conn. Cong. Sab. Sch. $25; Collected by Mrs. Rev. J. B. Bonar, $23.25 48 25 New Preston, Coun. Friends, by flea. S. J. Averitl 25 00 Norfolk, Conn. Friends. 25 OJ Norwich. Conn. M. Pierce 500 00 Norwich, Conn. A few Ladies of Broadway Ch. by Mrs. H. G. Ripley 17 00 Norwich, Conn. Othniel Gager 10 00 Old Lyme, Coon. Individuals, Cong. Ch.. by Mrs. N. S Lee - 11 00 Plainville, Cono. Friends, by Mrs. L. P. Buell. ($30 of which to coost. Mus. ELIZA. BETH C. CLAPP L. M.) 46 00 Pomfret, Coun. Collected by Mrs. C. E. Alexander 34 00 Prospect, Conn. Cong. Cli 25 00 South Britain, Coon. Cong. Ch. and Soc... 14 00 Thomaston, Coon. A Friend 2u 00 Watertown, Coon. Friends, by Mrs. James Loveland 6 00 West Hartford, Coon. Cong. Cli 23 00 Wethersfield, Conn. Friends. by Mrs. Jane J. Robbins 25 00 Albany, N. Y. Cong. Ch. by Mrs. J. F. Brad- ley 25 00 Brooklyn. N. V. Mrs. A. S Barnes 25 00 Fairport, N. V. Mrs. C. H. Dickinson 25 00 Gainsville, N. V. Collected by Mrs. B. F. Bristol 25 00 Hopkinton, N. V. Mrs. T. H. Laughlin 12 12 New York, N. V. TheAdvance, by It. B. H. 50 00 Rodman, N. V. John S. Sill 25 00 Syracuse, N. V. Ladies of Plymouth Cong. Ch. By Mrs. Rev. J. C. Holbrook 25 00 Syracuse. N. Y. Mrs. F. Townsend 20 00 Newark, N. J. Rev. G. M. Boynton 25 00 Marietta, Ohio. A. S. Nye 2 00 Orwell, Ohio. Rev. Win. T. Richardson 5 00 Sandusky. Ohio. Mrs. M. L. Pool 5 00 St. Clairavile, Ohio. Win. Lee, Sen 10 00 Lyndon, Ill. John M. Hamilton, $2.50; Others, SOc ~ oc Plymouth, Ill. L. A. Cook 10 00 Mattawan, Mich. Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Comstock 5 00 Three Oaks, Mich. Mrs. C. J. Parry 10 00 Rosendale, Wis. DANI.L CLARK, tocoost. himself L. M 50 00 Council Bluffs, Iowa. B. T 1 00 Cawlier City, Kansas. Collected by SIrs. H. H. Barr 6 50 61 Northfield, Miun. A. W. Skinner $ 5 00 (Ireen Island, Neb. Mrs. C. Seccomb 5 00 Savannah, Ga. Miss F. A. Twichell 10 00 Baldwin Co., Ala. Poor White 1 00 Total 2,748.95 Previously acknowledged in Nov. recetpts.6,784.20 Total 9,533.15 FOR TILLOYSON COLLEGIATE AND NORMAL INSTITUUE, TEXAS. East Hartford, Conn. Francis Hanmer. ... $100 00 Greenwich, Conn. Allen Howe, $25; L. P. Hubbard. $10; Joseph E. Brush, $1 40 00 (leriden, Conn. W. E. B. Benham, $10; Dea. Norman B. Wood, $5; Julius W. Yale, $5 20 00 New Haven, Coun. SIaiEoN E. BALDWIN, SAMUEL MILLER, Miss E. W. DAvENPOHY, $30 each to coust. themselves L. M.s Mrs. G. W. Bacon, $20; SWells Williams, $10; Miss M. ~. y., $1 121 00 New Haven, Conn. Amos Townsend...... 15 00 Windsor Locks, Coun. Mrs. H. E. Coffin... 10 00 Winsted, Conn. Mrs. Jennette C. Stillman. 10 00 Fort Howard, Wis. Mrs. C. L. A. Tank.... 25 00 Total .341 00 Previously acknowledged in Nov. receipts.. 605 00 Total.. 948 00 RECEIPTS OF THE CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION. F. PALACHE, Treasurer. Frees Sept. 20th tell Dec. 20th, 1878. 1. From our auxiliaries: Petalumaol which, from Miss M. C. Wa- terbury, for erection 01 school-room, $50 $59 15 StocktonMrs. M. C. Brown, $2 ; L. Lang- don, $2; M. S. Thresher, $2; Mrs. E. Hitchcock, $5; M. J. Nightingale, $2; Mrs. C. E. Ellsworth, $2; Chinese Pu- pils, $4 Total 2. From Annual Memberships157775: Grass ValleyRev. G. F. G. Morgan OaklandEleven Chinese brethren PescaderoMrs. W. C. Merritt Rio VistaRev. G. H. Smith SacramentoMrs. S. Denton San FranciscoRev. T. K. Noble, $2; three Chinese brethren, $6 157579: BeniciaMrs. C. A. Colby, $2; Mrs. L. M. Dougherty, $2 ; Mrs. N. P. Smith, $2 OaklandRev. S. V. Blakeslee, $2 ; Rev. G. Mooar, fi. D., $2.50, Rev. J. T. Wills, $2 RedwoodRev. H. F. Jewett Rio Vista-Mrs. J. H. Gardner RiversideMrs. Ellen G. Cross San FranciscoJames E. Ager, $2; Mrs. T. K. Noble, $2; Mrs. F. D. Sawyer, $2; flea. S. S. Smith, $2 . San MateoRev. J. H. Warren, fi. fi., $2; Mrs. J. H. Warren, $2; Mrs. Edna M. Watkins, $2 19 00 78 15 2 00 22 00 2 00 200 200 8 00 6 00 6 50 2 00 205 2 00 800 6 00 Total 70 50 3. From churches: Redwood Cong. Church 10 00 San FranciscoPlymouth Church 25 00 San Francisco Bethany Church (Chinese) 4 00 Santa Cml Cong. Church 10 00 Total 49 00 4. From individuals: BeniciaMrs. N. P. Smith 5 00 Bangor, MeMrs. F. U. Coe 2S 00 Total 30 00 Grand total $227 65 62 lVbrk, Statistic8, iVa?d8, dec. AiM AND WORK. To preach ~the Gospel to the poor. It originated in a sympathy with the almost friendless slaves. Since Emancipation it has devoted its main efforts to preparing the FREEDMEN for their duties as citizens and Christians in America and as missionaries in Africa. As closely related to this, it seeks to benefit the caste-persecuted CHINEsE in America, and to co-operate with the Government in its humane and Christian policy towards the INDIANs. It has also a mission in AnucA. STATISTICS. CHURCHES: In the SoothIn Ya. 1; N. C., 5; S. C., 2; Ga., 12; Ky., 7; Tenn., 4; Ala., 13; La., 12; Miss., 1; Kansas, 2; Texas, 5. Africa, 1. Among the Indians, 1. Total 66. INSTITUTIONs FOUNDED, FOSTERED OR SUSTAINED IN THE SoUTH.Chartered: Hampton, Va.; Berea, Ky.; Talladega. Ala. Atlanta, Ga.; Nashville, Tenn.; Tougaloo, Miss.; New Orleans, La.; and Austin, Texas, S. Graded or Normal Schools: at Wilmington, Raleigh, N. C.; Charleston, Greenwood, S. C.; Macon, Atlanta, Ga.; Montgomery, Mobile, Athens, Selma, Ala.; Memphis, Teun., 11. Other Schools, 18. Total 37. TEACHERS, MISsIoNARIEs AND ASSISTANTSAmong the Freedmen, 231; among the Chinese, 17; among the Indians, 17; in Africa, 14. Total, 279. STUDENTSIn Theology, 88; Law, 17; in College Course, 106; in other studies, 7,018. Total, 7,229. Scholars, taught by former pupils of our schools, estimated at 100,000. INDIANS under the care of the Association, 13,000. WANTS. 1. A steady INCREASE of regular income to keep pace with the growing work in the South. This increase can only be reached by regular and larqer contributions from the churches the feeble as well as the strong. 2. ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS for our higher educational institutions, to accommodate the in- creasing numbers of students; MEETING HOUSES, for the new churches we are organizing; MORE MINISTERS, cultured and pious, for these churches. 3. HELP FOR YOUNG MEN, to be educated as ministers here and missionaries to Africa a pressing want. Before sending boxes, always correspond with the nearest A. M. A. office, as below. Nzw YORE.... H. W. Hubbard, Esq., 56 Reade Street. BOSTON Rev. C. L. Woodworth, Room 21, Congregational House. CHICAGO Rev. Jas. Powell, 112 West Washington Street. MAGAZINE. This Magazine will be sent, gratuitously, if desired, to the Missionaries of the Association; to Life Members; to all clergymen who take up collections for the Association; to Snper- intendents of Sabbath Schools; to College Libraries; to Theological Seminaries; to Societies of Inquiry on Missions; and to every donor who does not prefer to take it as a subscriber, and contributes in a year not less than five dollars. Those who wish to remember the AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION in their last Will and Testament, are earnestly requested to use the following FORM OF A BEQUEST. I BEQUEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of dollars in trust, to pay the same in days after my decease to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treas- urer of the American Missionary Association of New York City, to be applied, under the direction of the Executive Committee of the Association, to its charitable uses and purposes.~ The Will should be attested by three witnesses [in some States three are requiredin other States only two], who should write against their names, their places of residence [if in cities, their street and number]. The following form of attestation will answer for every State in the Union: Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said [A. B.] as his last Will and Testament, in presence of us, who, at the request of the said A. B., and in his presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses. In some States it is required that the Will should be made at least two mofiths before the death of the testator

Work, Statistics, Wants, Magazine, Form of a Bequest 62-64

62 lVbrk, Statistic8, iVa?d8, dec. AiM AND WORK. To preach ~the Gospel to the poor. It originated in a sympathy with the almost friendless slaves. Since Emancipation it has devoted its main efforts to preparing the FREEDMEN for their duties as citizens and Christians in America and as missionaries in Africa. As closely related to this, it seeks to benefit the caste-persecuted CHINEsE in America, and to co-operate with the Government in its humane and Christian policy towards the INDIANs. It has also a mission in AnucA. STATISTICS. CHURCHES: In the SoothIn Ya. 1; N. C., 5; S. C., 2; Ga., 12; Ky., 7; Tenn., 4; Ala., 13; La., 12; Miss., 1; Kansas, 2; Texas, 5. Africa, 1. Among the Indians, 1. Total 66. INSTITUTIONs FOUNDED, FOSTERED OR SUSTAINED IN THE SoUTH.Chartered: Hampton, Va.; Berea, Ky.; Talladega. Ala. Atlanta, Ga.; Nashville, Tenn.; Tougaloo, Miss.; New Orleans, La.; and Austin, Texas, S. Graded or Normal Schools: at Wilmington, Raleigh, N. C.; Charleston, Greenwood, S. C.; Macon, Atlanta, Ga.; Montgomery, Mobile, Athens, Selma, Ala.; Memphis, Teun., 11. Other Schools, 18. Total 37. TEACHERS, MISsIoNARIEs AND ASSISTANTSAmong the Freedmen, 231; among the Chinese, 17; among the Indians, 17; in Africa, 14. Total, 279. STUDENTSIn Theology, 88; Law, 17; in College Course, 106; in other studies, 7,018. Total, 7,229. Scholars, taught by former pupils of our schools, estimated at 100,000. INDIANS under the care of the Association, 13,000. WANTS. 1. A steady INCREASE of regular income to keep pace with the growing work in the South. This increase can only be reached by regular and larqer contributions from the churches the feeble as well as the strong. 2. ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS for our higher educational institutions, to accommodate the in- creasing numbers of students; MEETING HOUSES, for the new churches we are organizing; MORE MINISTERS, cultured and pious, for these churches. 3. HELP FOR YOUNG MEN, to be educated as ministers here and missionaries to Africa a pressing want. Before sending boxes, always correspond with the nearest A. M. A. office, as below. Nzw YORE.... H. W. Hubbard, Esq., 56 Reade Street. BOSTON Rev. C. L. Woodworth, Room 21, Congregational House. CHICAGO Rev. Jas. Powell, 112 West Washington Street. MAGAZINE. This Magazine will be sent, gratuitously, if desired, to the Missionaries of the Association; to Life Members; to all clergymen who take up collections for the Association; to Snper- intendents of Sabbath Schools; to College Libraries; to Theological Seminaries; to Societies of Inquiry on Missions; and to every donor who does not prefer to take it as a subscriber, and contributes in a year not less than five dollars. Those who wish to remember the AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION in their last Will and Testament, are earnestly requested to use the following FORM OF A BEQUEST. I BEQUEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of dollars in trust, to pay the same in days after my decease to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treas- urer of the American Missionary Association of New York City, to be applied, under the direction of the Executive Committee of the Association, to its charitable uses and purposes.~ The Will should be attested by three witnesses [in some States three are requiredin other States only two], who should write against their names, their places of residence [if in cities, their street and number]. The following form of attestation will answer for every State in the Union: Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said [A. B.] as his last Will and Testament, in presence of us, who, at the request of the said A. B., and in his presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses. In some States it is required that the Will should be made at least two mofiths before the death of the testator (63 ) SABBATH READINC.Seeing that all Sunday azines and the greater part of religious week- lies have muds secular matter in them, especially adver- tisements, I have thought that there was an obvious want of a weekly paper composed of matter of a hi~h order of excellence and interest, and wholly suitable br I)erusal on the Sabbath-day. Such a papei~ 15 SABBATH READING. Every number contains a first-class sermon, which may be read in meetings where there is no preach- ing service, or at home by persons necessarily detained from church; also muds excellent selected matter, some of which is specially adapted for children. SABBATH READING is a handsome small eight-page paper, suitable in appearance for the parlor table, a nd suitable for binding at the end of the year or half year. It is sent post-pail to any address for 50 cents a year, and stops when subscription expires. A club of five will be supplied for a year for two dollars. This paper, which makes a most acceptable trastate for distribution in prisons, poor-houses, asylums, ships, etc., or in visitation from house to house, is sent post- jaid to any part f the continent at the rate of a dollar per 100 copies. Orders and remittances to be sent to the undersigned. JOHN DOUGALL, WITNEss OFFICE, No. 7 Frankfurt St., New York. The ~Iode1 iI[agazlne.A combination of the entertaining, the useful, and the beautiful, with fine art Engravings and Oil Pictures in each number worth more than its cost. DEMORESTS MONTHLY Surpasses all former issuesIin brilliancy, variety, and artistic excelleiice. It is the largest in form, the largest in circulation, and the best in everything that makes a magazine desirable; comprising entertaining Literature, Fine Illustrations, Music, Floriculture, Architecture, Household Matters, Reliable Fashions, and Full-size Pat- terns, with other rare and beautiful novelties calculated to improve the taste, and make home attractive and happy. Single copies, lIt.; Yearly, $3; with choice from splendid premiums. lilore than extraordlnary.A choice of double p -emiums Ibr 1879. The beautiful and highly prized Oil Pictures The Lions Bride, lIxIl in.; Rock of Ages, lIxIl in.; Old Oaken Bucket, 17x211 in.; After the Storm, 16x26 in.; or, Captive Child, 17x26 in. A selection of any two 01 these pictures to each subscriber at $1; SOc. extra for transportation; or a selection from 2) oIlier useful and valuable articles. Subscriptions can commence with any month. Address, W. JENNINGS DEMOREST, 17 East~l4th St., N. V. UNFERMENTED WINE. Pure Juice of the Grape; no Alcohol; lested for years; received International ~tieda1. T. H. JOHNSON, New Brunswick, N J. National Temperance Society, 58 Reade St., N.Y.; Congregational and Baptist Publication Societies, Boston and Philadelphia. MAKE THE CHILDREN HAPPY! Scrap Book and 100 Elegant SCRAP PICTURES Of Birds, Flowers, Ferns, Animals, & c., sent by mail, post-paid, on receipt of $1.00. The Pictures may be pasted in the book, affording great amuse- ment in arranging them. Tbey are the finest em- bossed imported Pictures. Or, 50 Sample Scrap Pictures, by mail, for 113 cents. A Box of 24 Sheets of Ladies Note Paper and 24 Envelopes mailed los- 25 Cents, or Extra Fine Laid & Plate Paper Finish .,, 50 Cents. Address, CEO. E. PERINE, Picture Publisher & Stationer, No. 100 Nassau St., New York City. SCI1OI.J.~ SA~WS. Rogers; Lester; Fleetwood; Ilex- tsr; & c., at manufacturers prices. Wood; Saws; Designs; Tools and Material. Send 6 c. postage for large catalogue. Flower Stands; Automatic Fount- ains; Ferneries; & c., & c. -~ Send 10 con ts postage for large cat- alogue. U. WEBSTER PECK, 110 Chambers St., New York. Please stote where you saw this advertisemenf. A. S. BARNES & CO. PUBLiSH THE ONLY S6N~S ~61{ IIIE S~T~I1{Y. THE HYMN AND TUNE BOOK which stands the test. Revised and enlarged. Prices greatly re- duced. Editions for every want. For Samples (loaned without charge) and Terms address the Publishers. LYMAN ABBOTTS CoMMoiltary Oil tli~ Now Tosta~ollt Illustrated and Popular, giving the latest views of the best Biblical Scholars on aH disputed points. A concise, strong and faithful Exposition in (8) eight volumes. octavo. - AGENTS WANTED IN EVERY LOCALITY. EDITED BY 11ev. J. E, RANKIN, D.ll. aild 11ev. E. S. LORENZ. Endorsed by FRANCIS MURPHY, and used exclusively in his meetings. This is the first practicable Collection of Hymns and Tunes abounding in vigorous Pieces adapted to the Gospel Temperance Movement, it is also the best Book for Church Prayer Meet- ings. Price 35 cis. post-paid. Special Rates by the quantity. DONT FAIL TO EXAMINE AT ONCE. A. 3. BARNES & CO., Publishers, New York and Chicago. Theological and S. S. Books. Immense stock. Good and cheap. Special atten. tion given to books for Students. Books for Agents. The Oid and New Bible Looking.G,lass, (with 280 Beautilul Emblem Engravings,) written by Drs. CRosBy, GuLLET, CHEEvER, PuNsauoN. It has re- ceived htlie best indorsements. Now ready, on the Clark plan, the Nichol Edition of the Expository Lectures of the Puritan Divinestbe English price, $1.75; our price, post-paid, $1.50. Send for particulars. N. TIBEALI & IINI, 37 Park 31w, N. 7. The Book of Psalms. ABBANGED FIB BEIPONBIVE 3~ADING IN BABBATH BIHOOLS, CHUBIHES 03 FAMILY WIRSHIP. The current version is strictly followed, the only peculiarity being the arrangement according to the Original ParaileUsms, for convenience in responsive reading. Two sizes. Prices: 32mo, Limp Cloth, 30 cts. per copy, $25 per 100; lOmo, Cloth, 70 cts. per copy,$56 per 100. Sent post-paid on receipt of price. TAINTIB BIIITHEBI, MEBBILL & Ci,, Publishers, 758 Broadway, New York. 0 RGA~S Splendid $340 ORGANS for $80. $100. $300 for $90. $275 for $200 for $70. $190 for $65, and $160 for $55. PIANOS$900 Piano Forte for ~ ~25. $800 for $200, $750 for $185. 700 for $165. $600 for $135, cash, not used a year, in perfect order. Great Bargains. Un- rivaled Instruments. Unequaled Prices. Send for Catalogue. HORACE WATERS & SONS, 40 East 14th Street, l~ Y. Meneely & Kimberly, BELL FOUNDERS, TROY, N. Y. Manufacture a superior quality of Bells. Special attention given to CHURCH BELLS tl~- Illustrated Catalogues sent free. (64) Established A. D. 1850. rr~ EJ MANHATTAN Bro~iBros.& Uo. Life Insurance Co.. 156 Broadway, New York, HAS PAID $7,400,000 ~Ti~j~ HAS PAID O Retain Premiums to $ 4,900,00 Policy-Holders, HAS A SURPLUS OP OVER LIABILITIES $ 1,wv,vuv By New York Slandardoj Valuation. It gives the Best insurance on the Best Lives at the most Favorable Rates. EZAMfl~E THE PLAIIS AITD HATES CF THIS COMPA1~Y. HENRY STOKES, PRESIDENT. C. Y. WEMPLE, S N. STEBBINS, Vice-President. Actuary. H. Y. WEMPLE, J. L. HALSEY, H. B. STOKES, Secretary. Assistant Secretaries. THE C ELEBRATED CERMA STUDENT LAlYIP. Gomplete, only $4.69. ALSO THE FAMOUS VIENNA COFFEE POT. ALL SIZES. Imported only by ~ 3A~O~J HOUSE-FURNISHING HARDWARE, aRINA, ~LAS~, CUTLERY, SILVERWARE,1 And COOKING UTENSILS. 1, 2, 3,12, 13, 15, 16 & Cooper Institute, N. Y. City. BANKERS, 59 WaIl St., New York, 211 Chestnut St., PhiladeIph~a, 66 State St., Boston. Issue, against cash deposited, or satisfactory guar- antee of repayment, Circular Credits for Travelers, In DOLLARS for use in the United States and adja- cent countries, and in POUNDS STERLING, for use in any part of the world. These Credits, bearing the signature of the hold- er, afford a ready means of identification, and the amounts for which they are isseed can be availed of from time to time, wherever he may be, in sums to meet the requirements of Ihe Traveler. Application for Credits may be made to either of the above houses direct, or through anyrespectable bank or hanker in the country. They also issue Commercial Credits, make Cable transfers of Money between this Country and England, and draw Bills of Exchange on Great Britain and Ireland. W. & B. DOUGLAS, IVliddtetown, Coun., MANUFACTURERS or UMPS, HYDRAULIC RAMS, GARDEN ENGINES, PUMP CHAIN AND FIXTURES, IIION CURBS, YARD hYDRANTS, STREET WASHERS, ETC~ Highest Medal award- ed them by the Univer- sal Exposition at Paris, France, in 1867; Vienna, Austria, in 1813; and Philadelphia, 1876. Founded in 1832. Branch Warehouses: & 87 John St. NEW YORK, AND 197 Lake Street, CHICAGO. Regular Dealers. For Sale by all

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The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 3 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York Mar 1879 0033 003
The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 3, miscellaneous front pages 64A-64B

VOL. XXXIII. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. To the Poor the Preached. ~ c~ el is 0 MARGii, 1879. CONI7Ij7NTh. EDITORIAL. GENEROUS GIFT 65 CALL TO oo FORWARD 65 Ma. ARTHINGTONS OFFER 66 NEW RECRUIT FOR MENDS MISSION 69 SUNDAY-SCHOOL CONCERT: Gen. C. B. Fisk... 70 WILDERNESS AND SOUTH COUNTRY: Rev. E. Corwin, D.D 70 ITEMS FROM THE FIELD 74 GENERAL NOTES 75 OUR QUERY COLUMN 76 THE FREEDMEN. SOME PlEaT IMPRESSIONS: Rev. Jos. E. Roy, D.D 78 CENTRAL SOUTH CONFERENCE: Rev. S. S. AShley SO GEORGIAAtlanta UniversityRevival among the Students Si ALABAMA, FLORENCEChristmaS Festival, & o. 82 LoUBIAEA, NEW ORlEANSStraight Univer Sity and Central ChurchWeek of Prayer and Work of Grace 52 TENNESSEE, NASHVILLEFISk University Day of Prayer TENNESSEE, MEMpRISWOmans WorkCot tage Meetings, & ~ 54 THE CHINESE. SUMMARY OF MISSION WORE: Rev. W. C. Pond 86 AFRICA. CHRISTMAS ~.T Av ELY STATION 87 CHILDRENS PAGE. LITTLE SALLIE 58 RECEIPTS 90 NEW YORU: flue ~mcvie~uu ~Uii~n~w~ ~ei~ui~n, ROOMS, 50 READE STREET. Price, 50 Cents a Year, in advance, No. ~. 56 RE ADE STREET, N. Y. PRESIDENT. HON. B. S. TOBEY, Boston. VICE-PRESIDENTS. Hon. F. D. PARISH, Ohio. Hon. B. D. HOLTON, Wis. Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, Mass. Rev. STEPHEN THURSTON, D. D., Me. Rev. SAMUEL HARRIS, D. D., Ct. WM. C. CHAPIN, Esq., R. I. Rev. W. T. EUSTIS, D. D., Mass. Hon. A. C. BARSTOW, H. I. Rev. THATCHER THAYER, D. D., R. I. Rev. RAY PALMER, D. D., N. Y. Rev. J. M. STURTEVANT, D. D., Ill. Rev. W. W. PATTON, D. D., D. C. Hon. SEYMOUR STRAIGHT, La. HORACE HALLOCE, Esq., Mich. Rev. CYRUS W. WALLACE, D. D., N. H. Rev. EDWARD HAWES, Ct. DOUGLAS PUTNAM, Esq., Ohio. Hon. THADDEUS FAIRBANKS, Vt. SAMUEL D. PORTER, Esq., N. Y. Rev. M. M. G. DANA, D. D., Minn. Rev. H. W. BEECHER, N. Y. Gen. 0. 0. HOWARD, Oregon. Rev. G. F. MAGOUN, D. D., Iowa. Col. C. G. HAMMOND, Ill. EDWARD SPAULDING, M. D., N. H. DAVID RIPLEY, Esq., N. J. Rev. WM. M. BARBOUR, D. D., Ct. ALONZO S. BALL, A. S. BARNES, EDWARD BEECHER, GEO. M. BOYBTON, WM, B. BROWN, Rev. W. L. GAGE, Ct. A. S. HATCH, Esq., N. Y. Rev. J. H. FAIRCHILD, D. D., Ohio Rev. H. A. STIMSON, Minn. Rev. J. W. STRONG, D. D., Minn. Rev. GEORGE THACHER, LL. D., Iowa. Rev. A. L. STONE, D. D., California. Rev. G. H. ATKINSON, D. D., Oregon. Rev. J. E. RANKIN, D. D., D. C. Rev. A. L. CHAPIN, D. D., Wis. S. D. SMITH, Esq., Mass. PETER SMITH, Esq., Mass. Dea. JOHN C. WHITIN, Mass. Rev. War. PATTON, D. D., Ct. Hon. .1. B. GRINNELL, Iowa. Rev. War. T. CARR, Ct. Rev. HORACE WINSLOW, Ct. Sir PETER COATS, Scotland. Rev. HENRY ALLON, D. D., London, Eng. WM. B. WHITING, Esq., N. V. J. M. PINKERTON, Esq., Mass. Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D. D., Ct. DANIEL HAND,.ESq., Ct. A. L. WILLISTON, Esq., Mass. Rev. A. F. BEARD, D. D., N. Y. FREDERICK BILLINGS, Esq., Vt. JOSEPH CARPENTER, Esq., R. I. CORRESPONDING SECRETARY. REV. M. B. STRIEBY, D. D., 56 Reade Street, N. Y.- DISTRICT SECRETARIES. REV. C. L. WOODWORTH, Boston. REV. G. D. PIKE, New York. REV. JAS. POWELL, ChiCago. EDGAR KETCHUM, ESQ., Treasurer, N. Y. H. W. HUBBARD, ESQ., Assistant Treasurer, N. Y. REV. M. B. STRIEBY, ReCording Secretary. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. CLINTON B. FISK, ADDISON P. FOSTER, B. A. GRAVES, S. B. HALLIDAY, SAML HOLMES, COMMUNICATIONS relating to the business of the Association may be addressed to either of the Secretaries as above; letters for the Editor of the American Missionary~~ to Rev. Geo. M. Boynton, at the New York Office. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS Should be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Asst Treasurer, No. ~6 Reade. Street, New York, or, when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., 112 West Washington Street, Chica~,o, Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a Life Member. Correspondents are specially requested to place at the head of each letter the name of their Post Office, and the Oounty and State in which it is located. S. S. JOCELYN, ANDREW LESTER, CHAS. L. MEAD, JOHN H. WASHBURN, G. B. WILLCOX,

Generous Gift Editorial 65

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL XXXIII MARCH, 1879. No. 3. ~meric~tn ~i~s~ionar~ ~E~nciatinn, We have told our friends that for the last three months our receipts, in common with those of our sister societies, have been less than for the corresponding months of the preceding year. January did better, but we would still have had some anxieties if there had not come to us from an aged friend, who had given us no reason to expect so large an offering, a check for ten thousand dollars. The letter which accompanied the gift, referred to his observance of our efforts to reduce the debt and our success in that direction, but asking us to expend this money, the savings of a lifetime, in carrying on our work. It was a gift from the Lord by the hand of His servant, and again, as often before, we are called to make record of his faithfulness who has promised to help those who are in His work. Should not this generous gift strengthen our confidence that God has yet other treasures with which He will enable us to commend His love to the despised, and to preach His gospel to the poor? THE CALL TO GO FORWARD. We thank our friends for their noble efforts to conquer the Debt. As we feared, however, the help thus given has diminished the supplies for our regular and pressing work. We have wrought with only one hand on the work and with the other held a weapon. But now that the debt is well nigh vanquished, we must gird ourselves not merely to repair the neglected gaps, but to push forward along the whole length of the wall. THE DEBT rnovxn~m FOR. Relying upon the payment of the money pledged, our actual indebtedness is reduced to only $6,440. Against this amount our Executive Committee has set apart our remaining Iowa lands, which at ~a low valuation fully balance it, as a sinking fund, to be held for this purpose only. The delt is thus provided for, and we have no more pleas to urge for its extinction,save as we suggest for this laat time, there is a noble opportunity just now for some generous friend to step in and claim the honor of giving the finishing stroke to this Goliath, so setting. free

Call to go Forward Editorial 65-66

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL XXXIII MARCH, 1879. No. 3. ~meric~tn ~i~s~ionar~ ~E~nciatinn, We have told our friends that for the last three months our receipts, in common with those of our sister societies, have been less than for the corresponding months of the preceding year. January did better, but we would still have had some anxieties if there had not come to us from an aged friend, who had given us no reason to expect so large an offering, a check for ten thousand dollars. The letter which accompanied the gift, referred to his observance of our efforts to reduce the debt and our success in that direction, but asking us to expend this money, the savings of a lifetime, in carrying on our work. It was a gift from the Lord by the hand of His servant, and again, as often before, we are called to make record of his faithfulness who has promised to help those who are in His work. Should not this generous gift strengthen our confidence that God has yet other treasures with which He will enable us to commend His love to the despised, and to preach His gospel to the poor? THE CALL TO GO FORWARD. We thank our friends for their noble efforts to conquer the Debt. As we feared, however, the help thus given has diminished the supplies for our regular and pressing work. We have wrought with only one hand on the work and with the other held a weapon. But now that the debt is well nigh vanquished, we must gird ourselves not merely to repair the neglected gaps, but to push forward along the whole length of the wall. THE DEBT rnovxn~m FOR. Relying upon the payment of the money pledged, our actual indebtedness is reduced to only $6,440. Against this amount our Executive Committee has set apart our remaining Iowa lands, which at ~a low valuation fully balance it, as a sinking fund, to be held for this purpose only. The delt is thus provided for, and we have no more pleas to urge for its extinction,save as we suggest for this laat time, there is a noble opportunity just now for some generous friend to step in and claim the honor of giving the finishing stroke to this Goliath, so setting. free 3fl. Arthington~ Otfer to the A. 2W. A. those lands again to aid our current work. We praise the Lord that we can now turn from this accomplished effort to other DEFERRED AND URGENT WORK. The debt effort has enforced an economy in field work that has been rigid nay, hindering. For example, one of our higher institutions hn~ become so full 4hat while it has accommodations for only 40 girls it has 60 in attendance, and one of the recitations must be held in a bed-room. Another instance is found in ~one of the brightest towns in Georgia, where we have planted a church and opened a school. The place is so near our Atlanta University that its pupils ~can readily supply it with both teaching and preaching force; but for the lack of ajew hundred dollars to erect a cheap, and yet adequate building for school and ~church, both are hindered in growth and usefulness, and if the means he not soon Thrnished, might as well be abandoned. Our industrial schools suffer for want of funds. The colored students are so ~poor that unless aid can in small amounts be furnished them, either by facilities for work or by help in money, many of them must abandon the effort for an educa- tion. These items as to school and church wGrk are but samples of what come to ns from all parts of the field. But there are other calls of special importance. No State in the South is growing more rapidly than Texas. A generous friend of the colored race has purchased an eligible lot of eight acres in Austin, Texas, and given it to us as the site of a colored institution. He and other friends have added gifts amounting to nearly $10,000, towards the erection of a substantial building. We shall begin the structure this spring, but will only enclose it, un- less the means are furnished to complete it. We will make no debt. We hope nay, we pleadthat the money may be speedily forthcoming to finish this build- ing and prepare it for immediate use. ~,, The noble offer of Mr. Arthington, of Leeds, England, to which we call atten- tion below, another avenue for the efforts of the Freedmen in the Evanueli. opens b zation of the land of their fathers. The proposed mission lies in tropical Africa, and is desolated by the slave trade. It thus appeals to our deepest sympathies as the life-long opponents of slavery, and to the millions from whom we shall select the missionaries who were themselves its victims. In view of these facts, we press our appeal on the hearts of our friends. Let -us go forward in the work so well begun, and let us enter the new fields opened to us in the providence of God. We ask not merely for special gifts for special ob- jects, but also for the regular work so well in hand, and needing so greatly the ~means of enlargement. MR. ARTHINGTONS OFFER TO THE A. M. A. The name of Robert Arthington, Esq~, of Leeds, England, has already become familiar to all good people who are interested in the evangelization of The Dark Continent. His gift of 5,000 each to the Church Missionary Society and the London Missionary Society, of 1,000 to the (English) Baptist Missionary Society, and his offer last year of a similar amount to our own American Board of Commis- ~ioners for Foreign Missions, all for the founding of new evangelizing agencies in Equatorial Africa, have been among the most marked events in the recent history of Christian g.!ving. These various gifts and offers have all been parts in the pros- ecution of a wisely comprehensive plan, which his subjoined letter clearly sets forth, and in furthering which he has now come to our Association with an offer of three thousand pounds ($15,000), and a plan for our occupation of an important ~--territory with an efficient mission.

Mr. Arthington's Offer to the A. M. A. Editorial 66-69

3fl. Arthington~ Otfer to the A. 2W. A. those lands again to aid our current work. We praise the Lord that we can now turn from this accomplished effort to other DEFERRED AND URGENT WORK. The debt effort has enforced an economy in field work that has been rigid nay, hindering. For example, one of our higher institutions hn~ become so full 4hat while it has accommodations for only 40 girls it has 60 in attendance, and one of the recitations must be held in a bed-room. Another instance is found in ~one of the brightest towns in Georgia, where we have planted a church and opened a school. The place is so near our Atlanta University that its pupils ~can readily supply it with both teaching and preaching force; but for the lack of ajew hundred dollars to erect a cheap, and yet adequate building for school and ~church, both are hindered in growth and usefulness, and if the means he not soon Thrnished, might as well be abandoned. Our industrial schools suffer for want of funds. The colored students are so ~poor that unless aid can in small amounts be furnished them, either by facilities for work or by help in money, many of them must abandon the effort for an educa- tion. These items as to school and church wGrk are but samples of what come to ns from all parts of the field. But there are other calls of special importance. No State in the South is growing more rapidly than Texas. A generous friend of the colored race has purchased an eligible lot of eight acres in Austin, Texas, and given it to us as the site of a colored institution. He and other friends have added gifts amounting to nearly $10,000, towards the erection of a substantial building. We shall begin the structure this spring, but will only enclose it, un- less the means are furnished to complete it. We will make no debt. We hope nay, we pleadthat the money may be speedily forthcoming to finish this build- ing and prepare it for immediate use. ~,, The noble offer of Mr. Arthington, of Leeds, England, to which we call atten- tion below, another avenue for the efforts of the Freedmen in the Evanueli. opens b zation of the land of their fathers. The proposed mission lies in tropical Africa, and is desolated by the slave trade. It thus appeals to our deepest sympathies as the life-long opponents of slavery, and to the millions from whom we shall select the missionaries who were themselves its victims. In view of these facts, we press our appeal on the hearts of our friends. Let -us go forward in the work so well begun, and let us enter the new fields opened to us in the providence of God. We ask not merely for special gifts for special ob- jects, but also for the regular work so well in hand, and needing so greatly the ~means of enlargement. MR. ARTHINGTONS OFFER TO THE A. M. A. The name of Robert Arthington, Esq~, of Leeds, England, has already become familiar to all good people who are interested in the evangelization of The Dark Continent. His gift of 5,000 each to the Church Missionary Society and the London Missionary Society, of 1,000 to the (English) Baptist Missionary Society, and his offer last year of a similar amount to our own American Board of Commis- ~ioners for Foreign Missions, all for the founding of new evangelizing agencies in Equatorial Africa, have been among the most marked events in the recent history of Christian g.!ving. These various gifts and offers have all been parts in the pros- ecution of a wisely comprehensive plan, which his subjoined letter clearly sets forth, and in furthering which he has now come to our Association with an offer of three thousand pounds ($15,000), and a plan for our occupation of an important ~--territory with an efficient mission. ilfr. Arthington6 Offer to the A. H. A. 67 The region which he carefully describes and commends to our care lies north and east of the Victoria Nyanza Mission of the Church Missionary Society; west and south of which lies the Tanganika Mission of the London Society; west of this the region which he has asked the American Board to occupy, and the Baptist Mission still further toward the western coast. These five divisions nearly cross the continent between 10 degrees north and 10 degrees south latitude. Of course they are large tracts, and only five startins~ points for evangelizing effort. We have felt that there was a special claim on our Association,whieh has froni its beginning been so intimately associated with the African race, and which haa- so long kept up its mission on the West Coast, to consider prayerfully and intelli- gently the proposal to enter into the far-reaching plans of this steward of the. ford. It is not a matter for hasty decision. The conditions which he imposes in regard to the liquidation of our debt we believe will be fully met before we can~ do more than consider and plan. The Executive Committee have appointed a~ sub-committee consisting of four of its members, with three of its officers, who will study into the matter with all care and report. The result of their investi- gations, with a map of the region, may be looked for in the April number of the MISSIONARY, to which, in connection with the valuable letter of Mr. Arthington in this, we ask the careful attention of all who are interested in the evangelization of Equatorial Africa. We print herewith a large portion of Mr. Arthinglons Letter. In your thirtieth Annual Report, page 15, you indicate a desire, on the part of your Society, to enter on some suitable field for missionary enterprise in Eastern or Central Africa; and again, in the thirty-first Report, I find in the first pages of the volume a similar desire expressed for extension, so as to bring the African Continent within the range of the mighty power of the GospelChrist risen again, in all his reality set forth as the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth. If your Society can so enter into the scheme I am about to propose as to as- sure me that the debt of your treasurysec the 31st Reportis extinguished, and that your members adopt the proposal of it prayerfully in all faith, I am im J)ressed that I should be glad in the Lord to offer to your Society towards the carry ing it into execution the sum of three thousand pounds. The unevangelized region of Africa to which I would call your earnest atten~ tion, and invite you to accept as a field for missionary labors (to be conducted with all energy in the Spiritvery judiciously fixing your positions for holding forth the word of Life so as to command the whole area, and diffuse throughout it the light of the Gospelyou and a great multitude of true believers continually standing on the watch-tower of the church and fervently praying, Thy kingdom come I) is situated and extends from the 10th parallel of north latitude to the J)oint southwards where the 40th meridian crosses or cuts the river Jub (or Gods- chob), west to east from the right (east) bank of the White Nile to the said 40th meridian, and from the parallel of longitude of that point on the Job southwards west and east from the White Nile to the right (west) bank of the Job, down to the 3rd parallel of north latitude, and from the 3rd parallel of north latitude down to the 1st parallel of north latitude, west and east from the 35th meridian to the Job. We thus avoid Somali Land, which is not at present eligible as a mission field. The territory south of, the parallel 1 degree north latitude, it is hoped, some other society will evangelize. West of the 35th meridian, fr ~m ~ de 68 A& . Arthingtons OJJer to the A. ii!. A. grees north latitude and southwards, appears suitable for the Church Missionary Society of England, in connection with the Yictoria Nyanza district. The general object of this method of arrangement is to assign the whole of Africa, so far as not iNlohammedanized, to different sections of the Christian church, that they may see that their several areas are evangelized. You would thus have a great and highly promising field for missionary labor, the most important and interesting people of which are: 1. The decayed Christian Remnants (remnants of the ancient Abyssinian church), Wolawo and Cambay, Muger and Gur~gue, and the places Euarea, Kaffa, Susa, Tuifti, Kullu and Doko. 2. The great and wide-spread Gallas tribes. 3. Dinkas. 4. The inhabitants of the Bern country. 5. The Latookas. 6. Fatiko and the Madi country. The great interest nnd importance of the Christian Remnants and of the Gallas tribes is well known. The Bern people it is especially desirable should be early instructed in Christian truth. They are situated not very far to the east of Gondokoro, outside of the traders route. They have never been reported, I be- lieve, but as a fine people comparatively, and are mentioned in Wernes work, published many years ago. The Latookas will appear interesting when we peruse Sir Samuel Bakers ac- count of them, and see The Albert Nyanza, 1866, vol. 1, pages 204-6, in which he writes: One of the principal channels, if not the main stream of the river Sobat, is only 4 days march, or fifty miles, east of Latooka, and is known to the natives as the Chol. See also, for accuracy of the places, Sir Samuel Bakers Ismailia, the map. The east bank of that stream (the Chol) is occupied by the Gallas. The Gallas (in their attack on the Latookas) were invariably mounted on mules, & c., the cavalry of the Akkara, & c. In a note to me, dated August, 1878, Sir Samuel Baker says: The Bern country has never been visited by Thiropeans; although it is not far from Gondokoro, it lies out of the way of traders routes. It would be comprised between north latitude 5 degrees 20 minutes and 6 degrees 50 minutes, and commences in east longitude about one degree east of Gondokoro, which is absolutely correct on the maps. Fatiko is a small district situated in 8 degrees north latitude, in the Madi country. You will find all places laid down with extreme accuracy in the maps in my last work, Ismailia. The linguistic aids for the evangelization of some of the tribes or populations say Gallas, Dinkas, Christian Remnants, People of Euarea, Kaffa, Susa, & c. already exist, I believe, in considerable degree. The proffered gift, then, if accepted by you, should be regarded as a nucleus to which the Church of Christ around you shall pour its offerings, and I think that two thousand pounds of the amount should be specially applied towards the purchase and perpetual maintenance of two river steamers, one to navigate the Sobat and command the mission to the Dinkasto such of the Gallas tribes as are their neighboxs on the east, between theni and Euareato the Gallas tribes on the Chol branch of the Sobat (east or right bank), and to the Latookas west or south- west (of the Chol), if accessible from that river; and the other steamer to navigate the Godschob (called the Jab at its mouth) and command the missions to the Chris- tian Remnants, Wolawo, & c., and to the Gallas, who are to be found in large numbers in the country west of, and up to, the right or west bank of the Godschob. And it is understood that the people of the Bern country shall claim a place amongst your earliest evangelistic efforts. Fatiko, with the Madi country and Lake Samburu and population, are included in the area, but need not claim a first place in your labors. Possibly the Gadlas on. the upper course orwatar~ of the A New Recruit for the ijfiendi Mission. 69 Oziif geographers are right as to the position of the source of this rivermay be reached from the Jub (Godschob) or from the Sobat. Your staff of missionaries for this work~ so full of promise of great results, should be a well-chosen band, some of them men skilled in some of the arts, say two in the use of scientific in- struments, and they should be most thoughtfully and prayerfully selected. I ask that two or three of your very best and ablest menmen of large hearts, of enterprise and great faith, with several of the best maps before you-will study the description of the area I have delineated, and if it is not in any point perfectly -clear, that you will at once ask for the missing details. I really desire a thorough and permanent occupation of the field. Yours most truly, in the Lord Jesus Christ, (Signed) ROBERT ART1TINGTON, January 10th, 1879. - Leeds, E~gland. A NEW RECRUIT FOR THE MENDI MISSION. It will be remembered that Rev. Floyd Snelson was compelled to return to this -country, after a sojourn of about a year in our African mission, on account of the rapidly failing health of his wife. He has resumed the care of the Mid way -Church in Georgia, from the pastorate of which he was taken, against the wishes of his people, for the foreign work. It was deemed necessary to make good the vacated place as soon as possible. In accordance with the expressed judgment of the missionaries on the field, the first want was of a man specially adapted to take charge of the saw-mill and other industrial interests at Avery Station, of which Mr. Jackson has had charge as well as of the church and school. Inquiries were instituted at once aq~ong our higher institutions for the right man, and we think we have found him. ElmoreL. Anthony was born a slave in Allen County, Kentucky, June 8th, 1848. Early in the progress of the war he ran away to join the Union army, but being rejected as a soldier on account of his youth, he returned to his old master, who was a stock trader, preferring, if he must be a servant to anybody, to serve him. In 1863 he left again, and soon after entered the regular army, where he served three years. He was promoted to be a sergeant, and while at Fort Duncan, in Texas, was detailed to be superintendent of laborers, having the oversight of over two hundred men. He says that he got on well in thc army, simply because he was perfectly temperate and sober, He bears testimonials from his officers as to his moral character and faithfulness. in 1870 he made his way to Berea, Ky., and entered the primary class. He has been there ever since, teaching during the last six years in his vacations; and was a member of the senior class when he came, at our call and by the advice and hearty commendation of the president and faculty of the college, to give himself to work in Africa. That he held, nearly from the beginning quite to the close of these years, the trusted position of janitor of the Ladies Hall, is no small evidence of the confidence which has been reposed in him, He is a man of stalwart frame, has been medically examined and pronounced perfect in health. He seems to ~us admirably adapted to the place as our man of affairs, competent at the same time to fill a gap in school as teacher when needed, and while not- a preacher in any sense of the word, yet of such honest purpose to do good that he Will be aio less a missionary for that. He sailed the 13th of February via Liberia..

A New Recruit for the Mendi Mission Editorial 69-70

A New Recruit for the ijfiendi Mission. 69 Oziif geographers are right as to the position of the source of this rivermay be reached from the Jub (Godschob) or from the Sobat. Your staff of missionaries for this work~ so full of promise of great results, should be a well-chosen band, some of them men skilled in some of the arts, say two in the use of scientific in- struments, and they should be most thoughtfully and prayerfully selected. I ask that two or three of your very best and ablest menmen of large hearts, of enterprise and great faith, with several of the best maps before you-will study the description of the area I have delineated, and if it is not in any point perfectly -clear, that you will at once ask for the missing details. I really desire a thorough and permanent occupation of the field. Yours most truly, in the Lord Jesus Christ, (Signed) ROBERT ART1TINGTON, January 10th, 1879. - Leeds, E~gland. A NEW RECRUIT FOR THE MENDI MISSION. It will be remembered that Rev. Floyd Snelson was compelled to return to this -country, after a sojourn of about a year in our African mission, on account of the rapidly failing health of his wife. He has resumed the care of the Mid way -Church in Georgia, from the pastorate of which he was taken, against the wishes of his people, for the foreign work. It was deemed necessary to make good the vacated place as soon as possible. In accordance with the expressed judgment of the missionaries on the field, the first want was of a man specially adapted to take charge of the saw-mill and other industrial interests at Avery Station, of which Mr. Jackson has had charge as well as of the church and school. Inquiries were instituted at once aq~ong our higher institutions for the right man, and we think we have found him. ElmoreL. Anthony was born a slave in Allen County, Kentucky, June 8th, 1848. Early in the progress of the war he ran away to join the Union army, but being rejected as a soldier on account of his youth, he returned to his old master, who was a stock trader, preferring, if he must be a servant to anybody, to serve him. In 1863 he left again, and soon after entered the regular army, where he served three years. He was promoted to be a sergeant, and while at Fort Duncan, in Texas, was detailed to be superintendent of laborers, having the oversight of over two hundred men. He says that he got on well in thc army, simply because he was perfectly temperate and sober, He bears testimonials from his officers as to his moral character and faithfulness. in 1870 he made his way to Berea, Ky., and entered the primary class. He has been there ever since, teaching during the last six years in his vacations; and was a member of the senior class when he came, at our call and by the advice and hearty commendation of the president and faculty of the college, to give himself to work in Africa. That he held, nearly from the beginning quite to the close of these years, the trusted position of janitor of the Ladies Hall, is no small evidence of the confidence which has been reposed in him, He is a man of stalwart frame, has been medically examined and pronounced perfect in health. He seems to ~us admirably adapted to the place as our man of affairs, competent at the same time to fill a gap in school as teacher when needed, and while not- a preacher in any sense of the word, yet of such honest purpose to do good that he Will be aio less a missionary for that. He sailed the 13th of February via Liberia.. 70 S. S. ConcertThe Wilderne88 and the South Country. THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL CONCERT. GENERAL CLINTON B. FISK. It was a happy thought on the part of somebody to prepare a Sunday-school Concert exercise, which should embody so much valuThle information and afford so great pleasure and holy joy, as does that of the Jubilee Concert exercise, prepared by the Rev. G. D. Pike on substantially the same basis as that first introduced by Rev. A. E. Winship, of Massachusetts. It was my good fortune on Sunday, January 12th, to participate in the exer- cises of a concert, conducted in accordance with this exceedingly well arranged programme, in the Sunday-school of the Congregational church at Stamford, Cona., Rev. G. B. Wilicox, D.D., pastor. It was a glad day in that, to me, the most attractive of all New England villages. If any other town in the East can furi~ish a roll of better men, women and children than those who adorn the beautiful Christian homes of Stamford, then I want to go there and attend a Jubilee Concert exercise. The preparation at Stamford was complete. ALL, from the excellent pastor up to the oldest deacrn, and down to the youngest child, took part. The able and enthusiastic superintendent, Mr. Janius Smith, is a born missionary, and he led his Sunday-school host into the work with great earnestness. The church was filled at an early hour of the evening, and when the great throng sung that sweetest of all Jubilee Songs, and one which has stirred the hearts of the best people on two continents, Steal away to Jesus, that wonderful, weird, plain- tive melody fell upon my ears with almost the effect with which the Jubilee Singers have a thousand times rendered it with their matchless voices and marvellous power. Hon. Oliver Hoyt, one of Connecticuts wisest and beet senators, iinpres- sively invoked the Divine blessing. The facts in relation to the organization, suc- cessful progress and grand achievements for the Master of the American Mission- ary Association were admirably brought out by the tersely-prepared exercises.. The pastor, superintendent, teachers and scholars all had their part and did well. Rev. G. D. Pike, whose head and heart are crammed full of well-devised plans for the uplifting of the Freedmen, and through the uplifted Freedmen of America the redemption of Africa, made one of his most forcible pleas in behalf of the Association. The writer of this imperfect sketch followed with an exhortation in his Methodist way. The collection was taken and a happy day closed. The Sunday-school Jubilee Concert exercise, if generally used, will be instru- mental inft.ringfacts in the minds of young and old. I bespeak for it the exami- nation of Sunday-school superintendents, and I most heartily bespeak the generous consideration of all good people in behalf of the American Missionary As- sociation. THE WILDERNESS AND THE SOUTH COUNTRY. A Di.scourse on the Duty of the American Churches to the Despised and Outcast Races. PP.EACIIED IN THE INTEREST OF THE A. H. A. TO THE 1ST CONGREG4TIONAL CHURCH, JACKSONVILLE, ILL., BT THE PASTOR, REV. H. CORWIN, DO., DEC. 22, 1878. Joshua xii. 5: In th3 mountains and in the Valleys, and in the plains and in tLie springs, and in the. wild~rness and in the soulli Country. We owe nobody an apology for following ili example of the Great Teacher in the latitude and longitude he allowed to himself in the use of Old Testament texts. I honor by following a Divine example when I use this passage from Hebrew his-

General Clinton B. Fisk Fisk, Clinton B., General The Sunday-school Concert Editorial 70

70 S. S. ConcertThe Wilderne88 and the South Country. THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL CONCERT. GENERAL CLINTON B. FISK. It was a happy thought on the part of somebody to prepare a Sunday-school Concert exercise, which should embody so much valuThle information and afford so great pleasure and holy joy, as does that of the Jubilee Concert exercise, prepared by the Rev. G. D. Pike on substantially the same basis as that first introduced by Rev. A. E. Winship, of Massachusetts. It was my good fortune on Sunday, January 12th, to participate in the exer- cises of a concert, conducted in accordance with this exceedingly well arranged programme, in the Sunday-school of the Congregational church at Stamford, Cona., Rev. G. B. Wilicox, D.D., pastor. It was a glad day in that, to me, the most attractive of all New England villages. If any other town in the East can furi~ish a roll of better men, women and children than those who adorn the beautiful Christian homes of Stamford, then I want to go there and attend a Jubilee Concert exercise. The preparation at Stamford was complete. ALL, from the excellent pastor up to the oldest deacrn, and down to the youngest child, took part. The able and enthusiastic superintendent, Mr. Janius Smith, is a born missionary, and he led his Sunday-school host into the work with great earnestness. The church was filled at an early hour of the evening, and when the great throng sung that sweetest of all Jubilee Songs, and one which has stirred the hearts of the best people on two continents, Steal away to Jesus, that wonderful, weird, plain- tive melody fell upon my ears with almost the effect with which the Jubilee Singers have a thousand times rendered it with their matchless voices and marvellous power. Hon. Oliver Hoyt, one of Connecticuts wisest and beet senators, iinpres- sively invoked the Divine blessing. The facts in relation to the organization, suc- cessful progress and grand achievements for the Master of the American Mission- ary Association were admirably brought out by the tersely-prepared exercises.. The pastor, superintendent, teachers and scholars all had their part and did well. Rev. G. D. Pike, whose head and heart are crammed full of well-devised plans for the uplifting of the Freedmen, and through the uplifted Freedmen of America the redemption of Africa, made one of his most forcible pleas in behalf of the Association. The writer of this imperfect sketch followed with an exhortation in his Methodist way. The collection was taken and a happy day closed. The Sunday-school Jubilee Concert exercise, if generally used, will be instru- mental inft.ringfacts in the minds of young and old. I bespeak for it the exami- nation of Sunday-school superintendents, and I most heartily bespeak the generous consideration of all good people in behalf of the American Missionary As- sociation. THE WILDERNESS AND THE SOUTH COUNTRY. A Di.scourse on the Duty of the American Churches to the Despised and Outcast Races. PP.EACIIED IN THE INTEREST OF THE A. H. A. TO THE 1ST CONGREG4TIONAL CHURCH, JACKSONVILLE, ILL., BT THE PASTOR, REV. H. CORWIN, DO., DEC. 22, 1878. Joshua xii. 5: In th3 mountains and in the Valleys, and in the plains and in tLie springs, and in the. wild~rness and in the soulli Country. We owe nobody an apology for following ili example of the Great Teacher in the latitude and longitude he allowed to himself in the use of Old Testament texts. I honor by following a Divine example when I use this passage from Hebrew his-

Rev. E. Corwin, D.D. Corwin, E., Rev., D.D. The Wilderness and the South Country Editorial 70-74

70 S. S. ConcertThe Wilderne88 and the South Country. THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL CONCERT. GENERAL CLINTON B. FISK. It was a happy thought on the part of somebody to prepare a Sunday-school Concert exercise, which should embody so much valuThle information and afford so great pleasure and holy joy, as does that of the Jubilee Concert exercise, prepared by the Rev. G. D. Pike on substantially the same basis as that first introduced by Rev. A. E. Winship, of Massachusetts. It was my good fortune on Sunday, January 12th, to participate in the exer- cises of a concert, conducted in accordance with this exceedingly well arranged programme, in the Sunday-school of the Congregational church at Stamford, Cona., Rev. G. B. Wilicox, D.D., pastor. It was a glad day in that, to me, the most attractive of all New England villages. If any other town in the East can furi~ish a roll of better men, women and children than those who adorn the beautiful Christian homes of Stamford, then I want to go there and attend a Jubilee Concert exercise. The preparation at Stamford was complete. ALL, from the excellent pastor up to the oldest deacrn, and down to the youngest child, took part. The able and enthusiastic superintendent, Mr. Janius Smith, is a born missionary, and he led his Sunday-school host into the work with great earnestness. The church was filled at an early hour of the evening, and when the great throng sung that sweetest of all Jubilee Songs, and one which has stirred the hearts of the best people on two continents, Steal away to Jesus, that wonderful, weird, plain- tive melody fell upon my ears with almost the effect with which the Jubilee Singers have a thousand times rendered it with their matchless voices and marvellous power. Hon. Oliver Hoyt, one of Connecticuts wisest and beet senators, iinpres- sively invoked the Divine blessing. The facts in relation to the organization, suc- cessful progress and grand achievements for the Master of the American Mission- ary Association were admirably brought out by the tersely-prepared exercises.. The pastor, superintendent, teachers and scholars all had their part and did well. Rev. G. D. Pike, whose head and heart are crammed full of well-devised plans for the uplifting of the Freedmen, and through the uplifted Freedmen of America the redemption of Africa, made one of his most forcible pleas in behalf of the Association. The writer of this imperfect sketch followed with an exhortation in his Methodist way. The collection was taken and a happy day closed. The Sunday-school Jubilee Concert exercise, if generally used, will be instru- mental inft.ringfacts in the minds of young and old. I bespeak for it the exami- nation of Sunday-school superintendents, and I most heartily bespeak the generous consideration of all good people in behalf of the American Missionary As- sociation. THE WILDERNESS AND THE SOUTH COUNTRY. A Di.scourse on the Duty of the American Churches to the Despised and Outcast Races. PP.EACIIED IN THE INTEREST OF THE A. H. A. TO THE 1ST CONGREG4TIONAL CHURCH, JACKSONVILLE, ILL., BT THE PASTOR, REV. H. CORWIN, DO., DEC. 22, 1878. Joshua xii. 5: In th3 mountains and in the Valleys, and in the plains and in tLie springs, and in the. wild~rness and in the soulli Country. We owe nobody an apology for following ili example of the Great Teacher in the latitude and longitude he allowed to himself in the use of Old Testament texts. I honor by following a Divine example when I use this passage from Hebrew his- The Wilderne88 and the South Country. tory as marvelously suggestive of our broader heritage and of our responsibilities as a people coming into fuller possession of a goodly land; in the mountains and valleys of the Atlantic and Pacific seaboard ; in the vast plains of the interior; in the springs and great river sources of the lake region; in the wide reaches of wilder- ness, comparatively worthless but for their exhaustless resources of mineral wealth; and last, but not least, in the sunny south country. If, with emotions of patriotic pride, Joshua, the great captain, could speak of the wide extent and the varied resources of that goodly land, into the possession of which he was leading the descendants of a whole nation of fugitive slaves, how much Ipore, with jlevout gratitude and patriotic pride, may we dwell upon the ~oonderfsl resoisrees and the wide reaches of a free empire in which there are forty million sovereigns, and on whose territory you might place, in patch-work, three hundred and twenty-eight states as large as Palestine, and have scraps enough left over to cover the two dwarf sisters of the UnionDelaware and Rhode Jsland I Corresponding most nearly in area with Maryland, five Palestines might find com- fortable quarters in the single State cf Iliinois; yet so wonderful was the fertility of that land, now comparatively barren and desolate, that it at one time sustained a population so dense that if the vast territory of the United States were thus thickly settled, it should have not merely forty millions of inhabitants, but one thousand one hundred and forty millions. Who doubts that such a population might be sustained on the fat valleys of the interior and the plantations of the south country, even though the waste places of the wilderness were left out of the account as utterly unfit for the dwelling-places of men? And, as though this vast heritage of ours were not enough for a free and industrious people, God has over many portions of the land practicall~r doubled its area; piling its resources of wealth layer upon layer; rivaling and redoubling the riches of the surface soil by the exhaustless stores of coal, iron and copper, lead, silver and gold, treasured up for the use of many generations; for there is the hiding of His power who is the bountiful God of Providence. But my purpose is only so far to hint at the resources of this most favored of lands, as to make the marvelous facts a basis for the proposition that ability is one measure of our responsibility for the hearty and liberal doing of what we ca:i for the highest development of this whole land. And let us never forget that a gre at, civilized and Christian State is made and measured, not by its physical re- sources merely, not by its accumulated material wealth, but chiefly by the mental and moral stature of its inhabitants. The best prod acts and the richest resources of any State ere in its crop of men. If these, even on a sterile soil and under frowning skies, are liberal, large-hearted, industrious, patriotic and pious, they make of the desert a paradise, and amid the clefts of the rocks there may be rootage for great ideas. If everywhere, for a single generation, such a populace could have and hold possession of this planet, the old alien orb would shine so that the shortest- sigh ted angel could see it without a telescope, and the inhabitants of other worlds might intelligently covet it as a dwelling-place for the society which it would afford. But wealth without good society is worthless. That city might be a hell upon earth in which there were no churches and schools, though every man had a gold mine in one corner of his cellar and a diamond mine in another. Mexico, with its mountains streaked with silver, has but few attractions as the family res- idence of a man who cares to live out more than half his days, or who esteems it no luxury to live among an ignorant, bigoted and revengeful people. California to-day, with all its discovered treasures, could not be so safe or so attractive a 72 The ll7ilderness and the South Country. place of residence as it was before those discoveries, but for the better class of en- terprising, intelligent, honest, law-abiding citizens, who have come into possession of that land. Nor are political institutions, however desirable, of much practical worth, except as they are worked by men of moral principle, not for the selfish advantage of the few, but for the protection and enriching of all. In considering the claims of the American Missionary Association to our prayerful interest and our liberal benefactions, these preliminary thoughts have practical force as applied to moral science; for it is distinctively the aim of this Association to lift society as a whole by lifting at the lower stratum. Its work is confessedly not. with the most promising material, out of which the most may be made in the shortest time, but with the most degraded, unpromising and despised of the outcast races. This is the great alchemist among our charities; seeking to transmute the baser metal* into gold. For the transmuting of character the mission of Christ was a witness to the universe that the last might be first, and that the lowest might be lifted to the highest position of honor and glory, as the result of the Divine condescension, the deep down-reaching love of the Son of God. He came not to honor the lordly, but. to lift up the lowly. For gaining influence and establishing his kingdom he sought. out not the ruling classes; but, himself despised and rejected of men, he knew how to condescend to men of low estate. He dispensed his largest blessings to the despised and the outcasts, who, conscious of their vileness, felt their need of salvation. Not unfaithful to the self-satisfied Scribes and Pharisees, he came espe- cially to seek and to save those who felt themselves to be lost sheep of the house of Israel. Read the record anew, with this thought in mind, and see if his special aim. was not to seek and save the lost, in the sense of the despised and abandoned, who were, perhaps, without hope for themselves, and whose case might have been regarded as desperate by others. We are not the true followers of Christ if we are wanting in the Christ-like spirit, and seek not to save the despised and outcast races who dwell in the wilder- ness and in the south country. Do you tell me, as an excuse for neglecting them, that the Indians, instead of being the noble red men, such as the sickly sentimental fancy of the poet and the moralist too often paint them, are, for the most part, ignorant and vile, dirty and degraded, lazy, mean, treacherous and revengeful? My familiarity with the better class of frontiersmen prepares me candidly to admit it all as a statement of fact. But I draw from those facts a very different conclu- sion than that they are not worth saving. All the more do they need to be saved. 1 might, without encroaching upon the regions of romance, tell, by the hour, tales of horror, as they have been related to me by reliable witnesses, that would make the blood fairly curdle in your veins. And if I had the gift of eloquence I might so vividly depict those horrors that you would find yourselves, right here in the house of God, clenching your fist and threatening vengeance upon wretches so base, upon savages so merciless, upon mockeries of manhood so gross and beastly. But let me remind you that an intelligent Indian might with more eloquent tongue inveigh against the crimes of those who profess to be better than savages.. He might truthfully speak of the perfidy of those who break the faith of treaties almost before the ink is dry in which the plausible yet one-sided contract is writ- ten. He might with indignant sneer point to the great army of vagrants claiming better blood, as filthy and vile, as dangerous and degraded as the worst savages were ever charged with being. But in saying all this he has not made out his case. No~ criminal can make even a plausible defence in any court by th~ plea that he is n~ worse than the worst men he can find in society; though, somehow, quite respecta ble sinners do seem to gain some comfort from this sort of scavengers logic. Rite Th7dernes8 and the South Country. It is absurd to suppose that ignorant and brutal savages should be so much better than civilized men that there should not be found in every tribe, as there are with us in every community, a dangerous class, selfish enough to plunder and murder those who have never wronged them, and desperate enough to take any risk and to commit any crime. It were most surprising if it were not so. All the more then, I insist upon their need of saving. With all the stronger emphasis I urge that this nation cannot afford, on its undefended borders, any more than it can afford in its strong centres of population and of well orgauized l)olice, to be injifferent to the needless multiplying of such a class. has our civilization much to boast of if it admits that there is no better way for forty millions of people to deal with four hundred thousand Indians than to exterminate them ? If it were not true ,~as it is, that it costs more to kill them than to civilize, convert and by moral forces con- trol them, what less than savages are we if we adopt the creed of the worst class of frontiersmen as the creed of the churches; that the best thing we can do with the savage is to kill him; and that there are no good Indians but dead ones? Let us be intelligent enough to know, and candid enough to confess, that in estimating their possibilities of social, industrial and moral development, we have taken too much account of the exceptional cases in which they have made trou- ble, and not enough of the many tribes that, for long years, have lived in peace, grown thrifty, maintained self-control, cared for the education of their children, and honored their profession of religion. What this and kindred associations have successfully achieved among the Indians alone, entitles them to the gratitude of the nation, and the liberal support of all who have faith in the Christ-like work of saving the lost. I have not time to speak at length of the work of the Association~ among the Asiatic immigrants upon the Pacific coast. Many of you know how honestly and earnestly I contend that in many respects this serf population that is sweeping in upon our Western border is a most undesirable element, morally, socially and po- litically. But by as much as they are, in the mass, vile and degraded, the worst sort of stuff out of which to make American citizens, by so much the more are we bound not to outdo them in violence that would dishonor a savage, and in intole- rance and prejudice that is worse than heathenish. Here, too, the argument of this discourse finds its fullest illustration. It is the strongest proof of the bounty of our religion that its brightest trophies are secured and its grandest victories achieved upon the most hopeless fields, and in saving the very chief of sinners. But the work of the Association among the Aborigines of the wilderness is as nothing to their more important mission, and their more signal success among the colored people of the south country. Here is a population vastly more numerous and more dangerous if left in ignorance; for, wisely or unwisely, they have been invested with the right, and in some places they freely exercise the power to vote. Admit, now, all that may be said of the utter unfitness of the great majority of them to exercise this privilege o(freemen. Yet since, beyond recall, they have the right, and in some way must be counted as a very important factor in the forces that are to shape our destiny, we can no more afford to let them remain in ignorance, than we can afford to let the same class grow up in ignorance and vice among us, with so little sense of their responsibilities, and with so little self-res- pect as citizens, that they can be bought like cattle by the highest bidder. The more debased, indolent and ignorant they are, the greater the danger to our free institutions, and the stronger the motive for seeking to elevate, educate and save them. They constitute more than one-tenth of our population. If directly or 74 Items from the Field. indirectly we were accessory to the placing of so dangerous a weapon in their handsa weapon, as respects their own inteiests, liable to kick backwe are bound to help fit them so to exercise the right that they shall not be the ignorant tools of corrupt and crafty men in either party as ignorant and unprincipled as them- selves. This the A. M. A. is striving wisely to do in accord with the sentiments and sympathies of ~many of the former slave-owners, who in good faith accept the situation, and sincerely desire the temporal and spiritusi well-being of the colored people. But its highest aim and ours is such a spiritual elevation of the colored peo- pie as shall carry all the most salutary influences into their sccial, political and domestic life. Our honest and intelligent aim is to lift them out of their degra- dation by bringing them to Christ. Our work among them is with no sectarian, as it is ~ ith no partisan political purpose. We propose to help make them intelli- gent and worthy Christian people. There our responsibility ceases. As to partiea and sects, they must learn wisely to choose for themselves. Whatever the shading of their creed, we do care that they should be sincere in their love to God, close in their following of Christ, and honest in all their deal- iags with their fellow-men. We do care that their moral training shall be such that their religion shall mean not emotion merely, but character; not noise and bodily exercise, which profiteth little, but practical godliness, which leads one to earn an honest living for himself and his household, and suffers the neighbors chickens unmole3ted to roost low; not a religion of the lips and the tongue alone, but of the head and the heart controlling the life. Nowhere is a mere profession of godliness of much account, if virtues tried and true are not the proofs of an intelligent love and a sincere devotion. No creed can be accepted as a substitute for character. Christ must be wrought into the lif& ~ or we are not true Christians, and the more completely self-deceived we are, ~he gwreater will be our surprise, when, by and by, lie who is infallible in his ju6gineYt shall say, I never knew you. The cross worn upon the neck, or perched upon the 61~eeple~tops, or set up at every crossing, is at best a mocking reminder of our impiety; - if ever so loudly we profess to be saints, and yet live as though our religion were a ~olite theory with which to compliment our Maker, and to befool our fellow-men, ~ ~d not a thing of practical worth, to help one stand fire in the conflicts of x and in ~lie furnace of affliction. Such a genuine religion, temptatio. y climate, is wanted everywhere alike; in the East and the warranted to keep in aL 3outh country. The lofty and the lowly, the honored West, the North and the ~ table and the degraded, we and everybody, need it. and the despised, the respee gating. For it, and it alone, of all the worlds re- It is the only kind worth propi. power enfolded in every root-fibre of doctrine, ligions, has vital force and saving and in every seed-geim of truth. THE FIELD. ITEMS FROM - ver before; boarding-schcol over- GEEExWOOD, S. C.School fuller than e ske~arrangenwnts in neighboring crowded. Mr. Backenstose is cempelled to m, families for students, enrolled. We have a large ORAKGEBUIIG, S. C. Our school has 1% pupils 1~o have begun in music,. normal class. Six are teachers now. We have ~ - help us with a musical and this week we have resolved to foim a choir. Can you haa been injured by instrument ? We greatly need one for the church. Our organ taking it back and forth to church.

Items from the Field Editorial 74-75

74 Items from the Field. indirectly we were accessory to the placing of so dangerous a weapon in their handsa weapon, as respects their own inteiests, liable to kick backwe are bound to help fit them so to exercise the right that they shall not be the ignorant tools of corrupt and crafty men in either party as ignorant and unprincipled as them- selves. This the A. M. A. is striving wisely to do in accord with the sentiments and sympathies of ~many of the former slave-owners, who in good faith accept the situation, and sincerely desire the temporal and spiritusi well-being of the colored people. But its highest aim and ours is such a spiritual elevation of the colored peo- pie as shall carry all the most salutary influences into their sccial, political and domestic life. Our honest and intelligent aim is to lift them out of their degra- dation by bringing them to Christ. Our work among them is with no sectarian, as it is ~ ith no partisan political purpose. We propose to help make them intelli- gent and worthy Christian people. There our responsibility ceases. As to partiea and sects, they must learn wisely to choose for themselves. Whatever the shading of their creed, we do care that they should be sincere in their love to God, close in their following of Christ, and honest in all their deal- iags with their fellow-men. We do care that their moral training shall be such that their religion shall mean not emotion merely, but character; not noise and bodily exercise, which profiteth little, but practical godliness, which leads one to earn an honest living for himself and his household, and suffers the neighbors chickens unmole3ted to roost low; not a religion of the lips and the tongue alone, but of the head and the heart controlling the life. Nowhere is a mere profession of godliness of much account, if virtues tried and true are not the proofs of an intelligent love and a sincere devotion. No creed can be accepted as a substitute for character. Christ must be wrought into the lif& ~ or we are not true Christians, and the more completely self-deceived we are, ~he gwreater will be our surprise, when, by and by, lie who is infallible in his ju6gineYt shall say, I never knew you. The cross worn upon the neck, or perched upon the 61~eeple~tops, or set up at every crossing, is at best a mocking reminder of our impiety; - if ever so loudly we profess to be saints, and yet live as though our religion were a ~olite theory with which to compliment our Maker, and to befool our fellow-men, ~ ~d not a thing of practical worth, to help one stand fire in the conflicts of x and in ~lie furnace of affliction. Such a genuine religion, temptatio. y climate, is wanted everywhere alike; in the East and the warranted to keep in aL 3outh country. The lofty and the lowly, the honored West, the North and the ~ table and the degraded, we and everybody, need it. and the despised, the respee gating. For it, and it alone, of all the worlds re- It is the only kind worth propi. power enfolded in every root-fibre of doctrine, ligions, has vital force and saving and in every seed-geim of truth. THE FIELD. ITEMS FROM - ver before; boarding-schcol over- GEEExWOOD, S. C.School fuller than e ske~arrangenwnts in neighboring crowded. Mr. Backenstose is cempelled to m, families for students, enrolled. We have a large ORAKGEBUIIG, S. C. Our school has 1% pupils 1~o have begun in music,. normal class. Six are teachers now. We have ~ - help us with a musical and this week we have resolved to foim a choir. Can you haa been injured by instrument ? We greatly need one for the church. Our organ taking it back and forth to church. General N~te8. MACON, GA.Pastor Lathrop has printed on his Gospel Press, (given him while a Home Missionary in Wisconsin by a lady at the East), a stirring pastoral address. It includes a warm greeting, notice of services and invitations thereto also of the Lewis High School and the Sunday-school, enforced by appropriate Scripture. We quote one paragraph: No sectarian gospel will be taught from this pulpit. The pastor heartily believes, and endeavors to preach, the broad, liberal, helpful Gospel of peace on earth, gobd-will toward men, through our Lord Jesus Christ. This gospel of the Prince of Peace does not agree with quarreling among Christians, or strifes between churches. If My kingdom were of this world, then would My servants fight, said the Master. Our great aim will be to show how this glorious gospel and this blessed Jesus will help every needy heart to bear all its burdens; how every soul may be freed from the bondage of sin, and filled with love, meekness, temperance, patience, purity, righteousness, and joy, which the world knows not, neither can give nor take away. TALLADEGA, ALA.Some recent conversions and cases of special interest Ia religious things are reported in the college. One student, at least, has declared his desire to go to Africa some day, if the Lord shall open the way. SELMA. ALA.A happy work of grace is reported frcm the Burrell school, resulting in a considerable number of conversions. GENERAL NOTES. The Freedmen, Senator Windom has introduced a bill providing for the colonization and distribution of the colored people of the Southern States in new States and Terri- tories as they m:~y select. Some interest and sympathy with the project has been expressed by prominent colored men~ though we think the great majority of the most intelligent of thetn are persuaded that by patience and industry they can conquer peace and a place for themselves anywhere. Henry M. Stanley, the explorer, was present at the recent meeting of the Conference on the Civilization of Africa, and said that he would lead the Belgjan Exploring Expedition, which is soon to start for Africa. The Indians. The Board of Indian Commissioners held its regular yearly meeting for the preparation of its annual report in Washington last week. Besides the members of the Board there were representatives of the religious bodies interested in the man- agement of Indian affairs through their missionary operations among the different tribes, and also because many of the Indian agents are appointed on their recom- mendation. From the tenth annual report of the Board to the President, it appears that more than one-half of the Indians have discarded the blanket and donned a civilized garb; that about one-half have moved out of their lodges and wig- wams into houses, the number of which has increased nearly threefold in ten years; that the number of pupils in Indian schools has mor~ than doubled; that nearly one-sixth of the Indian population can read; that the number of acres of land cultivated by the Indians is about five times as great as ten years ago; that the production of wheat has increased nearly fivefold, of oats and barley nearly fourfold, and of hay nearly ninefold; and that the Indians own about three times as many horses and mules, six times as many cattle, seven times as many swine and

General Notes Editorial 75-76

General N~te8. MACON, GA.Pastor Lathrop has printed on his Gospel Press, (given him while a Home Missionary in Wisconsin by a lady at the East), a stirring pastoral address. It includes a warm greeting, notice of services and invitations thereto also of the Lewis High School and the Sunday-school, enforced by appropriate Scripture. We quote one paragraph: No sectarian gospel will be taught from this pulpit. The pastor heartily believes, and endeavors to preach, the broad, liberal, helpful Gospel of peace on earth, gobd-will toward men, through our Lord Jesus Christ. This gospel of the Prince of Peace does not agree with quarreling among Christians, or strifes between churches. If My kingdom were of this world, then would My servants fight, said the Master. Our great aim will be to show how this glorious gospel and this blessed Jesus will help every needy heart to bear all its burdens; how every soul may be freed from the bondage of sin, and filled with love, meekness, temperance, patience, purity, righteousness, and joy, which the world knows not, neither can give nor take away. TALLADEGA, ALA.Some recent conversions and cases of special interest Ia religious things are reported in the college. One student, at least, has declared his desire to go to Africa some day, if the Lord shall open the way. SELMA. ALA.A happy work of grace is reported frcm the Burrell school, resulting in a considerable number of conversions. GENERAL NOTES. The Freedmen, Senator Windom has introduced a bill providing for the colonization and distribution of the colored people of the Southern States in new States and Terri- tories as they m:~y select. Some interest and sympathy with the project has been expressed by prominent colored men~ though we think the great majority of the most intelligent of thetn are persuaded that by patience and industry they can conquer peace and a place for themselves anywhere. Henry M. Stanley, the explorer, was present at the recent meeting of the Conference on the Civilization of Africa, and said that he would lead the Belgjan Exploring Expedition, which is soon to start for Africa. The Indians. The Board of Indian Commissioners held its regular yearly meeting for the preparation of its annual report in Washington last week. Besides the members of the Board there were representatives of the religious bodies interested in the man- agement of Indian affairs through their missionary operations among the different tribes, and also because many of the Indian agents are appointed on their recom- mendation. From the tenth annual report of the Board to the President, it appears that more than one-half of the Indians have discarded the blanket and donned a civilized garb; that about one-half have moved out of their lodges and wig- wams into houses, the number of which has increased nearly threefold in ten years; that the number of pupils in Indian schools has mor~ than doubled; that nearly one-sixth of the Indian population can read; that the number of acres of land cultivated by the Indians is about five times as great as ten years ago; that the production of wheat has increased nearly fivefold, of oats and barley nearly fourfold, and of hay nearly ninefold; and that the Indians own about three times as many horses and mules, six times as many cattle, seven times as many swine and Our Query Uolumn. 76 about seventy-five times a~ many sheep as they did ten years ago. The Board remarks: This exhibit of results is certainly encouraging, and presents a strong argument against any radical change of policy. The Conference urge three measures upon the President and Congress 1. That courts of law be established. on Indian reservations, with jurisdiction in all cases where both parties are Indians. 2. That common schools be provided for Indians the same as for white children, under some regular system. 3. That the homestead law be so modified that an Indian may select his honiestead within the limits of the reservation to which he belongs.. The joint committee, consisting of three Senators and five Representatives, to whom the question of the transfer of the Indians to the War Department was submitted, being equally divided, have made two reports. Congressional experts have been trying to decide which of the two should have precedence as a quau majority report. Senator McCreery and Representatives Scales, Hooker and Boone favor the transfer. Their report claims that the present system actually prevailed even be- fore (in 1848) the Indians were given, in care of the Interior Department, as the War Department neither appointed nor surpervised the agents, but only received their reports. All past evils are therefore traceable to this system. The peace policyIn 1868 was a confession of its failure. The army control will be better,. because of the high character of army officers, and the system of accountability to which they are subject, because it will cost less money and avoid wars. Senators Sanders and Oglesby, and Representatives Stewart and Van Voor- hes report against the transfer, because of the abuses when the management was in the hands of the War Department down to 1849; because the Indians and the army officers agree in personally disliking the proposed transfer ; be- cause of the progress in civilization already made ; on the ground of econ- omy and appropriateness ; and because not one-third of the Indians need military supervision in any form. They ascribe the failures of the past to the unwise recognition of the tribal relation, exclusion from the protection of civil law, and of landed rights. They recommend that the Indian Bureau be made a distinct department, with a Cabinet officer at its head, and that the President be authorized to transfer temporarily the control of hostile tribes. The proposal to transfer was rejected by a vote of 101 to 88. The Chinese. The Committee on Education and Labor has introduced a bill, which has been passed in the House, forbidding the master of any vessel to bring more than fifteen Chinamen at any one time to the United States, under a penalty of $1O& fine for each passenger, and imprisonment for six months. We hope the Senate will have the good sense to refuse its consent to such action, which is a slight upon the Chinese Embassy here, and may easily lead to a withdrawal of the privi- leges to American citizens in the Flowery Land, which it was thought worth a. good deal of effort to obtain. OUR QUERY COLUMN. We print with great satisfaction the two following answers to the question about the training of nurses. The first tells what is being done in Le Moyne Insti tute; the second lays down foundation principles. Training for Nurses. I note wit.h interest the queiy in the January MrssroNAuv relative to the training of nurses. It is but one of many indications of a rapidly growing dissat- S

Our Query Column Editorial 76-78

Our Query Uolumn. 76 about seventy-five times a~ many sheep as they did ten years ago. The Board remarks: This exhibit of results is certainly encouraging, and presents a strong argument against any radical change of policy. The Conference urge three measures upon the President and Congress 1. That courts of law be established. on Indian reservations, with jurisdiction in all cases where both parties are Indians. 2. That common schools be provided for Indians the same as for white children, under some regular system. 3. That the homestead law be so modified that an Indian may select his honiestead within the limits of the reservation to which he belongs.. The joint committee, consisting of three Senators and five Representatives, to whom the question of the transfer of the Indians to the War Department was submitted, being equally divided, have made two reports. Congressional experts have been trying to decide which of the two should have precedence as a quau majority report. Senator McCreery and Representatives Scales, Hooker and Boone favor the transfer. Their report claims that the present system actually prevailed even be- fore (in 1848) the Indians were given, in care of the Interior Department, as the War Department neither appointed nor surpervised the agents, but only received their reports. All past evils are therefore traceable to this system. The peace policyIn 1868 was a confession of its failure. The army control will be better,. because of the high character of army officers, and the system of accountability to which they are subject, because it will cost less money and avoid wars. Senators Sanders and Oglesby, and Representatives Stewart and Van Voor- hes report against the transfer, because of the abuses when the management was in the hands of the War Department down to 1849; because the Indians and the army officers agree in personally disliking the proposed transfer ; be- cause of the progress in civilization already made ; on the ground of econ- omy and appropriateness ; and because not one-third of the Indians need military supervision in any form. They ascribe the failures of the past to the unwise recognition of the tribal relation, exclusion from the protection of civil law, and of landed rights. They recommend that the Indian Bureau be made a distinct department, with a Cabinet officer at its head, and that the President be authorized to transfer temporarily the control of hostile tribes. The proposal to transfer was rejected by a vote of 101 to 88. The Chinese. The Committee on Education and Labor has introduced a bill, which has been passed in the House, forbidding the master of any vessel to bring more than fifteen Chinamen at any one time to the United States, under a penalty of $1O& fine for each passenger, and imprisonment for six months. We hope the Senate will have the good sense to refuse its consent to such action, which is a slight upon the Chinese Embassy here, and may easily lead to a withdrawal of the privi- leges to American citizens in the Flowery Land, which it was thought worth a. good deal of effort to obtain. OUR QUERY COLUMN. We print with great satisfaction the two following answers to the question about the training of nurses. The first tells what is being done in Le Moyne Insti tute; the second lays down foundation principles. Training for Nurses. I note wit.h interest the queiy in the January MrssroNAuv relative to the training of nurses. It is but one of many indications of a rapidly growing dissat- S Our Query~ (Jolu?nn 77 isfaction with the present system of. education in this country. More and more it is coming to be the feeling that education, in its true sense, is not designed, as has been thought in the past, to fit people for . higher positions, but ratherto fit them to make the most of life in the positions they do occupy, and which must, in any event, be filled by some one. To satisfy this most reasonable feeling, more of the things that pertain to practical life must be thought and talked and taught in our schools. . It is no doubt a serious question as to how a safe transition can be made from the present highly artificial system to one that will have a more prac- tical bearing on the every-day life of the masses. In this case advice of a similar nature to that which Horace Greeley gave about resumption will prove, at least, the most reasonable. The best and only way tQU~ake the change is to change. But for the query. At Le Moyne School, where we have one almost continu- ous daily session from 9 A. i~r. to 3 r. ~r., at least an hour of this time each day must be given by the pupils to some branch of practical or industrial knowledge. We cannot wait for all the desired appliances in this work, or to have a beaten track pointed out to us. We are beginning with such appliances as are at hand, and we expect to learn from our own experience as well as from other sources; but at any rate in time to earn success. In the direct line of training nurses, each girl in the school, sixteen years old or over, will devote the industrial hour, for two days in each week, to studies un- der this head, including special lessons in anatomy; physiology and hygiene. For the present, at least, no text-book is to be placed in the hands of the stu- dents. They are to gain their knowledge from lectures, which are to be followed by general and familiar conversation between instructor and pupils on the same sul)ject. Each girl will be required to take notes of the lecture, and to write out what she can of the knowledge imparted. After a subject is completed, each mem- ber of the class is required to prepare an essny, putting in the best possible form her knowledge of the entire subject in all its bearings. This is, in a general way, to effect the theoretical training. We hope to find op- portunity to give members of the class at least a little practice: First, in their own homes or circle of friends; second, possibly in the womans ward of the city hospital, located near us; third, in private families desirous of forwarding our work; or fourth, among the destitute poor really in need of such services. Our work is to commence with the simpler and more commonly occurring complaints of this section, as colds, accidents that happen often, chills and fever, etc. I should like to write more fully of our plans as they relate to other industrial matters, but space forbids. We are thoroughly convinced, however, that in this matter of practical teaching, something more effective than tracts is required to make sure of accomplishing any great amount of good. We mnst come to closer quarters in this struggle; it must be made a hand-to-hand conflict. Along our part of the line we should have no fears of success if we could have placed at our disposal the appliances really needed for the work. In the training of nnrses, we need and must have a good manikin, a human skeleton, some forms or models of different organs of the human body, etc., etc. Who will come forward and help us to them I A. J. STEELE, Le ifoyne Normal Institute, lfiemphis, Tenn. The treatment which preserves health is the best treatment for its recovery. We should lend our pupils to see that wholesome diet eaten at proper hours, and sufficient sleep taken at the time which God appointed for sleep, will impart more 8oine Fir8t Jrr~pre& 8ion8. physical vigor than any other two agencies; and that a disregard for them is a fruitful source of much sickness, especially among colored people. Sunlight and pure air are important factors in making the sick well, and keep- ing the well from being sick. The temperance pledge is also a cheap and safe medi- cine. A knowledge of the chemistry of food, of digestion, circulation and respira- tion is important, and may be taught to comparatively young pupils. Nature, like a sensible dame, resents an insult; and sickness is the punishment she imposes to avenge her injuries. Nor will punishment cease until reparation is made. AMos W. FARKHAM, Avery Institute, Uharleston, 8. U. We are happy to make mention, which is all it would be proper for us to do in this place, of the book for boys written by Gen. 0. 0. howard. Our friends are so largely his friends, that many of them will want to read Donalds School )ays, putdished by Lee & Shepard, of Boston. THE FREEDMEN. REV. JOS. E. ROY, I). D., FIELD ~UPERD~TENDEbT, AILANTA, GA. SOME FIRST ilYIPRESSIONS. 1. I find this school and church work in more forward condition than I had expected. I had known of the slow process of building up educational and church institutions at the West. I knew of the greater difficulties in this line at the South. I am gratified to find the schools in such substantial buildings, and almcst all the churches in houses of their own, some of them attractive, and some very rough. 2. I find that these people handle the Congregational system better than I had expected. They even excel in parlia- mentary tactics; and what is the course of Congregational usage but the wise pro- ~cedure of a deliberative assemb1y~ In their reaction from the experience of bondage they rejoice in the full liberty ~of Christs house. If this system was, good enough to be given by the Apostles to the early churches round about the Mediterranean, which had not, as I be- lieve, been trained in New England, ~nd whose members had to take from them some severe rebukes in the line of morals, surely it is gooQenough for these lowly people. 3. I find an improvt meat of feeling among Southern people, both towards the Freedmen and our work among them. As the students come back from vacation service to our several institu- tions, they report this advance in good- will. The people are learning that ours is a philanthropic and missionary, and not a political process, and so their pr?ju- dice is abating. It is natural that some worthy people should feel a little cha- grin at the slipping of this work out of their hands; but not a few of them are glad to see it carried on by anybody. They say, now that these people have been made citizens, they must be made the best of citizens. 4. I find that the school work is the almost indispensable prerequisite to the church work. It fixes the place. It draws out the material. It qualifies for church activity. It is no gain to the Kingdom for us simply to transfer the old-time church members to our system. Our work is to train up the youth, to de- velop intelligence, and to organize a fellowship of congenial material. A judicious man of another denomination,

Some First Impressions The Freedmen 78-80

8oine Fir8t Jrr~pre& 8ion8. physical vigor than any other two agencies; and that a disregard for them is a fruitful source of much sickness, especially among colored people. Sunlight and pure air are important factors in making the sick well, and keep- ing the well from being sick. The temperance pledge is also a cheap and safe medi- cine. A knowledge of the chemistry of food, of digestion, circulation and respira- tion is important, and may be taught to comparatively young pupils. Nature, like a sensible dame, resents an insult; and sickness is the punishment she imposes to avenge her injuries. Nor will punishment cease until reparation is made. AMos W. FARKHAM, Avery Institute, Uharleston, 8. U. We are happy to make mention, which is all it would be proper for us to do in this place, of the book for boys written by Gen. 0. 0. howard. Our friends are so largely his friends, that many of them will want to read Donalds School )ays, putdished by Lee & Shepard, of Boston. THE FREEDMEN. REV. JOS. E. ROY, I). D., FIELD ~UPERD~TENDEbT, AILANTA, GA. SOME FIRST ilYIPRESSIONS. 1. I find this school and church work in more forward condition than I had expected. I had known of the slow process of building up educational and church institutions at the West. I knew of the greater difficulties in this line at the South. I am gratified to find the schools in such substantial buildings, and almcst all the churches in houses of their own, some of them attractive, and some very rough. 2. I find that these people handle the Congregational system better than I had expected. They even excel in parlia- mentary tactics; and what is the course of Congregational usage but the wise pro- ~cedure of a deliberative assemb1y~ In their reaction from the experience of bondage they rejoice in the full liberty ~of Christs house. If this system was, good enough to be given by the Apostles to the early churches round about the Mediterranean, which had not, as I be- lieve, been trained in New England, ~nd whose members had to take from them some severe rebukes in the line of morals, surely it is gooQenough for these lowly people. 3. I find an improvt meat of feeling among Southern people, both towards the Freedmen and our work among them. As the students come back from vacation service to our several institu- tions, they report this advance in good- will. The people are learning that ours is a philanthropic and missionary, and not a political process, and so their pr?ju- dice is abating. It is natural that some worthy people should feel a little cha- grin at the slipping of this work out of their hands; but not a few of them are glad to see it carried on by anybody. They say, now that these people have been made citizens, they must be made the best of citizens. 4. I find that the school work is the almost indispensable prerequisite to the church work. It fixes the place. It draws out the material. It qualifies for church activity. It is no gain to the Kingdom for us simply to transfer the old-time church members to our system. Our work is to train up the youth, to de- velop intelligence, and to organize a fellowship of congenial material. A judicious man of another denomination, Some Fir8t ]mpre88ion8. 79 speaking upon this subject, said that the Congregationalists could afford to wait for the young; that his church could not wait. It is surprising to see how rapidly the young people come forward, for the mass of our congregations are of that class. 5. I find a philosophical rcason for our call to thc church work. This peo- pie have been taught to scek dreams and visions at conversion; to think that there can be no regeneration without a dread- ful physical process of comino through. Now, there are not a few persons of strong minds and strong wills who say that they never can come through in that way. Some such have been delighted to find the quiet way of submission and fipth. Some of the noblest natures now in our churches were of that sort. Happy have been the preachers ar~d teachers who have led them in this way of peace. 6. I see a wise Providence in the open- ing of Homes for our workers. It was impossible to get board among the white people. The Freedmen had not the accommodations. It became neces- sary to provide. Homes which should be the property of the A. M. A. They become castles of safety and abodes of comfort. They also bring to bear the example and influence of home, which is a valuable adjunct to the missionary scheme. 7. As the soldiers once took this country, so now the women seem to be taking it over again. In all our char- tered institutions, men are at work, affording the masculine quality to the workmanship. But in all these, ladies are employed as teachers in the higher as well as in the primary depart- ments. Many of the normal and high schools are under the exclusive control of ladies. In the earlier conflict their sex was iheir protection. In all the movement their patience and tact and heroism, and their loving devotement to the good of the people, have secured a crown of success. Our country will never know its debt to these patriotic women. 8. That whatever in politic or person- al estate may betide the Freedmen, our business is to keep pegging away at th& up-lifting process. Whether for the time their vote is allowed them or not ;~ whether they be ~ku-kluxed or bush-. whacked or bulldozed; whether the South favor this work or not, this one thing we have to doto go for ward patiently, kindly, and strongly in this rudimental., work of Christian civilization. 9. That we are not to repress the emotional nature of this people, but to. give it a basis of intelligence. This element, which is a beauty and a power in the endowment of man, abounds in, the African mind; enriched by culture. it may yet add a glory to our civiliza-.. tion. Barnabas Root and Prof. Blyden both argued that we should develop. their race according to their idiosyncra- sies; and yet the tendency seems to be that as they advance in cultivation they re-act to the more severe and logical style, and so lose somewhat of their power. We ought not to contribute to. this result by our training process. Let them sing some of their rich spirituals. ~ Give them our hymns and tunes that have an enlivening glow. Be not afraid to appeal to their hearts as well as to their heads. Let them be allowed the Pauline privilege of saying Ainento the giving of thanks. It is a robbery of this people to bring them down to the jistellectual severity of the Puritans. It has been argued that we of the Caucasian blood have weakened ourselves by this. ruling down of our emotional seuti-. ments. It was a friend who said at Taunton, that what the Congregational-.. ists needed was consecrated emotion. At the same place it was incorrectly argued.. that our system was not adapted to the~ freed people because of their tropical nature. Was it so with the Oriental.. nature 1,800 years ago? 80 The Central South Conference. 10. That those who, in this work, during the years past, have gone on in the face of prejudice and ostracism and persecution, have made the way com- paratively easy for those of us who join them now. THE CENTRAL SOUTH CONFERENCE. The Annual Meeting at Chattanooga, Teun. REV. 5. 5. ASHLEY, ATLANTA. This body held its annual meeting at Chattanooga, Tenn., on the 15th, 16th and 17th of January, the prevalence of the yellow fever having prevented its session at the regular time in November. Owing to the withdrawal of most of the Alabama and of all the Georgia churches, to form conferences in their respective States, the Conference now consists of the Congregational churches in Mis- sissippi, Tennessee and Northern Ala- bama, twelve in number. The churches in Mississippi were not represented. Rev. Horace J. Taylor, of Athens, Ga., was chosen Moderator. Each evening of the session was occupied with preaching; Rev. S. S. Ashley, Dr. J. E. Roy and Prof. H. S. Bennett officiating. Papers were read as follows: On the Diaco- nate, by Dr. Roy; on the Congrega- tional Polity, the Scriptural authority therefor, and its advantages, by Rev. Tem- ple Cutler of Chattanooga; and interest- ing discussions were awakened by them. This Conference evidently believes that the time has come to push Congrega- tional church extension in the South. The experience of those who have been long in this field is, that Congregational- ism is eminently adapted to the South. The narratives of the state of religion in the Conference developed several in- teresting facts concerning Chattanooga. That city was severely smitten by the yellow fever. Through all the autumn, business and meetings were suspended. The citizens had largely fled away, and the place was left, to the sick, the dying and the doctors. The Chattanooga church consists of about eighty members; sev- eral of them were smitten, but not one died. The Band of Hope, a society pledged to abstinence from intoxicating drinks, tobacco and profanity, having between two hundred and three hundred members, lost only two members by the fever. This Band was organized by Rev. E. 0. Tade some ten years since. Its object is to gather in and hold under strict New Testament temperance prin- ciples the youth of both sexes. Some twelve hundred names have been en- rolled upon its records. Its power has been felt far and wide. A branch of the mother band has been organized in the city. It may be safely said that through its agency Chattanooga is more free from intemperance than any other Southern city hereabouts. Its elections are less noted for rioting and~lrunkenness than those of the cities of Georgia. Here is one result of A. M. A. work. Every church should have connected closely with it a kindred organization. The steadiness of this church in Chatta- nooga is largely owing to the temper- ance principles of its members, adopted while they were young. Bro. Taylor gave the Conference an interesting description of his former mis- sion field on the Gilbert Islands, point- ing out their peculiar coral formation, the customs and character of the inhabi- tants, and the success of Christian mis- sions among them. Prof. Bennett gave encouraging state- ments concerning Fisk University. Prof. Spence is in Scotland; Prof. Cravath at his post, and the machinery is run- ning smoothly. The number of students is about as large as usual; the ieligious interest not quite so decided as in former years, It was voted to invite the Congrega- tional churches of the South to meet in convention at Atlanta in November, 1880.

Rev. S. S. Ashley Ashley, S. S., Rev. Central South Conference: The Annual Meeting at Chattanooga, Tenn. The Freedmen 80-81

80 The Central South Conference. 10. That those who, in this work, during the years past, have gone on in the face of prejudice and ostracism and persecution, have made the way com- paratively easy for those of us who join them now. THE CENTRAL SOUTH CONFERENCE. The Annual Meeting at Chattanooga, Teun. REV. 5. 5. ASHLEY, ATLANTA. This body held its annual meeting at Chattanooga, Tenn., on the 15th, 16th and 17th of January, the prevalence of the yellow fever having prevented its session at the regular time in November. Owing to the withdrawal of most of the Alabama and of all the Georgia churches, to form conferences in their respective States, the Conference now consists of the Congregational churches in Mis- sissippi, Tennessee and Northern Ala- bama, twelve in number. The churches in Mississippi were not represented. Rev. Horace J. Taylor, of Athens, Ga., was chosen Moderator. Each evening of the session was occupied with preaching; Rev. S. S. Ashley, Dr. J. E. Roy and Prof. H. S. Bennett officiating. Papers were read as follows: On the Diaco- nate, by Dr. Roy; on the Congrega- tional Polity, the Scriptural authority therefor, and its advantages, by Rev. Tem- ple Cutler of Chattanooga; and interest- ing discussions were awakened by them. This Conference evidently believes that the time has come to push Congrega- tional church extension in the South. The experience of those who have been long in this field is, that Congregational- ism is eminently adapted to the South. The narratives of the state of religion in the Conference developed several in- teresting facts concerning Chattanooga. That city was severely smitten by the yellow fever. Through all the autumn, business and meetings were suspended. The citizens had largely fled away, and the place was left, to the sick, the dying and the doctors. The Chattanooga church consists of about eighty members; sev- eral of them were smitten, but not one died. The Band of Hope, a society pledged to abstinence from intoxicating drinks, tobacco and profanity, having between two hundred and three hundred members, lost only two members by the fever. This Band was organized by Rev. E. 0. Tade some ten years since. Its object is to gather in and hold under strict New Testament temperance prin- ciples the youth of both sexes. Some twelve hundred names have been en- rolled upon its records. Its power has been felt far and wide. A branch of the mother band has been organized in the city. It may be safely said that through its agency Chattanooga is more free from intemperance than any other Southern city hereabouts. Its elections are less noted for rioting and~lrunkenness than those of the cities of Georgia. Here is one result of A. M. A. work. Every church should have connected closely with it a kindred organization. The steadiness of this church in Chatta- nooga is largely owing to the temper- ance principles of its members, adopted while they were young. Bro. Taylor gave the Conference an interesting description of his former mis- sion field on the Gilbert Islands, point- ing out their peculiar coral formation, the customs and character of the inhabi- tants, and the success of Christian mis- sions among them. Prof. Bennett gave encouraging state- ments concerning Fisk University. Prof. Spence is in Scotland; Prof. Cravath at his post, and the machinery is run- ning smoothly. The number of students is about as large as usual; the ieligious interest not quite so decided as in former years, It was voted to invite the Congrega- tional churches of the South to meet in convention at Atlanta in November, 1880. Atlanta lfniver8ityRevival Among the Student& 81 GEORGIA. Atlanta University, Alumni and Students. PROF. J. F. FULLER, ATLARTA. This is the tenth year since the organi- zation of this school. The first class graduated from the higher normal course in 1873, and the first from the college in 1876. Classes have graduated regularly from both departments each year since. The alumni number 52, of whom, at graduation, 50 were professing Christians. With the exception of three who are now pursuing a higher course of study, and one who has, died since graduation, these are all doing active work for the Master among their own people, and, with others who have left school before completing the regular course of study, are selecting and send- ing to the University the more promising of their pupils. The present year shows a larger num- ber of students in attendance and of a better class. Besides those already es- tablished in different parts of the State, over a hundred of the students teach dur- ing the long summer vacation in the public schools, and also engage in Sab- bath school work. It is estimated that during the year 1878 over ten thousand pupils in the State of Georgia were taught by those educated at this Univer- sity. The influence of the school is commensurate with the number of its workers, and that influence, now very marked, is constantly increasing. The last catalogue shows 30 in the college classes, 37 in the preparatory, 72 in the higher normal, and 104 in the normal. The buildings are of brick, plain, sub- stantial and convenient, but inadequate to the present and prospective needs. The grounds are amplenearly sixty acresand beautifully located in the outskirts of the city. Revival among the Students, REV. c. w. FRANcIS, ATLANTA. You will be glad to know that at this school we are in the midst of a deep already brought into the kingdom a goodly number of precious souls. There has been a good degree of religious in- terest since the school caine together in October, and during the week of prayer, which we faithfully observed, that in- terest xvas deepened; and since that time some have been committing themselves to Christs service. The day of prayer for colleges, just observed, was an occa- sion of deep and solemn interest, and a considerable number took a step f or- ward. A few extra meetings have been held; but, for the most part, affairs have gone on as usual, with no interruption of school work; and but for the greater quiet and improved order and discipline of the school, and increasing fidelity to duty, an observer would not know how thorough a work was going forward. Our reliance has been mainly upon the truth, earnestly and plainly presented, rather than u pon any unusual measures, and our aim to reach the conscience, and thus secure an intelligent :and thor- ough submission to the claims of God. All the members of the classes to grad- uate this year now profess to be Chris- tians, and we hope will be well prepared to do effective work for the Master in the wide and needy field open before them. Some who have long withstood every good influence are already affect- ed, and we hope will soon yield to. Christs claims; indeed, there are hardly any in the family who are not ready to acknowledge a deep interest in the sub- ject. We do not like to give numbers, but we may reasonably hope that as many as twelve have already begun the new life, and more than as many more are deeply serious. We hope for a great- er work and a deeper consecration, and that the Lord may baptize afresh for the great and growing work pressing upon us. There are constantly, even at this season, calls for teachers in all parts of this State wleich cannot be answered, and in almost all cases Christian charac- ter is one of the first qualifications and effective work of grace, which Las sought.

Prof. J. F. Fuller Fuller, J. F., Prof. Georgia--Atlanta University, Alumni and Students The Freedmen 81

Atlanta lfniver8ityRevival Among the Student& 81 GEORGIA. Atlanta University, Alumni and Students. PROF. J. F. FULLER, ATLARTA. This is the tenth year since the organi- zation of this school. The first class graduated from the higher normal course in 1873, and the first from the college in 1876. Classes have graduated regularly from both departments each year since. The alumni number 52, of whom, at graduation, 50 were professing Christians. With the exception of three who are now pursuing a higher course of study, and one who has, died since graduation, these are all doing active work for the Master among their own people, and, with others who have left school before completing the regular course of study, are selecting and send- ing to the University the more promising of their pupils. The present year shows a larger num- ber of students in attendance and of a better class. Besides those already es- tablished in different parts of the State, over a hundred of the students teach dur- ing the long summer vacation in the public schools, and also engage in Sab- bath school work. It is estimated that during the year 1878 over ten thousand pupils in the State of Georgia were taught by those educated at this Univer- sity. The influence of the school is commensurate with the number of its workers, and that influence, now very marked, is constantly increasing. The last catalogue shows 30 in the college classes, 37 in the preparatory, 72 in the higher normal, and 104 in the normal. The buildings are of brick, plain, sub- stantial and convenient, but inadequate to the present and prospective needs. The grounds are amplenearly sixty acresand beautifully located in the outskirts of the city. Revival among the Students, REV. c. w. FRANcIS, ATLANTA. You will be glad to know that at this school we are in the midst of a deep already brought into the kingdom a goodly number of precious souls. There has been a good degree of religious in- terest since the school caine together in October, and during the week of prayer, which we faithfully observed, that in- terest xvas deepened; and since that time some have been committing themselves to Christs service. The day of prayer for colleges, just observed, was an occa- sion of deep and solemn interest, and a considerable number took a step f or- ward. A few extra meetings have been held; but, for the most part, affairs have gone on as usual, with no interruption of school work; and but for the greater quiet and improved order and discipline of the school, and increasing fidelity to duty, an observer would not know how thorough a work was going forward. Our reliance has been mainly upon the truth, earnestly and plainly presented, rather than u pon any unusual measures, and our aim to reach the conscience, and thus secure an intelligent :and thor- ough submission to the claims of God. All the members of the classes to grad- uate this year now profess to be Chris- tians, and we hope will be well prepared to do effective work for the Master in the wide and needy field open before them. Some who have long withstood every good influence are already affect- ed, and we hope will soon yield to. Christs claims; indeed, there are hardly any in the family who are not ready to acknowledge a deep interest in the sub- ject. We do not like to give numbers, but we may reasonably hope that as many as twelve have already begun the new life, and more than as many more are deeply serious. We hope for a great- er work and a deeper consecration, and that the Lord may baptize afresh for the great and growing work pressing upon us. There are constantly, even at this season, calls for teachers in all parts of this State wleich cannot be answered, and in almost all cases Christian charac- ter is one of the first qualifications and effective work of grace, which Las sought.

Rev. C. W. Francis Francis, C. W., Rev. Georgia--Revival among the Students The Freedmen 81-82

Atlanta lfniver8ityRevival Among the Student& 81 GEORGIA. Atlanta University, Alumni and Students. PROF. J. F. FULLER, ATLARTA. This is the tenth year since the organi- zation of this school. The first class graduated from the higher normal course in 1873, and the first from the college in 1876. Classes have graduated regularly from both departments each year since. The alumni number 52, of whom, at graduation, 50 were professing Christians. With the exception of three who are now pursuing a higher course of study, and one who has, died since graduation, these are all doing active work for the Master among their own people, and, with others who have left school before completing the regular course of study, are selecting and send- ing to the University the more promising of their pupils. The present year shows a larger num- ber of students in attendance and of a better class. Besides those already es- tablished in different parts of the State, over a hundred of the students teach dur- ing the long summer vacation in the public schools, and also engage in Sab- bath school work. It is estimated that during the year 1878 over ten thousand pupils in the State of Georgia were taught by those educated at this Univer- sity. The influence of the school is commensurate with the number of its workers, and that influence, now very marked, is constantly increasing. The last catalogue shows 30 in the college classes, 37 in the preparatory, 72 in the higher normal, and 104 in the normal. The buildings are of brick, plain, sub- stantial and convenient, but inadequate to the present and prospective needs. The grounds are amplenearly sixty acresand beautifully located in the outskirts of the city. Revival among the Students, REV. c. w. FRANcIS, ATLANTA. You will be glad to know that at this school we are in the midst of a deep already brought into the kingdom a goodly number of precious souls. There has been a good degree of religious in- terest since the school caine together in October, and during the week of prayer, which we faithfully observed, that in- terest xvas deepened; and since that time some have been committing themselves to Christs service. The day of prayer for colleges, just observed, was an occa- sion of deep and solemn interest, and a considerable number took a step f or- ward. A few extra meetings have been held; but, for the most part, affairs have gone on as usual, with no interruption of school work; and but for the greater quiet and improved order and discipline of the school, and increasing fidelity to duty, an observer would not know how thorough a work was going forward. Our reliance has been mainly upon the truth, earnestly and plainly presented, rather than u pon any unusual measures, and our aim to reach the conscience, and thus secure an intelligent :and thor- ough submission to the claims of God. All the members of the classes to grad- uate this year now profess to be Chris- tians, and we hope will be well prepared to do effective work for the Master in the wide and needy field open before them. Some who have long withstood every good influence are already affect- ed, and we hope will soon yield to. Christs claims; indeed, there are hardly any in the family who are not ready to acknowledge a deep interest in the sub- ject. We do not like to give numbers, but we may reasonably hope that as many as twelve have already begun the new life, and more than as many more are deeply serious. We hope for a great- er work and a deeper consecration, and that the Lord may baptize afresh for the great and growing work pressing upon us. There are constantly, even at this season, calls for teachers in all parts of this State wleich cannot be answered, and in almost all cases Christian charac- ter is one of the first qualifications and effective work of grace, which Las sought. 82 christmas FestivalStraight University and central cAurch. ALABAMA. Christmas Festival Bearing One Anothers Burdens. REV. WILLIAM H. ASH, FLORENCE. From the depletion made in Septem- ber by many of our members going to Kansas, a dark cloud for a time gathered over the work here; but I be- lieve the crisis is past, and some that were active in opposition are now work- ing in harmony with us, and endeavor- ng to take part in every good work. The fiithful few are ever encouraged by these cheering words: But if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it; lest haply ye be found even to fight against God. Up to the Sabbath previous to Christ- mas we were undecided as to whether it was best to have a Christmas tree; but I found so many willing hearts and ready hands eager to help, and particularly some not members of the church, but friendly to it, that I threw all my influence in this direction to make it a success. At first we planned to have it in the church; but finding that the building used for our. Sunday services was too small, it was removed to the court-house, where we had ample room. The church would only accommodate about one-fifth of the people who came with their children to receive the gifts, for we had something for nearly every Methodist and Baptist boy and girl, as well as every Congregationalist in town. On Friday night, the ladies of our church gave an entertainment to aid in defraying the expe.nses incurred by the burial of a member of the church who had died very suddenly. He would have been buried by the town but for a few loyal and hithful brethren who re- volted at any such idea, and at once as- sumed the responsibility, though there was not one cent in the treasury. At the supper they cleared enough to pay the debt, and quite a little ~um in addi- tion. Our polity is guarded with the same sacredness as in New England. $.LOUISIANA. Straight University and the Central Church A Week of Prayer and Work of Grace Revival Incidents. REV. WALTER S. ALEXANDER, NEW ORLEANS. New Orleans, Li., Feb. 1st, 1879. The terrible epidemic which held this city in its relentless grasp for five months and created general gloom and depres sion, delayed the opening of the Uni- versity till December 1st. When we closed the last term and planned for another yearour first year in the new University buildingour hopes were strong and enthusiastic, and we said, With the attraction and novelty of a fresh, beautiful building in a central po- sition, and the tide of public sentiment strongly in our favor, the new year will be a marked period in the educational in- terests of our State. These brilliant ex- pectations were changed to grave uncer- tainty and anxiety. But God is with us, and our fears are already dissipated. In the first place, the colored people were wonderfully exempt from the ravages of the fever. There were instances of the fever, but the mortality was slight. The only disadvantage was the uncertainty regarding the time of opening the term, which induced a large number to enter into other school arrangements. At this writing we have in the Academic Depart- ment 175, and in the Law Department 25. New students are enrolled every week, and we have great occasion for satisfaction and gratitude. Our friends will be glad to know that the new Uni- versity building suits our needs to perfec- tion. We could hardly suggest a change in the arrangement of rooms. In many respects it is a model house. If our friends could understand how earnestly we desire to furnish our beautiful chapel and two additional recitation rooms, in- to which we are almost ready to swarm, and how we long to see a neat fence sur- rounding the lot, isolating and protect- ing us, situated as we are on the grand boulevard of the city, I am sure that some

Rev. William H. Ash Ash, William H., Rev. Alabama, Florence--Christmas Festival--Bearing One Another's Burdens The Freedmen 82

82 christmas FestivalStraight University and central cAurch. ALABAMA. Christmas Festival Bearing One Anothers Burdens. REV. WILLIAM H. ASH, FLORENCE. From the depletion made in Septem- ber by many of our members going to Kansas, a dark cloud for a time gathered over the work here; but I be- lieve the crisis is past, and some that were active in opposition are now work- ing in harmony with us, and endeavor- ng to take part in every good work. The fiithful few are ever encouraged by these cheering words: But if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it; lest haply ye be found even to fight against God. Up to the Sabbath previous to Christ- mas we were undecided as to whether it was best to have a Christmas tree; but I found so many willing hearts and ready hands eager to help, and particularly some not members of the church, but friendly to it, that I threw all my influence in this direction to make it a success. At first we planned to have it in the church; but finding that the building used for our. Sunday services was too small, it was removed to the court-house, where we had ample room. The church would only accommodate about one-fifth of the people who came with their children to receive the gifts, for we had something for nearly every Methodist and Baptist boy and girl, as well as every Congregationalist in town. On Friday night, the ladies of our church gave an entertainment to aid in defraying the expe.nses incurred by the burial of a member of the church who had died very suddenly. He would have been buried by the town but for a few loyal and hithful brethren who re- volted at any such idea, and at once as- sumed the responsibility, though there was not one cent in the treasury. At the supper they cleared enough to pay the debt, and quite a little ~um in addi- tion. Our polity is guarded with the same sacredness as in New England. $.LOUISIANA. Straight University and the Central Church A Week of Prayer and Work of Grace Revival Incidents. REV. WALTER S. ALEXANDER, NEW ORLEANS. New Orleans, Li., Feb. 1st, 1879. The terrible epidemic which held this city in its relentless grasp for five months and created general gloom and depres sion, delayed the opening of the Uni- versity till December 1st. When we closed the last term and planned for another yearour first year in the new University buildingour hopes were strong and enthusiastic, and we said, With the attraction and novelty of a fresh, beautiful building in a central po- sition, and the tide of public sentiment strongly in our favor, the new year will be a marked period in the educational in- terests of our State. These brilliant ex- pectations were changed to grave uncer- tainty and anxiety. But God is with us, and our fears are already dissipated. In the first place, the colored people were wonderfully exempt from the ravages of the fever. There were instances of the fever, but the mortality was slight. The only disadvantage was the uncertainty regarding the time of opening the term, which induced a large number to enter into other school arrangements. At this writing we have in the Academic Depart- ment 175, and in the Law Department 25. New students are enrolled every week, and we have great occasion for satisfaction and gratitude. Our friends will be glad to know that the new Uni- versity building suits our needs to perfec- tion. We could hardly suggest a change in the arrangement of rooms. In many respects it is a model house. If our friends could understand how earnestly we desire to furnish our beautiful chapel and two additional recitation rooms, in- to which we are almost ready to swarm, and how we long to see a neat fence sur- rounding the lot, isolating and protect- ing us, situated as we are on the grand boulevard of the city, I am sure that some

Rev. Walter S. Alexander Alexander, Walter S., Rev. Louisiana, New Orleans--Straight University and Central Church--A Week of Prayer and Work of Grace--Revival Incidents The Freedmen 82-84

82 christmas FestivalStraight University and central cAurch. ALABAMA. Christmas Festival Bearing One Anothers Burdens. REV. WILLIAM H. ASH, FLORENCE. From the depletion made in Septem- ber by many of our members going to Kansas, a dark cloud for a time gathered over the work here; but I be- lieve the crisis is past, and some that were active in opposition are now work- ing in harmony with us, and endeavor- ng to take part in every good work. The fiithful few are ever encouraged by these cheering words: But if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it; lest haply ye be found even to fight against God. Up to the Sabbath previous to Christ- mas we were undecided as to whether it was best to have a Christmas tree; but I found so many willing hearts and ready hands eager to help, and particularly some not members of the church, but friendly to it, that I threw all my influence in this direction to make it a success. At first we planned to have it in the church; but finding that the building used for our. Sunday services was too small, it was removed to the court-house, where we had ample room. The church would only accommodate about one-fifth of the people who came with their children to receive the gifts, for we had something for nearly every Methodist and Baptist boy and girl, as well as every Congregationalist in town. On Friday night, the ladies of our church gave an entertainment to aid in defraying the expe.nses incurred by the burial of a member of the church who had died very suddenly. He would have been buried by the town but for a few loyal and hithful brethren who re- volted at any such idea, and at once as- sumed the responsibility, though there was not one cent in the treasury. At the supper they cleared enough to pay the debt, and quite a little ~um in addi- tion. Our polity is guarded with the same sacredness as in New England. $.LOUISIANA. Straight University and the Central Church A Week of Prayer and Work of Grace Revival Incidents. REV. WALTER S. ALEXANDER, NEW ORLEANS. New Orleans, Li., Feb. 1st, 1879. The terrible epidemic which held this city in its relentless grasp for five months and created general gloom and depres sion, delayed the opening of the Uni- versity till December 1st. When we closed the last term and planned for another yearour first year in the new University buildingour hopes were strong and enthusiastic, and we said, With the attraction and novelty of a fresh, beautiful building in a central po- sition, and the tide of public sentiment strongly in our favor, the new year will be a marked period in the educational in- terests of our State. These brilliant ex- pectations were changed to grave uncer- tainty and anxiety. But God is with us, and our fears are already dissipated. In the first place, the colored people were wonderfully exempt from the ravages of the fever. There were instances of the fever, but the mortality was slight. The only disadvantage was the uncertainty regarding the time of opening the term, which induced a large number to enter into other school arrangements. At this writing we have in the Academic Depart- ment 175, and in the Law Department 25. New students are enrolled every week, and we have great occasion for satisfaction and gratitude. Our friends will be glad to know that the new Uni- versity building suits our needs to perfec- tion. We could hardly suggest a change in the arrangement of rooms. In many respects it is a model house. If our friends could understand how earnestly we desire to furnish our beautiful chapel and two additional recitation rooms, in- to which we are almost ready to swarm, and how we long to see a neat fence sur- rounding the lot, isolating and protect- ing us, situated as we are on the grand boulevard of the city, I am sure that some Straight Univer8ity and the Central Church. good heart would suggest the means of accomplishing these things. But this is Gods work, and He will send relief if we can only wait. We shall graduate a class of six, of whom five are young men. They all have bright minds and are first-class scholars. It is a real pleasure to teach them. I hear them every morning in Uphams Mental Philosophy, and the most exacting teacher would ask no better recitations than are uniformly given. The inducements for young men and wpmen to qualify themselves for teachers of the highest grade are all that could be desired. It is impossible now to answer the demands for compe- tent teachers for the colored schools of Louisiana. I have received an applica- tion for a principal of a large parish school, with a salary of $1,200, and two are now in hand for lady teacher3, with salaries of $30 per month, in a town where good board can be obtained for $7 per month. This demand will con- stantly increase both in Louisiana and Texas. Two of our last senior class are teaching in Texas, and receiving $50 per month. - When I returned to the church, after an absence of more than five months, the people greeted me with enthusiasm, and said to me, You find us a united people. God has kept us together dur- ing this sad summer. We are ready for work. When will the revival begin? I told them we should begin special meetings with the Week of i~rayer ; but the time for earnest labor was al- ready at hand to prepare the people for the work of grao~, which I felt sure God had in store for us. Our prayer meetings were largely attended, and I could see thct the Church were longing and praying for a glorious revival. What a joyful duty it is to preach to such a people! The Week of Prayer came, and with a deep feel- ing of dependence upon God we gath- ered for our first special meeting. Night after night the attendance in- creased. Christians yielded themselves to the spirit of the meetings; the flame of religious fervor burned more bright- ly; and when, in sympathy with the Christian world, we had considered the topics assigned by the Evangelical Al- liance, we felt ready to enter upon the holy work of winning souls, and of di- recting all our thoughts and energies to this object. For four weeks we gath- ered every night, with an attendance ranging from 80 to 150, seldom falling below 100. Members of other churches flocked in; unconverted men and women heard the good news and joined the waiting throng. The result has beeti joyfulblessedglorious. In some re- spects I have never witnessed a revival of greater spiritual power. The work has been quiet as the under-current of a river, but deep, heart-searching and vital. The number of converts has been less than in some previous revivals; but when the position and influence of those who have been reached, one-half of them heads of families, is considered, the general result is highly important. A few instances will illustrate the na- ture of the good work. During a previ- ous revival a fair young girlwas one of the joyful converts. She has been steadfast Christian, honoring by a con- sistent, holy life her vows as a church member. One year ago she was mar- ried to a young man of many attractive qualities, and the centre of influence in a wide circle of friends. During this re- vival not only the husband, but the mother have found Christ, and to-day there is great joy in that household. On the night when the mother uttered the ex- ultant cry, Christ has set me free; I am redeemed! the child, who had praye(1 for her husbands and her mothers con- version, fainted from excess of joy and emotion. Another mother is made hap- py by the conversion of her son, and expresses her joy with fast-falling tears. Now a student from one of the country parishes yields to conviction and takes his stand as a Christian. Another, a 84 Fi8k Universityil Ornan8 iWorkJ?elief Fund. painter by trade, who says he knew nothing of Christianity before, seeks earnestly till he finds the Saviour. We shall never forget his impassioned elo- quence when he announced his conver- sion. It was the utterance of a deep, overwhelming joy. A young man, whose home teaching has been all wrong, walks for days beneath the dark shadow of doubt and fear. On one night he rose in meeting, and weeping freely said, Why do I not find peace? Why will not God have mercy? Oh, pray for me and help me ! Such agony of soul cannot continue long. It was the pro- found darkness before the dawn. To- day his faith is strong and joyful. There came into our meeting a wife, in whose conversion peculiar interest was manifested. Listening with eager in- terest from the first, she soon became in- tensely engaged in her own salvation. Near the close of one of our services she exclaimed, so soon as her emotion would permit her to speak, God, have mercy! Everybody pray for me! Ear- nestly she inquired the way of life, and af- ter a brief but bitter struggle the light came beaming in upon her soul, and she goes from house to house, spreading the glad tidings and telling what greatthings the Lord has done for her. Last year a married womana public school-teacher experienced this blessed change of heart, and the religion of Christ has been the absorbing theme of her life since. Now her daughter, an interesting girl of sixteen, shares the faith of the mother, who says, Have I not reason for loving God as I do ? One who became a Christian years ago, but who, through indifference, had lapsed from the enjoy- ment of the Christian life, has been re- covered. When she sought my counsel, I said, Dont expect to be converted over again. Take your place as a Chris- tam woman, and live as a Christian should live. The change with her has been like a. new conversion. The cloud has been dispelled~ and she rejoices in the restored favor of God. On the last night of our special ser- vices fully 150 people were present. I think we shall begin another special campaign the 1st of March. Pray for us that a great light may be kindled here, which God will never suffer to go out. Oh, the progress of this dear church these last three years! Their self-respect, their pure lives, their faith in. God, give cause for Christian confidence, af- fection and recognition. The true church of God will not withhold them. TENNESSEE. Fisk UniversityThe Day 6f Prayer, etc. inNS. E. H. CRAvATH, NASHVILLE. The meeting for prayer for the Associ- ation and its work was held on Mouday afternoon, January 0, at three oclock, in the chapel. Time number in attendance was very large, and there was an unusual freedom in prayer and a deep and tender interest in all the exercises. Prof. Ben- nett spoke of the falling off in receipts, of which you had made mention in a recent letter to him, and this called forth very earnest supplication that God would move men s hearts to liberal giving, so that the good work among their people might not suffer. The occasion was one of unusual interest. There have been two very clear and interesting cases of conversion since Christmas, and some among us are anx- ious. There has not yet been so large an increase in the number of students since New Years as we had expected. The weather has been intensely cold and money seems to be very scarce. The health of teachers and pupils is good. At the Baptist Institute they were compelled to suspend school on Monday because of sickness resulting from the unusual cold and exposure. Womans Work-Relief FundHealth Mat- tersCottage MeetingsNorthern Helpers. MISS HATTIE A. HILTON, MEMPHIS. The outlook seems much more en- couraging this year than last, for several reasons, one of the most important of which is, that the relief fund gives us

Pres. E. M. Cravath Cravath, E. M., Pres. Tennessee, Nashville--Fisk University--The Day of Prayer, etc. The Freedmen 84

84 Fi8k Universityil Ornan8 iWorkJ?elief Fund. painter by trade, who says he knew nothing of Christianity before, seeks earnestly till he finds the Saviour. We shall never forget his impassioned elo- quence when he announced his conver- sion. It was the utterance of a deep, overwhelming joy. A young man, whose home teaching has been all wrong, walks for days beneath the dark shadow of doubt and fear. On one night he rose in meeting, and weeping freely said, Why do I not find peace? Why will not God have mercy? Oh, pray for me and help me ! Such agony of soul cannot continue long. It was the pro- found darkness before the dawn. To- day his faith is strong and joyful. There came into our meeting a wife, in whose conversion peculiar interest was manifested. Listening with eager in- terest from the first, she soon became in- tensely engaged in her own salvation. Near the close of one of our services she exclaimed, so soon as her emotion would permit her to speak, God, have mercy! Everybody pray for me! Ear- nestly she inquired the way of life, and af- ter a brief but bitter struggle the light came beaming in upon her soul, and she goes from house to house, spreading the glad tidings and telling what greatthings the Lord has done for her. Last year a married womana public school-teacher experienced this blessed change of heart, and the religion of Christ has been the absorbing theme of her life since. Now her daughter, an interesting girl of sixteen, shares the faith of the mother, who says, Have I not reason for loving God as I do ? One who became a Christian years ago, but who, through indifference, had lapsed from the enjoy- ment of the Christian life, has been re- covered. When she sought my counsel, I said, Dont expect to be converted over again. Take your place as a Chris- tam woman, and live as a Christian should live. The change with her has been like a. new conversion. The cloud has been dispelled~ and she rejoices in the restored favor of God. On the last night of our special ser- vices fully 150 people were present. I think we shall begin another special campaign the 1st of March. Pray for us that a great light may be kindled here, which God will never suffer to go out. Oh, the progress of this dear church these last three years! Their self-respect, their pure lives, their faith in. God, give cause for Christian confidence, af- fection and recognition. The true church of God will not withhold them. TENNESSEE. Fisk UniversityThe Day 6f Prayer, etc. inNS. E. H. CRAvATH, NASHVILLE. The meeting for prayer for the Associ- ation and its work was held on Mouday afternoon, January 0, at three oclock, in the chapel. Time number in attendance was very large, and there was an unusual freedom in prayer and a deep and tender interest in all the exercises. Prof. Ben- nett spoke of the falling off in receipts, of which you had made mention in a recent letter to him, and this called forth very earnest supplication that God would move men s hearts to liberal giving, so that the good work among their people might not suffer. The occasion was one of unusual interest. There have been two very clear and interesting cases of conversion since Christmas, and some among us are anx- ious. There has not yet been so large an increase in the number of students since New Years as we had expected. The weather has been intensely cold and money seems to be very scarce. The health of teachers and pupils is good. At the Baptist Institute they were compelled to suspend school on Monday because of sickness resulting from the unusual cold and exposure. Womans Work-Relief FundHealth Mat- tersCottage MeetingsNorthern Helpers. MISS HATTIE A. HILTON, MEMPHIS. The outlook seems much more en- couraging this year than last, for several reasons, one of the most important of which is, that the relief fund gives us

Miss Hattie A. Milton Milton, Hattie A., Miss Tennessee, Memphis--Woman's Work--Relief Fund--Health Matters--Cottage Meetings--Northern Helpers The Freedmen 84-86

84 Fi8k Universityil Ornan8 iWorkJ?elief Fund. painter by trade, who says he knew nothing of Christianity before, seeks earnestly till he finds the Saviour. We shall never forget his impassioned elo- quence when he announced his conver- sion. It was the utterance of a deep, overwhelming joy. A young man, whose home teaching has been all wrong, walks for days beneath the dark shadow of doubt and fear. On one night he rose in meeting, and weeping freely said, Why do I not find peace? Why will not God have mercy? Oh, pray for me and help me ! Such agony of soul cannot continue long. It was the pro- found darkness before the dawn. To- day his faith is strong and joyful. There came into our meeting a wife, in whose conversion peculiar interest was manifested. Listening with eager in- terest from the first, she soon became in- tensely engaged in her own salvation. Near the close of one of our services she exclaimed, so soon as her emotion would permit her to speak, God, have mercy! Everybody pray for me! Ear- nestly she inquired the way of life, and af- ter a brief but bitter struggle the light came beaming in upon her soul, and she goes from house to house, spreading the glad tidings and telling what greatthings the Lord has done for her. Last year a married womana public school-teacher experienced this blessed change of heart, and the religion of Christ has been the absorbing theme of her life since. Now her daughter, an interesting girl of sixteen, shares the faith of the mother, who says, Have I not reason for loving God as I do ? One who became a Christian years ago, but who, through indifference, had lapsed from the enjoy- ment of the Christian life, has been re- covered. When she sought my counsel, I said, Dont expect to be converted over again. Take your place as a Chris- tam woman, and live as a Christian should live. The change with her has been like a. new conversion. The cloud has been dispelled~ and she rejoices in the restored favor of God. On the last night of our special ser- vices fully 150 people were present. I think we shall begin another special campaign the 1st of March. Pray for us that a great light may be kindled here, which God will never suffer to go out. Oh, the progress of this dear church these last three years! Their self-respect, their pure lives, their faith in. God, give cause for Christian confidence, af- fection and recognition. The true church of God will not withhold them. TENNESSEE. Fisk UniversityThe Day 6f Prayer, etc. inNS. E. H. CRAvATH, NASHVILLE. The meeting for prayer for the Associ- ation and its work was held on Mouday afternoon, January 0, at three oclock, in the chapel. Time number in attendance was very large, and there was an unusual freedom in prayer and a deep and tender interest in all the exercises. Prof. Ben- nett spoke of the falling off in receipts, of which you had made mention in a recent letter to him, and this called forth very earnest supplication that God would move men s hearts to liberal giving, so that the good work among their people might not suffer. The occasion was one of unusual interest. There have been two very clear and interesting cases of conversion since Christmas, and some among us are anx- ious. There has not yet been so large an increase in the number of students since New Years as we had expected. The weather has been intensely cold and money seems to be very scarce. The health of teachers and pupils is good. At the Baptist Institute they were compelled to suspend school on Monday because of sickness resulting from the unusual cold and exposure. Womans Work-Relief FundHealth Mat- tersCottage MeetingsNorthern Helpers. MISS HATTIE A. HILTON, MEMPHIS. The outlook seems much more en- couraging this year than last, for several reasons, one of the most important of which is, that the relief fund gives us Ifoman8 WorkRelief. Fund. access to many more families. Last Sab- bath five new scholars came to Sunday- school, all from families which had been benefited by the relief. One of the boys, eleven years old, who belongs to a very poor family, but who is quite a hero among his neighbors, because of his honesty and industry, I often met last year with others on the commons, but he could not come to Sunday-school because he was so ragged. As he was very anxious to attend, a suit of clothes was given him last week, and Sabbath morning he came to the church before his teacher was dressed for breakfast, and waited patiently during the three hours until the exercises began, enjoying his improved appearance. The past few weeks have been very cold for this climate, and many a widow with her little children has been made to rejoice as she gathered her family around the bright fire and partook of the whole- some food provided by the A. M. A. re- lief. The yellow fever made terrible havoc in many families indeed in some none are left to tell the tale of woe! For a few days, now, the weather has been very warm and there is much sickness, and the death r,ate is very high among the colored peoplein many cases, no doubt, resulting from want of proper at- tention. A few days since I visited a man suffering with indigestion and cold; he had called a doctor, but was not re- lieved; his wife was anxious to help him, but knew not what to do; so she was told to let the light in from behind, in- stead of in front of the patient, as it was very painful to his eyes, then to ap- ply cloths wet in hot water to the ach- ing head and chest, and hot bricks, steaming with vinegar, to his feet. In half an hour he was relieved and the next day was~ almost well, only needing directions about food and ventilation. This is but an instance among many of those who suffer for the want of such simple remedies, of the use of which mand for nurses has been very great during the past year, we propose giving some attention to this branch in our school, which has filled up since Christ- mas and is doing well. The industrial department is getting in good working order. I have about forty women and girls under my general supervision, the more experienced as- sisting me in teaching the others to cut and make garments. They seem much interested in the work. This depart- ment is looked upon with approval by most of the people, as but few mothers are capable of teaching their daughters these accomplishments, though they are very anxious that they should learn them. My field of work is already twice as large as last year. Members of the dif- ferent churches welcome me into their houses, and invite their neighbors to our cottage meetings, of which we have five every week in different neighbor- hoods. The pastor of the leading Metho- dist church here gave me the names of several members of his church who would be glad to have me hold moth- ers meetings in their houses, which was a great help in my work, as it did much to remove the suspicion with which they have regarded me. Some who are not professed Christians have invited me to their houses, saying they hope by so doing they may see the way more clearly. Many colored people look upon the epidemic of the past sea- son as a judgment from God on account of their sins, and try to be more relig- ious lest a worse evil befall them. The Ladies Missionary $ociety, of Roseville, Ill., l~ve become interested in this work, and have forwarded a box, for which we are thankful. The Little Girls, of Crete, Ill., who last year sent a box, have this year formed a society, which they have named The Milton Busy Bees, have met every they have no knowledge. As the de- two weeks, and with their friends have The Work of other Yi~~ion~ among the Chinese. prepared a box of very valuable cloth- God bless all our kind friends at the ing, which has been received, and has North who aid us so much by these made many a heart beat warmer. May I substantial signs of their sympathy. THE CHINESE. Summary of Mission Work among the Chinese. REV. WM. C. POND, SAN FRANCISCO. At the annual meeting of the Califor nia Chinese Mission I was requested to append to the report then presented an account of the work of other missions. I venture to hope that that account will be of interest to the readers of the Mis- SIONARY, and offer it as my contribution for this month. The facts were obtain- ed not from printed reports, but by special inquiries. The Presbyterian Mission reports four evening mission schools, one in each of the cities of San Francisco, Oakland, Sacramento and San Jose, with an aver- age attendance of 70, 60, 35 and 24 re- spectively. Four American missionaries, speaking the Chinese language, are em- ployed, four Chinese preachers, and six other teachers. There is, also, in San Francisco, a day school for boys and girls, with two teachers, one English and one Chinese, and an average attend- ance of twelve pupils. There are six preaching places, three in San Francisco, three in Oakland, two in Sacramento, and two in San Jose. Twenty religious services are held each week, with an at- tendance which varies from a very few to one hundred. Two Chinese churches have been organized, one in San Fran- cisco and the other in Oakland. The former has 40 members, of whom two were received the past year. The latter has 29 members, of whom six were added the last year. The San Francisco church has been in existence many years, and has received to membership from its or- ganization 103 persons. In connection with the Sacramento Mission, 21 Chris- tian Chinese have been received to the Presbyterian Church of that city; fifteen are still members of the church, and of these, eight were received last year. In connection with the San Jos6 school there are seven Christian Chinese, mem- bers of the Presbyterian church of that city. The Ladies Foreign Missionary Society of the Presbyterian church sustains in San Francisco a Home for Chinese women, which has now eleven inmate~, who must, of course , be not only taught, but Sheltered and boarded, and, often, protected from the brutes in human form who claim to be their owners. The total number of laborers connect- ed with the Presbyterian Mission is thus seen to be fifteen. The total average attendance at the schools, 212. The total number of church members, from the first, is 160, of whom 69 have been removed by dismissal to churches in China, by death, or by the dropping of their names from the roll. The total number who hear the gospel from the lips of the missionaries or native preach- ers cannot be estimated, but must run far up into the hundreds, if not into the thousands. Of the Methodist Chinese Mission, Rev. Dr. Gibson, Superintendent, makes the following succinct and clear report: Five evening and day schools, with a total average attendance of 149; five Sunday-schools, with a total average attendance of 246; four preaching places, with a total average attendance of 170; public preaching, daily prayer meetings, praise meetings, class meeting and Bible class, weekly, 78 Chinese members and 10 probationers; baptisms last year adults, 19; children, 3; cost of girls boarding-school, *1,900; cost of all other work, $7,600.

Rev. Wm. C. Pond Pond, Wm. C., Rev. Summary of Mission Work among the Chinese The Chinese 86-87

The Work of other Yi~~ion~ among the Chinese. prepared a box of very valuable cloth- God bless all our kind friends at the ing, which has been received, and has North who aid us so much by these made many a heart beat warmer. May I substantial signs of their sympathy. THE CHINESE. Summary of Mission Work among the Chinese. REV. WM. C. POND, SAN FRANCISCO. At the annual meeting of the Califor nia Chinese Mission I was requested to append to the report then presented an account of the work of other missions. I venture to hope that that account will be of interest to the readers of the Mis- SIONARY, and offer it as my contribution for this month. The facts were obtain- ed not from printed reports, but by special inquiries. The Presbyterian Mission reports four evening mission schools, one in each of the cities of San Francisco, Oakland, Sacramento and San Jose, with an aver- age attendance of 70, 60, 35 and 24 re- spectively. Four American missionaries, speaking the Chinese language, are em- ployed, four Chinese preachers, and six other teachers. There is, also, in San Francisco, a day school for boys and girls, with two teachers, one English and one Chinese, and an average attend- ance of twelve pupils. There are six preaching places, three in San Francisco, three in Oakland, two in Sacramento, and two in San Jose. Twenty religious services are held each week, with an at- tendance which varies from a very few to one hundred. Two Chinese churches have been organized, one in San Fran- cisco and the other in Oakland. The former has 40 members, of whom two were received the past year. The latter has 29 members, of whom six were added the last year. The San Francisco church has been in existence many years, and has received to membership from its or- ganization 103 persons. In connection with the Sacramento Mission, 21 Chris- tian Chinese have been received to the Presbyterian Church of that city; fifteen are still members of the church, and of these, eight were received last year. In connection with the San Jos6 school there are seven Christian Chinese, mem- bers of the Presbyterian church of that city. The Ladies Foreign Missionary Society of the Presbyterian church sustains in San Francisco a Home for Chinese women, which has now eleven inmate~, who must, of course , be not only taught, but Sheltered and boarded, and, often, protected from the brutes in human form who claim to be their owners. The total number of laborers connect- ed with the Presbyterian Mission is thus seen to be fifteen. The total average attendance at the schools, 212. The total number of church members, from the first, is 160, of whom 69 have been removed by dismissal to churches in China, by death, or by the dropping of their names from the roll. The total number who hear the gospel from the lips of the missionaries or native preach- ers cannot be estimated, but must run far up into the hundreds, if not into the thousands. Of the Methodist Chinese Mission, Rev. Dr. Gibson, Superintendent, makes the following succinct and clear report: Five evening and day schools, with a total average attendance of 149; five Sunday-schools, with a total average attendance of 246; four preaching places, with a total average attendance of 170; public preaching, daily prayer meetings, praise meetings, class meeting and Bible class, weekly, 78 Chinese members and 10 probationers; baptisms last year adults, 19; children, 3; cost of girls boarding-school, *1,900; cost of all other work, $7,600. A Chri8tmas in Africa. 87 One of our schools is a boarding school for Chinese girls and women. We call it the Asylum. As to churches, our plan is a little different from yours. We have classes at different l)laees, but all are members of the one church at San Francisco. At Los Angeles,from a Chinese Mission School, which was sustained for many years by the California Chinese Mission, twenty in all have united with the Pres- byterian church in that city. The United Presbyterian Church.-- This church, also, sustains a mission school in Oakland, which has an average attendance of about forty pupils. The ,Womans Union Missicim to Chi- nese Women and Children has been in operation nearly nine years. As its name indicates, it is a union work, and is sustained for the most part by ladies in the different churches of San Fran- cisco and Qakiand. The Society has been aided materially this last year by the Chinese themselves, having received a gift in money from the Six Com- panies, and also from the Chinese mer- chants. The special work of this Mission is among Chinese children, and for them a day school is sustained in the second story of the old Globe Hotel, at the corner of Dupont and Jackson streets. With this special work is also combined visitation among Chinese families. The number of scholars on the roll the past year is fifty-two. Thirty-two of these are boys and twenty girls. There are two teachers employed, an English teacher and a teacher of Chinese. The running expenses of this Society are about eighty-five dollars a month. If, now, I add to this statement the following statistics touching our own Congregational Mission, the exhibit of missionary work among the Chinese in California will be complete. We maintain 11 schools: at Oakland, Petaluma, Sacramento; in San Francis- co, the Central, Barnes and Bethany; San Leandro, Santa Barbara, Stockton, Visalia and Woodland; in which 16 teachers are employed. 1,492 pupils have been enrolled during the year. The average attemjdance for the 12 months) has been 244647 being the largest number reported in any single month. 93 profess to have ceased from idol wor- ship, and 75 give evidence of conversion. There is, outside these organized mis- sions, considerable work done by the churches in Chinese Sunday-schools, no complete or reliable statistics of which could be easily obtained. At those sus- tained by Congregational churches the total average attendance is, of pupila about 250, and of teachers about 100. There is furthermore, we may trust, in Christian households scattered through- out the State, a work done for Chinese employed in them, which cannot be re- ported here, but whose record is on high. There, too, its fruit will appear, gathered into everlasting life. AFRICA. A CHRISTMAS IN AFRICA. XBS. H. E. JACKSON, AVERY STATION. To-day we have celebrated the birth of our dear Saviour. The first thing was the giving of presents to the laborers, which Mr. Jackson did from his own earnings. It was the custom of the former missionaries to give fhe la- borers each a Christmas present, and they are not a people who forget very soon any fav ~r shown them by the for- mer missionaries. This present consisted of two goats and two bushels of rice, which was divided among them. I watched with pleasure their happy faces as each one received his portion. At ten oclock the first bell rang for services, and at the ringing of the sec- ond bell the chapel was filled to its ut most capacity with the heathen, who came from miles around to hear and learn of Jesus, and why we celebrate thia

Mrs. H. E. Jackson Jackson, H. E., Mrs. A Christmas in Africa Africa 87-88

A Chri8tmas in Africa. 87 One of our schools is a boarding school for Chinese girls and women. We call it the Asylum. As to churches, our plan is a little different from yours. We have classes at different l)laees, but all are members of the one church at San Francisco. At Los Angeles,from a Chinese Mission School, which was sustained for many years by the California Chinese Mission, twenty in all have united with the Pres- byterian church in that city. The United Presbyterian Church.-- This church, also, sustains a mission school in Oakland, which has an average attendance of about forty pupils. The ,Womans Union Missicim to Chi- nese Women and Children has been in operation nearly nine years. As its name indicates, it is a union work, and is sustained for the most part by ladies in the different churches of San Fran- cisco and Qakiand. The Society has been aided materially this last year by the Chinese themselves, having received a gift in money from the Six Com- panies, and also from the Chinese mer- chants. The special work of this Mission is among Chinese children, and for them a day school is sustained in the second story of the old Globe Hotel, at the corner of Dupont and Jackson streets. With this special work is also combined visitation among Chinese families. The number of scholars on the roll the past year is fifty-two. Thirty-two of these are boys and twenty girls. There are two teachers employed, an English teacher and a teacher of Chinese. The running expenses of this Society are about eighty-five dollars a month. If, now, I add to this statement the following statistics touching our own Congregational Mission, the exhibit of missionary work among the Chinese in California will be complete. We maintain 11 schools: at Oakland, Petaluma, Sacramento; in San Francis- co, the Central, Barnes and Bethany; San Leandro, Santa Barbara, Stockton, Visalia and Woodland; in which 16 teachers are employed. 1,492 pupils have been enrolled during the year. The average attemjdance for the 12 months) has been 244647 being the largest number reported in any single month. 93 profess to have ceased from idol wor- ship, and 75 give evidence of conversion. There is, outside these organized mis- sions, considerable work done by the churches in Chinese Sunday-schools, no complete or reliable statistics of which could be easily obtained. At those sus- tained by Congregational churches the total average attendance is, of pupila about 250, and of teachers about 100. There is furthermore, we may trust, in Christian households scattered through- out the State, a work done for Chinese employed in them, which cannot be re- ported here, but whose record is on high. There, too, its fruit will appear, gathered into everlasting life. AFRICA. A CHRISTMAS IN AFRICA. XBS. H. E. JACKSON, AVERY STATION. To-day we have celebrated the birth of our dear Saviour. The first thing was the giving of presents to the laborers, which Mr. Jackson did from his own earnings. It was the custom of the former missionaries to give fhe la- borers each a Christmas present, and they are not a people who forget very soon any fav ~r shown them by the for- mer missionaries. This present consisted of two goats and two bushels of rice, which was divided among them. I watched with pleasure their happy faces as each one received his portion. At ten oclock the first bell rang for services, and at the ringing of the sec- ond bell the chapel was filled to its ut most capacity with the heathen, who came from miles around to hear and learn of Jesus, and why we celebrate thia 88 Little Sallie. eventful day. There were so many pres- ent that we were obliged to bring in extra seats. They gave very good at- tention and seemed to drink in the truths of Jesus Christ as they were given them. It would have been encouraging to you could you have seen them when they were told that this dear Saviour whom we celebrate is a God who hears in Men- di, Slierbro, Timony and all other lan- guages, and if tAhey come to Him with pure and contrite hearts He will wash away their sins and make them white in the blood of the Lamb. From their cheerful countenances one could rend that their happy hearts sung forth praises to God. I am, as you may know, a lover of singing, so we selected some of the most beautiful and appropriate hymns for the occasion. As we sung, I, like the heathen, could but exclaim praise to God in the highest. Surely Africa will be redeemed from the curse of ignorance and sin, and her sons and daughters learn to bow in reverence to the true and living God. After service, Mr. Jackson and I pre- pared a dinner, to which we invited the chiefs of the Bargroo river. They seem- ed to enjoy themselves very much in- deed. The dinner consisted, as near] y as possible, of their country dishes and a plenty of pure cold water. Having a country cook, the dishes were all served up in regular country style. We had our interpreter to dine with them, so that we might be able to converse with them on the meaning of Christmas day and how they should celebrate it. We are greatly encouraged to go~ for- ward in the work. It is true that it is a hard and tedious one, but wh& n we lean on Jesus it is made light. You would, perhaps, be pleased to know of some of our encouragements. There is an un- usual amount of interest manifested on the part of the natives in religion. They take hold of the truths imparted to them as if their souls were thirsty for the living bread of heaven. They are also gradunlly laying aside their country fashions, such as gregrees, charms and fetiches. All of these are features of interest to one who labors among them. Although we are thus encouraged, the habit of drinking rum is spreading among them. This is a great curse to Africa. No evil could be perpetrated among these people more injurious to them than the selling of rum. Really, many of them seem to think that rum is the staff of life, and in order to exist they must; have it. This idea has been brought to them through the medium of a civilized people, whose highest aim should be to wipe this evil practice out of existence. Mr. Jackson endeavored to impress upon their minds as cJearly as possible the great sin of drinking rum, and I am sure that many were con- vinced of it. The church is progressing both in in- terest and in strength. The first Sunday in this month was communion day. The presence of the Lord seemed near each one. Five persons joined the church and were baptized. Among the number was one chief. We have now three chiefs belonging to our church, and we believe that they are really converted men. CHILDRENS PAGE. LITTLE SALLIE. had learned to read elsewhere, but came PROFESSOR A. K. SPENCE, OF FISK UNIVERSITY. to the school connected with Fisk Uni- (written from Dundee, Scotland.) versity to pursue her studies still further. Little Sallie was born a slave, but be- There she soon saw she was a sinner, came free through the Emancipation and needed a Saviour. She sought long, Proclamation of Abraham Lincoln. She but did not find peace to her soul. She

Professor A. K. Spence Spence, A. K., Professor Little Sallie Children's Page 88-90

88 Little Sallie. eventful day. There were so many pres- ent that we were obliged to bring in extra seats. They gave very good at- tention and seemed to drink in the truths of Jesus Christ as they were given them. It would have been encouraging to you could you have seen them when they were told that this dear Saviour whom we celebrate is a God who hears in Men- di, Slierbro, Timony and all other lan- guages, and if tAhey come to Him with pure and contrite hearts He will wash away their sins and make them white in the blood of the Lamb. From their cheerful countenances one could rend that their happy hearts sung forth praises to God. I am, as you may know, a lover of singing, so we selected some of the most beautiful and appropriate hymns for the occasion. As we sung, I, like the heathen, could but exclaim praise to God in the highest. Surely Africa will be redeemed from the curse of ignorance and sin, and her sons and daughters learn to bow in reverence to the true and living God. After service, Mr. Jackson and I pre- pared a dinner, to which we invited the chiefs of the Bargroo river. They seem- ed to enjoy themselves very much in- deed. The dinner consisted, as near] y as possible, of their country dishes and a plenty of pure cold water. Having a country cook, the dishes were all served up in regular country style. We had our interpreter to dine with them, so that we might be able to converse with them on the meaning of Christmas day and how they should celebrate it. We are greatly encouraged to go~ for- ward in the work. It is true that it is a hard and tedious one, but wh& n we lean on Jesus it is made light. You would, perhaps, be pleased to know of some of our encouragements. There is an un- usual amount of interest manifested on the part of the natives in religion. They take hold of the truths imparted to them as if their souls were thirsty for the living bread of heaven. They are also gradunlly laying aside their country fashions, such as gregrees, charms and fetiches. All of these are features of interest to one who labors among them. Although we are thus encouraged, the habit of drinking rum is spreading among them. This is a great curse to Africa. No evil could be perpetrated among these people more injurious to them than the selling of rum. Really, many of them seem to think that rum is the staff of life, and in order to exist they must; have it. This idea has been brought to them through the medium of a civilized people, whose highest aim should be to wipe this evil practice out of existence. Mr. Jackson endeavored to impress upon their minds as cJearly as possible the great sin of drinking rum, and I am sure that many were con- vinced of it. The church is progressing both in in- terest and in strength. The first Sunday in this month was communion day. The presence of the Lord seemed near each one. Five persons joined the church and were baptized. Among the number was one chief. We have now three chiefs belonging to our church, and we believe that they are really converted men. CHILDRENS PAGE. LITTLE SALLIE. had learned to read elsewhere, but came PROFESSOR A. K. SPENCE, OF FISK UNIVERSITY. to the school connected with Fisk Uni- (written from Dundee, Scotland.) versity to pursue her studies still further. Little Sallie was born a slave, but be- There she soon saw she was a sinner, came free through the Emancipation and needed a Saviour. She sought long, Proclamation of Abraham Lincoln. She but did not find peace to her soul. She Little Sallie. was very sorrowful, and her trouble ap- peared in her down-cast face. She often sighed and sometimes wept. She pray- ed much and read her Bible. Her teachers felt sad for poor little Sallie. At last light came. The Bible says, Sorrow continueth for a night, but joy cometh in the morning. Her joy was great. Any one could see that she had met a change. Her countenance was all aglow. A sweet smile played on her lips. Her voice was full of music as she told what God had done for her. Her eye kindled as she spoke of her dear Saviour. All the affection of her young heart was given to him. It was sweet to listen to her prayers, in which she often said, dear Jesus. But Sallie wished to do something for Him who had done so much for her. All young converts feel in that way. Old Christians feel so, too. Paul says, The love of Christ constraineth us. But what could she do? She was so young, and only a girl. Even if she were a woman, she could not go into the l)ulpit and preach. Only men do that. What could she do? This perplexed little Sallie. One of her teachers, knowing her trouble, said to her, Well, Sallie, you can read, can you not? Oh, yes I she replied, for she was a good reader. There are many colored people who were long slaves, and cannot read, are there not? Would not you like to read the Bible to some of them? This thought pleased little Sallie. Soon after she put on her hat, took her Bible, and went out, Christs little mis- sionary. She stood erect, she stepped light, she looked happy; she was going out to do good for Jesus. No doubt His love was warm in her heart just then. We always feel love to God when for His sake we try to do good to men. She did not know it, but the teacher who suggested her mission followed to see what she would do. When she turned a street corner, he turned it soon after her. At last she entered a little house, such as many of the colored peo- ple live in. It was made of boards, one story high, and had only one room. The day was warm. The door was open. He went to it and looked in. I will try to tell you what he saw. Sallie sat in a chair with her Bible in. her lap, reading. One colored woman was, seemingly, busy at a table, ironing clothes. But her iron went back and forth nearly in the same place, while she looked away, eyes and mouth open, to little Sallie, to whom she listened attentively. Another had ceased from her work, and, leaning against the wall, looked down upon our little missionary in a most loving, motherly way. A third was sitting at her feet and gazing with her great, dark face into the face of Sallie, who, in a low, sweet voice, was reading: He was wounded for our transgressions ; He was bruised for our iniquities ; the chastisement of our peace was upon Him; and with His stripes we are healed. Was it not beautiful? You know this is a prophesy of Christ, written many hundred years before the sufferings it describes, which Jesus bore for us. Find the fifty-third chapter of Isaiah and read it for your- selves, my young friends, and think that Sallie read it to those poor colored women; and as you go over these verses, may the same love and joy fill your hearts as filled hers. Remember, also, that you, too, may be workers for Christ in some way. It may not be in Sallies way. She used to sing, Therell be something in Heaven for children to do. There is something for them to do on earth, too. Seek Gods guidance and He will show you what. Christ says that if we give cven s cup of water to any one, for His sake, we shall not lose our reward. Sallie did not work for pay, but she had her reward in the consciousness that she was pleasing Jesus and doing good to those women. Many years have passed since the time of this narrative. Little Sallie is now a I~O .Receiyt8. young woman. Through the aid of kind friends she completed the course of studies in the Normal department of Fisk University, and is now teaching colored children in the far-off State of Texas. The freed people of the South .need such teachers; they need also minis- ters of their own race; and many mis- sionaries are needed for Africa. One way, my dear young friends, in which you can serve the Lord, is this Help us to educate these young people. When you put a little piece of money into the box for this cause and for Jesus sake, He sees it, and will say to you in the last day Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. RECEIPTS FOR JANUARY, 1879. MAINE, $749.02. Bs.ngor. Hammond St. Cli. Ibal.) $3441; Hammond St.. Sab. Sch. $15 $49 41 7 Browovljie. Hon. A. H. Merrill, $100; cong. Cli. and Soc.. $11 115 00 Bnxt ii. 11ev. Joseph Kyte 3 00 Gorham. First Cong. Cli. to roost. SAMUEL T. Doi~x, MOSES FOGG and JOHN S. LEAVIT L.M.s 8321 Hallowell. Emm~ French, half bbL of C... Mac.hias. A Friend. 3 00 Monson. Rev. a. w. Eme-son 2(1 50 North Dixisiont. Mrs. H. E. K 1 00 Norway. Mrs. Mary K. Frost. 5 00 Portland. State St. Cli., $344.90; High St. Cotig. Cli.. $100 444 90 Searsport. J. Y. B 1 00 Skowlieran. Mrs. L. ~1. weston, $5; Miss S.A.T.,$l 601) South Boidgton. Mrs B. Hale 3 00 Wells. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adi, 50 Winthrop. Mrs. E. H. N ~1 00 Yarmouth. Fi.r4 Cong. Cli. and Soc 12 50 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $10,651.97. Amherst. Ladies Benev. Asso. $2 and box of 0., for Wilmington, N. C .. 2 00 Anirim. Friend~, by Imla Wright...... 110 00 Aist ad. Third Cong. Cli. and Soc 14 00 Boscawen. Cong. Cli. and Soc 17 05 Bristol. Cong. Cli. aol Soc 4 15 Chester. Cong. Cli and Soc. . 10 00 Concord. Miss F. A. G. and Mrs. A F., $1; Mrs. C. L. G., SIc 1 60 Derry. Mrs. H. T 50 Dover. M. A. L 1 00 Exeter. A Friend, $311; Mrs. A C. Per- kitts. hbl. of C 30 00 Fitzwillian. Des. Rufus B. Phillips 5 00 Franeestin. Joseph Kingsbry, $10; A. 11 00 Gilmanton Iron Works. Moiss P. Page. for future wrk of the,Assnci.,.tion 10,000 00 Gresiville. Cong. Cli. and Soc 7 00 Harrisvil;e. Mrs. r~ucy B. Richardson 10 (10 Hebron. 11ev. J. B. Cook 2 00 Hopkinton. (~ong. Cli 10 00 Keene. First Cong. Sab. Soli.. $12.33; Mrs. Samuel Towne, $5; G. C.. $1 18 33 Lebanon. Cong. Cli. and Soc 32 75 Londonderry. C. S. P 1 00 Manchester. Franhlin St. Cli. and Soc..... 70 41 Meredith Village. Mrs. C. S so Milford. Cong. Cli 33 70 Monroe. Cong.Ch.and Soc 1 10 Nashua. Cong Cli. and Soc 10 24 New Ipervicli. Hillside Gleaners, for Wilmington, N. C 4 00 NeW London. ESTAT of Eliza S. Trussell.. 150 00 New L ndon. Miss H K. T 50 Peterborough. Cong. CS 25 46 Pittsfield. John L. Tliorndike 10 00 Rochester. Cong. Cli. and Soc $25 00 Salem. Individuals in Cong. Cli. and Soc 6 00 Slielburne. Mrs M. C. ingalls 3 00 Temple. Mrs. W. K 1 00 Warner. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adl) 9 25 West Campton. T. J. Sanborn 5 00 Wilton. Mistletoe Band, for Wilmington, - N. C., $10; J. T. H., $1 11 00 VEnMONT, $779.62. Bristol. Cong. Cli. and Soc 24 00 Brookileld. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc 15 1.0 Cambridge. Des. S. Mntagne 5 00 Cartleton. Cong. Sab. Sch 11 90 Chelsea. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adl) 4 00 Chester. G. H. C so Dorset. I. N. Sykes s 00 11-sex Joncton. Elizabeth T. Macomber... 5 00 Granby and Victory Cong. Cli. and Soc 3 00 Maribderd. l.yrnan Clark 10 00 Mclndoes Falls. Come. Cli. and Soc 12 00 Morrisville. A Friend, s 00 North Benningcon. Cong. Cli. and Soc.... 16 00 Pittsford. Henry Sherman 30 50 Randolph. Mrs. I. Nichols 2 00 Royalton. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $15;First Cong. Cli.. for St ent Aid. Atlanta U.. $13.51 28 51 Rn land. Cong. Cli. and Soc 5 89 Saint Albans. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. ... 50 77 Saint Jolinabury. North Cli., $464.83; North Cli. SabSoli., $50. 51483 Waitafield. 0. I. B. and A. Al. B., $1, S. H. Robins~n. bbl. of C 1 00 West Brattleborough. Cong. Cli 10 22 Williston. C. A. 8eymour 5 00 Windsor. Cong. Cli 13 50 MASSACHUSETTS, $4,308.38. Acton. Mrs. M. F., for Student Aid, At- lanta U 1 00 Amherst. Fii~LCong. Chand Soc., $79.43; North Cong. Cli. and Soc., $24.86; Player Meeting, Ag. College, by 11. U. Howe, $1.50. 11)5 79 Andover. Peter Sinilli 600 Go Andover. Ladies A cx. Miss. Soc. of Free CS.. $25; John Smith, $10; Francis H. Johnson, $5; H. C. Andrews, $2; Mrs. David Gray, $2; D.C., $1; J W. P., $1; G. F., $l,for Student Aid, Straight U 47 00 Andover. ESTATE of Mrs. Caroline P. Tay- lor, by James C. Taylor, Ex . .... 200 00 Arlington. Cong. CS. and Soc 25 00 Asliby. Cong. Cli. and hab. Sri., $25, for Stud-nt Aid, Atlanta U.G. S. S., SOc 25 50 Aslifield. Cong. Ladies 10 26 Attleborougli. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adl) 8 00 Auburndale. Miss Emma Warren, for Tougaloo U 2 00 Ballardyale. XV. C. C., for Student Aid, S. fT. 50

Receipts for January, 1879 90-96

I~O .Receiyt8. young woman. Through the aid of kind friends she completed the course of studies in the Normal department of Fisk University, and is now teaching colored children in the far-off State of Texas. The freed people of the South .need such teachers; they need also minis- ters of their own race; and many mis- sionaries are needed for Africa. One way, my dear young friends, in which you can serve the Lord, is this Help us to educate these young people. When you put a little piece of money into the box for this cause and for Jesus sake, He sees it, and will say to you in the last day Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. RECEIPTS FOR JANUARY, 1879. MAINE, $749.02. Bs.ngor. Hammond St. Cli. Ibal.) $3441; Hammond St.. Sab. Sch. $15 $49 41 7 Browovljie. Hon. A. H. Merrill, $100; cong. Cli. and Soc.. $11 115 00 Bnxt ii. 11ev. Joseph Kyte 3 00 Gorham. First Cong. Cli. to roost. SAMUEL T. Doi~x, MOSES FOGG and JOHN S. LEAVIT L.M.s 8321 Hallowell. Emm~ French, half bbL of C... Mac.hias. A Friend. 3 00 Monson. Rev. a. w. Eme-son 2(1 50 North Dixisiont. Mrs. H. E. K 1 00 Norway. Mrs. Mary K. Frost. 5 00 Portland. State St. Cli., $344.90; High St. Cotig. Cli.. $100 444 90 Searsport. J. Y. B 1 00 Skowlieran. Mrs. L. ~1. weston, $5; Miss S.A.T.,$l 601) South Boidgton. Mrs B. Hale 3 00 Wells. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adi, 50 Winthrop. Mrs. E. H. N ~1 00 Yarmouth. Fi.r4 Cong. Cli. and Soc 12 50 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $10,651.97. Amherst. Ladies Benev. Asso. $2 and box of 0., for Wilmington, N. C .. 2 00 Anirim. Friend~, by Imla Wright...... 110 00 Aist ad. Third Cong. Cli. and Soc 14 00 Boscawen. Cong. Cli. and Soc 17 05 Bristol. Cong. Cli. aol Soc 4 15 Chester. Cong. Cli and Soc. . 10 00 Concord. Miss F. A. G. and Mrs. A F., $1; Mrs. C. L. G., SIc 1 60 Derry. Mrs. H. T 50 Dover. M. A. L 1 00 Exeter. A Friend, $311; Mrs. A C. Per- kitts. hbl. of C 30 00 Fitzwillian. Des. Rufus B. Phillips 5 00 Franeestin. Joseph Kingsbry, $10; A. 11 00 Gilmanton Iron Works. Moiss P. Page. for future wrk of the,Assnci.,.tion 10,000 00 Gresiville. Cong. Cli. and Soc 7 00 Harrisvil;e. Mrs. r~ucy B. Richardson 10 (10 Hebron. 11ev. J. B. Cook 2 00 Hopkinton. (~ong. Cli 10 00 Keene. First Cong. Sab. Soli.. $12.33; Mrs. Samuel Towne, $5; G. C.. $1 18 33 Lebanon. Cong. Cli. and Soc 32 75 Londonderry. C. S. P 1 00 Manchester. Franhlin St. Cli. and Soc..... 70 41 Meredith Village. Mrs. C. S so Milford. Cong. Cli 33 70 Monroe. Cong.Ch.and Soc 1 10 Nashua. Cong Cli. and Soc 10 24 New Ipervicli. Hillside Gleaners, for Wilmington, N. C 4 00 NeW London. ESTAT of Eliza S. Trussell.. 150 00 New L ndon. Miss H K. T 50 Peterborough. Cong. CS 25 46 Pittsfield. John L. Tliorndike 10 00 Rochester. Cong. Cli. and Soc $25 00 Salem. Individuals in Cong. Cli. and Soc 6 00 Slielburne. Mrs M. C. ingalls 3 00 Temple. Mrs. W. K 1 00 Warner. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adl) 9 25 West Campton. T. J. Sanborn 5 00 Wilton. Mistletoe Band, for Wilmington, - N. C., $10; J. T. H., $1 11 00 VEnMONT, $779.62. Bristol. Cong. Cli. and Soc 24 00 Brookileld. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc 15 1.0 Cambridge. Des. S. Mntagne 5 00 Cartleton. Cong. Sab. Sch 11 90 Chelsea. Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adl) 4 00 Chester. G. H. C so Dorset. I. N. Sykes s 00 11-sex Joncton. Elizabeth T. Macomber... 5 00 Granby and Victory Cong. Cli. and Soc 3 00 Maribderd. l.yrnan Clark 10 00 Mclndoes Falls. Come. Cli. and Soc 12 00 Morrisville. A Friend, s 00 North Benningcon. Cong. Cli. and Soc.... 16 00 Pittsford. Henry Sherman 30 50 Randolph. Mrs. I. Nichols 2 00 Royalton. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $15;First Cong. Cli.. for St ent Aid. Atlanta U.. $13.51 28 51 Rn land. Cong. Cli. and Soc 5 89 Saint Albans. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. ... 50 77 Saint Jolinabury. North Cli., $464.83; North Cli. SabSoli., $50. 51483 Waitafield. 0. I. B. and A. Al. B., $1, S. H. Robins~n. bbl. of C 1 00 West Brattleborough. Cong. Cli 10 22 Williston. C. A. 8eymour 5 00 Windsor. Cong. Cli 13 50 MASSACHUSETTS, $4,308.38. Acton. Mrs. M. F., for Student Aid, At- lanta U 1 00 Amherst. Fii~LCong. Chand Soc., $79.43; North Cong. Cli. and Soc., $24.86; Player Meeting, Ag. College, by 11. U. Howe, $1.50. 11)5 79 Andover. Peter Sinilli 600 Go Andover. Ladies A cx. Miss. Soc. of Free CS.. $25; John Smith, $10; Francis H. Johnson, $5; H. C. Andrews, $2; Mrs. David Gray, $2; D.C., $1; J W. P., $1; G. F., $l,for Student Aid, Straight U 47 00 Andover. ESTATE of Mrs. Caroline P. Tay- lor, by James C. Taylor, Ex . .... 200 00 Arlington. Cong. CS. and Soc 25 00 Asliby. Cong. Cli. and hab. Sri., $25, for Stud-nt Aid, Atlanta U.G. S. S., SOc 25 50 Aslifield. Cong. Ladies 10 26 Attleborougli. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc. (adl) 8 00 Auburndale. Miss Emma Warren, for Tougaloo U 2 00 Ballardyale. XV. C. C., for Student Aid, S. fT. 50 ReceFyt8. Boston. Mrs B. C. Parkburat of Mt Vernon Cli., $20; Mrs. Livermore, $2; Mrs. A. C. ~8. Si; Friends Christmas Box, for Wit rain gton, N. C. $23 00 Boston. Mrs. Samuel A. Bradbury, $25; in- correctly ack. in Feb. number. Boxford. 11ev. W. S. Coggin, $6; Mrs. J. K. Coles Sab. Sch. class, $2, for Student Aid, Straight U.;F. C., SOc 7 50 Boylston. Ladies, for lireiglit. . 1 00 Bradford. S. W. Carleton, for Student Aid, Straight U 5 00 Brocton. Joseph Hewitt, $1O;Mrs. Barzilla Corey, $f; Miss Lizzie Kingman and tSci., $l.96,frr Tiugaloo U 16 96 Brookline. Harvard Cong. Ch. . .... 67 75 Cambridge. Mrs. C. A. W Cambridgepo~ t. Prospect St. Cli. and Soc., $195.75; Pilgrim Cong. Cli., $62.32; Mrs. F. K., 60c.; N. H. H., 50c.; A. A. P., 50c... 259 74 Cenlervile. Cong. Cli. and Soc 6 67 Chaile~town. First Ch. and Parish 50 00 Chesterfield. Cong. Cli. and Soc 7 5ie Clinton. Mrs. C. B. Sawyer 10 00 Coleraine. Miss E. MeG 1 00 Cotuit. Union Cong. Cli. and Soc 9 30 Dalton. Hon. Z. Ii. Crane 100 00 Danvers. C. W. L 50 Douglass. A. M. H.. 70 Fast Douglass. Cong Cli. and Soc. to consi. Tnox.& s H. MEEKS and CLASIA 13. SIMMoNs, L. ~1s 65 91 Easthampton. First Cong. Sab. 5db 25 00 East Longnieadow. Cong. Cli. and Soc., $30; F.M., St 31 00 East Medway. First Cong. Cli. and Soc.... 10 00 East Woburn. Win. Temple 3 00 Enfold. Cong. cli. and Soc 110 41 Fall River. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. $83.31; M.E.$1 8134 Fitchbure. Miss C. S. D 1 00 Framingliana. Plymouth Cong. Cli. and Soc. $26.27; Young People s Mission of Plymouth Cli. $11.35 and bhl. of C.; Mrs. Maria Fay, $5; sirs. S. N. Brewer, $2; A Friend, $1 45 62 Georgetwn. First C.ing. Cli and Soc 2s 40 Gilberiville. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 50 Gloucester. Cong. Cli. and Soc 50 00 Goshen. Cong. Cli. and Soc 8 45 Great Barrington. First Cong. cli. and Soc. $70; James Bird $ 1211) 82 50 Graftsin. Ryan. Cong. Cli. and Soc 3:1 14 Greenwich. Cong. Isab. lich 18 hO Groton. Union Cong. Cli 18 09 Hadley. Fiist Cong. Cli. and Soc. $6.10; Sab. S li. $8.67 14 77 Hatfield. Cong. Cli. and Soc 46 00 Haverhill. North Cong. Cli. and Soc. ($100 of which from Mrs. Theodore Noyes), $03.39; C. C. and D. F. $1.00 204 39 Harwicliport. Leonard Ilolihit s it) 00 HingL am. Ryan. Cong. Cli. and Soc 23 10 Hinsdale. Cong. Cli. Sab. icli. box of hooks Hyde (ark. Cong. Cli. and Soc 24 80 Ilubbardaton. A.G.D si lpswieh. Linebrook Cong. Cli . . 6 30 Lawrence. Lawrence St. Cli. and Soc. $62.07; Coil. flnion Meeting, $21.70, for Student Aid, Straight U 83 77 Lee. MAli 100 Leominster. Orthodox Cong. Cli. and Soc.. 13 18 Lexingt in. Hancock Cli. and Soc 13 14 Littleton. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 50 Lowell. High St. Cli. and Soc. $53.73; First Cong. Cli. and Soc. $78.90; Has. E. M. Buss. $30. to const. liciseif L. M~ Mrs. E. J. Donnell, $5 197 (3 Ludlow. Cong. Cli 27 60 Maiden. Brs. H. L. B I 00 Manchester. Bbl. of C. Mansfield. P. M F 1 00 Maitapooselt. A. C 1 00 Medfield. F. D. E 50 Merrimac. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to const. I. B.BArLxs,L.M 5005 91 Middleton. Ladies 01 Cong. Cli. bbl. of C. and $2.26 for Freight; Cong. Cli. and Soc. $14 $16 26 Milibury. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $58.50 ;Cong. Cli and Soc. $21.60, for Studeit Aid, At lanta U 80 00 Honson. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $26.49;--Sun- beam Mission Circle,for Chinese .31. $20... 46 411 Newborypori. J.D 1 00 Newton. Eliot Cli. $137.41; Mrs. 11. B. M. Soc. . 137 91 Newton Centre. First Cong. Cli. $29.91; J. W. Soc.; S. A. F. Soc 80 96 Newlonville. Central Cong. Soc 20 89 Nec ton Falls. Ladies libi. of C. North Amherst. it. S 1 00 North Brookileld. First Cong. Cli 12 68 North cheimeford. Cong. Cli. and Soc 22 61 North Hadley. Cli. and Sab. Scli.for Student Aid, ioagaloo U. $10;Cong. Sab. Sch. $465 14 58 Norwood. Mrs. H.N. Fuller, hal. to conat. B. W. FULLER, L. H 4 75 Oxford. First Cong. Cli. and Soc. $20.28; L. ~V. Soc 20 78 Peabody. T. S 1 00 Phillipaton. A. and T. Ward 8 00 Pittefield. Firet Cong. Cli. to coust. 11EV. SAMUEL hARRIsoN and IRRo. BARTLETT, L.Ms . 100 00 Plymouth. Cli. of Pilgrimage 43 91) Reading. Mrs. Mark M. Temple 2 00 Ilelioboth. Cong. Cli. S. S. box of Hooks. ltocheser. First Coig. Cb. and Soc ~ tt Bockland. Miss S. M. Bailey, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 18 00 Salem. Joseph 18. Towne, $10 for Student Aid, Straight U. ;South Cong. Cli., M. C. Coll., $5.sO;M. iv., SOc .. 16 110 Sandwich. H. H. Nye 2 00 South Attleborongli Cong. Cli. and Soc 3 38 Soutliborougli. Pilgrim Cong. Cli., $8.93; H. A. F., Soc ~ 45 South Hadley. Teachers and litndents of Mt. H olyoke Fem. Sem.,for Tougaloo U 16 80 South Royalaton. Cong. Cli. and S.c., $10; Mrs. S. Ne, SOc 10 50 Springfield. South Cong. eli., $27.22; First Cong. Cli. and Soc., $20.61; Mrs. A. C. H., 41.10; A.A.H.,$l 4993 Sterling. Cong. Co. and S c 23 73 Stoneham. Coug. Cli. and Soc 21 56 Stow. Mrs. H. W.. for Tougatoo U 25 Taunton. Trin. Cong. Cli. aid Soc 40 80 tewksbury. George Lee, $10; Rev. S. F. French, $5; Win. H. Lee, $5, for Student Aid, Straight U 20 00 Warren. Mrs. Joseph Ramsdell $5 of which for Chinese At.) 6 00 Watertown. Miss L P. Auld, $16, for Books for Airs. Mother;Mrs. J. A., SOc 15 50 West Boxtord. Cong Cli., for ,Student Aid, Straight U 7 54 West Brookfield. First Cong. Cli and Soc., $12.47; D. S Stebbins, hhl. of C 12 47 Westfield. Second Cli. and Soc 19 57 West Springfield. Park St. cli., $46 11; First Cli., 415 61 iS Whitinsville. 11ev. J B. Thurston 30 00 Williamstown. Miss Emily Beckwith 10 00 Wilmington. Cong Sib. Scli., $lt. for Stu- dent Aid, Tattadega C J Skilton, $10.... 40 00 Winchestor. A Friend, 2 00 Woburn. First Cong. Sab. Seli. $110; Cong Cli. and Soc. tin past), $40 94; Mrs. G. A B., Soc 191 44 Woicester Centiat Cong. Cli., $149.48; Salem St. Cli and Soc., 464.118; Old South Cong. Cli. and Soc., 461.25; A. H. C.. Sto.; Rev. W. J. Vi., SOc 265 81 RHODE ISLAND, $431.33. Bristol. Mrs. R 1 00 Little Compton. United Cone. Cli. and Soc. 82 0 Pawtucket. Cong. Cli. and Soc... ~0 0~1 92 ]?eceipt8. Providence. Beneficent Cong. Cli., $235 33: Young Ladies Soc. of Beneficent Cli., $100, for Student Aid, Fisk U.MiS5 E. A. Lins ley, $3 $338 33 CONNECTICUT, $2,853.41. Black Rock. Coeg.Ch 1 80 Bloomfield. Cong. Cli 7 34 Bridgeport. Second Cong. Cli., $49.35; J. B., $1 50 35 Broad Brook. Cong. Cli and Soc 14 00 Bristol. Cong. Sab. 5db 20 00 Cheshire. 11ev. I. H. I 1 00 Chester. Cong. Cli 15 00 Cromwell. Cong. Cli 5 00 Durham. Miss A P. C 1 00 Essex. First Cong. Cli 14 12 Farmington. Cong. Cli., qoar. coil. ($100 of which from Henry D. Hawley.) 167 95 Olastonbury. First Cong. Cli., $1i6.16; G. M.J. 60c 155 76 4lriswold. Mrs. 11. B 1 00 Guilford. Mrs. Lucy E. Tuttle, $103.50; First Cong. Cli., $24 127 50 Haddam. Cong. Cli 5 00 Hartford. Asylum Hill Cong. Cli., $152.55 South Cong. Cli., $100; Mrs. M. C. Be. mis, $20.50; Mrs.1W. T., SOc.; A Friend, SOc.; Mrs. A. 11. C., 25c 274 30 Kensington. Cong. Cli. and Soc., to const. LEA,NDER A. BUNcE, L. M 31 57 Jewett City. Cong. Cli. and Soc 13 60 Manchester. E. S. and E. A. B 1 00 Montville First Cong. Cli 6 50 Moose Meadow. Mrs. H. L. E.... New Britain. Sooth Cong. Cli. (of which $5 special from a member,) $76.94; South Cli. A Friend, $20; Mrs. S. SOc 97 44 New Haven. 0. A. Dorman, $100; F. C. Sherman, $100; Amos Townsend, $50; Henry Johnson, $5;Delia C. Davis, for Student Aid, Atlanta U. $5;I. P. $1; XV. A. L. $1; Mrs. S. P. C. SOc 262 50 New London. Second Cong. Cli. (of which $300 from TRUST ESTATE of tlie late H. P. Haven) 819 62 New London. A Friend 1 00 Norfolk. Cong. Cli. to const. Miss SARAH CustTsss;L.M 30 00 North Guilford. A. E. Bartlett, $15.50; A Friend, $5; M. L. C.SOc 21 00 Norwalk. Mrs. Win. B. St. John 3 00 Norwich. Miss. Assn of Second Cong. Sab. 5db. $50, for Student Aid, Atlanta UMiss S. M. Lee, $5 55 00 Old Lyme. Miss Mary Sill, lidl. of C. for Talladega C. Orange. Cong. Cli 10 80 Plymouth. Cong. Sab. 5db. for Agt Dept. Talladega, Ala 100 00 Iloxhury. Cong. Cli 17 75 Salisbury. Cong. Cli 65 25 Stamford. First Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db 50 00 Stratford. A. S. C 5 00 Terryville. Cong. Cli., M. C. Coils 15 00 Tbomaston. Cong. Cli 23 51 Warren. First Ecclesiastical Cli. and Soc.. 28 20 Washington. A few Friends, by Henry S. Nettleton 6 00 Waterbury. First Cong. Cli 125 61 Watertown. Cong. Sab. 5db. to coost. AN- NA H. ScoTT and G ORGE N. GRIswOLD, L. Ms 69 00 West Chester. Con,,. Cli 11 00 West Meriden. E. K. Breckenridge 5 00 West Safford. Cong. Cli. and Soc 2 75 Willimantic. Cong. Sab. Sch. for .~tudent Aid,Stright U 2500 Winsted. Mrs. M. A. Mitchell, $10; Elias 11. Gilman, $10; First Cong. Cli. (adl) $6.19 26 19 Woodliridge. Cong. Cli. $9.69; Cong. Sab. 5db. $6.35, (of which $6 for Student Aid, Atlanta U.) 16 60 Woodstock. Cong. Sab. Scli. to const. DORA A. LINDEMAN. L. M so oo AFriend 1750 NEW YORK, $991.03. Antwerp. Two S. S. Classes and a few La. dies, by Mrs. Kate C. Abell, pkg. of C. and $1 for Tattadega C $1 00 Aquebogue, L. I. Sab. Sch. and Friends,for Student Aid, Straight U 38 00 Brooklyn. Mrs. Lewis Tappan 10 00 Brooklyn, E B. ESTATE of Mary Withing ton, by J. N. Stearns, Ex 315 45 Evans. Mrs. K. P. 11. Camp 5 00 Camden. S. Sperry 2 00 Champlain. H. H 1 00 Cliestertown. R. C. C 1 00 Chureliville. Carohue Town, for ,Student Aid, Atlanta U 5 00 Cohoes. Mrs I. Terry 5 00 Coxsackie. Mrs. 11. F. Spoor, $5; and Miss A. G. Fairchild, $5; Rev. M. Lusk, 13 13 00 East Avon. Mrs.F. B 1 00 Fast Bloomfield. Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db 31 40 Fredonia. SIrs. 11. ~ Kellogg, box of C. Fulton. J. C. Galispe, $7; Almon Bristol, $5; T. W. Chesebro, $5; Boa. F. S. SOc.; Mrs. I. C. $1 18 50 Greigsville. Mrs. S. J. Child, Mrs. F. A. Gray and Miss L. A. Gray 3 00 Hudson. Mrs. D. A. Jones, $10; A. S. P. SOc 10 50 Kiantone. Mrs. 11. C. Halls S. S. Class 7 00 Lebanon. M. Day, $5; Thomas H. Hitch cock, $5; A. Seymour, $5; S. H., $1; J. H. 1700 Le Roy. Mrs. Sarah Covert, $6; Mrs. Dea. McEwein, $5 ............ ... 11 00 Lima. Mrs. Mary Sprague, for Student Aid, Hampton Inst s 00 Locust Valley. Mrs. Sarah Palmer........, 5 00 Lockport. First Cong. Cli 63 92 McGrawville. H. B. Corey 2 00 Middleport. G. J. H 1 00 Mount Sinai Cong. Cli 8 00 Newark Valley. Cong. Cli 16i3 Newdeld. Rev. Chas. Wiltey 10 00 New York. Mrs. Parker, $100; Mrs. C. Tap. pan Lewis, $5; A Friend, $5;S. S. Class ( Pilgrim Band,) Broadw y Tab. Cli., $15.6ofor Student Aid, Hampton Inst.. 125 (0 North Walton. Union Miss. Soc., $14.87; Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db., $8.21; A Friend, $1 24 08 Orwell. Friends by Rev. F. N. Greeley, box of C Oswego. J. G 50 Paris Hill Cong. Cli. and Sali. Sch 26 00 P0km. Miss Abigail Peck 10 00 Penn Tan. W. W. Taylor 2 10 Riverhead. Mrs. Eliza Miller, $20; Miss Knowles, $5 25 00 Rochester. A. Hubregtse 2 50 Smyrna. First Cong. Cli. and Sab. 5db. Miss. Soc 20 00 Tarrytown. A Friend 60 00 Tompkinsville. Mrs. Maria Snyder 2 00 Troy. Mary and Margaret J. Cushman 1 00 Walton. First Cong. Cli 79 75 West Chazy. Daniel Bassett 5 00 West Farms. J. A . 50 NEW JERSEY, $209.50. Belleville. Mrs. J. B 50 Bricksburgh. Mrs. G. L 1 00 Jersey City. First Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch. fos Student Aid, Fisk U 50 00 Jersey City. B. B. A 5 00 Morrlstown. Mrs. R. R. Graves, $100; W. B., $1 101 00 Newark. J. H. Dbnison 30 00 Paterson. Benj. Crane, $20; P. Van Houten, $2 22 00 PENNSYLVANIA, $42.00. Philadelphia. W. P. F., $1; Rev. C. E. B., SOc.; Mrs. J. R. McC., SOc 2 00 Pittsburgh. Third Presh. Sab. 5db. for Stu dent Aid, Talladega. Ala 2S 00 Washin4on. Mrs. M. B. McFarland 10 CO West Alexander. John McCoy and Wito.... 5 00 ]i?eceipt8. OHIO, $350.42. Alliance. J. S. Thomas $2 00 Ashland. J. Thompson 2 28 Belpre. Cong. Ch 5 20 Cliardon. Sali. Sch. Class, (Cheerful Workers ) 10 00 Claridon. Cong. Ch 45 01 Cincinnati. Rent,for the peer in New Or- teens, Le 15 15 Cleveland. Euclid Av. Cong. Ch. $21.10; Franklin Av. Cong. Cli., 88.82 29 92 Geneva. MRS. S. Knousnusey, hal. to const. herself, L. H 10 00 Hudson. Ladies Union Miss. Soc., lilil. of C. for Colored poor ef S. 0 iKingsville. Myron Whiting 10 00 Madison. M. B. H 1 00 Marietta. mrs. E. XV. B 1 00 Marysville 11. 5. Wilcox, for Student Aid, Setma, Ale 20 00 Medina. Cong. Ch. and Soc., adl. for Touge. looU . 500 MossRun. M.B.F 50 Newark. Welsh Cong. Ch 9 30 North Bloomfield. Friend, for lad Dept. Tettedega C . 36 63 Norwalk. First Cong. Ch 7 30 Oberlin. First Cong. Cli., $20; Harris Lewis, $5; J. S. McClelland, $2; HR. $1; Ladies Soc. of 2d Cong. Cli. 2 blils. of C.,for Colored poor of N. 0 28 00 Orrville. Chas. S. Strong 5 00 Painsville. First Cong. Cli. (of which $2.50 from Mrs. Morley for Straight U.,) $26.07 First Cong. S. S., $25; C. R. Stone, $5 56 07 Ru~les. Mrs. J. T. . 50 Sliaronville. J. H 1 00 Springfield. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 7 56 Tallmadge. Mrs. Harriet Seward, $5;Mrs. A. F., SOc., for Tougetoo U 5 50 Toledo. Mrs. Ehiza H. Weed 10 00 Twinsliurgh. J. R. Parma~ee 3 00 TJnionvitle. H. XV 1 00 Wellington. E. W 50 Windliam. First Cong. Cli 19 00 INDIANA, $17. Elkhart. First Cong. Cli 6 00 Madison. G. XV. Soutliwortli 10 00 Newyille. A. D 1 00 ILLINOIS, $2,277.53. Aurora. First Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch. for Stu. dent Aid, Fisk U . 25 00 Chicago. New Eng. Cli., $16.39; New Eng. Cli. Sab. Sch. $65.16 81 55 Delavan. Mrs. 11. Houghton 2 00 Downers Grove. J. XV. Bushnell 5 00 Elgin. Mrs.C.C.B... 100 Galena. Mrs. Anne Bean 2 00 Galesburg. First Cli. of Christ.... 34 60 Geneseo. Cong. Cli. (inpart) iS 00 Glencoe. Cong. Cli 54 42 Greenview. H. W. XV Si; Hutsonville. C. V. N 50 Kings. Cong. Cli 3 00 Lamoille. Cong. Cli .. . 3 95 La Salle. XV. E. T 1 00 Lewistown. ESTATE of Myron Phelps, by Mary P. Phelps, Henry Phelps, and Ste. phen Phelps, Exs 1,000 00 Lombard. First Cong. Ch 775 Macomli. U. H. S 1 00 Millington. Mrs. D. W. J 50 Owosso. Mrs. E. H. A 1 50 ~ayson. Cong. Sab. Seli 20 00 Polo. Robert Smith.. 50000 Port Byron. Ladies Miss. Soc., $4.25 ;Mrs. E.L.H.,55c. for TougatooLl . 480 Princeton. Benj. Ferris 10 00 Itockford. Ladies of First Cong. Ch., $13; Mrs. Penfield, $l0,for Student Aid, Tel. ledege, Ate...... . Stillman Valley. Cong. Oh Tilden. Mrs. A. E. A Waukegan. Miss E. D., for Tougeloo U Wyoming. Cong. Cli 93 YorkNeck. AR $ 1 . Friends 450 00 MICHIGAN, $139.38. Alpena. Julia F. Farwell, for Student Aid, Atlente U 10 00 Armada. Miss Lydia A. Jackman.... 5 00 Birmingham. Mrs. A. D. S 1 00 Chelsea. John C. Winans 10 00 Clinton. Mrs. S. R 50 Detroit. A Friend 1 50 Edwardsburg. U. E 1 00 Galesbnrg. Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch. for Student Aid, Fisk U 17 40 Grand Rapids. E. H. B 50 Grass La~ee. First Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch., $25 for Student Aid, Fisk U. Cong. Cli. and Soc., $10.23 35 23 Homer. Mrs. C. C. Evarts 1 25 Jackson. Mrs. Eliza Page, $15; B. T.. $1 16 00 Borneo. Mrs. A. B. Maynard, $10; Mrs. S. L. Andrews, $10; Miss T. S. Clark, $5, for Ledy Missionary, Memphis, Teon. ;M. A. J. $1; Miss T. S. C.. SOc 26 50 SaintJohns. Mrs.D.B 100 Stanton. Mrs. J. 51. W 50 Stockbridge. Mrs. B. and Mrs. C 1 00 Traverse City. S. A 1 00 Union City. Andrew Lucas 4 00 Warren. Rev. J. [~. Beebe 5 00 Ex Teacher 1 00 WISCONSIN, $144.85. Appleton. G. W. P. $26; Cong. Cli. $11.90 37 90 Beloit. Prof. W. P . 50 Delavan. Cong. Cli 11 50 Fort Atkinson. Mrs. Caroline Snell 5 00 Geneva. Presh. Cli 22 04 Green Bay. A. Kimball and Others, $5,for Student Aid, Atlanta U. ;B. M. 20c 5 20 La Crusoe. Mrs. W. XX 50 Mazomanie. B. L 1 00 Oslikosh. 001. C. B. H 50 Racine. Rev. C. N 1 00 Slieboygan. Mrs. L. H. Chase, $10.50; D. B. SOc.; A. D. SOc 11 50 White~vater. First Cong. Cli 48 21 IOWA, $146.06. Algona. Cong. Oh 9 00 Anita. Cong Cli 100 Burlington. Cong. Cli. (adl) 38 90 Clay. Cong. Cli 5 00 Davenport. Capt. E. A. Adams, for Student Aid, Tattadega, Ate 50 00 Dunlap. Cong. Cli 8 11 Grinnell. A. A. Murcli 2 00 McGregor. XVomans Miss. Soc., hal to coust. Mus. A. B. PEARSALL, L. M 16 80 Osago. Womans Miss. Soc 7 25 Parkersberg. Rev. A. P 1 00 Tabor. Miss Julia B. Williams, $6, for Ste. den Aid, Fisk U. ;J. E. W. $1 7 00 MINNESOTA, $138.09. Excelsior. Cong. Cli ~. 10 00 Hamilton. Cong. Cli $9; Sab. Sch 14 00 Lake City. Con,, Sab. Sch., for Student Aid, Straight U 25 00 Minneapolis. Plymouth Cong. Cli., $24.24; Mrs. P. L.VanVleck, $lofor Student Aid, Atlanta lL ;Pilgrim Cli. $2.75 36 99 Nortlifield. First Cong. Cli 37 10 Spring Valley. Cong Cli, Qear. Coll 15 KANSAS, $10.51. Meriden. J. Rutty 10 00 Wellsville. B. F. S 51 NEBRASKA, $51.00. Camp Creek. G. F. L 50 Nebraska City. Mrs. E. S 50 A Friend .. 50 00 23 00 COLORADO, SOc. 22 ~ Canyon City. D. L 1 00 33 MONTANA, $1.50. 4 39 Camp Baker. A Friessci 50 1 50 94 Receiyt& MISSOURI, $10. St. Louis Miss Clara M. Janes,for Student Aid, Hampton Inst $10 00 OREGON, SOc. Forest Grove. Mrs. M. R. W 50 CALIFORNIA, $27 50. Rolinerville. Mrs. Mary A. Brown, $2; Mrs. A. B.. SOc 2 50 San Francisco. Mrs. N. Gray... 25 00 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, $10.40. Washington Mis. A. N. Bailey. $10; M. S. C., 40c .... 10 40 WEST VIRGINIA, $1.50. Elm Grove. II. M. Atkinson, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 1 .50 TENNESSEE, $382.93. Chattanooga. Miss Blanche Curtis, for Stu dent Aid, Tougaloo 10 00 Memphis Le Moyne Sch 261 28 Nashville. Fisk University 111 65 NORTH CAROLINA, $138.52. Mcteansville. Rev. Alfred Connett, $3.20; Cong. Cli. $1.80 5 00 Raleigh. Washington 5db. $15; Miss E. P. hayes, $10 25 00 Wilmington. Nernial Sch. $102.39; First Cong. Cli. $6.13 108 52 SOUTH CAROLINA, $278.00. Charleston. Avery Inst $276; A. W Fain- ham, $2.~ 278 00 GEORGIA, $297.70. Atlanta. Storrs Sch 207 85 Atlanta. Bent 56 00 Macon. Lewis High Sch . 53 85 ALABAMA, $429.28. Marion. Girls Sewing Class, for Mendi .Af. 21 00 Maryvile. First Cong Cli. 8ab. Sch. /or ,Stades,.t Aid, Sesme, Ala 10 00 Montgomery. Public Fund 150 00 Talladega. Talladega C. $47.28; J. W. R. bOo.; G. N. E. SOc 48 28 FLORIDA, $5.00. Jacksonville. C. B. Wilder 6 00 LOUISIANA, $80.00. New Orleans. Straight University 80 00 MISSISSIPPI, $10.00. Natchez. Rev. C. A 50 Tougalno. Tougaloo U., $19.50; Rev. G. S. Pope, ~9 45; h. E. S., SSc 29 50 $1.19. Friends.for Tougatoo U 1 19 PERSIA, $30.00. Oroomish. Mr. and Mrs. B. T.alaree, Jr.... 30 00 INCOME FUND, $130.00. GraveS Library Fund, Atlanta U 150 00 Total 26.177 62 Total from Oct 1st to Jan. 31st $55,924.18 H. W. HUBBARD, Asst Treas. RECEIVED FOR DEBT. Wells, Maine. Rev. B. Soutliwortli $ 5 00 Francestown. N. H Cong Cli 1200 Cambridge Vt. Madicon Safford 10 10 Hardwick, Vt. A. M. Amsden, $20; Mrs. Mary B. Amaden, $5 25 00 Ludlow, Vt. Mrs L. Martin 6 Oo Abington, Mass. Mrs. H. P 1 to Bridgewater, Mass. M. S. Dunham $5 00 Easthampton, Mass. Mrs. Emily G. Willis- ton 50 00 Fall River, Mass. Rev. Win. W. Adems... 25 00 Fkrence, Macs. A. L Willioton 500 00 Georgetown, Mass. .... . 10 00 Monson. Mass. Cong. Cli. $9.73; Mrs. C. 0. Chapins Class, $5.50 15 23 Newtonvi;le, Mass. Mrs. J. W. Hayes 25 00 North BrookOdd Mass. First Cong. Cli 50 00 South Weymouth, Mass. Friends, by Rev. G. F. Stanton 25 00 Ware, Macs. First Cong. Cli., SI. C. ColI 5 31 Winciendon, Mass. Rev. D. Fosttr and Wife 25 00 Worcester, Mass. M. A. T 7 ~ Colchestes, Conn. Colected by Mrs. S. E. Ransom ~.. 27 00 Easion, Coun. Mrs. R. H. Wheeler 25 00 Cromwell, Conu. Cong. Cli 2 50 Harif rd, Conn. Centre Cli., by Mrs. J. W. Cooke 100 00 Middlefield. Coon. Friends in Cong. Soc2 by Rev. A. C. Denison.. 16 00 Middletown, Conn, A few ladies in First Cong. Cli., by Mrs E. Tesey 25 00 Newtown, Coun. Cong Cli . 5 00 Unionville, Coun. Friends, by Mrs. T. E. Daviess 25 00 Waterbury, Conn. Young Ladies Mission Circle of First Cong. Cli., by Mrs. E. A. Morris 25 00 Binghamton, N. Y. Friends, by Mrs. Edward Taylor 57 00 New York, N F. Clias. L. Mend 100 00 New Yo,k, N. V. Mrs. L. Smith Bohart, to const. Mns. SIAasv B. COATESwOnTH L. M. 30 00 Oneida County, N. V A Friend 100 00 Rochester, N. V. A. Beebe 3 00 Walton, N. F. Collected by Mrs. Wm A. Mlii e 25 00 West Winfield, N. V. Mrs. Luna Bucklen, $3;Rev.L.W.C.,$l 400 Irvington. N. J. Rev. A. Underwood 25 00 Morristown, N. J. E. A. Graves . 500 00 Willoughby, 0. 10 00 Chicago. Ill. Mrs. L. A. Walker 5 00 Elgin, Ill. A Friend 10 00 Geneseo, Ill. Mis. L. B. Perry 10 00 Millington, DI. Sirs. D. W. J 50 Winnebago, Ill. N. F. Pdrscns. . 10 00 York N~ ck, lii. Anna Reynolds 20 00 Ill. A Friend 5 00 Detroit, Mich. Rev. Frank T. Bayley - 15 00 Jckson, Mich. Mi.s Elisa Page 10 00 College Springs. Iowa. J. G. Laughlin, $5; F. A. Noe, $5 10 00 Osage, Iowa. Childrens Mission Circle, ( Cheerful Givers l 5 00 Meriden. Bans. J Butiy 10 00 Wild Cat, Kans. S. D. Pierce II) 00 Palataka, Fla. Mrs. E. Rhldwin 25 00 Total . 2,054 04 Previously acknowledged In Decem ber receipts 9,533 15 Total $l1,5l,7 19 FOR TILLCTSON NORMAL AND COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, AUSTIN, TEXAS. l~xeter, N. H. Mrs. Augusta F. Odlin $100 00 Elanov r, Conn. Davsd A. Alen ...... 250 00 Oberlin, 0. Mrs. Wheat 1 00 Total 351 00 Previously acknowledged in Decem her reccipta 946 00 Total $1,297 00 (95) 73,620 MORE Siu~er Sewill~ ~adhiiles Sold 1111878 THAN IN ANY PREVIOUS YEAR. A________ In 1870 we sold 127,833 1878 356,432 sewing Machines. Our sales have increased enormously every year through the whole period of hard ti[nes. WE NOW SELL THREE-QUARTERS OF ALL THE SEW ING MACHINES SOLD IN THE WORLD. For the accommodation of the Public we have t,500 subordinate offices In the United States and Canada, and 3,000 offices in the Old World and South America. PRICES GREATIiIY REDUCED. Waste no money on cheap counterfeits, Send for our handsomely Illustrated Price Liet, THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, rrincipal Office, 3~ Union Square, 1~ew York SABBATH READINC. SEEING that all Sundae magazines and most reli~i one weeklies have much secular matter, espeeially advertisements, I have thought that there was an ob- vious want of a weekly paper composed of mstter or a hidi order of excellence and Interest, and wholly suit- ahle for perusal on the Sabbath-day. Such a paper is SABBATH READING. Every number contains a first-class sermon, rvhlch nay be read in mretings where there is no preaching, ir at home by persons neceacarily detained Ironun rliurcli; also micla excellent selected matter, some of which is specially adapted for cliililren. SABBATH REAnI~O is a handaunie small eight-page paper, suitable in appearance Or tire parlor tahe, and suitable or binding at the end of the year or half year. It is sisnt post-pail t(i any address for 51 cents a year, and strips wheu subscription expires. A c.ub of five wili be supplied or a year br two dollars. This paper, which makes a m st acceptable tractate for dist ioution in p bone, poor-houses, asylums, ships, etc. or in visitation from house to house, is sent post- paid tm any part of the continent at the rate of a dollar per 1110 copies. Address, JOHN DOUG ALl, WITNEss OFFICE. No. 7 Frairklort St.. New York. TIlE NUlI1JL~ SERIES OF STANDARD COMMENTARIES. Nichols price, $3 75 Our price, $ 1 .50. These Cmueutariis are from the aidec Puritan Divines, who have devoted their whole lives to a siiigle book or two, instead of the whole Bible. Rev. J. C. Ryle sacs Ni hula is doing an immense see- vi is t~ the Church in publishing, at a singularly cheap prire, this heat commentaries of the Puritmos. Dr. Thomas, of The II.mlilst, says We most cor- dually advise our mitriaterial readers to enrii-h their li- braries with this inagn~ficent and wondri insly cheap editbinin of the works ol the Puritan Divines. let. Gouge on the Hebrews,. in 3 vo e. Jd. Airy on Philippiane, and cartwriglit on cilossians. 3d. King in Jonah, arid R~ai;olds on Ooadiah and Haggol. 4th. Stock and I irshiol in Malaciri. arid Bernard and Fuller on Riir h. 5th. hardy on First Jiuirn. 6th. lit rliury on Habakkuk and Isbadiali. 7th. Bayne on the Fphi-siari-. ith. George Newton on the 17th Chapter of John. Stir. Smith, Pierson and Gouge on the Psalms. 10th. Cotton on Ecciesiasres and Cantiches. and Mullet on Proverbs. E. TIBBALS & SONS, 37 Park How, Y. Y. A. S. BARNES & CO. PUBLiS .1 TIlE ONLY TIlE HYMN AND TUNE BOOK which stands the teat. Revised and eulareed. Prices greatly re- duced. Editions for every want. For Samples loaned without charge) and lerms address the Publishers. LYMAN ABBOTTS Collh1llollt~ry Oil tiio N~w T~st~illollt Illustrated and Popular, giving the latest views of the heat Biblical Schohars on all disputoh points. A concise, strong and faithful Exposition in (8) eight volumes octavo. AGENTS WANTED IN EVERY LOCALITY. EDITED i3Y 11ev. J. 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Bro~u Bros. & Co. ~ANKERS, 69 & 61 Wall Stroot, Now York, 211 ~liostiiut St., Phu1a~ol~liia, 66 51810 Stroot, Bostoll. Issue Commercial Credits5 make Cable transfers of Money between this Country and Eng- land, and buy and sell Bills of Exchange on Great Britain and Ireland. They also issue, against Cash deposited, or satisfactory guarantee of repayment, ~ir~vIar ~rodi1s for Tra~gIIgrs, In DOLLARS for use in the United States and adjacent countries, and in POUNDS STERLING, for use in any part of the world. The Book of Psalms. ARRANGED FOR RESPONSIVE READING IN SABBATH SCHOOLS, CHURCHES OS FAMILY WORSHIP. The current version is strictly followed, the only peculiarity being the arrangement according to the Original Parallelisms, for convenience in responsive reading. Two sizes. Prices: 32mo, Limp Cloth, 30 cts. per copy, $25 per ISO; l6mo, Cloth. 70 cts. per copy,$56 per 100. Sent post-paid on receipt of price. TAINTOR SROTHERS, MERRILL & Cl.. PubUshIrI, 75~ Broadway, New York. UNFERMENTED WINE. Pure Juice of the Grape; no Alcohol; tested for years; received International lilledal. T. H. JOHNSON, New Brunswick, N. J. National Temperance Secisty, 58 Reade St., N.Y.; Congregational and Baptist Publication Societies, Boston and Philadelphia. Meneely & Kimberly, BELL FOUNDERS, TROY, N. Y. Manufacture a superior quality of Bells. Special attention given to CHURCH BELLS W~ Illustrated Catalogues sent free. W. & B. DOUGLAS, Illiddletown, Conn., MANUFACTURERS OF PUMPS, HYDRAULIC RAMS, GARDEN ENGINES, PUMP CHAIN AND FIXTURES, IRON CURBS, YARD HYDRANTS, STREET WASHERS, ETC., Highest Medal award- ed them by the Univer- sal Exposition at Paris, France, in 1867; Vienna, Austria, in 1873; and Philadelphia, 1876. Founded in 1832. 0 fl..GANS - for Branch Warehluses $100. $300 for $90. $275 $340 ORG~NS & 87 John St. for $80. $200 for $70- $190 for $65, and $160 for $55. 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The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 4 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York Apr 1879 0033 004
The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 4, miscellaneous front pages 96A-96B

VOL. XXXIII. No. 4. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. To th ~r the Gospel is Preached. 0 PhIL, 1879. CONTENTS: EDITORIAL. MAP OF EASTERN AFRICA (Cover) p. 2 THE AHTHINGTON MISSION 97 FINANdIAL 101 PROGRESSENCOIJRAGEMEHT 101 CONGEEGATIONALISM IN THE SOUTH: Rev. C. L. Woodwortli 102 ITEMS FROM THE FIELD 103 GENERAL NOTES~ 104 THE FREEDMEN. SUNDAY-SCHOOLS FOR THE FREEDMEN: Rev. J. E. ROT, U. U 107 VIRGINIAWork at Hampton, from a Three Months Observation: Rev. John Ii. Den Son 109 GEORGIA, MACONA Beginners Reflections, 112 AL& HAMA, TALLADEGA Revival in Church and College 113 SELMARevival WorkA Well- organized Church 114 MONT~OaERv~Thonghtfn1 Con gregation 115 Mississippi, TOUGALOOA Praise Meeting.. 116 AFRICA. HEATHEN BTJNDOO DANCE AND A RETREAT: Benj. James. M. D 118 VISIT TO THE INTERIOR: Rev. A. E. Jazk- son 119 THE INDIANS. SCHOOL AND CHURCH WORE AT DUNGINESS, WT 120 THE CHINESE. Cun CHINESE HELPERS: Rev. W. C. Pond, 121 RECEIPTS 123 NEW YOLR1i~. thc ~nei~zr~n ~h~gtuz~uij ~i~ton, ROOMS, 56 READE STREET. Price, 50 Cents a Year, in advance. MAP tocation and Accessibility MISSION IN EASTERN AFRICA Pro e4 to tho IL1VL A. Lybiaxi a a e r t

The Arthington Mission Editorial 97-101

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL. XXXIII. APRIL, 1879. No. 4. ~nterxcan ~ ~~nciati.on, THE ARTHINGTON MISSION. In the March MISSIONARY we published the letter containing the offer of 3,000 to the A. M. A. for the establishment of a mission in Central Africa, to lie be- tween the river Nile on the west, and the river Jub on the east, and to extend from 10 deg. north latitude to 3 deg. on the Nile, and 1 deg. on the Jub. The offer has received as much and as careful attention as the time has allowed, and we submit in this issue the results so far as yet attained. We call attention to THE ACCOMPANYING MAP showing the location and accessibility of the proposed mission. The territory assigned is included in dotted lines, and is nearly in the centre of the map, which has been drawn in accordance with the latest discoveries. The sources of the Nile are indicated in the Victoria and Albert Nyanza lakes. The rivers Sobat and Jub are given as by the best authorities. The stations of Gondokoro and Fatiko are shown, and the general location of the various known tribes. The report says nothing of the Abyssinians in the northeast, being confined thus far to the most accessible portion of the region. The mission stations on the three lakes have been conspicuously lettered and underlined; that of the Church Missionary Society at Rubaga, the capital of King Mtesa, and Kagei on the south end of the lake, where they propose to have at least a depot; Ujiji on the Tanganika, where the London Missionary Society have located; and Livingstonia on the Nyassa, from which the missionaries of the Free Church of Scotland will move to a location probably on the west coast, where they will be free from the tsetse fly. The proposed field will be seen to be accessible by the Nile. The cataracts have been ascended by vessels of considerable size, at very high Nile, but always with great danger and difficulty. It is more feasible to transport from Souakim, on the Red Sea, across the desert by camel-back to Berber, thence by steamer to Khartum and Gondokoro, which, or the military station only a few miles south on the opposite bank of the river, may be the best point of departure and depot of supplies. It may not be a matter of great difficulty to explore the Sobat and penetrate by it into the very heart of this region. For the view of the field and the attitude toward it taken by the Association, we refer to the following report of the Foreign Committee, which was unanimously adopted and ordered to be printed at the last meeting of the Exe~utive Committee: 98 The Art/dngton Afis8iOn. REPORT OF THE FOREIGN COMMITTEE. TheCoinmittee beg leave to report that they have consulted such books as have been accessible, respecting the part of Africa designated by Mr. Arthington, and have also obtained an interview with Col. C. Chaill6 Long, the African explorer, who has penetrated both by the Sobat and the Jub further into that territory than any other white man now living. From the information gathered, they conclude that though there are difficul- ties, there are no insurmountable obstacles in the way of the establishment of the mission proposed. The country has been visited by a number of explorers, mer- chants and officers of the Egyptian Government. Steamers ply up and down the Nile in close proximity to some of the tribes it is proposed to reach. Sir Samuel Baker has illustrated the feasibility of conveying steel steamers in sections across the desert, from Souakim on the Red Sea, to Berber on the Nile, at which point they can be reconstructed and used on the Nile and its tributaries. With a small screw steamer, a missionary expedition can explore the different portions of the country mentioned by Mr. Arthington, using the boat for storage of supplies, and as a mission house, until stations can be established. The locality on the east bank of the Nile and along the river Sobat we believe to be moreeasy of access than either of the three central African missions estab- lished by the English and the Scotch on the Nyassa, Tanganika and Victoria Nyanza lakes, and that every argument for establishing these missions can be applied with greater force to a mission in the Nile basin. Of the region and peoples accessible by the river Jub, your Committee have as yet been able to gain no clear information, further than that the high lands, extend- ing back for perhaps twenty miles from the sea-coast, sink into low, marshy plains, through which the river runs as far as it has been navigated. The higher region in the interior, in which it must have its source, is as yet utterly unknown. We not only deem the proposed mission practicable, but the call to it Providen- tial. The attention of the civilized world has recently been directed in a striking manner to the Nile basin. The opening of the Suez Canal, and the explorations of Speke, Grant, Petherick, Schweinfurth, Long, Baker and Stanley, have famili- arized us with the country and its people, awakening an interest in its behalf that is wide-spread; while the efforts of Sir Samuel Baker and Colonel Gordon for the suppression of the slave-trade open to this Association an opportunity for co-op- eration in a work consistent with its origin and history. The number of slaves that come down the Blue and White Nile is probably 25,000 annually (Southworth, see page 355; Charles News Wanderings in Africa, page 492). Many of these are gathered from the Fatiko, Obbo, Latooka and Madi country (see Ismailia, page 355), and efforts for their relief by missionaries co- operating with the Government of Col. Gordon would be of much promise (Col. Long, before Executive Committee A. M. A.), especially as Col. Gordon has been appointed Governor General of the Nile basin for life, by the Khedive of Egypt, which position he has accepted, with the avowed purpose of suppressing the slave trade. ( Rhedives Egypt, page 294.) He appears to have entered upon this task with the spirit of an old Scotch Covenanter, taking his Bible with him in his tent, in the desert and in the wilderness. (Khedives Egypt, page 291.) It is a matter of interest that the proposed mission is among the real heathen. Moslem Africa extends across the continent to about 9 deg. north latitude. (See Reades African Sketch Book, Vol. I., page 3l2~) Below that belt of country there are no obstacles in the way of religious efforts among the natives, except The Arthinglon iti& ~ion. 99 those common to all missions among an unclad and tropical people. Sir Bartle Frere, as quoted by Secretary Hutchinson of the Church Missionary Society, says that the missionary, by the negro, free or slave, is everywhere regarded as a friend. lie has not the slightest objection of any kind, moral or material, political or social, to the missionary, whom he is glad to welcome as doing him good in many ways, and greatly adding to the importance of the tribes, in the midst of which a mission station is established. The peculiarity of the climate and the characteristics of the people indicate that the proposed mission should be manned largely by Freedmen from America. The climate is sure to wear out a white man in the course of a few years, if he remains constantly on the ground. (Col. Long, before the Executive Committee of the A. M. A.) The degree of mortality among the white soldiers of the Egyptian army, and the fate of the missionaries of the Austrian Mission at Gondo- koro, illustrate the same fact. Besides, the general testimony is, that black men are better able to convince people of their own color of the attainments that may be reached in religion and civilization by the African race. Thus it appears that not only the dllmate is for the Negro, but the work of missions as well. It is the office of this Association to make use of the Freedmen educated in its schools as missionaries to Africa, as speedily as Providence shall open the way. It is able to furnish a portion of the force required at an early day. The animal and vegetable productions of the country are so abundant that the material interests essential to the success of the mission are assured. The resources of the country are immense. It is estimated that in the nine provinces of the Soudan there are 140,000, 000 acres of fine, black, soft, loamy soil, an acreage that would make two productive cotton empires, each larger than France. You need not plough this soil; you need not work it; you have only to scatter the seed, and the periodical rains, or 8ileeahs (water-wheels for artificial irrigation) water the earth, and then at maturity you reap your harvest. (Four Thousand Miles in Africa, page 357.) The Madi country, for example, is thickly settled, and abounds with vast herds of the finest cattle. (Ismailia, page 286.) The Fatiko people are muscular and well built, and, generally, their faces are handsome ( Ismailia, page 282); while the Obbo people, living as they do at an altitude of 3,600 feet above the level of the sea, wear clothing, and afford a market for cloth, for which they exchange ivory, giving promise of an active market at an early day. (See Albert Nyanza, page 224.) The physical geography of a portion of the territory mentioned by Mr. Arthing- ton is as attractive as any found in Central Africa. In latitude 3 deg. to 9 deg. north, on the White Nile, and eastwards, the elevations vary from 1,500 to 4,000 feet above the level of the sea (Ismailia, page 522), and possess all the variety of scenery of mountain, plain, forest and meadow, which give a park-like beauty to portions of the country. At Fatiko, in latitude 3 deg. north, during eight months the range of the thermometer was between 60 deg. at 6 A.M. and 90 deg. at noon, the average temperature being equal to about 75 deg. (Ismailia, pages 513, 514, 515, 516.) From all that can be gathered, your Committee believe that, if the means shall be furnished for entering upon the proposed mission field, it will be wise to inau- gurate the work among the highlands south of Gondokoro, among the Bern, Fa- tiko, Latooka or Obbo tribes, selecting a locality, if possible, accessible by steamer, not too far from some station of the Egyptian Government, and among tri bes of mild and friendly disposition, and thus open to religious and civilizing agencies. 100 The Arthington 21fas8wfl. The Committee also urge that the relations of America to the slave trade have been such that we are in duty bound to do all we can for the redemption of the people of Africa, and that as a thank-offering to God for His overruling Provi- dence in ridding our country of slavery, we, of America, should he ready to estab- lish one new mission at least in addition to the three that have recently been un- dertaken with so much enthusiasm and at so great expense by our British friends. The special claims of this field upon the American Missionary Association are obvious. Equatorial Africa is not a new and untried field to it. The Mendi Mission was organized by the Amistad Committee thirty-seven years ago, and was transferred to the care of the Association in 1846. We are not unfamiliar with the discouragements or the hopeful aspects of the work. We ought to have learned something by so long experience. It is by no means proposed to divert strength from the old mission, which has never, perhaps, been in more promising condition, to a new field. Rather it would be our hope, if the Lord should lay this work upon us, that these eastern and western fields, balancing each other across the dark continent, would more than double the interest of those who work through us in the evangelization of Africa. The negro race has always been our prominent and peculiar charge. That the people of this district have been degraded more by the slave trade than by their native heathenism, makes their claim on us the less possible to resist. And the fact that the missionary spirit among the students in our Southern colleges will soon demand room in which to expend itself in self- denying labor, forbids that we should refuse such an offer without careful and prayerful consideration. We, therefore, advise that an appeal be made for $35,000, which, with the $t5,OO0 offered by Mr. Arthington, will amount to $50,000, as a fund for the establishment of a mission in the Nile basin, to be called The Arthington Mis- sion, in remembrance of the beneficent donor, who, under God, has by his liber- ality already made it possible for the great missionary societies to establish Central African missions. The Committee hope that the Lord may incline some one or more of the friends of African missions, whom He has blessed with wealth, to put into our hands the larger part of the sum required for this undertaking, and that the Association may receive, say $30,000, from one, two or three contributors, which will still leave room for the many who may desire by smaller gifts to have a part in the enter- prise. We further suggest that a force of not less than ten missionaries would be re- quired to enter upon this work ; that of this number, eight should, if possible, be of African descent, and that correspondence should be entered into with a view to their wise selection at such time as sufficient funds shall be subscribed to warrant a beginning of the undertaking. Also, that estimates be obtained respecting the dimensions and cost of a suitable steamer to serve the purposes of the mission. We recommend further that this report be printed in the April number of the AMERICAN MIssIONARY, and thus submitted to the prayerful consideration of the friends of the African race, and that the Executive Committee await their decision as it shall be indicated in their response, trusting in it to read the full disclosure of the Masters will, and purposing to be wholly guided thereby. GEO. M. BOYNTON, M. E. STRIEBY, AnrnsoN P. FOSTER, G. D. PIKE, JohN H. WASHBURN, II. W. HUBBARD. CLINTON B. FISK, FinancialProgre88Encouragement. 101 FINANCIAL. The American Missionary Association is practically out of dcbt, hut not out of danger. If receipts for current expenses are not kept up, a new debt is inevitable. The receipts for February and up to March 14th (the date of going to press), are $7,233 less than for the corresponding months of last year. This falling off may be partly due to the effort made to pay our debt and that of the Home Missionary Society, and partly to the unconscious feeling that with the debt paid little else is needed. But our work and workers are on our hands. Our office expenses are brought down to the most economical figures, and our expenditures in the field are most rigidly confined to the appropriations. If the receipts of this fiscal year are brought up to those of lastthe basis of the appropriationsthe work will be carried through successfully and without debt. We earnestly entreat our fricnds to grant us that desired result. We cannot ourselves avert the calamity of debt, for if we should recall every laborer, and close every school and church, we should still owe the salaries and return travel- ing expenses, so that the saving would be very little. We ask, therefore, a gener- ous and steady support for the rest of the year. Pastors can be our greatest helpers. They can see to it that our collections are not forgotten. If our cause is on the list, they can secure the collection at the regular time. If it is not, and we have received no contribution for a year or two past, the pastor is entreated to consider if our work is not worthy of support, and to present it to his people. Even if the offering should be small, it would be gladly received. Individi~al donors are also asked to aid us in this endeavor. Our experience in the last two years gives us hope that this, our appeal, will not be in vain. PROGRESSENCOURAGEMENT. The work in the Southern States moves slowly; there are many hindrances, and we are sometimes discouraged. But then, again, a way-mark is reached showing such progress as to rebuke unbelief. We point to one stich. Will the reader picture to himself the early toils and trials of Rev- John G. Fee in Kentucky. The son of a slaveholder, he began to preach an anti-slavery gospel, and organized a church excluding slaveholders. In 1855 he was mobbed; again in 1858; and in 1859 a meeting was assembled in Richmond, the county seat of Madison County, which sent a committee to Berea to warn Mr. Fees associates (he was then in the North) to leave in ten days. The warning was given with such quiet emphasis that it had to be obeyed. Thirty-six persons were banished from the State. The change in twenty years is indicated in the following extract from the Ken- tucky Register of February 21, 1879, published in that same town of Richmond, Ky. It can be seen, too, in the prosperity of Berea College, with its 273 pupils, one-half of them white: REV. JOHN G. Fxx AT THE CounT-llovsx.Probably no man in Madison County in past years has been talked about as much as Rev. John G. Fee, the founder of the town and college of Berea. He has been a resident of the county for more than twenty-five years, has been a preacher of the gospel, and, yet strange to say, never until last Sunday preached a sermon in this place. On the day named, lie occupied by invitation the pulpit of Dr. T. H. Clelland at the Court- House. Owing to the fact that no general notice of Mr. Fees intention to speak

Financial Editorial 101

FinancialProgre88Encouragement. 101 FINANCIAL. The American Missionary Association is practically out of dcbt, hut not out of danger. If receipts for current expenses are not kept up, a new debt is inevitable. The receipts for February and up to March 14th (the date of going to press), are $7,233 less than for the corresponding months of last year. This falling off may be partly due to the effort made to pay our debt and that of the Home Missionary Society, and partly to the unconscious feeling that with the debt paid little else is needed. But our work and workers are on our hands. Our office expenses are brought down to the most economical figures, and our expenditures in the field are most rigidly confined to the appropriations. If the receipts of this fiscal year are brought up to those of lastthe basis of the appropriationsthe work will be carried through successfully and without debt. We earnestly entreat our fricnds to grant us that desired result. We cannot ourselves avert the calamity of debt, for if we should recall every laborer, and close every school and church, we should still owe the salaries and return travel- ing expenses, so that the saving would be very little. We ask, therefore, a gener- ous and steady support for the rest of the year. Pastors can be our greatest helpers. They can see to it that our collections are not forgotten. If our cause is on the list, they can secure the collection at the regular time. If it is not, and we have received no contribution for a year or two past, the pastor is entreated to consider if our work is not worthy of support, and to present it to his people. Even if the offering should be small, it would be gladly received. Individi~al donors are also asked to aid us in this endeavor. Our experience in the last two years gives us hope that this, our appeal, will not be in vain. PROGRESSENCOURAGEMENT. The work in the Southern States moves slowly; there are many hindrances, and we are sometimes discouraged. But then, again, a way-mark is reached showing such progress as to rebuke unbelief. We point to one stich. Will the reader picture to himself the early toils and trials of Rev- John G. Fee in Kentucky. The son of a slaveholder, he began to preach an anti-slavery gospel, and organized a church excluding slaveholders. In 1855 he was mobbed; again in 1858; and in 1859 a meeting was assembled in Richmond, the county seat of Madison County, which sent a committee to Berea to warn Mr. Fees associates (he was then in the North) to leave in ten days. The warning was given with such quiet emphasis that it had to be obeyed. Thirty-six persons were banished from the State. The change in twenty years is indicated in the following extract from the Ken- tucky Register of February 21, 1879, published in that same town of Richmond, Ky. It can be seen, too, in the prosperity of Berea College, with its 273 pupils, one-half of them white: REV. JOHN G. Fxx AT THE CounT-llovsx.Probably no man in Madison County in past years has been talked about as much as Rev. John G. Fee, the founder of the town and college of Berea. He has been a resident of the county for more than twenty-five years, has been a preacher of the gospel, and, yet strange to say, never until last Sunday preached a sermon in this place. On the day named, lie occupied by invitation the pulpit of Dr. T. H. Clelland at the Court- House. Owing to the fact that no general notice of Mr. Fees intention to speak

Progress--Encouragement Editorial 101-102

FinancialProgre88Encouragement. 101 FINANCIAL. The American Missionary Association is practically out of dcbt, hut not out of danger. If receipts for current expenses are not kept up, a new debt is inevitable. The receipts for February and up to March 14th (the date of going to press), are $7,233 less than for the corresponding months of last year. This falling off may be partly due to the effort made to pay our debt and that of the Home Missionary Society, and partly to the unconscious feeling that with the debt paid little else is needed. But our work and workers are on our hands. Our office expenses are brought down to the most economical figures, and our expenditures in the field are most rigidly confined to the appropriations. If the receipts of this fiscal year are brought up to those of lastthe basis of the appropriationsthe work will be carried through successfully and without debt. We earnestly entreat our fricnds to grant us that desired result. We cannot ourselves avert the calamity of debt, for if we should recall every laborer, and close every school and church, we should still owe the salaries and return travel- ing expenses, so that the saving would be very little. We ask, therefore, a gener- ous and steady support for the rest of the year. Pastors can be our greatest helpers. They can see to it that our collections are not forgotten. If our cause is on the list, they can secure the collection at the regular time. If it is not, and we have received no contribution for a year or two past, the pastor is entreated to consider if our work is not worthy of support, and to present it to his people. Even if the offering should be small, it would be gladly received. Individi~al donors are also asked to aid us in this endeavor. Our experience in the last two years gives us hope that this, our appeal, will not be in vain. PROGRESSENCOURAGEMENT. The work in the Southern States moves slowly; there are many hindrances, and we are sometimes discouraged. But then, again, a way-mark is reached showing such progress as to rebuke unbelief. We point to one stich. Will the reader picture to himself the early toils and trials of Rev- John G. Fee in Kentucky. The son of a slaveholder, he began to preach an anti-slavery gospel, and organized a church excluding slaveholders. In 1855 he was mobbed; again in 1858; and in 1859 a meeting was assembled in Richmond, the county seat of Madison County, which sent a committee to Berea to warn Mr. Fees associates (he was then in the North) to leave in ten days. The warning was given with such quiet emphasis that it had to be obeyed. Thirty-six persons were banished from the State. The change in twenty years is indicated in the following extract from the Ken- tucky Register of February 21, 1879, published in that same town of Richmond, Ky. It can be seen, too, in the prosperity of Berea College, with its 273 pupils, one-half of them white: REV. JOHN G. Fxx AT THE CounT-llovsx.Probably no man in Madison County in past years has been talked about as much as Rev. John G. Fee, the founder of the town and college of Berea. He has been a resident of the county for more than twenty-five years, has been a preacher of the gospel, and, yet strange to say, never until last Sunday preached a sermon in this place. On the day named, lie occupied by invitation the pulpit of Dr. T. H. Clelland at the Court- House. Owing to the fact that no general notice of Mr. Fees intention to speak 102 Congregationali8m in the South. had been given, his audience was very small; otherwise the Court-House would have been filled to its utmost capacity. Mr. Fee is a forcible and pleasant speaker, agreeable in his manner, and impresses his hearers that he is in earnest, honest in his convictions, and conscientiously seeks the advancement and w~4l-being of his~ fellow-men. As he stood before his audience, a messenger for Christ, and preached the words of the Master, one could but recall the trying years of the past, when the speaker fearlessly combated a race prejudice and battled for the freedom of a people who seemed hopelessly enslaved ; when he stood alone in his advocacy of negro liberty, and in his mild and gentle way, sought to convince his neighbors that human slavery was wrong and condemned by God; when his enemies perse- cuted him, and the people among whom he lived sought to pull him down, and even threatened to take his lifeone could but recall these stormy days of hate and sectional prejudice, and at the same time remember that when the war came and Mr. Fees party was in the ascendant, he had no man punished; he sought tc~ avenge no personal grievance, but went on with his life-work in his quiet, unob- trusive way, forgetting his enemies or only remembering them to forgive them. We print in this number the first of a series of five articles, from the pen of Dist. Sec. Woodworth, on the general topic, Congregationalism in the South. They will give an outline of its history, and hints as to its reponsibility and opportunity. While it will not be, as it has not been, the sole object of the Association to extend the form of church polity, to which most of the churches which contribute to it are attached, but rather to labor for the intelli- gent Christianization of the people who most need it, we are disposed to think that there will be found a greater affinity between the Southern people and the Congregational way than many have supposed. We do not endorse all the utter- ances on the incompatibility between the two which were made at the last An- nual Meeting, and are glad to have so careful a survey of the whole subject as these articles will furnish. CONGREGATIONALISiVI IN THE SOUTH. 1. Before the War. DIST. SEC. C. L. WOODWOBTH, BOSTON. Few are aware, perhaps, that up to 1861 Congregationalism had but tw& churches south of Mason and Dixons line; and these were not indigenous to the soil, but the transplanted growths of other lands. The first was the old Circular Church of Charleston, S. C., organized in 1690, of Irish and Scotch Presbyterians~ of Congregationalists from the North, and of Huguenots from the persecutions in France. The second was the Midway Church, in Liberty County, Georgia, which was formed in 1695, as a colony from the First Congregational Church of Dorches- ter, Mass. It first planted itself on the Ashley River in South Carolina, at a place which is called Dorchester; but in 1752, the colony having grown to more than five hundred souls, emigrated bodily into Georgia, transplanting the church into that new country. Among the eminent men on its roll of preachers was the father of Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes. Both these churches have a very distinct and striking history. Both sent out hundreds of most intelligent and worthy members, who adorned all the walks of

Dist. Sec. C. L. Woodworth Woodworth, C. L., Dist. Sec. Congregationalism in the South Editorial 102-103

102 Congregationali8m in the South. had been given, his audience was very small; otherwise the Court-House would have been filled to its utmost capacity. Mr. Fee is a forcible and pleasant speaker, agreeable in his manner, and impresses his hearers that he is in earnest, honest in his convictions, and conscientiously seeks the advancement and w~4l-being of his~ fellow-men. As he stood before his audience, a messenger for Christ, and preached the words of the Master, one could but recall the trying years of the past, when the speaker fearlessly combated a race prejudice and battled for the freedom of a people who seemed hopelessly enslaved ; when he stood alone in his advocacy of negro liberty, and in his mild and gentle way, sought to convince his neighbors that human slavery was wrong and condemned by God; when his enemies perse- cuted him, and the people among whom he lived sought to pull him down, and even threatened to take his lifeone could but recall these stormy days of hate and sectional prejudice, and at the same time remember that when the war came and Mr. Fees party was in the ascendant, he had no man punished; he sought tc~ avenge no personal grievance, but went on with his life-work in his quiet, unob- trusive way, forgetting his enemies or only remembering them to forgive them. We print in this number the first of a series of five articles, from the pen of Dist. Sec. Woodworth, on the general topic, Congregationalism in the South. They will give an outline of its history, and hints as to its reponsibility and opportunity. While it will not be, as it has not been, the sole object of the Association to extend the form of church polity, to which most of the churches which contribute to it are attached, but rather to labor for the intelli- gent Christianization of the people who most need it, we are disposed to think that there will be found a greater affinity between the Southern people and the Congregational way than many have supposed. We do not endorse all the utter- ances on the incompatibility between the two which were made at the last An- nual Meeting, and are glad to have so careful a survey of the whole subject as these articles will furnish. CONGREGATIONALISiVI IN THE SOUTH. 1. Before the War. DIST. SEC. C. L. WOODWOBTH, BOSTON. Few are aware, perhaps, that up to 1861 Congregationalism had but tw& churches south of Mason and Dixons line; and these were not indigenous to the soil, but the transplanted growths of other lands. The first was the old Circular Church of Charleston, S. C., organized in 1690, of Irish and Scotch Presbyterians~ of Congregationalists from the North, and of Huguenots from the persecutions in France. The second was the Midway Church, in Liberty County, Georgia, which was formed in 1695, as a colony from the First Congregational Church of Dorches- ter, Mass. It first planted itself on the Ashley River in South Carolina, at a place which is called Dorchester; but in 1752, the colony having grown to more than five hundred souls, emigrated bodily into Georgia, transplanting the church into that new country. Among the eminent men on its roll of preachers was the father of Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes. Both these churches have a very distinct and striking history. Both sent out hundreds of most intelligent and worthy members, who adorned all the walks of Item8 from the Field. 103 lifeteachers, preachers, professors, lawyers, judges, governors, senatorsbut neither of them ever propagated itself. Both were ministered to for years by men of other denominations, though none ventured to tamper with their polity. It is a singularillustration of the toughness and vigor of the Congregational life, and of the uncongenial soil in which it was planted. The two churches held on their way with no signs of age or weakness until the outbreak of the war. The old Circular Church unfortunately lost its meeting- house in the great fire during the siege of Charleston. It was also weakened by deaths and emigrations, as well as by the withdrawal of most of the colored membership to form the new Plymouth Church of Charleston. Notwithstanding all this the white membership have bravely held together, have built themselves a small chapel, and until recently have been ministered to by Rev. William Adams, son of the late Dr. Nehemiah Adams, of Boston. The Midway Church in the same way split on the color line, but not to forni7~ two Congregational churches. The white part of it at the close of the war sur- rendered the polity to which they had clung with heroic tenacity for more than one hundred and sixty years, and went over in a body to the Presbyterian Church South. Not so the larger part of the colored membership. They knew nothing but Congregationalism, and they refused to accept anything in its stead. The result was that they were formed into the new Congregational Church of Midway. They have built a new meeting-house, and are showing marvelous energy in main- taining their institutions and working towards self-support. It is matter of interest that many of these colored Congregationalists of Old Midway were scat- tered during and since the war into the towns and counties around, and have formed the seed out of which six or seven other Congregational churches have sprung. Right here, then, these two facts confront us: The one, that our polity, for so~ue reason, stopped short at the boundary between freedom and slavery. The other, that, having passed that boundary, it seemed to have no power to prop- agate itself, either by sending out colonies or by organizing new converts on the ground. It is certainly a strange anomaly in church extension, and we leave each one to answer for himself whether it was some instinct in Congregationalism which held it North of the latitude of slavery, or whether the overruling Power, which gave it its mission in America, turned it back until it could go with an open Bible, free speech, and its democratic equalities. ITEMS FROM THE FIELD. ORANGEnURG, S. C. Last month we printed a very short plea for a musical in- strument for the church. We express here our thanks to Mr. S. T. Gordon, of New York, who sent us word a few days ago that an organ was at our disposal for this use. Such ready responses are full of encouragement. ATLANTA, GA. A good degree of religious interest still prevails in Atlanta University. On the first Sunday of March, four persons united with the church by profession of faith, and a number of others propose to do so at an early day. An equal number of those convertel here will join churches at their homes. on No. 1 MrLI~un STATION, GA.The station called Ogeechee in our printed list in Feb. Magazine, should be ATh. 1 Miller Station, tJhathamn Uo., Ga. Miss E. W. Douglass, formerly at McLeansville, N. C., has been transferred to this field, anfi finds ample opportunity for missionary labor. Friends commu- nicating with her, or with Rev. John R. McLean, pastor of the church, will please note the correct P. 0. address.

Items from the Field Editorial 103-104

Item8 from the Field. 103 lifeteachers, preachers, professors, lawyers, judges, governors, senatorsbut neither of them ever propagated itself. Both were ministered to for years by men of other denominations, though none ventured to tamper with their polity. It is a singularillustration of the toughness and vigor of the Congregational life, and of the uncongenial soil in which it was planted. The two churches held on their way with no signs of age or weakness until the outbreak of the war. The old Circular Church unfortunately lost its meeting- house in the great fire during the siege of Charleston. It was also weakened by deaths and emigrations, as well as by the withdrawal of most of the colored membership to form the new Plymouth Church of Charleston. Notwithstanding all this the white membership have bravely held together, have built themselves a small chapel, and until recently have been ministered to by Rev. William Adams, son of the late Dr. Nehemiah Adams, of Boston. The Midway Church in the same way split on the color line, but not to forni7~ two Congregational churches. The white part of it at the close of the war sur- rendered the polity to which they had clung with heroic tenacity for more than one hundred and sixty years, and went over in a body to the Presbyterian Church South. Not so the larger part of the colored membership. They knew nothing but Congregationalism, and they refused to accept anything in its stead. The result was that they were formed into the new Congregational Church of Midway. They have built a new meeting-house, and are showing marvelous energy in main- taining their institutions and working towards self-support. It is matter of interest that many of these colored Congregationalists of Old Midway were scat- tered during and since the war into the towns and counties around, and have formed the seed out of which six or seven other Congregational churches have sprung. Right here, then, these two facts confront us: The one, that our polity, for so~ue reason, stopped short at the boundary between freedom and slavery. The other, that, having passed that boundary, it seemed to have no power to prop- agate itself, either by sending out colonies or by organizing new converts on the ground. It is certainly a strange anomaly in church extension, and we leave each one to answer for himself whether it was some instinct in Congregationalism which held it North of the latitude of slavery, or whether the overruling Power, which gave it its mission in America, turned it back until it could go with an open Bible, free speech, and its democratic equalities. ITEMS FROM THE FIELD. ORANGEnURG, S. C. Last month we printed a very short plea for a musical in- strument for the church. We express here our thanks to Mr. S. T. Gordon, of New York, who sent us word a few days ago that an organ was at our disposal for this use. Such ready responses are full of encouragement. ATLANTA, GA. A good degree of religious interest still prevails in Atlanta University. On the first Sunday of March, four persons united with the church by profession of faith, and a number of others propose to do so at an early day. An equal number of those convertel here will join churches at their homes. on No. 1 MrLI~un STATION, GA.The station called Ogeechee in our printed list in Feb. Magazine, should be ATh. 1 Miller Station, tJhathamn Uo., Ga. Miss E. W. Douglass, formerly at McLeansville, N. C., has been transferred to this field, anfi finds ample opportunity for missionary labor. Friends commu- nicating with her, or with Rev. John R. McLean, pastor of the church, will please note the correct P. 0. address. 104 General Notes. TALLADEGA, ALA. A precious work of grace. Eighteen hopeful conver- sions, and many more almost persuaded. The meeting we have just come from has been seldom paralleled in our experience. Many seem to be discovering that there is life for a look at the Crucified One. Pray, watch, work, has been our motto for some time past, and these are the blessed results. Will our dear A. MI. A. pray for this part of its Israel ? MONTGOMERY, ALA. -The Swayne School has received a valuable box for its Teachers Home from the ladies of the church at Lyonsville, Ill. It contained ~ rag carpet, comfortables, bed and table linen, etc. ANNIsTON, ALA.March 2d, six were received into this church on profession of their faith. Two infants were baptized. ATHENS, ALA. There is great zeal in study, especially in Bible study. This has greatly strengthened our hearts, for we know The entrance of Thy word giveth light, and we are encouraged to hope for the speedy conversion of several young men who have publicly asked the prayers of Christians. TOUGALOO, Miss. Students are manifesting more than usual interest in study and general improvement. We do hope we can be allowed to put fences around the place ; we are losing so much every year by having the farm all open to the public. We can make it a source of income when properly fenced and stocked. NEW IBERIA, LA.The South-western Conference of Congregational Churches will meet at St. Pauls Church, New Iberia, April 2d. BEREA, Ky. An encouraging religious interest is reported. Five young men of excellent promise have, within a week, confessed Christ. This has been under the regular ministration~ without help from abroad. Most of the prayer-meet- ings are well attended. The community is very harmonious. MEMrHIS, TENN.The school never was in a more flourishing condition than now, and the future has never before seemed so full of promise. GENERAL NOTES. The Freedmen. There are probably a million and a half of church members among the colored population of the Southern States. Ex-Governor Brown, of Georgia, expresses himself as follows in regard to the position and claims of the Freedmen: I think I speak the sentiments of & vast majority of our people, that it is our interest to make of the colored race the very best citizens we can. To do this it is necessary to educate them as far as our means will allow, ~nd to lift them from the ignorance in which they were found at the time of their freedom to a much higher grade of intelligence. They can never be good citizens and exercise intelligently the rights of freemen till they have these advantages. We regret to see that the Young Mens Christian Association, of Washington, D. C., by the Rev. 0. C. Morse, its secretary, feared to have a few colored Sunday- school teachers mingle with white persons engaged in similar work, withdrew in- vitations given, and at first refused admission to the three or four who came with cards of invitation, though they were afterwards allowed to enter. Meanwhile Senator Bruce was occupying with dignity the chair of the Senate of the United States.

General Notes Editorial 104-107

104 General Notes. TALLADEGA, ALA. A precious work of grace. Eighteen hopeful conver- sions, and many more almost persuaded. The meeting we have just come from has been seldom paralleled in our experience. Many seem to be discovering that there is life for a look at the Crucified One. Pray, watch, work, has been our motto for some time past, and these are the blessed results. Will our dear A. MI. A. pray for this part of its Israel ? MONTGOMERY, ALA. -The Swayne School has received a valuable box for its Teachers Home from the ladies of the church at Lyonsville, Ill. It contained ~ rag carpet, comfortables, bed and table linen, etc. ANNIsTON, ALA.March 2d, six were received into this church on profession of their faith. Two infants were baptized. ATHENS, ALA. There is great zeal in study, especially in Bible study. This has greatly strengthened our hearts, for we know The entrance of Thy word giveth light, and we are encouraged to hope for the speedy conversion of several young men who have publicly asked the prayers of Christians. TOUGALOO, Miss. Students are manifesting more than usual interest in study and general improvement. We do hope we can be allowed to put fences around the place ; we are losing so much every year by having the farm all open to the public. We can make it a source of income when properly fenced and stocked. NEW IBERIA, LA.The South-western Conference of Congregational Churches will meet at St. Pauls Church, New Iberia, April 2d. BEREA, Ky. An encouraging religious interest is reported. Five young men of excellent promise have, within a week, confessed Christ. This has been under the regular ministration~ without help from abroad. Most of the prayer-meet- ings are well attended. The community is very harmonious. MEMrHIS, TENN.The school never was in a more flourishing condition than now, and the future has never before seemed so full of promise. GENERAL NOTES. The Freedmen. There are probably a million and a half of church members among the colored population of the Southern States. Ex-Governor Brown, of Georgia, expresses himself as follows in regard to the position and claims of the Freedmen: I think I speak the sentiments of & vast majority of our people, that it is our interest to make of the colored race the very best citizens we can. To do this it is necessary to educate them as far as our means will allow, ~nd to lift them from the ignorance in which they were found at the time of their freedom to a much higher grade of intelligence. They can never be good citizens and exercise intelligently the rights of freemen till they have these advantages. We regret to see that the Young Mens Christian Association, of Washington, D. C., by the Rev. 0. C. Morse, its secretary, feared to have a few colored Sunday- school teachers mingle with white persons engaged in similar work, withdrew in- vitations given, and at first refused admission to the three or four who came with cards of invitation, though they were afterwards allowed to enter. Meanwhile Senator Bruce was occupying with dignity the chair of the Senate of the United States. General Notes. 105 Africa. The Khedive of Egypt, at the close of 1877, appointed Captain George Mal- colm (Pasha) for the suppression of the slave trade in the Red Sea. As late as June 1878, he reported that he could accomplish nothing, as the trade was effect- ually l)rotected by the Turkish flag. Mr. Maples, of the Universities Mission, writes from Masasi, East Africa, that, owing to thc energy of Dr. Kirk and Seyid Borghash, the wholesale slave trade at Zanzibar, and up and down the coast for hundreds of miles, is almost entirely stopped; but that they are still smuggled into dhows by twos and threes so clothed and disguised as not to awaken suspicion; that in the interior, slave car- avans make their way from the Nyassa region to the coast as far north as Somali, and south to and beyond Lindi. He says: I should scarcely be believed were I to tell you how great is the deterrent effect upon the slave trade in these parts of a solitary mannered Englishman d welling among the people. Mr. Penrose, of the Church Missionary Society, with all his camp followers, has been killed in the country of the Unyamwesi. Mr. Mackey. of the C. M. S., arrived last July with the caravan at Kagei, on the Victoria Nyanza. (See map.) He visited Lukonge at Ukerewe, in regard to the murder of Mr. ONeill and Lieutenant S~nith; heard the explanations given, and demanded the note-books and pistols of his friends, as an evidence of regret and a pledge of friendship. These were not given up to him, and he, therefore, declined to have further relations with that people. Mr. Wilson writes of the healthiness of the Uganda country, and thinks that missionaries wives may safely accompany theni thither. There are large deposits of kaolin, or china clay, near Mtesas capital, and abundance of nutmeg trees. Col. Gordon has advised the C. M. S. to establish a mission on the west shore of the Albert Nynuza, which he represents to be a healthy location, free from foreign influence, and substantially under protection of the Egyptian Government. Rev. J. B. Thomson, of the London Missionary Society at Ujiji, on Lake Tanganika, died at his post January 20th. It is a great loss to this new mis- sion. The Directors ask, Who now will be bipt izeci for the dead? The English Baptist Missionary Society will occupy San Salvador, 50 miles from the west coast of Africa and south of the Congo, as the head-quarters of their work, with a station at Makuta. Mr. Comber returned to England after a tour of observation, and hopes to return this month with two associates. Mr. Stanley strongly advocates the construction of a railway, which would be about 500 miles in length, from a point on the east coast to the southern end of the Victoria Nyanza. Another railway 150 miles long would bring us to take Tan- ganika, which has a water-way of about 330 miles, and another 200 miles long to Lake Nyassa, which gives many hundred miles of water-way. A four~th short railway would. lead to the navigable waters of the Shire and the Zai~besi, which flow into the sea. These link-lines of railway would open up about 1,300 miles of splendid navigable water. Connect these lines also with the sources of the Coisgo or Livingatone river, and a chain of trading posts is possible across the continent to the west coast. The value of this new market to English and Amer- ican merchandise would thus be immense, and the speedy doWnfall of the slave tiade be made suro~ 106 General jYotes. The Wesleijan (English) Mi8sionary Notices publishes an accountof a recent visit by two of their missionaries into the interior, seventy miles west from Sierra Leone. They found a healthier country, though only 210 feet above sea level, and a cooler climate. Fruit is grown, cotton spun, and iron implements made. The villages were increasing in size, and are now at peace. Slavery and polygamy exist among them. The country is open to missionary effort, and Mr. Huddleston is speedily to be located at Fouracaria, in the Limba country. The following extract is of special interest as relating to the region proposed to us for missionary work by Mr. Arthington: African research, in its relation to commerce merely, is being taken up with energy in the three principal emporiums of the MediterraneanGenoa, Marseilles and Trieste. The experienced African traveller, Dr. Mattenci, has started from Genoa at the head of an expedition fitted out at the charge of a number of Italian merchants. He goes through the Suez Canal to Suatin and Matamma, in the south- west of Abyssinia, and will penetrate, if time and circumstances permit, into the Galla Lands. Almost at the same date an Austrian expedition leaves Trieste, under charge of two marine officers, Pletsch and Pizzighelli. They propose to re- main for above a whole year in Shoa, in order to make an exhaustive study of its capacity for export and import trading, and to return a complete report to a num- ber of eminent Austrian mercantile firms. From Marseilles, lastly, several repre- sentatives of commercial houses in south-western Europe have been despatched to the Red Sea, Shoa, and Abyssinia, with similar~instTuctions.A.triCafl Times. The Yatican has entrusted to the Algerian Roman Catholic Mission the cre- ation of two stations in Central Africaone on Lake Tanganika, the other on Lakes Yictoria and Albert iNyanza. The Indians. The House Committee reported against the several bills to establish territo- rial government in the Indian Territory. The conclusions of the Committee are as follows: FirstThat the bill (Oklahoma) under consideration conflicts with ex~sting treaty stipulations. SecondThat to decide that a treaty is no longer binding requires for its justi- fication reasons which commend themselves to the principles of equity and good conscience, particularly where the parties to the compact with the United States are weak and powerless and depend solely on the good faith of the Government. ThirdThat no such reasons exist for violating the treaty stipulations which reserve the Indian Territory exclusively for Indians, and which secure to the Cher- okees, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Creeks and Seminoles, the right of self-government, under the restrictions of the Constitution of the United States. FourthThat even if there were no opposing treaty stipulations, no objections resting on good faith, it would be unwise and impolitic to throw the Indian Ter- ritory open to white settlers without the consent of the Indian owners. Fifth-That while official recommendationssome of them entitled to the highest repectare strongly in favor of making Indians citizens of the United States, and transferring their land titles from the national tenure in common to the individual tenure in severalty, experience has shown that in the great majority of cases such measures, instead of benefiting, have proved injurious to the Indian. Si th-That experience fully demonstrates that the holding of their lands in common by the Indian tribes is an effectual safeguard~against the worst effects of Sunday-schools for the Freedmen. 107 Indian improvidence. Apart from any considerations of justice or humanity, it would be unwise and unstatesmanlike to adopt measures which, by destroying that safeguard, would be calculated to reduce the great mass of them, in opposi- tion to their own earnest protests, to a state of hopeless penury and degradation. The report is signed by Messrs. Neal, Riddle, Muldrow, Aldrich, Reed, Bag- ley and James T. Jones of the committee. When Gen. Howard went alone, as it were, and unarmed among the hos- tile and ferocious Chiricahuas, and boldly faced their head chief Cochise, he showed them a moral power which they had never seen before, and so produced a deep impression of respect for the superiority of white men that has probably done more than any brute force could have effected towards the pacification of the tribe. The treaty then made was, and is still, sacredly respected by Taza, the son and successor of Cochise, and by all the Apaches, except, perhaps, fifty hostiles, who still prowl on the Mexican border. The Chinese. Last month we recorded the failure of the proposal to transfer the Indians to the War Department. This month, with equal pleasure, we note the failure of the bill virtually to prohibit Chinese immigration. After passing both House and Senate, it was vetoed by the President, and on the motion to pass it over the veto, was defeated, having evidently lost ground in the intervening days. Among the many memorials addressed to the President on this subject, the following was sent by our Executive Committee: To the President of the United States: SIR: The Executive Committee of the American Missionary Association respect- fully but most earnestly ask that the Executive veto be affixed to the bill passed by Congress affecting the relations of this country with China. We regard that bill as a surrender to caste prejudice, an injury to this country, a wrong to China, and a violation of treaty stipulations, of the fundamental principles of the Declara- tion of Independence, and of the law of God. Signed by vote of the Committee, CHARLES L. MEAD, JoHN H. WAsru3uu~, February 21, 1579. M. E. STRIEBY. THE FREEDMEN. REV. JOS. E. ROY, D. D., FIELD SUPERINTENDENT, ATLANTA, GA. SUNDAY-SCHOOLS FOR THE FREEDMEN. The International Sunday-school Con- our earnest prayers and endeavors in vention at Atlanta, upon the motion of their behalf. Rev. Joshua Knowles, of Georgia, passed At the request of the executive com this resolution : mittee, Rev. W. S. Plumer, D. D., of That the present mental and moral South Carolina, spoke upon this resolu- condition of the colored people of this tioii. The venerated man, cutting down country, especially their lack of proper the tangle about the entrance to the sub- and adequate instruction, is calculated ject, showed that the prophetic curse to enlist our sympathy, and call forth uttered by Noah did not apply to the

Sunday-schools for the Freedmen The Freedmen 107-109

Sunday-schools for the Freedmen. 107 Indian improvidence. Apart from any considerations of justice or humanity, it would be unwise and unstatesmanlike to adopt measures which, by destroying that safeguard, would be calculated to reduce the great mass of them, in opposi- tion to their own earnest protests, to a state of hopeless penury and degradation. The report is signed by Messrs. Neal, Riddle, Muldrow, Aldrich, Reed, Bag- ley and James T. Jones of the committee. When Gen. Howard went alone, as it were, and unarmed among the hos- tile and ferocious Chiricahuas, and boldly faced their head chief Cochise, he showed them a moral power which they had never seen before, and so produced a deep impression of respect for the superiority of white men that has probably done more than any brute force could have effected towards the pacification of the tribe. The treaty then made was, and is still, sacredly respected by Taza, the son and successor of Cochise, and by all the Apaches, except, perhaps, fifty hostiles, who still prowl on the Mexican border. The Chinese. Last month we recorded the failure of the proposal to transfer the Indians to the War Department. This month, with equal pleasure, we note the failure of the bill virtually to prohibit Chinese immigration. After passing both House and Senate, it was vetoed by the President, and on the motion to pass it over the veto, was defeated, having evidently lost ground in the intervening days. Among the many memorials addressed to the President on this subject, the following was sent by our Executive Committee: To the President of the United States: SIR: The Executive Committee of the American Missionary Association respect- fully but most earnestly ask that the Executive veto be affixed to the bill passed by Congress affecting the relations of this country with China. We regard that bill as a surrender to caste prejudice, an injury to this country, a wrong to China, and a violation of treaty stipulations, of the fundamental principles of the Declara- tion of Independence, and of the law of God. Signed by vote of the Committee, CHARLES L. MEAD, JoHN H. WAsru3uu~, February 21, 1579. M. E. STRIEBY. THE FREEDMEN. REV. JOS. E. ROY, D. D., FIELD SUPERINTENDENT, ATLANTA, GA. SUNDAY-SCHOOLS FOR THE FREEDMEN. The International Sunday-school Con- our earnest prayers and endeavors in vention at Atlanta, upon the motion of their behalf. Rev. Joshua Knowles, of Georgia, passed At the request of the executive com this resolution : mittee, Rev. W. S. Plumer, D. D., of That the present mental and moral South Carolina, spoke upon this resolu- condition of the colored people of this tioii. The venerated man, cutting down country, especially their lack of proper the tangle about the entrance to the sub- and adequate instruction, is calculated ject, showed that the prophetic curse to enlist our sympathy, and call forth uttered by Noah did not apply to the 108 Sunday-school8 for the Ifreedmen. African race, but only to the Cannanites, a single branch of the family of Ham. He spoke of the Ethiopian eunuch as one of the first trophies of the Gospel out of the Jewish nation. Africa now says to us when we put the question Understandest thou what thou read- est 1 How can I, except some one guide me ? And that is what these people are looking to us for to-day. Now a great work is to be done for these people, and it is to be done just as it is to be done for white folks. We nmst do this in self-defense. It is not possible that this great mass of uneducated mind can be among us without in the end doing great mischief. In 1825, Dr. John H. Rice predicted that if this country was ever desolated, it would be by some crisp-haired prophet, arising and claim- ing inspiration from Heaven, holding himself ready to lead on these people to damage and mischief of every sort. He had known for sixty years that colored children could learn by rote as well as white children; he had sometimes thought better. And here is encourage- ment. He had written a memoir of a Christian negro, Monroe. His own life had been saved by a negro, when, as a boy, he was capsized in the Ohio. Be kindly affectioned toward these peo- ple, said the patriarchal man in the spirit of the aged John, and God will provide for them a future of great honor and usefulness among us. Let us love them and treat them as brethren, and remember that the 1)100(1 of JCNV Christ cleanseth us from all sin ~ us, the l)lack man as well as the white man. In the printed report of that speech applause is counted nine times. At that convention, in the report 1w States of Sunday-school work, Maryland annon need three Sundayschool mission- aries, one of whom labored among the col ore(1 1)0 1)10, and two teachers associa- tions in Baltimore, one for the colored. We wiTh it uoder~tood that we are tak- in~ care of the colored children and oath- n ering them into our schools. Virginia reported: We are earnestly engaged in pushing the work among the the colored population. The colored Sunday-school organized in 1855, by Stonewall Jackson, was still alive, superintended by CoL Preston, and having as teachers some of the ablest professors in the university at Lexington. Experience has shown that the best way to elevate the colored man is to give him well-ordered and well- taught Sunday-schools. Florida said: The work in colored schools is gaining ground, one of them having over 30G scholars. Texas reported many flour- ishing colored Sanday-schools, and was happy to have one of her intelligent Christian colored superintendents in that convention. Besides what is being done by the several denominations in their respective way, the American Sunday-school Union has in the South twelve of its missiona- ries. I met one of them the other day, Rev. J. J. Strong, whose field is the State of Alabama. In five years he had organized 157 schools, of which 37 were colored. Of the 142 schools aided by him, 58 were colored. He finds much aid and comfort at the home of Judge Thornton, in the northern part of the State. As he was about to start out on foot for the tour of the county, the judge said: You must take my pony. As the pony was known all over the county, he served as an introduction from the judge. This missionary is one of two who are sustained by one of those unabridged Christian men in the North. The other one works among the Swedes in Wisconsin. The salary and traveling expenses, and ~1OO to be given away l)y this worker in Alabama, uses up .~l,1OO a year in this ex~ellent work of Christian pail anthro py. Besides all this at the South in this line, the Americt a Mtssionary Associa- tion rel)orts for the last year 5,894 Sun- day-school scholars connected with its sixty-four churches. Then there is a vast The Work at Jlarnpton,frorn a Three lYfouths O6servation. 109 amount of such work done every year that does not come into these statistics. During the last summer vacation Atlanta University sent out 150 day-school teach- ers, and Fisk as many more, and all our institutions furnish more or less of them. Nearly all of these also run for the time their own Sunday-schools, thus reaching many thousand children with the truth of Gods word. It is known that up to this time our colored teachers have reached 100,000 of these day scholars, a multitude of whom have been taught in Sunday-schools. Talladega College, the last year, by its students, reached 1,200 Sunday-school scholars. In the past years they have reached, in all, 20,000. Out of these schools six Congregational churches have grown up. Rev. G. W. And rews, the instructor in theology, has been accus- tomed to take his class on Saturday morning over the lesson of the next day, thus training them in a normal way as well as in the way of the truth. I had the pleasure of attending, in the month of February, the convention held in New Orleans for organizing the State Sund ny-school Association for Louisiana. Florida was organized the week after, which leaves only three State associa- tions yet to be set up. At Athinta, ~the delegates from the South rel)orte(l their purpose to go home and organize every State. At New Orleans it was reported that Louisiana hal already 9i,000 chil- dren in Sunday-schools, nod this is near- ly oneseventh of the entire population of the State. With an association nuder the vigorous administration of its p?esi dent, Mr. W. IL Lyman, and his live ex- ecutive committee, it is lIf)1)ed that all the ptLri~hes (counties) of the State xxill soon be organized, and the work greatly set forward. In that convention, color- ed delegates were t~re~eii t. participating. The resolution of the Atlanta convention quoted above, upon introduction by the man who was elected l)resident, was ~nanimously adopted. Upon taking the chair, he assured colored people of sym- pathy and co-operation. Rev. W. S. Alexander, our president and pastor in New Orleans, who was made officially prominent in the convention, was also put on as one of the vice-presidents and one of the members of the executive committee of the State association. Two colored pastors were also put upon that committee. More and more the heart of the good people of the South is turning toward the colored children. VIRGINIA. -I-- The Work at Hampton, from a Three Months Observation. xxv. JOHN H. DENIiSON. Arlores seret, diligens Agricola, qua- rum adspiciet baccam ipse nun quam. A diligent husbandman plants trees, the fruit of which he himself shall neyer be- hold. With such sentiments did our excellent Arnold support us in the ardu- ous pursuit of Latin prose composition. It is evident, however, that there is a difference in trees, if not in diligent hus- bandmen. Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute is a tree whose fruit may be speedily beheld, not only by those who planted it, but by those also who culti- vate or enrich it. It is a paying invest- ment. Every year it sends its roots deeper and stretches its boughs out far- ther. It commends itself to the practi- cal Christian sentiment of the South. It is a peace-making force throughout this section. Its attitude towards all Southern questions is intelligent, con sid rate and just ; it gives no sympathy to fonaticism on either side, and nothing but discouragement to political schemers. It sends out every summer the wholesome leaven of a class of young men an(l women who have been trained to teach intelli- geut ly; to use their hands as well as their heads; to see the dignity of labor; to ac- eel)t t~se situation, and not to he ashamed of their color. In short, they are trained

Rev. John H. Denison Denison, John H., Rev. Virginia--Work at Hampton, from a Three Months' Observation The Freedmen 109-112

The Work at Jlarnpton,frorn a Three lYfouths O6servation. 109 amount of such work done every year that does not come into these statistics. During the last summer vacation Atlanta University sent out 150 day-school teach- ers, and Fisk as many more, and all our institutions furnish more or less of them. Nearly all of these also run for the time their own Sunday-schools, thus reaching many thousand children with the truth of Gods word. It is known that up to this time our colored teachers have reached 100,000 of these day scholars, a multitude of whom have been taught in Sunday-schools. Talladega College, the last year, by its students, reached 1,200 Sunday-school scholars. In the past years they have reached, in all, 20,000. Out of these schools six Congregational churches have grown up. Rev. G. W. And rews, the instructor in theology, has been accus- tomed to take his class on Saturday morning over the lesson of the next day, thus training them in a normal way as well as in the way of the truth. I had the pleasure of attending, in the month of February, the convention held in New Orleans for organizing the State Sund ny-school Association for Louisiana. Florida was organized the week after, which leaves only three State associa- tions yet to be set up. At Athinta, ~the delegates from the South rel)orte(l their purpose to go home and organize every State. At New Orleans it was reported that Louisiana hal already 9i,000 chil- dren in Sunday-schools, nod this is near- ly oneseventh of the entire population of the State. With an association nuder the vigorous administration of its p?esi dent, Mr. W. IL Lyman, and his live ex- ecutive committee, it is lIf)1)ed that all the ptLri~hes (counties) of the State xxill soon be organized, and the work greatly set forward. In that convention, color- ed delegates were t~re~eii t. participating. The resolution of the Atlanta convention quoted above, upon introduction by the man who was elected l)resident, was ~nanimously adopted. Upon taking the chair, he assured colored people of sym- pathy and co-operation. Rev. W. S. Alexander, our president and pastor in New Orleans, who was made officially prominent in the convention, was also put on as one of the vice-presidents and one of the members of the executive committee of the State association. Two colored pastors were also put upon that committee. More and more the heart of the good people of the South is turning toward the colored children. VIRGINIA. -I-- The Work at Hampton, from a Three Months Observation. xxv. JOHN H. DENIiSON. Arlores seret, diligens Agricola, qua- rum adspiciet baccam ipse nun quam. A diligent husbandman plants trees, the fruit of which he himself shall neyer be- hold. With such sentiments did our excellent Arnold support us in the ardu- ous pursuit of Latin prose composition. It is evident, however, that there is a difference in trees, if not in diligent hus- bandmen. Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute is a tree whose fruit may be speedily beheld, not only by those who planted it, but by those also who culti- vate or enrich it. It is a paying invest- ment. Every year it sends its roots deeper and stretches its boughs out far- ther. It commends itself to the practi- cal Christian sentiment of the South. It is a peace-making force throughout this section. Its attitude towards all Southern questions is intelligent, con sid rate and just ; it gives no sympathy to fonaticism on either side, and nothing but discouragement to political schemers. It sends out every summer the wholesome leaven of a class of young men an(l women who have been trained to teach intelli- geut ly; to use their hands as well as their heads; to see the dignity of labor; to ac- eel)t t~se situation, and not to he ashamed of their color. In short, they are trained 110 [like Work at llampton,from a Three iJIontk8 Observation. to the work that lies before them, and not trained away from it. It is a rare thing for a graduate of the Normal School to enter into polit- ical life. Not one has been known to be a demagogue. The standard set before them is that of a hard-working Christian manhood ; and it must be said that they bid fair to make the best citizens we have, in a time when the great demand is for men who will not work for an office, but who will work honestly for a living. Our country seems to be crying for a fur- ther supply of that article which forms the staple and the grit of nations a contented, practical manhoodthe vir integer vit& of Horace, re-inforced by grace. It is that demand which Hampton is seeking to meet, and does meet, with its yearly class of graduates. Many years ago all England was start- led by the arraignment of an educated gentleman for stealing; he was a grad- uate of Oxford; he plead guilty, but said it was his only resource; he had not been able to find any business by which he could support himself honestly. Since then the history of our financial institu- tions has made it appear that this gen- tleman was not alone in his unhappy predicament; there has been a world of college education which has not fitted its beneficiaries to gain an honest liveli- hood. It has given them the accom- plishments of a social rank, but not the power to earn that rank; it has simply made them miserable. It has done worse even: it has left them in the midst of a moral snare. It is the grand miscalcula- tion of our educational system. Here are millions of acres at the South waiting to be reclaimed by skilful hands; here are thousands of educated men who cannot find an honest self-supporting business. The lever of education is not applied at the right place. It is the merit of Hamp- ton that it does apply the lever at the right place. It trains the hand as well as the head. It fits a man to take up the work God has placed before him. It gives him the conditions on which a Christian life may flourish. The religious teaching is evangelical. The school regards itself as representing the American Missionary Association, and is faithful to the trust. Nowhere can teachers be found more earnestly evangel- ical, laboring often beyond their strength to bring souls to Christ. To their honor be it said, however, that both Unitari- ans and Friends have not only contrib- uted of their means in large proportion, but have also served in the work of edu- cation and Christian culture with the most unselfish devotion. They reap a far richer reward than that of theolog- ical proselytism. Their noble spirit, scorning all partisan ends, seeking only for an opportunity to do good, has greatly increased the humane and benefi- cent influence of the school; has caused it to be widely felt outside of its own walls, and to become every day more and more an instrument of peace and reconstruc- tion. There is a world of kindly deeds and neighborly acts which cannot be enume- rated, but which prove to the commun- ity the kinship of our Northern Christ- ianity, and they meet with a response. When a petition was presented this win- ter for the purpose of subjecting the school to taxation, a large majority of the most influential citizens in Hampton entered their protest, and the petition fell to the ground. It w~as a sign of the times. The religious work of the school has been well directed, although not a thing that could be put in figures. It is largely an endeavor to counteract the tendencies of ignorance and prejudice in the colored churches and so give free play to the spirit of grace. A large proportion of the students are professors of religion when they come. The emotions and prej- udices have been trained to excess by an ignorant but fervid system of religion which has exercised but slight control The Work at Harnpton,from a Three 3Iionth8 Observation. 111 over immoral practices. The effort is to balance this by the cultivation of the conscience and understanding in Scrip- tural truth; especially to hold up before their minds the idea of an every-day re- ligion and a practical Christian man- hood. The interest this winter has not reached the revival point, but students have been led to Christ from time to time. Our hope is not in transports, but in that steadily increasing lump of leaven, a prac- tical, self-denying piety. It shows itself in the morale of the school. We have 316 students214 boys and 102 girls of these, 56 are Indian boys, and 9 In- dian girls. In such a mass of human nature, fresh from uncivilization, one might expect serious disturbances and scan- dals, not to say rowdyism ; yet Wash- ingtons birthday was celebrated on the open green by Negroes, and Indi- ans who had just taken off their blan- kets, with an Arcadian good behavior, while blacks and aborigines met to- gether in the school parlors and played games together, boys as well as girls, without indecorum. It is a frequent comment how little trouble they make, for so miscellaneous a collection. There is a spirit, an atmosphere of Christianity that pervades everything. Perhaps the most striking fact of the winter is the Indian work. It is a pity that people at the North do not see the great importance of this, for it is much in need of funds. Four years ago a party of hostile Indians of the most in- tractable sort were captured and sent in irons to St. Augustine, under charge of Capt. Pratt, U. S. A. They were desper- ate fellows; one killed himself rather than submit. Under the Christian treatment of Capt. Pratt they experienced a won- derful change, lai~l aside their savage propensities, and heartily embraced the principles of civilization. A year ago it was proposed that they should be brought to Hampton. The experiment was tried successfully. They mingle in a kindly way with the negroes, and have mani- fested an earnest disposition to learn what they call the white mans road. They have given up their tobacco and their whis- key; they hold prayer-meetings together, where one may hear their tones of ear- nest entreaty, pleading with God in their own language. Furthermore, they show their faith by their works, and may be seen digging ditches or picking potatoes with all the energy of an Anglo-Saxon. This for aboriginal gentlemen who, four years ago, accounted manual labor to be the deepest degradation to which a war- rior could submit. Best of all, they have manifested repen- tance toward God and faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. At the first communion in March, eleven of them are, at their own earnest de8ire, to be admitted to the church. Last summer the experiment proved such a success that the school I offered to take 50 more, and educate them for Government, at the low rate of $167 apiece. It was too low an estimate; but it was thought that friends would help, especially in the erection of a building. They came last fall40 boys and 9 girls bright-faced, ready to learn, full of response to kindness. They are better than could have been expected; already some of them have shown an interest in Christ. No work could promise better. They have a great desire to learn, and are especially interested in the mechani- cal arts that will help their people toward civilization. Mr. Corliss has offered one of his engines for a machine shop, but there is no money with which to put a roof over it; even the Indian dormitory is yet unpaid for. For want of $18,000 the work is checked; but it is a vital work. If there are two classes of men to whom the people of the United States owe a helping hand, they are the Indi- ans and the Negroes. Besides, it is Gods time; both races have been awakened to their needs; there is a cry for help. Even from the far neighborhood of Pu- 112 A Beginners Re/lection.s congregationalism. get Sound have come letters asking if there is room at Hampton. The time has come for the elevation of the Indian race; the fulcrum is at Hampton. Here, too, is part of the lever; what we want is the other part. Freely ye have received, Christ says, freely give. We cannot wash away our national injustice; God does not expect that. We can show peni- tence by our helpfulness toward those who have been its victims. So much God will expect, and it is likely to be sad for us if we fail to meet the expectation. GEORGIA. A Beginners ReflectionsThe GospelCon. gregationalismThe 1~Tegro. 11Ev. S. E. LATHEOP, MACON. I have been at this post for about three months, and as it is my first e4erience with the colored people, I may be par- doned for offering some impressions that have come to me since entering on the work. Having preached eight years to white people in the North, I was some- what curious to compare the results of the same Gospel as applied to different races. The comparison thus far is entire- ly satisfactory. I am more than ever con- vinced of the priceless value of the Gos- pel as an elevating, purifying power in huma n hearts, no matter what is the color of the skin. Judging medicines by their results, we say that this or that is a specific for certain diseases; so~ judging Christianity by its results, as applied not only to different individuals but to dif- ferent races, it is a specific for the deep- seated disease of sin everywhere. As different doctors have formulte of their own, differing more or less each from the other, so are the different sects or schools of religious thought. I, as a Congregationalist born and bred, the son of a Western Home Missionary, with Puritan ancestry running back to the days of John Robinson, am, as a stu- (tent of human nature and of theological therapeutics, convinced more than ever of the value of our Puritan ideas, modi- fied, mellowed and improved as they are by the additional light which has broken forth out of Gods word. I think Congregationalism is adapted to African as well as Caucasian Chris- tians; both from its lack of iron- bound traditions and mannerisms, and theological slancr and also from its flexibility, its adaptedness, its sancti- fied common sense, which does not make a Procrustean bed of inflexible length for tall and short alike, nor like that which the prophet mentions, shorter than that a man can stretch himself upon it, and the covering nar- rower than that he can wrap himself in it. Its covering is, like Christs seamless robe, broad enough to envelop in its generous fold every forlorn heart. I have also verified what I had before heard, that the Negro race is not all composed of Uncle Tomsthat, in fact, such transcendent characters are rare. The negro is neither a prince in disguise nor a hero in rags. He is exceedingly human, fallible, ignorant, childlike, fickle, improvident, thoughtless. We could easily lengthen this catalogue of failings, painful things which oftentimes tend to discourage the Christian worker. But hence is all the more need of the Gospel among them. Their animalism makes necessary th~m proper antidote of spiritual training. Their unsteadiness calls loudly for patience, perseverane., courage, on the part of teacher and mis- sionary. Past centuries mightily influ- ence the present. When I consider how far from perfect is our boasted Cauca- sian race, and how the home pastors and home missionaries toil unceasingly amid difficulties to teach sobriety, self- control and an embodied Gospel among the worlds dominant race, I can have more patience with the lower strata of humanity. Remembering the defalcations, the im- moralities, the ontbreaking evils which so often come to light among the white

Rev. S. E. Lathrop Lathrop, S. E., Rev. Georgia, Macon--A Beginner's Reflection--The Gospel--Congregationalism--The Negro The Freedmen 112-113

112 A Beginners Re/lection.s congregationalism. get Sound have come letters asking if there is room at Hampton. The time has come for the elevation of the Indian race; the fulcrum is at Hampton. Here, too, is part of the lever; what we want is the other part. Freely ye have received, Christ says, freely give. We cannot wash away our national injustice; God does not expect that. We can show peni- tence by our helpfulness toward those who have been its victims. So much God will expect, and it is likely to be sad for us if we fail to meet the expectation. GEORGIA. A Beginners ReflectionsThe GospelCon. gregationalismThe 1~Tegro. 11Ev. S. E. LATHEOP, MACON. I have been at this post for about three months, and as it is my first e4erience with the colored people, I may be par- doned for offering some impressions that have come to me since entering on the work. Having preached eight years to white people in the North, I was some- what curious to compare the results of the same Gospel as applied to different races. The comparison thus far is entire- ly satisfactory. I am more than ever con- vinced of the priceless value of the Gos- pel as an elevating, purifying power in huma n hearts, no matter what is the color of the skin. Judging medicines by their results, we say that this or that is a specific for certain diseases; so~ judging Christianity by its results, as applied not only to different individuals but to dif- ferent races, it is a specific for the deep- seated disease of sin everywhere. As different doctors have formulte of their own, differing more or less each from the other, so are the different sects or schools of religious thought. I, as a Congregationalist born and bred, the son of a Western Home Missionary, with Puritan ancestry running back to the days of John Robinson, am, as a stu- (tent of human nature and of theological therapeutics, convinced more than ever of the value of our Puritan ideas, modi- fied, mellowed and improved as they are by the additional light which has broken forth out of Gods word. I think Congregationalism is adapted to African as well as Caucasian Chris- tians; both from its lack of iron- bound traditions and mannerisms, and theological slancr and also from its flexibility, its adaptedness, its sancti- fied common sense, which does not make a Procrustean bed of inflexible length for tall and short alike, nor like that which the prophet mentions, shorter than that a man can stretch himself upon it, and the covering nar- rower than that he can wrap himself in it. Its covering is, like Christs seamless robe, broad enough to envelop in its generous fold every forlorn heart. I have also verified what I had before heard, that the Negro race is not all composed of Uncle Tomsthat, in fact, such transcendent characters are rare. The negro is neither a prince in disguise nor a hero in rags. He is exceedingly human, fallible, ignorant, childlike, fickle, improvident, thoughtless. We could easily lengthen this catalogue of failings, painful things which oftentimes tend to discourage the Christian worker. But hence is all the more need of the Gospel among them. Their animalism makes necessary th~m proper antidote of spiritual training. Their unsteadiness calls loudly for patience, perseverane., courage, on the part of teacher and mis- sionary. Past centuries mightily influ- ence the present. When I consider how far from perfect is our boasted Cauca- sian race, and how the home pastors and home missionaries toil unceasingly amid difficulties to teach sobriety, self- control and an embodied Gospel among the worlds dominant race, I can have more patience with the lower strata of humanity. Remembering the defalcations, the im- moralities, the ontbreaking evils which so often come to light among the white Revival in flialladega. 113 Christians, who have many centuries of Christian ancestors behind them, I can surely have more charity for these sable people who themselves dwelt in bondage so long, whose ancestors were slaves, and whose history shades off into the dim, remote, unknown past of savage Africa. Even the Jews, that remarka- ble people, known as they always have been for shrewdness, intelligence and business prosperity, after being enslaved in Egypt for some hundred years, were fearfully debased and demoralized, wan- dering in the wilderness many years, and even when they had conquered their pro- mised land, were in turmoil and confu- sion. Can we expect better things of the sons of Ham? No nation can be born in a day whose minds and hearts are degraded by bondage for so long. But there is evident progress. The colored people of Macon deserve praise for their efforts after a truer life. There are 10,000 of them in this city, and among them is much poverty and want. But others have, since emanci- cipation, laid up property and secured comfortable homes of their own. Their children in school compare favorably in most respects with white children. Some of them walk three or four miles each way to attend our Lewis High School. The extravagance and effervescence of re- ligious gatherings is becoming more and more toned down as iutelligence in- creases. They are more and more winning the respect of the whites, and I think there is more disposition on both sides to live peaceably than at any previous time since the war. Our church and school have had various trials, but now the pmspect seems more favorable. One man has united with the church on pro- fession. ALABAMA. Revival ii the Church and College. REV. ~. W. ANDREWS, TALLADEGA. On March 2d thirty were received into our church, the fruits, in part, of a revi- val still in progress. It is the custom in the South to admit converts to the church on the first convenient opportu- nity, as in apostolic times, according to Acts ii. 47. Of these thirty, seven were baptized in infancy, mostly by our own missiona- ries, ten years ago; three were immersed; the rest followed Ezek. xxxvi. 25. The youngest was not quite nine years old; the oldest was between sixty and sev- enty, and as happy a new-born soul as one often meets. Several were from forty to fifty. Five are heads of families, one of whom I have heard called king of men, because of his commanding infiu- enQe. He says: I mean to be as faith- ful in the service of Christ as I have been in that of Satan. I am now ready for any duty the church may impose upon me; l)e it easy or hard, it makes no difference to me. His conversion has startled everybody. One little boy scarce- ly ten years old often prays intelligently and touchingly for a dear uncle and aunt, and asks others to join him. All but two of the girls at Foster Hall are hopeful Christians; and of the forty- five young men who board at the same place, but four remain without a hope in Christ. Two in the higher normal room still refuse to enter upon the better life, and fourteen in the common school normal, out of the ninety in that depart- ment. The community outside of the college, our people say, was never before so awakened since the college was estab- lished here. The meetings have been characterized by a wonderful freedom from excite- ment; indeed, I was never in a revival before where there was so little. It has pleased God in this instance to mag- nify preaching in a wonderful manner. Dr. Roy w~s with us a week lacking one day, and preached every night and on the Sabbath, interesting and profiting every one. One night many hearts were deeply moved by his tender recital of the Old, old story of Jesus and his love. We held extra meetings for two or three

Rev. G. W. Andrews Andrews, G. W., Rev. Alabama, Talladega--Revival in Church and College The Freedmen 113-114

Revival in flialladega. 113 Christians, who have many centuries of Christian ancestors behind them, I can surely have more charity for these sable people who themselves dwelt in bondage so long, whose ancestors were slaves, and whose history shades off into the dim, remote, unknown past of savage Africa. Even the Jews, that remarka- ble people, known as they always have been for shrewdness, intelligence and business prosperity, after being enslaved in Egypt for some hundred years, were fearfully debased and demoralized, wan- dering in the wilderness many years, and even when they had conquered their pro- mised land, were in turmoil and confu- sion. Can we expect better things of the sons of Ham? No nation can be born in a day whose minds and hearts are degraded by bondage for so long. But there is evident progress. The colored people of Macon deserve praise for their efforts after a truer life. There are 10,000 of them in this city, and among them is much poverty and want. But others have, since emanci- cipation, laid up property and secured comfortable homes of their own. Their children in school compare favorably in most respects with white children. Some of them walk three or four miles each way to attend our Lewis High School. The extravagance and effervescence of re- ligious gatherings is becoming more and more toned down as iutelligence in- creases. They are more and more winning the respect of the whites, and I think there is more disposition on both sides to live peaceably than at any previous time since the war. Our church and school have had various trials, but now the pmspect seems more favorable. One man has united with the church on pro- fession. ALABAMA. Revival ii the Church and College. REV. ~. W. ANDREWS, TALLADEGA. On March 2d thirty were received into our church, the fruits, in part, of a revi- val still in progress. It is the custom in the South to admit converts to the church on the first convenient opportu- nity, as in apostolic times, according to Acts ii. 47. Of these thirty, seven were baptized in infancy, mostly by our own missiona- ries, ten years ago; three were immersed; the rest followed Ezek. xxxvi. 25. The youngest was not quite nine years old; the oldest was between sixty and sev- enty, and as happy a new-born soul as one often meets. Several were from forty to fifty. Five are heads of families, one of whom I have heard called king of men, because of his commanding infiu- enQe. He says: I mean to be as faith- ful in the service of Christ as I have been in that of Satan. I am now ready for any duty the church may impose upon me; l)e it easy or hard, it makes no difference to me. His conversion has startled everybody. One little boy scarce- ly ten years old often prays intelligently and touchingly for a dear uncle and aunt, and asks others to join him. All but two of the girls at Foster Hall are hopeful Christians; and of the forty- five young men who board at the same place, but four remain without a hope in Christ. Two in the higher normal room still refuse to enter upon the better life, and fourteen in the common school normal, out of the ninety in that depart- ment. The community outside of the college, our people say, was never before so awakened since the college was estab- lished here. The meetings have been characterized by a wonderful freedom from excite- ment; indeed, I was never in a revival before where there was so little. It has pleased God in this instance to mag- nify preaching in a wonderful manner. Dr. Roy w~s with us a week lacking one day, and preached every night and on the Sabbath, interesting and profiting every one. One night many hearts were deeply moved by his tender recital of the Old, old story of Jesus and his love. We held extra meetings for two or three 114 Revival WorkA Well- Organized Church. by observing the week of prayer, remembering especially the request for a concert of prayer with the officers and workers of the A. M. A., and with great blessing, we felt, to those of us who met together to claim the promises. As the white churches held union meetings during the week in the after- noon, I attended some of them also, and was cordially received and invited to lead one of the meetings. It chanced to be the day of prayer for nations, and I improved the occasion to set forth as strongly as I was able, not only the obligation, but the necessity that lies upon all Christians and all patriots, state or national, irrespective of denomi- national or political affiliations, to engage earnestly in the work of Christian educa- tion, if we would avert the terrible evils already impending. I was listened to with respect and evident appreciation, and there seems to be a growing spirit of cordiality and co-operation. After another week of preparatory meetings, we opened the audience-room and began preaching every night, except Saturday, which we have kept up for three weeks with considerable success, having over thirty hopeful conversions and an uncounted number of iyiquirers; in fact, almost all express a desire, more or less earnest, to become Christians. I find but few of the difficulties That trouble us so much in the North. There is but little skepticism, or the so pre- valent idea of salvation by mere morality, and no Universalism that I have met as yet. The colored people are emphati- cally a religious people, and the diffi- culty is not so much in getting them to go forward to the anxious seats, or enter the inquiry-room, or to weep over their sins and cry for mercy, as it is to show them the simplicity of the way of salvation. They have been taught that they must see visions and dream dreams, must be held by the hair of the head over An interesting work of grace is now the bottomless pit and then taken to heaven, in progress in our church. We began I before they can be soundly converted; weeks. During the week of prayer and the remainder of January there were no conversions save one, that of reck- less George, as he used to be called. He was one of our brightest young men, and his conversion made a deep impres- sion. The revival did not commence in earnest until the first week in February, when there were twenty who turned to the Lord from the ways of sin. Since then the work has gone steadily forward. This whole region seems ripe for a spiritual harvest; but whence are to come the reapers, as there is a limit to strength, and other duties press sorely. We can- not have many more extra meetings, though there are many inquirers; still we do not despair, as God has shown us how easily He can brush away all obstacles to the progress of His kingdom. He has again and again, during the continuance of these meetings, rebuked our want of faith. The theological students have ren- dered excellent service by visiting from door to door. Christians have been ful- ly awake. It is a glorious work to be in- strumental in starting a soul in the better way; but there remains the work, greater if possible, of development through a wise Christian culture. We constantly remember Pauls advice, recorded in Acts xx. 28. I have time only for this hasty word concerning the work of grace here. I hope some one else may furnish you a full account. We all feel grateful for this quickening of our religious life, and this seal of our labors in the Lord, and our prayer is that an army of Christian young men and women may be raised up from this beginning of new life. While we watch, work and pray, we want to see the desert rejoice and blossom as the rose. Revival WorkA well-organized Church. BEv. C. B. CURTIS, SELMA.

Rev. C. B. Curits Curits, C. B., Rev. Alabama, Selma--Revival Work--A well-organized Church The Freedmen 114-115

114 Revival WorkA Well- Organized Church. by observing the week of prayer, remembering especially the request for a concert of prayer with the officers and workers of the A. M. A., and with great blessing, we felt, to those of us who met together to claim the promises. As the white churches held union meetings during the week in the after- noon, I attended some of them also, and was cordially received and invited to lead one of the meetings. It chanced to be the day of prayer for nations, and I improved the occasion to set forth as strongly as I was able, not only the obligation, but the necessity that lies upon all Christians and all patriots, state or national, irrespective of denomi- national or political affiliations, to engage earnestly in the work of Christian educa- tion, if we would avert the terrible evils already impending. I was listened to with respect and evident appreciation, and there seems to be a growing spirit of cordiality and co-operation. After another week of preparatory meetings, we opened the audience-room and began preaching every night, except Saturday, which we have kept up for three weeks with considerable success, having over thirty hopeful conversions and an uncounted number of iyiquirers; in fact, almost all express a desire, more or less earnest, to become Christians. I find but few of the difficulties That trouble us so much in the North. There is but little skepticism, or the so pre- valent idea of salvation by mere morality, and no Universalism that I have met as yet. The colored people are emphati- cally a religious people, and the diffi- culty is not so much in getting them to go forward to the anxious seats, or enter the inquiry-room, or to weep over their sins and cry for mercy, as it is to show them the simplicity of the way of salvation. They have been taught that they must see visions and dream dreams, must be held by the hair of the head over An interesting work of grace is now the bottomless pit and then taken to heaven, in progress in our church. We began I before they can be soundly converted; weeks. During the week of prayer and the remainder of January there were no conversions save one, that of reck- less George, as he used to be called. He was one of our brightest young men, and his conversion made a deep impres- sion. The revival did not commence in earnest until the first week in February, when there were twenty who turned to the Lord from the ways of sin. Since then the work has gone steadily forward. This whole region seems ripe for a spiritual harvest; but whence are to come the reapers, as there is a limit to strength, and other duties press sorely. We can- not have many more extra meetings, though there are many inquirers; still we do not despair, as God has shown us how easily He can brush away all obstacles to the progress of His kingdom. He has again and again, during the continuance of these meetings, rebuked our want of faith. The theological students have ren- dered excellent service by visiting from door to door. Christians have been ful- ly awake. It is a glorious work to be in- strumental in starting a soul in the better way; but there remains the work, greater if possible, of development through a wise Christian culture. We constantly remember Pauls advice, recorded in Acts xx. 28. I have time only for this hasty word concerning the work of grace here. I hope some one else may furnish you a full account. We all feel grateful for this quickening of our religious life, and this seal of our labors in the Lord, and our prayer is that an army of Christian young men and women may be raised up from this beginning of new life. While we watch, work and pray, we want to see the desert rejoice and blossom as the rose. Revival WorkA well-organized Church. BEv. C. B. CURTIS, SELMA. A Thougktful Congregation. 115 and though they are, in many cases, be- ginning to distrust this old-time teach- ing, yet it is hard for them to see that all they need to do is to repent and believe the gospel. Indeed, it is the universal testimony of the converts that their faith is continually tried by the de- clarations of their friends, that they havent any religion, because they havent been to heaven or hell,~~ or come through shouting. We try to teach them that simple reliance on the word of God is far better and safer than dreams or feelings, and that by their fruits ye shall know them. We are now holding thrce services during the week, and dislike very much to oive up while there are still some who have been seeking ever since the special meetings began, with seemingly great earnestne~s, and yet cannot see the way clearly. Many of those who have been converted naturally belong to other churches, so that the addition to our membership will not be large, but we feel that the work is genuine, and those who go to other churches will carry a warmer feeling of interest in us which will help our work greatly in the fu- ture. I enjoy this work exceedingly, and have been, from the first, favorably im- pressed with the condition of things in my field. The church has been thor- oughly organized, and has a good record. Its influence is being felt in this com- munity. Temperance and virtue are necessary to church membership, and as much cannot be said of all the colored churches in the South. The church building is commodious and pleasant, with reading-room and lecture-room in basement, cumbered with no debt, and upon its sweet sounding bell (the gift of the Sabbath-school) is engraved the fit- ting invitation, Come, and let him that heareth say come. For a church of its size I have never seen so many ready and efficient workers. Indeed, nearly all the members are workers, not drones, as has been thoroughly demon- strated during this revival. Neither can~too much be said in praise of the work of the teachers of Burrell School, who, though no longer under the commission of your society, and necessarily undenominational in their efforts, do much real missionary work. Such an intelligent, faithful and efficient corps of coadjutors it has never been my fortune to meet before. I wish to acknowledge through your columns the receipt of a large quantity of second-hand Sunday-school papers, well preserved, and greatly appreciated by our children, as they have been only partially supplied before. The package came, prepaid, by express from Cairo. Our heartiest thanks to the unknown donors, and may other schools be moved to go and do likewise. A Thoughtful CongregationPersonal Work. REV. F. BASCOM, D. D., MONTGOMERY. The church has been quickened in its spiritual life and activity, but no per- vading revival influence has gone forth into the community. A good propor- tion of our members seem to be earnest, growing and happy Christians. Our social-religious meetings are very enjoy- able, Some who have been delinquent now promise better things. One or two have just begun a new life of faith in Christ, and some others have promised to take the subject of their salvation into serious consideration. By follow- ing up such cases, I trust some of them may be won to Christ by personal effort. I learn, on inquiry, that most of our members were brought one by one to the Saviour by persevering and judicious pastoral labor. The colored people are very accessible to such effort; and what a boundless field for it they furnish I But the laborers are few that care to gather such a harvest. I still enjoy my work, and the privi- lege and importance of it grow in my estimation. Last Sabbath I preached

Rev. F. Bascom, D.D. Bascom, F., Rev., D.D. Alabama, Montgomery--Thoughtful Congregation--Personal Work The Freedmen 115-116

A Thougktful Congregation. 115 and though they are, in many cases, be- ginning to distrust this old-time teach- ing, yet it is hard for them to see that all they need to do is to repent and believe the gospel. Indeed, it is the universal testimony of the converts that their faith is continually tried by the de- clarations of their friends, that they havent any religion, because they havent been to heaven or hell,~~ or come through shouting. We try to teach them that simple reliance on the word of God is far better and safer than dreams or feelings, and that by their fruits ye shall know them. We are now holding thrce services during the week, and dislike very much to oive up while there are still some who have been seeking ever since the special meetings began, with seemingly great earnestne~s, and yet cannot see the way clearly. Many of those who have been converted naturally belong to other churches, so that the addition to our membership will not be large, but we feel that the work is genuine, and those who go to other churches will carry a warmer feeling of interest in us which will help our work greatly in the fu- ture. I enjoy this work exceedingly, and have been, from the first, favorably im- pressed with the condition of things in my field. The church has been thor- oughly organized, and has a good record. Its influence is being felt in this com- munity. Temperance and virtue are necessary to church membership, and as much cannot be said of all the colored churches in the South. The church building is commodious and pleasant, with reading-room and lecture-room in basement, cumbered with no debt, and upon its sweet sounding bell (the gift of the Sabbath-school) is engraved the fit- ting invitation, Come, and let him that heareth say come. For a church of its size I have never seen so many ready and efficient workers. Indeed, nearly all the members are workers, not drones, as has been thoroughly demon- strated during this revival. Neither can~too much be said in praise of the work of the teachers of Burrell School, who, though no longer under the commission of your society, and necessarily undenominational in their efforts, do much real missionary work. Such an intelligent, faithful and efficient corps of coadjutors it has never been my fortune to meet before. I wish to acknowledge through your columns the receipt of a large quantity of second-hand Sunday-school papers, well preserved, and greatly appreciated by our children, as they have been only partially supplied before. The package came, prepaid, by express from Cairo. Our heartiest thanks to the unknown donors, and may other schools be moved to go and do likewise. A Thoughtful CongregationPersonal Work. REV. F. BASCOM, D. D., MONTGOMERY. The church has been quickened in its spiritual life and activity, but no per- vading revival influence has gone forth into the community. A good propor- tion of our members seem to be earnest, growing and happy Christians. Our social-religious meetings are very enjoy- able, Some who have been delinquent now promise better things. One or two have just begun a new life of faith in Christ, and some others have promised to take the subject of their salvation into serious consideration. By follow- ing up such cases, I trust some of them may be won to Christ by personal effort. I learn, on inquiry, that most of our members were brought one by one to the Saviour by persevering and judicious pastoral labor. The colored people are very accessible to such effort; and what a boundless field for it they furnish I But the laborers are few that care to gather such a harvest. I still enjoy my work, and the privi- lege and importance of it grow in my estimation. Last Sabbath I preached 116 A Prai8e Ifeeting. three times: twice for my people, and once for the A. MI. E. church. Quite a large congregation. MISSISSIPPI. A Praise Meeting. 11EV. G. STANLEY POPE, TOUGALOO. S& on after the opening of the school we gathered together in our chapel, to tell a few of the things for which we were thankful. I wish some of our friends had been present to share the enjoyment of the occasion with us. One said : I have had the severest sickness of my life, but it proved a good thing for me. It kept me from going to my second school at Lake, where the fever was so bad afterwards. I see a great change in the people. They have been more thoughtful. I have not prayed once without asking God to pro- tect and bless the teachers and scholars of our institution. My prayers have been answered. Another said: I am thankful that I have been blessed with more light than many others. I never before saw how great the darkness is in our country. The condition of the people where I have been teaching is dreadful. Another, who is not a Christian : I am thankful that I have at last got here, where I have so long desired to be. I hope I may be blessed spiritually as well as in my studies. Another : I see the need of good teachers and preachers as I never did before. I am thankful for this, and that I am spared to gct back under these kind instructors. I have been in a very intemperate place. l)nt the Lord has helped me to do good work. S:cured a good many Signers to the pledge. I am thankful for this, and that I have been sjared during the sickness. One who was converted last winter said : I am thankful that I have been with Christians who have led me to the Lord. I (lUnt know how to tell my gratitude. I am just beginning to know what it is to be upright and truthful. When I left here last summer to go to a new place, I felt that I needed Gods aid. I asked Him to be with me. He has kept me and made my work success- ful. I thank Him for it. I will con- tinue to thank him. The old motker thanks the Lord that she has been able to get here to hear the Bible read, and see the teachers back again. I was teaching near Grenada. That was my P. 0. The fever was on three sides of me. Some of my scholars had to leave school; but amidst it all God spared me, and I am thankful for it. There were some white young men came into my Sunday-school. At first I was afraid, but I spoke to them, and asked them if they would like some papers. They kept coming, and seemed just as much interested in what I said, and in getting the papers, as any of my pupils. 1-Je leadeth me. I cannot begin to tell all the things foi which I am thankful. Aside from the health of my own family, nothing rejoices me more than to see these faces. Our friends at the North cannot begin to realize the gloom that settled down over us here. It seemed as though we were breathing in death continually. I am thankful that God has spared us, and that I have had such a pleasant family during the summer. To this effect spoke Brother Miner, who remained here during the summer with several of the young peo- ple to take care of the farm. These are only fragments that were. jotted down. Au hour and a half was spent in this way. A few of our stu- dents had the fever, but we have not heard of one who died with it. This continues to be the cause of great thank- fulness. OUR TEMPERANCE MEETING, a few nights later, was no less interest- ing. I noted down a few sentences, as one after anoth r reported, which

Rev. G. Stanley Pope Pope, G. Stanley, Rev. Mississippi, Tougaloo--A Praise Meeting The Freedmen 116-118

116 A Prai8e Ifeeting. three times: twice for my people, and once for the A. MI. E. church. Quite a large congregation. MISSISSIPPI. A Praise Meeting. 11EV. G. STANLEY POPE, TOUGALOO. S& on after the opening of the school we gathered together in our chapel, to tell a few of the things for which we were thankful. I wish some of our friends had been present to share the enjoyment of the occasion with us. One said : I have had the severest sickness of my life, but it proved a good thing for me. It kept me from going to my second school at Lake, where the fever was so bad afterwards. I see a great change in the people. They have been more thoughtful. I have not prayed once without asking God to pro- tect and bless the teachers and scholars of our institution. My prayers have been answered. Another said: I am thankful that I have been blessed with more light than many others. I never before saw how great the darkness is in our country. The condition of the people where I have been teaching is dreadful. Another, who is not a Christian : I am thankful that I have at last got here, where I have so long desired to be. I hope I may be blessed spiritually as well as in my studies. Another : I see the need of good teachers and preachers as I never did before. I am thankful for this, and that I am spared to gct back under these kind instructors. I have been in a very intemperate place. l)nt the Lord has helped me to do good work. S:cured a good many Signers to the pledge. I am thankful for this, and that I have been sjared during the sickness. One who was converted last winter said : I am thankful that I have been with Christians who have led me to the Lord. I (lUnt know how to tell my gratitude. I am just beginning to know what it is to be upright and truthful. When I left here last summer to go to a new place, I felt that I needed Gods aid. I asked Him to be with me. He has kept me and made my work success- ful. I thank Him for it. I will con- tinue to thank him. The old motker thanks the Lord that she has been able to get here to hear the Bible read, and see the teachers back again. I was teaching near Grenada. That was my P. 0. The fever was on three sides of me. Some of my scholars had to leave school; but amidst it all God spared me, and I am thankful for it. There were some white young men came into my Sunday-school. At first I was afraid, but I spoke to them, and asked them if they would like some papers. They kept coming, and seemed just as much interested in what I said, and in getting the papers, as any of my pupils. 1-Je leadeth me. I cannot begin to tell all the things foi which I am thankful. Aside from the health of my own family, nothing rejoices me more than to see these faces. Our friends at the North cannot begin to realize the gloom that settled down over us here. It seemed as though we were breathing in death continually. I am thankful that God has spared us, and that I have had such a pleasant family during the summer. To this effect spoke Brother Miner, who remained here during the summer with several of the young peo- ple to take care of the farm. These are only fragments that were. jotted down. Au hour and a half was spent in this way. A few of our stu- dents had the fever, but we have not heard of one who died with it. This continues to be the cause of great thank- fulness. OUR TEMPERANCE MEETING, a few nights later, was no less interest- ing. I noted down a few sentences, as one after anoth r reported, which A Prcti8e iJfeeting. 117 will show what kind of work has been lone by our students during the sum- mer. One young woman said, When I first spoke to my scholars about tent- perance, they did not know what I meant. I would not allow any one to sign the pledge until I was sure he understood it. I read temperance sto- ries, etc. I found one lady using snuff and toddy, who said she didnt know as there was anything about drink in the Bible. She thought the Lord would forgive such a little thing. A minister said he never saw drink to be such a bad thing. lie would not sign the pledge, but I have since heard that he is going to try to estal)liSh a temperance rule in his church. I got 28 signers to the pledge. Mr. T. said: I got 48 names to my pledges; most of them were young peo- ple, some of them children. I tried not to receive any unless they thoroughly understood it. I met some opposition from the old folks, but some of them signed. One young man fifteen miles away came in and signed. He was after- ward taken sick, and the doctor prescrib- ed toddies, but he stoutly refused them. I think many can be depended upon. There is no other such work being done in the county. Mr. H. : My work was not so great as I think it should have been. The community was very wicked, most of the older ones hung back, 24 signed, most of them my scholars. I took my pledge to school every day, and to Sunday-school. I told them very plainly what is meant by signing the pledge, or more would have signed. I found the very small ones understood it as well as the older ones. Some are so poor they cannot get drink. II. T. T. : I have not much of a re- port. Did not find one who believed in teiuj)erance. Went to the older ones first, but they were not willing to sign. I secured 12 signers. Might have had more, but did not take the small ones. Gue minister said he had looked at it a long time, and thought it would be well to present it to his people, but wodid not sign. Another minister did. There are ministers here as well as elsewhere who are willing to preach, on the Sabbath, a purer type of Christianity than they exemplify in their home life during the week. C. J. T.: I did not make an effort at first. I ~as invited to their Loving Society. I went with my Bible, pledge and statistical essay in hand. I put in a good deat of vengeance and converted & good many right there. Got 25 names. At close of school I got some more; in all 47. We must keep this subject before them. A Baptist Convention was held there. I got three ministers to sign. Mr. Tanner labored with one minister who wrote out a resolution, and secured its passage in Convention, that their mem- bers should not drink. Miss C. : I presented the subject to my Sundiy-school. Had a meeting at night. Many of the parents came. I read about Daniel purposing in his heart, and then sung Dare to be a Daniel. The first one to sign was a man about fifty years old ; 24 signed. The next Satur- (lay I went ten miles into the country and spent the Sabbath. 26 signed there. One man, who had no children and was well off, but spending his money rapidly for drink, signed and is now sav- ing his money. I went to Lake to help Mr. T. Many signed his pledge there. One liitle boy at Forest wanted to be a Daniel and signed. lie was snake-bit- ten, whiskey was prescribed, but he iefused to tirink it even after he was told that that would not be breaking his pledge, lie recovered. Most of my signers were among the older ones. Other reports were as interesting as these, but I am at raid I am writing too much no~v. I have taken these reports hi the ordi~r in whieb they were given. After hearing from all our students, I may send you the number of signers to the pledge, secured during the summer by them. 118 A ileatlien Bundoo Dance and a Retreat. AFRICA. MENDI MISSION. A Heathen Bundoo Dance and a Retreat. BENJAMIN JAMES, H. D., GOOD HOPE STATION. iDr. James, who accompanied his two children to Freetown, whence they re- turned to this country, in care of Mr. Snelson, on his way back to the mission, made a brief visit to Mr. Gomer and the Shengay Mission of the United Breth- ren. After speaking of the excellent re- ligious and industrial work accomplished at that mission, he gives this account of a Bundoo womens dance, which he chanced to see in that vicinity. Have patience with me while I re- late a curious sight that I accidentally witnessed at a town near the mission, showing the power for good exercised by this little band of Christian~ work- ers. About ten oclock in the morning on Tuesday, the beating of a coun- try drum was heard afar off. My boy Joseph said to me, Let us go and see them cut rice by the beat of the drum, to which I consented. We followed the sound of the drum until we came to the town of Debia, much larger than the one under the Christian charge of our mission, and governed by a female chief of the noted Caulker family. In a grove near this town, within which no male was allowed to enter, proceeded those sounds from mystic drums which at- tracted us to this place. Madam Caulker gave me a very cordial welcome; indeed, her dignified manners made me almost forget that she was the representative of a heathen clan. Edibles were set before me, although brought by a little naked girl; which circumstance was not calcu- lated to improve a relish for the seem- ingly palatable food, yet I do assure you I devoured it greedily. Soon after eating, the drumming ceased from the forest; then came out a large number of women, with white cotton bands, two and a half inches wide, tied around their brows, led by an old woman with a white country cloth around her, and a white handkerchief tied, covering the frontal and occipital portions of her head. When they saw me they were amazed and appeared timid, but this perplexed condition of the organization was soon removed by the head-woman, who had been previously summoned into the presence of the chieftess. Soon the drums, which had attracted me, began to rumble out their peculiar sounds to dancing thumps, beaten by female drum- mers, arranged in dancing order, with their backs towards us, coming from where they were placed in this array. These same women, who appeared timid, bashful and reserved a little while before, sung, beat and stepped to time slowly, motioned with their hands to some- thing apparently to me in the sky, and moved towards a place where they were soon to stand. As they gently and elegantly wheeled in regular order into their respective places, three well-formed and comely girls, about nineteen, side by side, toss- ing their bodies right and left, to and fro, in a very graceful manner, danced together for nearly a quarter of an hour. After the triple dance there was a double one; this was succeeded by a single dance. These three girls were then withdrawn and other members of the order were selected to fill their places. Many feats of skill in dancing were performed by the first three. I noticed that when they danced their supple limbs were tossed in many enig- matical postures, which drew forth ap- plause and great laughter from the by- standers, who understood them. After dancing ~or an hour before us, the leader of the mystic sisterhood ordered it discontinued, and they retired to a capacious bamboo-covered hut to par- take of refreshments, which seemed to

M.D. Benjamin James James, Benjamin, M.D. Heathen Bundoo Dance and a Retreat Africa 118-119

118 A ileatlien Bundoo Dance and a Retreat. AFRICA. MENDI MISSION. A Heathen Bundoo Dance and a Retreat. BENJAMIN JAMES, H. D., GOOD HOPE STATION. iDr. James, who accompanied his two children to Freetown, whence they re- turned to this country, in care of Mr. Snelson, on his way back to the mission, made a brief visit to Mr. Gomer and the Shengay Mission of the United Breth- ren. After speaking of the excellent re- ligious and industrial work accomplished at that mission, he gives this account of a Bundoo womens dance, which he chanced to see in that vicinity. Have patience with me while I re- late a curious sight that I accidentally witnessed at a town near the mission, showing the power for good exercised by this little band of Christian~ work- ers. About ten oclock in the morning on Tuesday, the beating of a coun- try drum was heard afar off. My boy Joseph said to me, Let us go and see them cut rice by the beat of the drum, to which I consented. We followed the sound of the drum until we came to the town of Debia, much larger than the one under the Christian charge of our mission, and governed by a female chief of the noted Caulker family. In a grove near this town, within which no male was allowed to enter, proceeded those sounds from mystic drums which at- tracted us to this place. Madam Caulker gave me a very cordial welcome; indeed, her dignified manners made me almost forget that she was the representative of a heathen clan. Edibles were set before me, although brought by a little naked girl; which circumstance was not calcu- lated to improve a relish for the seem- ingly palatable food, yet I do assure you I devoured it greedily. Soon after eating, the drumming ceased from the forest; then came out a large number of women, with white cotton bands, two and a half inches wide, tied around their brows, led by an old woman with a white country cloth around her, and a white handkerchief tied, covering the frontal and occipital portions of her head. When they saw me they were amazed and appeared timid, but this perplexed condition of the organization was soon removed by the head-woman, who had been previously summoned into the presence of the chieftess. Soon the drums, which had attracted me, began to rumble out their peculiar sounds to dancing thumps, beaten by female drum- mers, arranged in dancing order, with their backs towards us, coming from where they were placed in this array. These same women, who appeared timid, bashful and reserved a little while before, sung, beat and stepped to time slowly, motioned with their hands to some- thing apparently to me in the sky, and moved towards a place where they were soon to stand. As they gently and elegantly wheeled in regular order into their respective places, three well-formed and comely girls, about nineteen, side by side, toss- ing their bodies right and left, to and fro, in a very graceful manner, danced together for nearly a quarter of an hour. After the triple dance there was a double one; this was succeeded by a single dance. These three girls were then withdrawn and other members of the order were selected to fill their places. Many feats of skill in dancing were performed by the first three. I noticed that when they danced their supple limbs were tossed in many enig- matical postures, which drew forth ap- plause and great laughter from the by- standers, who understood them. After dancing ~or an hour before us, the leader of the mystic sisterhood ordered it discontinued, and they retired to a capacious bamboo-covered hut to par- take of refreshments, which seemed to A Vi8it to the Interior. 119 have been prepared and furnished by every village for miles around. Before taking my departure I inquired of the chief tess who these women were. She replied~ that they were the Bundoo wo- men, who were about to remove their place of meeting to Carter, farther into the interior, because they were mo- lested or hindered by the advance of Christianity, which is continually in- creasing about their old meeting bush. All must acknowledge this as a triumph for Christianity, and those who con- tribute to the support of the Shengay mission ought to rejoice that they have had the privilege of being instrumental in causing one of the greatest evils to Africas social and Christian advance- ment to move back into the forest, there to await the coming day of its inevitable dissolution, which, I trust, is not far off. A Visit to the Interior. REV. A. K. JACKSON, AVERY. Avery is situated at the head of navi- gation on the Little Sherbro river, a beautiful site overlooking a vast scope of country. It is about forty-three miles from Good Hope, and quite accessible to any point where we may wish to push our work in future ; and it is hoped that this station will be the centre from which many stations may be planted still further into the interior at no dis- tant future. The Little Sherbro river, with its rippling stream, glides within a few hundred feet of Avery, and flows into the Big Bargroo river, and the Big Bar- groo, with its tributaries, opens an avenue to any part of Africa accessible by water. We have a very beautiful little chapel, and it is very well filled each Sabbath by persons from the surrounding vil- lages as well as our own. For the most part, all appear attentive to what is said to them, and when questioned seem to have quite a clear idea. Through the blessing of Divine providence, three of the chiefs have come into my church, and I think that they are hopefully con- verted. They add very greatly to the interest of the church, because where the chiefs go their subjects will follow. By this means I am enabled to reach a great portion of the heathen element. I have now about thirty-six enrolled upon my church book, twenty-five of whom I have baptized. It is really remarkable to see how readily they take hold of the truths of Jesus. I am also glad to say, that in many of them one can see a marked improvement in their lives. They are a people that de- light to engage in palavers or quarrels, and I mark a very great change in many of them in this respect. They seem to de- sire peace, and when a palaver comes up they frown upon it with seemingly sin- cere indignation. They are also begin- ning to see the wrong of polygamy. That of itself is one of the best signs of reform, for polygamy is one of the prevailing sins of this country. Mrs. Jackson has been holding meetings for the women, in which great interest waa manifested. So the Lord has been greatly blessing both sexes. Quite recently I had a pleasant tour in the Bargroo country. I was very agree- ably surprised to see everything so fa- vorable. In the first place, the people were as hospitable as one could wish, and far more so than one could have expected in a heathen land. I am persuaded to believe that the tribes further in the in- terior are much more docile and far more industrious and a finer class of people than those living on the coast. I visited eight of their towns, and, with very few exceptions, their villages were as clean and neat as any I ever saw. Their houses were made of mud and sticks and covered with bamboo, but all seemed to have been done in taste. Some of their villages were laid out in a perfect system. One that especially at- tracted my attention for its neatness, and the systematic plan on which it was laid out. was Do-do. It has a population of

Rev. A. E. Jackson Jackson, A. E., Rev. Visit to the Interior Africa 119-120

A Vi8it to the Interior. 119 have been prepared and furnished by every village for miles around. Before taking my departure I inquired of the chief tess who these women were. She replied~ that they were the Bundoo wo- men, who were about to remove their place of meeting to Carter, farther into the interior, because they were mo- lested or hindered by the advance of Christianity, which is continually in- creasing about their old meeting bush. All must acknowledge this as a triumph for Christianity, and those who con- tribute to the support of the Shengay mission ought to rejoice that they have had the privilege of being instrumental in causing one of the greatest evils to Africas social and Christian advance- ment to move back into the forest, there to await the coming day of its inevitable dissolution, which, I trust, is not far off. A Visit to the Interior. REV. A. K. JACKSON, AVERY. Avery is situated at the head of navi- gation on the Little Sherbro river, a beautiful site overlooking a vast scope of country. It is about forty-three miles from Good Hope, and quite accessible to any point where we may wish to push our work in future ; and it is hoped that this station will be the centre from which many stations may be planted still further into the interior at no dis- tant future. The Little Sherbro river, with its rippling stream, glides within a few hundred feet of Avery, and flows into the Big Bargroo river, and the Big Bar- groo, with its tributaries, opens an avenue to any part of Africa accessible by water. We have a very beautiful little chapel, and it is very well filled each Sabbath by persons from the surrounding vil- lages as well as our own. For the most part, all appear attentive to what is said to them, and when questioned seem to have quite a clear idea. Through the blessing of Divine providence, three of the chiefs have come into my church, and I think that they are hopefully con- verted. They add very greatly to the interest of the church, because where the chiefs go their subjects will follow. By this means I am enabled to reach a great portion of the heathen element. I have now about thirty-six enrolled upon my church book, twenty-five of whom I have baptized. It is really remarkable to see how readily they take hold of the truths of Jesus. I am also glad to say, that in many of them one can see a marked improvement in their lives. They are a people that de- light to engage in palavers or quarrels, and I mark a very great change in many of them in this respect. They seem to de- sire peace, and when a palaver comes up they frown upon it with seemingly sin- cere indignation. They are also begin- ning to see the wrong of polygamy. That of itself is one of the best signs of reform, for polygamy is one of the prevailing sins of this country. Mrs. Jackson has been holding meetings for the women, in which great interest waa manifested. So the Lord has been greatly blessing both sexes. Quite recently I had a pleasant tour in the Bargroo country. I was very agree- ably surprised to see everything so fa- vorable. In the first place, the people were as hospitable as one could wish, and far more so than one could have expected in a heathen land. I am persuaded to believe that the tribes further in the in- terior are much more docile and far more industrious and a finer class of people than those living on the coast. I visited eight of their towns, and, with very few exceptions, their villages were as clean and neat as any I ever saw. Their houses were made of mud and sticks and covered with bamboo, but all seemed to have been done in taste. Some of their villages were laid out in a perfect system. One that especially at- tracted my attention for its neatness, and the systematic plan on which it was laid out. was Do-do. It has a population of 120 & Aool and Church Work at Dungines8. about fifteen hundred persons. It is a very beautiful town, situated on a pen- insula, with a fine view of a large ex- tent of country. It is densely populated and the houses are built close together. Three tall lines of barricade enclose the entire town, with only three large gates through which persons can enter. I chanced to stop there all night. I found the chief a very hospitable man. He en- tertained me as best he could, and gave me my supper and a bed to sleep on. Next morning he sent me my breakfast, which consisted of a goat, chicken and some eggs. On going to the door I found three men ready to slay and dress the goat. The interpreter of the chief accom- panied these gifts. He said that the king did not know how to cook English fashion, and therefore he would advise that I have it cooked in the English way. This being rather more of a breakfast than I could consume, I only had the chicken and eggs cooked. I had the goat made fast and carried him home to my wife, who I knew would be delighted to have him for a pet. After I had eaten, the king came to see how I enjoyed my breakfast. After talk- ing a while he told me that he would be glad to have a missionary station planted at or near his town, so that he could send his children to school that they might learn about Gods law. He then took me around the town and showed me the bar- ricade. Then lie took me on the outside of the barricade and pointed out to me a very beautiful spot of ground, which he would give for a mission station. I could only thank him for his hospitality toward the mission and his seeming love for the work. On Sunday I preached in a very large village, and I really believe that every man, woman and child was present, and it seemed as if they were completely spell- bound during the entire service. It in- spires one to put forth greater efforts when he chances to penetrate into the in- terior and there see the difference be- tween these tribes and those living on the coast. They are not so corrupt in habits from association with the low class of traders. One thing very remark- able about this people is that they are not at all hostile toward the light-skin- ned man nor the dark-skinned man, but will soon learn to put implicit confidence in either, and more especially if he speak to them about Jesus Christ. They, from some source or other, have learned that there is a Saviour. Even those who have never seen or heard a missionary themselves seem to be thor- oughly informed as to the objects of this mission. I am impressed more and more each day that the many years work of our missions in Africa has been a great suc- cess. Not only blossoms but fruits ar~ al- ready seen in the immediate vicinity of the mission, and far into the interior there has been a silent influence for good that we knew not of. The labors of the dark days of our missions were not in vain, but are now being crowned with the glorious fruits ot~ righteousness, which will only be a brighter crown for those who have fallen asleep at their post of duty. THE INDIANS. SCHO~L AND ChURCH WORK AT DUNGINESS. his reputation was good where he had REV. MYRON EELLB, SKOKOMISH, WASHING- previously taught, and he has taken TON TERRITORY. We have an excellent young man at hold of the work among the Indians Dunginess as school-teacher. Although wisely and earnestly, and also satisfac- never met him until he took torily to the Agent and the Indians. charge of the school, I learned that He has earned an excellent reputatiox

Rev. Myron Eells Eells, Myron, Rev. School and Church Work at Dunginess The Indians 120-121

120 & Aool and Church Work at Dungines8. about fifteen hundred persons. It is a very beautiful town, situated on a pen- insula, with a fine view of a large ex- tent of country. It is densely populated and the houses are built close together. Three tall lines of barricade enclose the entire town, with only three large gates through which persons can enter. I chanced to stop there all night. I found the chief a very hospitable man. He en- tertained me as best he could, and gave me my supper and a bed to sleep on. Next morning he sent me my breakfast, which consisted of a goat, chicken and some eggs. On going to the door I found three men ready to slay and dress the goat. The interpreter of the chief accom- panied these gifts. He said that the king did not know how to cook English fashion, and therefore he would advise that I have it cooked in the English way. This being rather more of a breakfast than I could consume, I only had the chicken and eggs cooked. I had the goat made fast and carried him home to my wife, who I knew would be delighted to have him for a pet. After I had eaten, the king came to see how I enjoyed my breakfast. After talk- ing a while he told me that he would be glad to have a missionary station planted at or near his town, so that he could send his children to school that they might learn about Gods law. He then took me around the town and showed me the bar- ricade. Then lie took me on the outside of the barricade and pointed out to me a very beautiful spot of ground, which he would give for a mission station. I could only thank him for his hospitality toward the mission and his seeming love for the work. On Sunday I preached in a very large village, and I really believe that every man, woman and child was present, and it seemed as if they were completely spell- bound during the entire service. It in- spires one to put forth greater efforts when he chances to penetrate into the in- terior and there see the difference be- tween these tribes and those living on the coast. They are not so corrupt in habits from association with the low class of traders. One thing very remark- able about this people is that they are not at all hostile toward the light-skin- ned man nor the dark-skinned man, but will soon learn to put implicit confidence in either, and more especially if he speak to them about Jesus Christ. They, from some source or other, have learned that there is a Saviour. Even those who have never seen or heard a missionary themselves seem to be thor- oughly informed as to the objects of this mission. I am impressed more and more each day that the many years work of our missions in Africa has been a great suc- cess. Not only blossoms but fruits ar~ al- ready seen in the immediate vicinity of the mission, and far into the interior there has been a silent influence for good that we knew not of. The labors of the dark days of our missions were not in vain, but are now being crowned with the glorious fruits ot~ righteousness, which will only be a brighter crown for those who have fallen asleep at their post of duty. THE INDIANS. SCHO~L AND ChURCH WORK AT DUNGINESS. his reputation was good where he had REV. MYRON EELLB, SKOKOMISH, WASHING- previously taught, and he has taken TON TERRITORY. We have an excellent young man at hold of the work among the Indians Dunginess as school-teacher. Although wisely and earnestly, and also satisfac- never met him until he took torily to the Agent and the Indians. charge of the school, I learned that He has earned an excellent reputatiox Our C/iine8e ITe~pers. 121 among the whites in the neighborhood, and has grown in their estimation as a conscientious Christian since he first went there about nine months since. Last summer he was married to a lady whose heart is in the work, and who assists him as she is able. Her health, however, does not admit of her doing as much as she wishes to do. In addition to his day-school for the children, he has lately begun an evening school, three evenings in the week, for half a dozen of the older Indians who wish to learn. These older Indians are accustomed to talk English, more or less, some of them quite well, and hence find it easier to learn than wild Indians would. He holds services regularly with them on the Sabbath, and on Thursday evening a prayer meeting has been sus- tained since last May ; the only one in the county. The last Sabbath I spent with them, I baptized two of the older Indians and received them into our churchthe first-fruits of our work there. I have been tolerably well satisfied for a year that they were suitable candidates for church membership, but preferred to wait until our teacher could become thoroughly acquainted with them, as I thought that he could form a more intelligent opinion after almost daily in- tercourse with them, than I could by semi-annual visits. But we agree in our conclusion. Last Sabbath we had the privilege of receiving another of our school-boys inte our church here. He is one of our older pupils, an elder brother of one already a member. The report of our Sabbath-school for this place, read on Christmas, showed that three Indian girls had been present every Sabbath on which there was school during the year, it having been necessarily omitted on three Sabbaths, and on every one of these Sabbaths they had recited at least six verses of the Scripture lesson, and without making a single mistake. This is better than has ever been done before in the history of the school, only one having been perfect last year. The average attend- ance during the year has been fifty- seven. THE CHINESE. CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION. Auxiliary to the American Missionary Association. PRESIDENT: Rev. J. K. McLean, D. I). VICE-PRESIDENTS: Rev. A. L. Stone, D. D., Thomas c. Wedderspoon, Esq., Rev. T. K. Noble, Hon. F. F. Low, Rev. I. E. Dwinell, D. D., Hon. Samuel Cross, Rev. S. H. willey, D. D., Edward P. Flint, Esq., Rev. J. Vt. Hough, D. D., Jacob S. Taber, Fsq. DIREcTORS: Rev. George Mooar, D. D., Hon. E D. Sawyer, Rev. E. P. Baker, James H. Raven,. Isq., Rev. Joseph Rowell. Rev. John Kimball, E. P. Sanford, Esq. SEcRETARY: Rev. w. C. Pond. TREASURER: E. Palache, Esq. OUR CHINESE HELPERS. REv. wM. c. POND, SAN FRANCISCO. I am trying to contrive how, while keeping within our limited means, to increase our force of Chinese helpers. I am sure that with reference to imme- diate results, these who know by ex- perience the darkness of heathenism, who have themselves trodden the path out of that darkness into the light of Christ, are better fitted to lead others along the same path than we could pos- sibly be, even though we had their lan- guage at our tongues end. But it is not easy to provide for these helpers the things needed for their best ef- ficiency. They ought to be entirely supported by us, so as to give their whole time to study and to Christian work; and they need special teachers,

Rev. Wm. C. Pond Pond, Wm. C., Rev. Our Chinese Helpers The Chinese 121-123

Our C/iine8e ITe~pers. 121 among the whites in the neighborhood, and has grown in their estimation as a conscientious Christian since he first went there about nine months since. Last summer he was married to a lady whose heart is in the work, and who assists him as she is able. Her health, however, does not admit of her doing as much as she wishes to do. In addition to his day-school for the children, he has lately begun an evening school, three evenings in the week, for half a dozen of the older Indians who wish to learn. These older Indians are accustomed to talk English, more or less, some of them quite well, and hence find it easier to learn than wild Indians would. He holds services regularly with them on the Sabbath, and on Thursday evening a prayer meeting has been sus- tained since last May ; the only one in the county. The last Sabbath I spent with them, I baptized two of the older Indians and received them into our churchthe first-fruits of our work there. I have been tolerably well satisfied for a year that they were suitable candidates for church membership, but preferred to wait until our teacher could become thoroughly acquainted with them, as I thought that he could form a more intelligent opinion after almost daily in- tercourse with them, than I could by semi-annual visits. But we agree in our conclusion. Last Sabbath we had the privilege of receiving another of our school-boys inte our church here. He is one of our older pupils, an elder brother of one already a member. The report of our Sabbath-school for this place, read on Christmas, showed that three Indian girls had been present every Sabbath on which there was school during the year, it having been necessarily omitted on three Sabbaths, and on every one of these Sabbaths they had recited at least six verses of the Scripture lesson, and without making a single mistake. This is better than has ever been done before in the history of the school, only one having been perfect last year. The average attend- ance during the year has been fifty- seven. THE CHINESE. CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION. Auxiliary to the American Missionary Association. PRESIDENT: Rev. J. K. McLean, D. I). VICE-PRESIDENTS: Rev. A. L. Stone, D. D., Thomas c. Wedderspoon, Esq., Rev. T. K. Noble, Hon. F. F. Low, Rev. I. E. Dwinell, D. D., Hon. Samuel Cross, Rev. S. H. willey, D. D., Edward P. Flint, Esq., Rev. J. Vt. Hough, D. D., Jacob S. Taber, Fsq. DIREcTORS: Rev. George Mooar, D. D., Hon. E D. Sawyer, Rev. E. P. Baker, James H. Raven,. Isq., Rev. Joseph Rowell. Rev. John Kimball, E. P. Sanford, Esq. SEcRETARY: Rev. w. C. Pond. TREASURER: E. Palache, Esq. OUR CHINESE HELPERS. REv. wM. c. POND, SAN FRANCISCO. I am trying to contrive how, while keeping within our limited means, to increase our force of Chinese helpers. I am sure that with reference to imme- diate results, these who know by ex- perience the darkness of heathenism, who have themselves trodden the path out of that darkness into the light of Christ, are better fitted to lead others along the same path than we could pos- sibly be, even though we had their lan- guage at our tongues end. But it is not easy to provide for these helpers the things needed for their best ef- ficiency. They ought to be entirely supported by us, so as to give their whole time to study and to Christian work; and they need special teachers, 122 Our Chinese ilelpers. since they cannot be taught in school- hours. First of all, they ought to study the Bible, and learn how to interpret it; but should add to this, constant atten- tion to our language, and to the rudi- ments of geography, astronomy, and history. I have ventured thus far to appoint only five: Wong Sam and Chung Ying for schools in this city, Jee Gain for Oakland, Lee Haim for Sacramento, and Hong Sing for Peta- luma. Besides these, there are many volunteer helpers who, in the schools, in the Association, in the Bible and prayer meetings, instant in season and out of season, bear their testi- mony, and do whatever work they can; for most of our Chinese Christians, I rejoice to say it, are witnesses and workers for their Lord. Readers of the MIssIONARY have heard from Jee Gain and Wong Sam several times heretofore. Hong Sing is the one last added to our list ;for five years a Christian, and during most of that time the leader among the pupils in our Beth- any school, and my interpreter when I spoke to them. He understands Eng- lish well; talks it quite easily and intel- ligibly; but when he comes to write it, like most of our brethren, he gets it twisted badly. The idioms of his na- tive tongue are very unlike ours. He went to Petaluma, expecting, for the most part, to support himself as a house- servant, accepting, however, low wages in consideration of having time for mis- sionary work; but he found that the house-work crowded the Lords work so hard that he seemed to be accomplish- ing little, and was almost discouraged. He wrote, a month ago, as follows: I write a few words to let you know that I have a place and been working a few days; but not a steady work, because that man was sick; so I take his place till he get well. It is pretty hard to get a place. And I tell you about the school. It is very small. Evening I be present at 5 oclock and explain to them. After school close I take fifteen minutes for Bible lesson. I try to explain to them as I can. I thought I come back to San Francisco, but I will wait a little longer, as much our people here [many of our people are here], but most all like gambling. I do not know what is the matter, they wont come. I heard somebody say, because they have been learning for awhile, and not understand the words what it meant; so they dont come any more. I hope soon to have time to go out to ask come again. I am very sorry and expends [since you expend] so much for the school. It seems to be sow, having no reap [seed-sowing, but no harvest]. Yet my sheep hear my voice. We must try to do the best way. He conclud- ed that the best way was to abandon everything else and give himself to mission work, asking onlysince we could afford nothing morethat we pay the cost of his board; and it is on that basis he is working now. From one of the letters of Lee Haim, from Sacramento, I give the following extract: Now I will tell you the TRIAL5 OF WONG THONG by his father. He has been a member of our Association four weeks. Three weeks ago his father came into our Asso- ciation rooms to find out who leads his son to be a member of our Association. I made reply to him, It is L Then he answered me unpleasantly, andfr said he do not know the regulations of our Christian Association ; but only he knows, whoever believes in Christ Jesus, they dont want to worship or serve their own fathers from generation to genera- tion. That is very bad. And disobey the parents. Then I ask him: Would you rather your son to serve you or take care of you in your lifetime, or rather to have your sons worship when you died? I perceive that you would rather your son serve you personally. Nobody needs to be worshipped after death. Then he said he would not converse with me. Ji?eceipt8. 123 Then I said, Well, sir, please to hear me in these few words: Every one ought to be punished by God who did not put their trust in Him, and also transgressed the commandment of God by their tradition. For God has com- manded: Honor thy father and mother. And another thing: God commanded us not to worship any false gods. But our fathers, from generation to generation, did not do as God commanded. For that fact we are in great fear of God. So we are turned from the bad thing which we did before, and now are trans- formed by the renewing of the mind. Then he felt very bad at my words, and departed from me immediately. On Friday, after Wong Thong was dis- missed from school and went back to his old home, then his father chased him with a hatchet, attempting to kill him, for his father disliked him to become a Christian. But Wong Thongs heart never be fail, I think the Lord God Je- sus Christ is near to protect those who will put their trust in Him. OUR SAN FRANCI5CO ANNIVERSARY was held last Sunday evening, February 16th. The Pacific has the following no- tice of it: At Bethany Church, last Sunday evening, the fifth anniversary of the Chinese Sunday-schools and Mission schools connected with that church was celebrated. It was an occasion of rare interest. yearly one hundred Chinese were present, and forty-two took part in the exercises. These consisted of reci- tations of Scripture and other religious selections, short original addresses, sev- eral dialogues, and the singing of hymns in English and Chinese. A quartet of Chinese sung in English with a distinct- ness of utterance and harmony which some choirs composed of persons to the manner born might profitably imi- tate. But the best and highest joy con- nected with the occasion lay in the con- fident hope that almost all these Chi- nese had passed from death unto life from the selfish and slavish worship of demons to a loving loyalty to the true God. It illustrates the fact that, in spite of adverse prejudices and public senti- ments, men brought face to face with a good work cannot refuse it the tribute of their appreciation and sympathy; that our new church has never been so full since its dedication as on that evening; and that, after two of the brief original addresses, the applause, though discoun- tenanced, was irrepressible. I had proposed to write a thought or two about recent anti-Chinese legisla- tion; but I fear I have trespassed too much on your space already; and I am sure that if Congress and the country can bear the sin and shame such laws involve, our work can bear whatever of hindrance it may bring to us. It isnt the first time that King Canute has tried by his royal chair to breast a rising tide; but I have been slow to think such folly was reserved for my own country and this nineteenth century after Christ. RECEIPTS FOR FEBRUAR~T, 1879. MAINE, $223.90. NEW HAMPSHIRE, $1,174.67. Augusta. Cong. Ch. and Soc. $27.50; Bedford. Presbyterian Church,for Wilming. $10 $37.50 ton, N. C $11.60 Bath. Cash 100.00 Brookline. Cong. Cli. and Soc 15.96 Fa~moutb. Second Cong. Ch. and Soc 7.40 Center Harbor. Cong. Ch. and Soc 17.61 Hampden. H. S. and J. L 1.00 Colebrook. E. C. $1.; 3. A. H. 50c 1.50 Limington. Cong. Oh. and Soc 6.00 Concord. South Cong. Ch. and Soc. $38.94; Newport. M. S. N 1.00 W. H. Pitman, $2 for Mencli .31 40.94 Norridgewock. S. 13. and J. S. B 1.00 Hinsdale. Cong. Cli. and Soc 9.15 North Bridgton. Cong. Oh. and Soc 5.00 Hilisborough Bridge. J. 13., Mrs. J. G., Mrs. Orland. Mrs. Bnck and daughter 30.00 E. T., and Mrs. D. XV. $1. ea 4.00 Scarborough. A Friend 30.00 Hillsborough Centre. John Adams, $5 0. Winthrop. C. Fairbanks 3.00 C. ~1 6.00

Receipts for February, 1879 123-128

Ji?eceipt8. 123 Then I said, Well, sir, please to hear me in these few words: Every one ought to be punished by God who did not put their trust in Him, and also transgressed the commandment of God by their tradition. For God has com- manded: Honor thy father and mother. And another thing: God commanded us not to worship any false gods. But our fathers, from generation to generation, did not do as God commanded. For that fact we are in great fear of God. So we are turned from the bad thing which we did before, and now are trans- formed by the renewing of the mind. Then he felt very bad at my words, and departed from me immediately. On Friday, after Wong Thong was dis- missed from school and went back to his old home, then his father chased him with a hatchet, attempting to kill him, for his father disliked him to become a Christian. But Wong Thongs heart never be fail, I think the Lord God Je- sus Christ is near to protect those who will put their trust in Him. OUR SAN FRANCI5CO ANNIVERSARY was held last Sunday evening, February 16th. The Pacific has the following no- tice of it: At Bethany Church, last Sunday evening, the fifth anniversary of the Chinese Sunday-schools and Mission schools connected with that church was celebrated. It was an occasion of rare interest. yearly one hundred Chinese were present, and forty-two took part in the exercises. These consisted of reci- tations of Scripture and other religious selections, short original addresses, sev- eral dialogues, and the singing of hymns in English and Chinese. A quartet of Chinese sung in English with a distinct- ness of utterance and harmony which some choirs composed of persons to the manner born might profitably imi- tate. But the best and highest joy con- nected with the occasion lay in the con- fident hope that almost all these Chi- nese had passed from death unto life from the selfish and slavish worship of demons to a loving loyalty to the true God. It illustrates the fact that, in spite of adverse prejudices and public senti- ments, men brought face to face with a good work cannot refuse it the tribute of their appreciation and sympathy; that our new church has never been so full since its dedication as on that evening; and that, after two of the brief original addresses, the applause, though discoun- tenanced, was irrepressible. I had proposed to write a thought or two about recent anti-Chinese legisla- tion; but I fear I have trespassed too much on your space already; and I am sure that if Congress and the country can bear the sin and shame such laws involve, our work can bear whatever of hindrance it may bring to us. It isnt the first time that King Canute has tried by his royal chair to breast a rising tide; but I have been slow to think such folly was reserved for my own country and this nineteenth century after Christ. RECEIPTS FOR FEBRUAR~T, 1879. MAINE, $223.90. NEW HAMPSHIRE, $1,174.67. Augusta. Cong. Ch. and Soc. $27.50; Bedford. Presbyterian Church,for Wilming. $10 $37.50 ton, N. C $11.60 Bath. Cash 100.00 Brookline. Cong. Cli. and Soc 15.96 Fa~moutb. Second Cong. Ch. and Soc 7.40 Center Harbor. Cong. Ch. and Soc 17.61 Hampden. H. S. and J. L 1.00 Colebrook. E. C. $1.; 3. A. H. 50c 1.50 Limington. Cong. Oh. and Soc 6.00 Concord. South Cong. Ch. and Soc. $38.94; Newport. M. S. N 1.00 W. H. Pitman, $2 for Mencli .31 40.94 Norridgewock. S. 13. and J. S. B 1.00 Hinsdale. Cong. Cli. and Soc 9.15 North Bridgton. Cong. Oh. and Soc 5.00 Hilisborough Bridge. J. 13., Mrs. J. G., Mrs. Orland. Mrs. Bnck and daughter 30.00 E. T., and Mrs. D. XV. $1. ea 4.00 Scarborough. A Friend 30.00 Hillsborough Centre. John Adams, $5 0. Winthrop. C. Fairbanks 3.00 C. ~1 6.00 124 ..Recezpt8. Keene. Sec. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $50.; A Friend, $56.24; Mrs. N. B. C., SOc. Mrs. E.A.W.,25c $16699 Manchrster. First Cong. Ch. and Soc., $59.99;Ladies of First Cong. Cli., lilt of C. for Talladega, Ala 59 99 New Ipewich. Cong. Ch. and Soc., $4.69; Lad.bs of Cong. Cli., box of C. and $2 f~r freight; Mrs. Dr. G., $1 7 69 Orford. Cong. Oh. and Soc 18 Of, Pal tam. Friend . 15 (0 Iiindge. Cong. Oh. and Soc., $4.14; H. B. W.. 35c 449 Sullivan. Cong. Cli. and Soc 8 00 Swauzey. Cong. Cli. and Soc 12 00 Temp a. Cong. Sab. 5db 14 00 Walpole. Cong. Cli. and Soc 13 00 Wilton. A. B. C 50 A Friend 803 25 Gao. Cook 5 00 VERMONT, $208.46. I3arre. Cong. Cli. and Soc Bennington. Second Cong. Oh Berlin. Cong. Cli. and Soc Burlington. First Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db Cambridge. A few Ladies, Box of C., by Mrs. Madison Safford; Cong. Cli., Com- munion Set Castletou. Cong. Cli. and Soc. $16.10; Mrs. L. G. S. $1 East Poultusy. A. D. Wilcox Fayetteville. A. Birchard, $5; Mrs. L. C. C. and Mrs. A. E. K. H. $1 Nortlifield. Cong. Cli. and Soc Pittsfield. Cong. Cli Qoechee. Cong. Sal. 5db Waitefield. Cong. Cli. and Soc West Brattleboro. Mrs. F. Gaines Weston. Mrs. C. W. Sprague, $2; Lucy P. Bartlett, $2 15 33 66 62 3 61 50 00 17 10 5 00 6 00 14 26 5 00 13 04 50 5 00 4 00 MASSACHUSETTS, $977.42 Abington. Mrs. S. B. F 1 00 Acton. Mrs. H. C. L. for .Student Aid, At- lanta U 1 00 Andover. Misses McKeen, for ,Student Aid, Atlanta U 2 00 Ashdeld. Mrs. G B. Hall 5 00 Anbucndale. Cong. Sab. 5db., $28.75, for Tougalo;Mrs. D. W. Scott, $5; Mrs. B. W. Scott and Fiends, libi. of C. for Student Aid, Tougaloe U 33 75 Barnstable Co. A Friend 20 Ott Bedford. M. B. R 50 Beecliw od. Cong. Cli. and Soc 1 43 Belchertown. D. B. B 50 Billerica. H. B. S 1 00 Boston Highlands. E. E. B 1 00 Braintree. J. M. L 12 Cambridgeport. Mrs. L. D. C 1 00 Campello. Cong. Cli. and Soc 104 65 Cliarlestown. Winthrop Cong. Cli 66 11 Danvers. First Cong. Cli. $6.25, and 10 blils. apples,for Atlanta, Ga 6 25 Harvard. Mrs. C. S 50 Jlavedhull. R.S.C 50 Holbrook. Miss Sarah J. Holbrook, for Stad eat Aid, Tougatoo U 25 00 Hyde Park. Cong. Sal. Sch., for Student Aid. Hampton Inst 70 00 Lowell. L. Kimball, $25; H. M. Hcnt, $5.. 30 00 Milibury. First Cong. Cli. Sal. Sch.. for Student Aid, Atlanta U 25 00 Millord. Mrs. B. H 50 Middletown. Mrs. S. Fuller, 3 IbIs, apples.; Mrs. XV. W. Fuller, 2 bIls. apples, for Atlanta Ga. Natick 10 Nortliampion. A Friend 100 00 (taiham. Cong. Cli. and Soc 65 011 Reading. A Friend 2 00 Rockland. Cong. Cli. $50 for Missionary Work;Elljah Shaw, $20 70 00 Balem. J.H.T so Sharon. Cong. Cli. and Soc $12 00 Soutli Boston. Miss J. A 50 Soutbbridge. A Friend 3 00 South Deerfield. Mrs. Mary C. Tilton 2 00 Springfield. South Cli., B. M. P., $10; Mrs. R. K., $1 11 00 Sunderland. Dorcas Soc., blI. of C. for At- lanta, Ga. TopsOdd. Ladies of Cong. Cli., box of C. Watertown. Mite Box, $2.50; Mrs. B. S. P., 60c 3 10 Webster. Rev. B. F. P 50 Westborongli. Evan. Cong. Cli. and Soc., $119.63; Freedmans Mission Asan, Ill. of C 119 63 West Cummingion. Rev. J. B. B 50 West Madway. Cong. Cli. and Soc 27 87 Westminster. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 67 00 West Newton. J. H. P 60 West Stockb,ridge. Geo. W. Kniffin 10 00 Whitinsyilla. Cong. Sal. 5db 28 00 Williamstown. Bey. Mark Hopkins, D. B 5 00 Winchendon. Atlanta Soc., Ill. of C., for Atlanta, Ga. Worcester. Union Cli., $60.29; M. F. W., $1; G. M. P., 50c 61 79 Wrentham. J. M. P 66 RHODE ISLAND, $32.09. Newport. Rev. T. Thayer. 10 00 Providence. Chavles St. Cong. Sal. Sch.... 22 0 CONNECTICUT, $2,292.90. Bozrah. Miss H. Maples. $5; SA., $1 609 Bristol. Cong. Oh., to coust. JOHN A. WAY, MILEs L. PECK, and W. H. 14ETTLETON, L.M.s 9426 Collinsyille. Cong. Cli. and Soc 28 ItO Cornwall Bridge. Geo. H. Swift 10 00 Cromwell. Mrs. S. Topliff 511, Derby. First Cong. Cli 25 00 Greenville. Cong. Sal. Sch.,fos Student Aid, Atlanta U 31 95 Haddam Neck. Cong. Cli 2 69 Badlyme. R. B Hungerford. $50; Jos. W. Hongarford, $50 100 09 Hartford. Mrs. Lawson B. Bidwell, $30, to const. SAMUEL NOTY, L. M.; Mrs. P. John. son (of which $1 for Mendi M.), $1.50 31 50 Huntington. Cong. Cli. and Friends. 7 50 Kensington. Mrs. M. Hotchkiss 10 50 Litchfield. First Cong. Cli 17 96 Meriden. The Chas. Parker Co., 9 dos. tea- spoons and 6 dos. forks, for Atlanta, Ga. Middletown. ESTATE of Mrs. Anna H. Phil lips. ly J. M. Hubbard 300 00 Naugatuck. Cong. Cli 130 09 New Baven A Lady Friend, $5; A Friend, $5; M. N., $1; Rev. S. W. Bar. num, 6 copies Romanism As It Is .... 11 00 New Milbrd. Miss Susie F. Nattlaton, $5; Mrs. F. G. B., SOc 5 50 Norwich. Park Cli. (of which $30 from Mrs. Clias. Lee, to coust. Rzv. LEONARD W. BACON, L. M., and $30 from Miss S. H. Lee, to consi. EDWARD T. CLAP?, L. M.).. 694 76 Norwich. Broadway Cong. Cli. adlI, $250; Bnckinaham Sal. Sch., $20; Second Cong. Cli., $128.22; S. H., $1 399 22 Norwich Town. Samuel Case 10 00 Old Lyme. Miss B. M. P 1 09 Plymouth. Cong. Sal. 5db., for College Farm. Talladega, Ata 100 oo Prospect. B. B. Brown...... 10 00 Stamford. J. A. Bcckwell, M. D., for Stu- dent Aid, Atlanta U 20 00 Stanwich. William Brush 100 50 Thomaston. Cong. Oh 27 37 Unionville. First Cong. Oh., for Talladega C 3673 Wapping. Second Cong. Cli 20 26 Washington. Cong. Cli 14 65 ~Vest Haven. Cong. Cli 20 61 Windsor Locks. Mrs. L. P. Dexter 6 00 Winsted. Dr. Lyman Case 10 00 XVoodbu.ry. Mrs. H. L. Curtis 10 00 Receipts. NEW YORK, $454.16. Black Creek. Cong. Cli. $1; Miss M. T. $1. $2 00 Big Hollow. Nelson Hitchcock 5 00 Brooktyn. Mrs. Lewis Edwards, two vain. able quilts. Brooklyn, E. D. David B. Nicholson 15 00 Cambria Center. Coug. Cli ........... . 1500 Canast ta. E. B. Northrup, $5; R. H. and Mrs. R. H. Childs, $5 10 00 Clear Creek. Cong. Cli 3 50 Eagle Harbor. A. P 30 East Palmyra. Mrs. Laura E Dada, for Student Aid 5 00 Ellington. Cong. Cli. $9.08; and Sab. Sch. $8.02 17 10 Fredonia. Mrs. Sarah B. Chandler 5 00 Greenville. Mrs. H. M. Wakeley 5 00 Griffins lUlls. Dea. Henry Moore 15 00 Hamilton. Cong. Cli 10 75 Harlem. Cong. Cli. ( of which $10 from W. XV. Ferrier, for Stud~nt Aid, Atlanta a Taliadega Cells.), $:35.6i; Cong. Sab. Sch. $10 45 64 Havanna. J. F. P 1 00 Limo. Delia A. Phillips 25 00 Moravia. First Cong. Cli 11 92 MotLs Corners. Cong. Cli 2 06 New York. S T. Gordon, $100; Miss P. T. Magie, $5 ;Meriden Cntlery Co., 4 doz. Knivesfor Atlanta, Ga 105 00 Norwich. Cong. Cli and Soc . 12 00 North Winfield. Miss E. J. Alexander, for a Teacher 10 00 Otisco Valley. ESTATE of Mrs. Olive S. Fris- bie, by I. F. Frisbie 50 00 Patchogne. Cong Cli 17 06 Perry Centre. I. M 1 00 Plattsburgh. G. W. Dodds 5 00 Rochester. Mrs. A. E. Aloright 5 00 Syracuse. An Old ~riend 10 00 Union Falls. Francis E. Duncan, $10.10; Mrs. FannyD. Duncan, $5 15 10 Verona. Cong Cli 1923 Walton. Chas. S. Fitch.for Mendi M 5 00 Weatmoreland. A. S. B Si, Whitestuwn. James Symonds 6 00 NEW JERSEY, $20.76. Bound Brook. Ladies of Cong, Ch., for Tougaloo Colts Neck. Reformed Cli Millstone. Mrs. J. F. C Hearts Content. A Friend, libi. of C... Trenton. Mrs. E. B. F PENNSYLVANIA, $46.00. Minersville. First Welsh Cong. Cli Philadelpliia. S. A. J Pittsburgh. Third Pies. Sab. 5db., for Ste.. dent Aid, Tailadega C Troy. C. C. Paine OHIO, $367.38. Bellevue. J. S Belpre. Cong. Sab. Sch Bucyrus and Sulphur Springs. Friends, box of Sundries,for Tougsloo U. Burton. Mrs. H. H. F. and Mrs. H. F Cincinnati. Rent, for the poor in New Or- leans. La Cleveland. Rev. H. Trautman Delaware. Win. Bevan Greenwich Station. Win. M. Mead Huntsburgh. Cong. Sob. 5db., for Student Aid. Toug lon U Jefferson. Friends, box of Sundries, for Tougalon U. Lenox. A. J. Holman Madison Mrs. H. H. Roe and others, $35, for Tougaloo; Cong. Sab. 5db., $3, for SI udent Aid, Tougaloo U Medina. Ladies Benev. Soc., for Student Aid, Tnugaloo U Metamora. Mrs. M. S 125 Napoleon. Mrs. N. B. P $1 00 North Benton. M. J. H 1 00 Oak Hill. Cong. Cli. and Soc. 6 12 Oberlin. ESTATE of Miss Mary J. Hulburd, by Hiram Hulliurd, Ex 32 00 Oberlin. Second Cong. Cli., $19.42; Mrs. C. C.W,Slc.; R.M.K., $1 2093 Patnesville. Ladies Sew. Soc of Cong. Cli., by Stella H. Avery, Treas 25 00 Ravenna. S. H 1 00 Ripley. Mrs. Mary Tweed 2 50 Rock Creek. L. C 50 Sendusky. First Con. Cli., $78.43, to coost. LEwcs Moss and E. E. Urn, L. Ms. ;by Rev. J. Strong, $5 83 43 Saybrook. Friends, for .~tudent Aid, Tougaioo, U 7 00 South 5 1cm. Daniel S. Pricer, $2; Presb. Sab. 5db., $1 10; Miss M. M., $1; Mrs. M. 8., $1 5 10 Steubenville. Womens Miss. Soc. of First Cong. Cli., by M. J. Leslie, Treas. 10 00 Toledo. Mrs. M. A. Harringion, $5;Mary R. Pomeroy. for Student Aid, Atlanta U., $3;Mrs. P. G. H., $1 9 00 Wayne. David Parker 5 00 Weymontli. Cong. Cli., for Student Aid, Tougatoo U 2 24 West Mill Grove. Rev. S. S. H 76 INDIANA, 24c. Pntnamvtlle. B. H 24 ILLINOIS, $184.38. Chicago. Union Park Cli 33 07 Delavan. R. Hodgton 6 50 Elgin. Cong. Cli 6 24 Evanston, Cong. Cli 14 06 Galesburg. J. G. W 1 00 Geneseo. Cong. Cli 64 51 Geneva. A Friend, 6 00 Hamlet. L. C 1 00 Lisbon. G. K 60 Port Byron. Ladies, Box of C. for Touga.. be U. Roclielle. Mrs. A. C. F 1 00 Rockford. A Friend, $25;Mrs. Pen- field, $l0,for Student Aid, Talladega 6.... 35 00 Rock Island. A Friend, 10 00 Roseville. Cong. Cli 15 50 13 00 Truica. W. B. 50 5 76 Wilmette. Mrs. A. T. S 50 1 00 MICHIGAN, $901.60. 1 00 Adrian. ESTATE of Sarah M. Wolcott, by Win W. Brewster. Ex. (adl) 13 00 Ann Arbor. First Cong. Cli 46 10 10 50 Bliesfield. W. C 60 60 Calnmet. A School Teacher;for Straight U 500 25 00 Detroit. F. MS. SOc.; S. Z. SOc 1 00 10 00 Dowagiac. A Friend, ... 1 10 Hillsdale. M.J 51 Homer. A. K. B 1 00 ~ Joneeville, R B. N. . . 60 ~ ~ Kslamazoo. ESTATE of Mrs. Clarinda B. Saf- ford, by J. B. Cobb, Ex 396 57 Memphis. Ladies Missionary Soc., for 1 00 Lady Missionary, Memphis, Ten 3 00 Olivet. Mon. Con. Cong. Cli 5 92 67 20 Parma. Mrs. M. B. Tanner 3 00 5 00 Ricliland. S. H 1 00 S 00 Saint Johns First Cong. Cli. and Soc., $20; 500 G.V.,SOc 2050 Thetford. ESTATE of Amasa Carrier, by 12 30 Win. C. Mathews 400 00 WISCONSIN, $98.75. 5 00 Braudon. Friends box of C., for Touga- leo U. Cooksville. Cong. Cli 5 00 38 00 Fulton. Cong. Cli 4 00 Menomonee. Cone. Cli. (in part) 5 00 9 00 Oconoinowoc. Cong. Sab. 5db., for Student 1 00 Aid 12 50 126 Receipts. Ripon. J. D $ 75 Salem. Win, Munson 50 00 Union Grove. Dr. Adams 5 00 Windsor. Cong. Sab. Sch 16 50 IOWA, $247.70. Davenport. Capt. E. A. Adams, $5ofor Stu. dent Aid, Talladega C. ;Geo. W. Ells, $11 61 00 Dubuque. ESTATE of Calista C. Rogers, by Dr. R. Clark, Ex 100 00 Dubuque. Cong. Ch 15 00 Eldora. C. McK. Duren 5 00 Grinnell. Prof. B 50 Iowa City. Mrs. E. A. B., $1; Miss H. C., $1; J.T.T.,50c 250 Lyons. Cong. Cli 50 00 Tabor. A. C. G 1 00 Toledo. Mrs. E. N. Barker 5 00 Traer. Little Ones of Cong. Cli., $5; for Student Aid, Fisk U. ;Mrs. C. H. Bissell, Box of C., and $2.7ofor Freight,for Touga.. tooU 770 MINNESOTA, $36.38. East Prairieville. Union Sab. Sch 9 00 Hersey. Cong. Cli 5 60 Leech Lake. Rev. S. G. W., $1; Miss S. B., $1 200 Minneapolis. Plymouth Cli 13 52 Sleepy Eye. Cong. Cli 5 26 Tivoli. L. H 1 00 Spring Valley. Cong. Cli. Quar. Coll., $15 (incorrectly ack. in March number). MISSOURI, $18.75. Kidder. S. C. Coult 5 00 Laclede. E. D. S 1 00 Saint Louis. Mrs. P. Penrose 4 75 Warrensburg. Rent. 8 00 OREGON, $1.00. Forest Grove. J. W. M 1 00 CALIFORNIA, $109.71. Benicia. Mrs. N. P. S 51 Oakland. S. Ricliards 100 00 Santa Barbara. Mrs. H. M. Van Wrinkle... 9 20 MARYLAND, SOc. Baltimore. 50 VIRGINIA, SOc. Farmville. F. N. W 50 TENNESSEE, $428.25. Chattanooga. Rent, $150; Cong. Cli., $2; ladividuals, $2 154 00 Memphis. Le Moyne Sch 109 75 Nashville. Fisk University 164 50 NORTH CAROLINA, $136.12. Raleigh. Washington Sch 33 40 Wilmington. Normal Sch. $99; First Cong. Cli., $3.22 P. J. I., 60c 102 72 SOUTH CAROLINA, $288. Charleston. Avery Inst 288 GO GEORGIA, $1,189.12. Atlanta. Storrs School, $256.60; Atlanta University, $190.50; A Student, Atlanta U. $3 450 10 Brunswick. Risley Scbool,for Mendi 31... 1 00 Macon. Lewis High Sch 50 63 McIntosh. Rev. Josepli E. Smith, far Stu- dent Aid, Atlanta U 50 00 Ogeechee. Miss E. W. D 1 00 Savannah. Beach Inst., $630.14; Cong. Cli., $5.83 636 37 ALABAMA, $212. Childersburg. Rev. A. J., for If endi Al $1 00 Mobile. Emerson Inst 36 00 Montgomery. Public Sch. Fund 175 00 FLORIDA, SOc. Orange City. Mrs. M. D. H 50 LOUISIANA, $110.25. New Orleans. Straight University 110 25 MISSISSIPPI, $47.93. Deasonvile. H. L. B 50 Livingston. Friends, for Tougalno 10 00 Tougalno. Tongalon U.. $27.43. ;Rev. G. S. Pope, $lofor Student Aid 37 43 Total 9,809.13 Total from Oct. 1st to Feb. 28th $65,733.41 H. W. HUBBARD, .Asst Treas. RECEIPTS FOR DEBT. New Haven, Coun. Mrs. Sarah A. Hibbard 10 00 Rockville. Conn. Ladies, by Mrs. H. F. Hyde 25 00 Whutneyville, Coun. Ladies in Cong. Cli. by Elias Dickerman 26 00 Aslibuinham, Mass. Collected by Mrs. E. L. Evans 23 00 Haverhill, Mass. Gyles Merrill and Wife .. 100 00 Campello, Mass. Cong. Cli. and Soc 7 69 Millbury, Mass. Tyler Waters 5 00 North Abington, Mass, Cong. Cli. $7; Mrs. Noah Ford, $3 ... 10 00 West Roxhury, Mass. Rev. Edward Strong 25 00 Griffins Mills, N. F. Dea. Henry Moore 25 00 North Winlield, N. Y. Miss E. J. Alex- ander 10 00 Rochester, N. F. Collected by Mrs. M. P. Porter 17 00 Spencerport, N. Y. Mrs. Upton, $1; Mrs. Jones, $1; Others, $3, by Mrs. I. B. Clark 5 00 Baltimore, Md. Collected by Mrs. Martin Hawley 25 00 Illinois. A Friend, 1,388 58 Olivet, Micli. Win. B. Palmer 500 00 College Springs, Iowa. Cong. Cli 5 00 Iowa. Sales Cf Iowa Mortgages 10,669 51 Skokomieb, Wash. Tar. Rev. Myron Ealls and Wife 25 00 Total 12,801 78 Previously acknowledged in January re ceipts 11,587 19 Total $24 488 97 FOR TILLOTSON COLLEGIATE AND NORMAL INST1TUTE, AUSTIN. TEXAS. Maine, Two Insane Friends of the Freedmen, to const. JA~.SE5 M. PRINCE, L. M $30 00 Springfield, Mass. By Rev. A. Winter 5 17 East Hartford, Coun. Abraham Williams.. 100 00 Meriden, Conn. Mrs. J. R. Yale 10 00 Plainville, Coun. Ezekiel Cowles 5 00 Waterbury, Conn. Charles Benedict 100 00 Palmyra, N. Y. Mrs. MART A. WoonwARn, $50, to conet. herself L. M.; Mrs. HAsuu. Ox H. SEXTON, $30, to const. herself L.M.. 8000 Total 330 17 Previously acknowledged in January re Ceipts 1,297 00 Total $1627 17 (127) 73,620 MORE Si11~er S8~iil~ ladhlilOs Sold 1111878 Than in any previous year. In 1870 1878 we sold 127,833 356,432 Sewing Machines. Our sales have increased enormously every year through the whole period of hard times. We now Sell Three-quarters of all the Sewing Machines sold in the World. For the accommodation of the Public we have 1,500 subordinate offices In the United States and Canada, and 3000 offices in the Old World and South America. PRICES GREATLY REDUCED. Waste no money on cheap counterfeits. Send for our handsomely Illustrated Price List. THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Principal Office, 31 Union Square, New York. Brown Bros. & Co. BANKERS, 69 & 61 Wall Str~t, N~r York, 211 ChosIllilt st,, Phu1ad.~lDhia, 66 ~t8to ~troot, Bostall. Issue Commercial Credits, make Cable transfers of Money between this Country and Eng- land, and buy and sell Bills of Exchange on Great Britain and Ireland. They also issue, against cash deposited, or satisfactory guarantee of repayment, CirCular Or~dits for Tra~Ilers, In DOLLARS for use in the United States and adjacent countries, and in rou~~s STERLING, for use in any part of the world. Established A. D. 1550. EANHATTAN Life Insurance Co.. 156 Broadway, New York, HAS PAID $7,400,000 ci~~r~ - HAS PAID $4,900,000 ~ to HAS A SURPLUS OF OVER $ .L~VUVIJV LIABILITIES By New York Slandard o/ Valuation. It gives the Best insurance on the Best Lives at the most Favorable Rates. HEAMflTE THE PLA1~3 AMD HATES OT THIS COMPA1~Y. HENRY STOKES, PRESIDENT. c. Y. wEMPLE, S. N. STEBBINS, Vice-President. Actuary. H. Y. WEMPLE, J. L. HALSEY, H. B. STOKES, Secretary. Assistant Secretaries. (128) A. S. BARNES & CO. PUBLiSh THE ONLY S6N~7IS fOI{ IIIE Si~N~1L~M. THE HYMN AND TUNE BOOK which stands the test. Revised and enlarged. Prices greatly re- duced. Editions for every want. For Samples (loaned without charge) and Terms address the Publishers. LYMAN ABBOTTS ~ Illustrated and Popular, giving the latest views of the best Biblical Scholars on all disputed points. A concise, strong and faithful Exposition in (8) sighs volumes octavo. AGENTS WANTED IN EVERY LOCALITY. ~ I~!. EDITED BY Rev. J. E. RANKIN, Di). aild Rev. B. S. LORENZ. Endorsed by FRANCIS MURPHY, and used exclusively In his meetings. This is the first practicable Collection of Hymns and Tunes ahonudiug in vigorous Pieces adapted to the Gospel Temperance Movement, it is also the best Book for Church Prayer Meet- ings. Price 35 cii. post-paid, Special Rates by the quantity. DONT FAIL TO EXAMINE AT ONCE. A. S. BA~ES & CO., Publishers, New York and Chicago. The Book of Psalms. AHHAI7GED FOH RESPOIOSIVE IIEADfl~G IN SABBATH SCHOOLS, CHUHOHEI 03 FAMILY WIESHIP. The current verston is strictly followed, the only peculiarity being the arrangement according to the Original Parailelisms, for convenience in responsive reading. Two sizes. Prices: 32mo, Limp Cloth, 30 cIa. per copy, $25 per 100; l6mo, Cloth. 70 cts. per copy,$56per 100. Sent post-paid on receipt of price. TAfl~TO3 BHOTHEIIS, MEHHILL & Cl,, Publishirs, 738 Broadway, New York. Meneely & Kimberly, BELL FOUNDERS, TROY, N. Y. Manufacture a superior quality of Bells. Special attention given to CHURCH BELLS. Al~ Illustrated Catalogues sent free. BUY THE BEST GOODS BOGLE & LYLES, Nos. 87 & 89 Park Place NEW YORK, Dealers in CHOICE CANNED FRUITS VEGETABLES, POTTED MEATS, ETC., Sole Agents for RICHARDSON & RUBBINS Extra Yellow Peaches. DUDLEYS PATENT DIAGONAL ROAD SCRAPER IS THE BEST. Weighs but 10 lbs., has Steel Cutter Plate, can he worked square or at any desired an- gle, and is rapidly superseding all others where It is known. A Few of Many Testlanonials of its Value: Works in rough or smooth ground. No one who has used it will he without it,M. Bartholo- mew & Sons, Goshen, Ct. Select-men of the Town of Litchfield, Ct., say: It is the best Scraper ever invented, end cheerfully recommend tt to all interested in Roads, as calcu- lated m.terially to lessen the expense of making and repairing the same. Is twice as good as you represent it. With same labor will do two or three times as much as any scraper I ever sa~. Answers our fullest expecta- tions.H. TucKER, of Rockville. Leaves a road in better shape, and is easier for man and team than any scraper I ever saw. ~~J S. KInNEY, Washington. Send for circular. S. H. DUDLEY, Bantam Falls, Litchfield County, Ct. SABBATH READINCE A weekly paper composed of matter of a bach order of excellence and interest, and wholly suitable for perusal on the Sabbath-day. 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The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 5 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York May 1879 0033 005
The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 5, miscellaneous front pages 128A-128B

VOL. XXXIII. No. 5. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. To the Poor the Gospel is Preached. 0 -4 MAY, 18~. CONTENT ~ EDITORIAL. PARAGRAPHS 129 THE LANDITS WEALTH AND ITS WANT 130 WAR OH MISSIONS 132 THE NEGRO HEGIRA 133 WOMANS WORK FOR WOMANCONGREGA TIONALISM IN THE SOUTH 135 ITEMS FROM THE FIELD 137 GENERAL NOTES 138 THE FREEDMEN. TOUR INTO THE SOUTHWEST: Rev. J. E. Roy, D.D 140 GEORGIA, ATLANTALady Missionsry Need- Gd 143 ALABAMA, MONTGOMEHYTeflafltry, Promis- ing Field, & c. : Rev. F. Bascom, D. P 143 ALABAMA, MOBILEEmerSon Inst,it1.~e: Rev. D. L. Hickok 145 MARIONRevival of Education; Rev. Geo. H. Hill 146 LOUISIANAStraight University: Prof. J. K. Cole 147 TEKASCORPUS CHRISTIRevival 148 TENNESSEEYellow Fever Fund 149 AFRICA. NATIVE PREACHERS ADVANCE CALLED, & C.. 150 THE CHINESE. SOME POINTS ON THE CHINESE QUEsTloN: Rev. W. C. Pond 151 RECEIPTS 153 CONSTITUTION 157 WORE, STATISTICS, WANTS & C loS 1~YEW Yorni. Roo~is, 56 READE STREET. Price, 50 Cents a Year, in advance~ 56 REAIYE STRE~ET, N. X~. PRESIDENT. HON. E. S. TOI3EY, Boston. VICE-PRESIDENTS. Hon. F. D. PARISH, Ohio. Hon. E. D. HOLTON, Wis. Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, Mass. Rev. STEPHEN THURSTON, D. Ii)., Me. Rev. SAMUEL HARRIS, D. D., Ct. WM. C. CHAPIN, Esq., R. 1. Rev. W. T. EUSTIS, D. Th, Mass. Hon. A. C. BARSTOW, R. I. Rev. THATCHER THAYER, D. D., R. I. Rev. RAY PALMER, D. D., N. Y. Rev. J. N. STURTEVANT, D. D., 111. Rev. W. XV. PATTON, D. D., D. C. Hon. SEYMOUR STRAIGHT, La. HORACE HALLOCK, Esq., MiCh. Rev. CYRUS W. WALLACE, D. D., N. H. Rev. EDWARD HAWES, Ct. DOUGLAS PUTNAM, Esq., Ohio. Hon. THADDEUS FAIRBANKS, Vt. SAMUEL D. PORTER, Esq., N. Y. Rev. N. N. G. DANA, D. D., Miun. Rev. H. W. BEECHER, N. Y. Gen. 0. 0. ~OWARD, Oregon. Rev. G. F. MAGOUN, D. D., Iowa. Col. C. G. HAMMOND, Ill. EDWARD SPAULDING, N. D., N. H. DAVID RIPLEY, Esq., N. J. Rev. WM. M. BARBOUR, D. D., Ct. Rev. W. L. GAGE, Ct. A. S. HATCH, Esq., N. V. Rev. J. H. FAIRCHILD, D. D., Ohio. Rev. H. A. STIMSON, Miun. Rev. J. W. STRONG, D. D., Minn. Rev. GEORGE THACHER, LL. D., Iowa. Rev. A. L. STONE, D. D., California. Rev. G. H. ATKINSON, D. D., Oregon. Rev. J. E. RANKIN, D. D., D. C. Rev. A. L. CHAPIN, D. D., Wis. S. D. SMITH, Esq., Mass. PETER SMITH, Esq., Mass. Dea. JOHN C. WHITIN, Mass. Rev. WM. PATTON, D. D., Ct. Hon. J. B. GRINNELL, Iowa. Rev. WM. T. CARR, Ct. Rev. hORACE WINSLOW, Ct. Sir PETER COATS, Scotland. Rev. hENRy ALLON, D. D., London, En WM. E. WHITING, Esq., N. V. J. M. PINKERTON, Esq., Mass. Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D. D., Ct. DANIEL HAND, Esq., Ct. A. L. WILLISToN, Esq., Mass. Rev. A. F. BEARD, D. D., N. V. FREDERICK BILLINGS, Esq., Vt. JOSEPH CARPENTER, Esq., R. I. CORRESPONDI G SECRETARY. REV. M. E. STRIEBY, D. D., 56 Reade Street, A. Y. DISTRICT SECRETARIES. REV. C. L. XVOODWORTH, Boston. REV. G. D. PIKE, New York. REV. JAS. POWELL, ChiCogo. EDGAR KETCHUM, ESQ., Theasurer, N. Y. H. XV. HUBBARD. ESQ., Assistnnt Treosurer, A. Y REV. N. E. STRIEBY, ReCording Secretery. ALONZO S. BALL, A. S. BARNES, EDWARD BEECHER, GEO. N. BOYNTON, War. B. BROWN, EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. CLINTON B. FISK, ADDISON P. FOSTER, E. A. GRAVES, S~ B. HALLIDAY, SAML HOLMES, S. S. JOCELYN, ANDREW LeSTER CHAS. L. HEAD, JOHN H. WASHBUIIN G. B. WILLCOX. COMMUNICATIONS relating to the business of the Association may be addressed to either of the Secretaries as above; letters for the Editor of the American Missionary to Rev. Gee. N. Boynton, at the New York Office. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS should be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Asst Treasurer, No. 56 Reade Street, New York, or when more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational House, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street, Chicar,o, Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a Lffe Member. Correspondents are specially requested to place at the hCad of each letter the name of their Post Ol~ce, and the County and State in which it is located.

Paragraphs Editorial 129-130

THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL. XXXIII MAY, 1879. No. 5. ~meric~tn ~i$~io flRV~ We wish to remind our readers that the offer of Mr. Arthington, as it has come under our consideration by the report of the Foreign Committee, and as it has been put before them by its publication in the MIssIoNARY for April, is still commended to their consideration, and open to acceptance or declinature, as they may decide. We are well aware that such great things are not to be lightly or suddenly decided. It is a subject which demands careful weighing, and all the light which may be gained from earthly as well as from heavenly sources. The first offer was not made suddenly or unadvisedly. Dr. 0. II. White, of the Freedmens Aid Society of England, writes us that he conversed with Mr. Arthington about it more than a year ago, who said then, I will think of it, and you rray earnestly that Rob- ert Arthington may be led to a right decision. We can say nothing better now. Do you, friends, think about it, and we will pray earnestly that you may be led to a right decision. We have just received from the est~te of the late Charles Avery, of Pittsburgh, Pa., $12,000 as an endowment, the interest to be used in the work of African evan- gelization. As the money has just come to hand as we are going to press, there has been no opportunity for action on the part of the Executive Committee as to its specific appropriation. It may be deemed advisable to use it in furtherance of the mission proposed to us by Mr. Arthington, of Leeds England. In behalf of Africa and her descendants on two continents, we cannot forbear another tribute to the memory of Mr. Avery, and to his executors who have so faithfully carried out his benevolent wishes. Rev. W. H. Willcox, of Reading, Mass., and his brother, Rev. G. B. Willcox, D.D., of Stamford, Conn., have returned from a tour among our institutions of the South, in which they have been accompanied by District Secretary Pike. It is with no small degree of pleasure that we record their great satisfaction in what they saw and their hearty approval of the work, and the proof they have given of their sincerity in it. It is well known that Mr. Willcox has been acting in behalf of Mrs. Daniel P. Stone, of Malden, Mass., in the distribution of a large fund among the educational institutions of our land. As a result of his observation of the work done at Atlanta and Fisk Universities, he has appropriated one hundred 130 The LandIts Wealth and its Want. thousand dollars to be divided equally between these two institutions. This af- fords aid, which is greatly needed, for the enlargement of the work at these most important places. It will go into buildings and other permanent equipment. We devoutly wish that men and women who have money to give would go and do likewise,visit our institutions for the education of the Freedmen, see the work which is being done, and the work which needs to be done, and then act in the light they have gained from actual observation. Rev. B. C. Church, of Goliad, Texas, who has been long and faithfully occu- pied in our service, needs a l~uggy, not for pleasure-driving, we assure our readers, but that he may be able to visit not only his immediate field, but the new station at Flatonia, as often as may be needed for the supervision of that new and prom- ising work. He says the running part will do, and a second-hand one at that. Surely that is a modest request. Is there not some one of our readers who has such a vehicle to spare for the Lords work, top and all? Two months ago, among our Items from the Field was a plea, condensed into less than two lines, for an organ for the church at Orangeburg, S. C. A few days after, Mr. S. T. Gordon generously offered to give us the needed instrument, and it is now helping the service of song in the house of the Lord in that place. The pas- tor writes: We have received that invaluable gift, the cabinet organ donated by Mr. S. T. Gordon in aid of the day and Sunday-school and church work in this field. For this goodness the children, the congregation and ourselves unite in sending Mr. Gordon and the A. N. A. ten thousand grateful thanks. And we beseech the Lord to abundantly reward this labor f love. It will afford us very great aid indeed. It is encouraging to receive such prompt responses to wants thus simply made known. We are emboldened to call attention to a similar petition for an organ, in the letter from Corpus Christi, Texas. What other generous and prompt friend will be moved to answer, Here it is? THE LANDITS WEALTH AND ITS WANT. Among the explorers of the eastern part of Equatorial Africa no other has given us so full descriptions of the land, its wants and woes, and its brilliant possi- bilities, as Sir Samuel Baker. And he, too, in his Ismailia, traverses largely the territory suggested for our occupation by Mr. Arthington. The following para- graphs are from his description of the natural scenery, and of the beauty and fertility of the land on the east side of the Nile above and below Fatiko. Is this not a pleasing picture of a portion of our proposed field? I reveled in this lovely country. The fine park-like trees were clumped in dark-green masses here and there. The tall dolape-palms (Borassus Ethiopicus) were scattered about the plain, sometimes singly, at others growing in consider- able numbers. High and bold rocks, near and distant mountains, the richest plain imaginable in the foreground, with the clear Un-y-Am~ flowing now in a shallow stream between its lofty banks, and the grand old Nile upon our right, all combined to form a landscape that produced a paradise. The air was delight- ful. There was an elasticity of spirit, the result of a pure atmosphere, that made one feel happy in spite of many anxieties. My legs felt like steel as we strode along before the horses, with rifle on shoulder, into the magnificent valley,

The Land--Its Wealth and Its Want Editorial 130-132

130 The LandIts Wealth and its Want. thousand dollars to be divided equally between these two institutions. This af- fords aid, which is greatly needed, for the enlargement of the work at these most important places. It will go into buildings and other permanent equipment. We devoutly wish that men and women who have money to give would go and do likewise,visit our institutions for the education of the Freedmen, see the work which is being done, and the work which needs to be done, and then act in the light they have gained from actual observation. Rev. B. C. Church, of Goliad, Texas, who has been long and faithfully occu- pied in our service, needs a l~uggy, not for pleasure-driving, we assure our readers, but that he may be able to visit not only his immediate field, but the new station at Flatonia, as often as may be needed for the supervision of that new and prom- ising work. He says the running part will do, and a second-hand one at that. Surely that is a modest request. Is there not some one of our readers who has such a vehicle to spare for the Lords work, top and all? Two months ago, among our Items from the Field was a plea, condensed into less than two lines, for an organ for the church at Orangeburg, S. C. A few days after, Mr. S. T. Gordon generously offered to give us the needed instrument, and it is now helping the service of song in the house of the Lord in that place. The pas- tor writes: We have received that invaluable gift, the cabinet organ donated by Mr. S. T. Gordon in aid of the day and Sunday-school and church work in this field. For this goodness the children, the congregation and ourselves unite in sending Mr. Gordon and the A. N. A. ten thousand grateful thanks. And we beseech the Lord to abundantly reward this labor f love. It will afford us very great aid indeed. It is encouraging to receive such prompt responses to wants thus simply made known. We are emboldened to call attention to a similar petition for an organ, in the letter from Corpus Christi, Texas. What other generous and prompt friend will be moved to answer, Here it is? THE LANDITS WEALTH AND ITS WANT. Among the explorers of the eastern part of Equatorial Africa no other has given us so full descriptions of the land, its wants and woes, and its brilliant possi- bilities, as Sir Samuel Baker. And he, too, in his Ismailia, traverses largely the territory suggested for our occupation by Mr. Arthington. The following para- graphs are from his description of the natural scenery, and of the beauty and fertility of the land on the east side of the Nile above and below Fatiko. Is this not a pleasing picture of a portion of our proposed field? I reveled in this lovely country. The fine park-like trees were clumped in dark-green masses here and there. The tall dolape-palms (Borassus Ethiopicus) were scattered about the plain, sometimes singly, at others growing in consider- able numbers. High and bold rocks, near and distant mountains, the richest plain imaginable in the foreground, with the clear Un-y-Am~ flowing now in a shallow stream between its lofty banks, and the grand old Nile upon our right, all combined to form a landscape that produced a paradise. The air was delight- ful. There was an elasticity of spirit, the result of a pure atmosphere, that made one feel happy in spite of many anxieties. My legs felt like steel as we strode along before the horses, with rifle on shoulder, into the magnificent valley, The LandIts Wealth and its IVant. 131 in which the mountains we had descended seemed to have taken root. The country was full of game. Antelopes in great numbers, and in some variety, started from their repose in this beautiful wilderness, and having for a few mo- merits regarded the strange sights of horses, and soldiers in scarlet uniform, they first trotted and then cantered far away. The graceful leucotis stood in herds upon the rivers bank, and was the last to retreat. * * * * * Magnificent trees (acacias), whose thick, dark foliage drooped near the ground, were grouped in clumps, springing from the crevices between huge blocks of granite. Brooks of the purest water rippled over the time-worn channels, cut through granite plateaux, and as we halted to drink at the tempting stream, the water tasted as cold as though from a European spring. The entire country on our left was a succession of the most beautiful rocky undulations and deep, ver- dant glades, at the bottom of which flowed perennial streams. The banks of these rivulets were richly clothed with ornamental timber, the rich foliage contrast- ing strongly with the dark gray blocks of granite, resembling the ruins of ancient towers. But this land, so rich and beautiful, is all going to waste. Its game and cattle are doomed to as swift destruction as the countless herds of buffalo and antelope which only fifteen years ago thronged the prairies of Dakota. We copy from the same source this picture of the waste which is the sure precursor of want. By the Nile traders arrangements the companies of Abou Saood receive as their perquisite one-third of all the cattle that may be stolen in successful razzias. The consumption of cattle by these brigands is enormous. All flour is purchased in exchange for flesh, while flesh is also necessary for food: thus the cow is being eaten at both ends. The frightful drain upon the country may be imagined by the following caleulation, which is certainly below the truth: If 1,000 loads of ivory must be carried to Ismailia, 2,000 cows are required as payment of carriers; 1,000 belong to the brigands as their perquisite; 300 are necessary to feed the native carriers and soldiers during the journey; 3 300 cows are required to deliver 1,000 loads of ivory a distance of 165 miles from Fatiko to Ismailia (Gondokoro). A station of 35 men consumes daily - - - - - - 700 lbs. In addition they require to exchange for flour - . . 350 lbs. Daily consumption of flesh 1,050 lbs. The oxen of the country do isot average more than 170 lbs. cleaned. 2,255 beasts are thus required annually. 5,555 oxen are necessary to feed and pay for the transport from a station only 350 strong, according to the customs of White Nile brigandage. It must be remembered that at least a thousand, and sometimes double that number of slaves, are prisoners in each station. All these must be fed. The same principle is adopted in the exchange of flesh for flour; thus the expenditure of cat- tle is frightful. Not only oxen, but all the breeding cows and young calves are killed without the slightest reflection. No country can support such wilful waste; thus, after many years of ravage, this beautiful country has become almost barren of cattle. The central districts, occupied by the slave-traders, having been denuded of cattle, it has become necessary to make journeys to distant countries. But this is not the worst aspect of affairs. For by how much a man is better than a beast, by so much his life is more sacred, and to be guarded with more jealous 132 War or Jifzs8wn8? care. Read this story of a slave raid, its treachery, its brutality, its capture not only of slaves, but its slaughter of many times the number led away to sale. But this is not all; for in the pages of Ismailia follows the record of a dreadful retri- bution in which the whole 103 of Abou Saoods men are put to death and 150 of their allies. This is but one of many like scenes which have helped to make the slave regions of Africa as degraded as they are found to-day. A man named Ali Hussein was a well known employ~ of Abou Saood. This ruffian was an Arab. He was a tall, wiry fellow, with a determined but brutal cast of countenance, who was celebrated as a scoundrel among scoundrels. Even his fellows dreaded his brutality. There was no crime that he had not committed, and as his only virtue was extreme daring, his reputation was terrible among the native population. He had arranged to make a descent upon the Umiro tribe, about six days march to the southeast. He accordingly sent natives as spies with specious messages to the Umiro, announcing his intention of visiting them to pur- chase ivory. With a party increased by volunteers from other stations to a force of about 300 men, he arrived at Umiro. The simple natives received him gladly and showed extreme hospitality. The country was thickly populated and abounded with vast herds of the finest cattle. After a weeks sojourn among the Umiro, during which he had received large presents of elephants tusks and seventy head of oxen from the confiding natives, the treacherous ruffian gave an order to his brigands at sunset. They were to be under arms an hour before daybreak on the following morning, to set fire to the adjacent villages of their generous hosts and to capture their large herds of cattle, together with their women and children. At the time appointed, while every Umiro slept, unconscious of approaching danger, several villages were surrounded, and volleys of musketry were poured upon the sleeping inmates. The straw huts were ignited, and the flames rapidly spread, while a massacre commenced similar to the butcheries to which the slave- hunters were so well accustomed. The Utniro, thus taken by surprise, and appalled by so dastardly a treachery, were easily defeated. Their children and wives were captured, together with large herds of cattle, which are celebrated for their size. All these were driven in triumph to Fatiko. We only ask, in conclusion, is not this a field for Christian men to occupy this fair land, with such means of supporting life, and with horrors like these enacted year by year, against which the presence of even a few white Christian men would be a most effectual check? WAR OR MISSIONS? Christian England is at war with the Zulus, not altogether successfully, we fear not altogether justly. It seems to he about the same question which is at issue perpetually between the United States Government and the Indiansa disputed strip of territory lying between Transvaal and Zululand is, by arbitration mutually agreed upon, decided to belong of right to the Zulus. But the Dutch Boers who had settled therein decline to give up their claims. The English Government, to whom that territory had been transferred, defend them in iliaintaining their re- sistance to what had been declared to be the rightful owner, and because King Cetywayo is a small sovereign, the Queen on whose dominions the sun never sets proposes to compel him. This is about the story as it comes to us. So Christian England and Americanot the Christianity in England and Americatreat their poor neighbors. Now, in the prosecution of this Zulu war thousands of men are sent out to do

War or Missions Editorial 132-133

132 War or Jifzs8wn8? care. Read this story of a slave raid, its treachery, its brutality, its capture not only of slaves, but its slaughter of many times the number led away to sale. But this is not all; for in the pages of Ismailia follows the record of a dreadful retri- bution in which the whole 103 of Abou Saoods men are put to death and 150 of their allies. This is but one of many like scenes which have helped to make the slave regions of Africa as degraded as they are found to-day. A man named Ali Hussein was a well known employ~ of Abou Saood. This ruffian was an Arab. He was a tall, wiry fellow, with a determined but brutal cast of countenance, who was celebrated as a scoundrel among scoundrels. Even his fellows dreaded his brutality. There was no crime that he had not committed, and as his only virtue was extreme daring, his reputation was terrible among the native population. He had arranged to make a descent upon the Umiro tribe, about six days march to the southeast. He accordingly sent natives as spies with specious messages to the Umiro, announcing his intention of visiting them to pur- chase ivory. With a party increased by volunteers from other stations to a force of about 300 men, he arrived at Umiro. The simple natives received him gladly and showed extreme hospitality. The country was thickly populated and abounded with vast herds of the finest cattle. After a weeks sojourn among the Umiro, during which he had received large presents of elephants tusks and seventy head of oxen from the confiding natives, the treacherous ruffian gave an order to his brigands at sunset. They were to be under arms an hour before daybreak on the following morning, to set fire to the adjacent villages of their generous hosts and to capture their large herds of cattle, together with their women and children. At the time appointed, while every Umiro slept, unconscious of approaching danger, several villages were surrounded, and volleys of musketry were poured upon the sleeping inmates. The straw huts were ignited, and the flames rapidly spread, while a massacre commenced similar to the butcheries to which the slave- hunters were so well accustomed. The Utniro, thus taken by surprise, and appalled by so dastardly a treachery, were easily defeated. Their children and wives were captured, together with large herds of cattle, which are celebrated for their size. All these were driven in triumph to Fatiko. We only ask, in conclusion, is not this a field for Christian men to occupy this fair land, with such means of supporting life, and with horrors like these enacted year by year, against which the presence of even a few white Christian men would be a most effectual check? WAR OR MISSIONS? Christian England is at war with the Zulus, not altogether successfully, we fear not altogether justly. It seems to he about the same question which is at issue perpetually between the United States Government and the Indiansa disputed strip of territory lying between Transvaal and Zululand is, by arbitration mutually agreed upon, decided to belong of right to the Zulus. But the Dutch Boers who had settled therein decline to give up their claims. The English Government, to whom that territory had been transferred, defend them in iliaintaining their re- sistance to what had been declared to be the rightful owner, and because King Cetywayo is a small sovereign, the Queen on whose dominions the sun never sets proposes to compel him. This is about the story as it comes to us. So Christian England and Americanot the Christianity in England and Americatreat their poor neighbors. Now, in the prosecution of this Zulu war thousands of men are sent out to do The Negro Hegira. 133 battlegenerals, captains, common soldiers. Money is freely spent, millions of dollars, to keep a rnde race from acknowledged rights. Blood is spilt and lives are sacrificed, not by the one or two, but by the hundred. But there is another battle to be fought in Africa, in the interests of the Christianity that is in England and America; a battle against superstition, and all the ignorance and violence in~ cluded in it, against the slave trade and its demoralizing influences. It, too, will cost men and money. In its accomplishment, lives will be laid down. Already in the new fields opening, one and another have fallen, until six, perhaps, have thus far given up their lives in this cause. The advance guard, the scouts, have not all escaped the perils of such service. It costs money, too; but it will not cost half as much to convert a savage African as it will to kill him. Missions are cheap compared with war. And then, look at the end of it all. Money and blood to extend territory, to defend a flag! Where is the treasury, and where the lives ready to be laid down that the banner of the Prince of Peace may be set up in Equatorial Africa, and its inhabitants be made subjects of Him whose dominion hath no end l Read these emphatic words of David Livingstone, so well illustrated by his own quietly heroic life: We talk of sacrifices until we fear the word is nauseous to God. We have no English female missionary biography worth reading, because it is all polluted by the black mans idea of sacrifice. It ought not so to be. Jesus became a missionary and gave His life for us. Ilundreds of young men annually leave our shores as cadets. When any dangerous expedition is planned by Government, more volun- teers apply than are necessary to man it. On the proposal to send a band of brave men in search of Sir John Franklin, a full complement for the ships could have been procured .of officers alone, without any common sailors. And what thousands rushed to California from different parts of America on the discovery of gold How many husbands left their wives and families! How many Christian men tore themselves away from all home endearments to suffer and toil and perish by cold and starvation on the overland route ! How many sank from fever and exhaus- tion on the banks of the Smcrameuto ! Yet no word of sacrifices there ! Our talk of sacrifices is ungenerous and heathenish. THE NEGRO HEGIRA. It is not many months since we had to record the Liberian exodus fever. The movement which excited so great hopes among the deluded blacks has passed out of sight, and the holders of ten-dollar shares in the barque Azor are no nearer the tropical shores of Africa than they were a year ago. From those who went ~ut in so ill-advised a manner, for a long time almost nothing came back to us but their wail of suffering as they reached their journeys end. And now another impulse has seized upon thousands apparently of the negro population of Mississippi and Louisiana, to leave the places where they were born and reared and seek ~new homes. As early as the middle of March probably fifteen hundred had found their way to Sr. Louis under the impression, it is said, that they would be supported in that city and provided with free transportation to Kansas, where, on arrival, they would receive from the Government, lands, mules, money and agricultural implements. A small proportion of them appeared to be in comfortable circumstances, and proceeded by steamer or rail to Kansas City or Topeka. Others were entirely destitute and dependent from the first on charita

The Negro Hegira Editorial 133-135

The Negro Hegira. 133 battlegenerals, captains, common soldiers. Money is freely spent, millions of dollars, to keep a rnde race from acknowledged rights. Blood is spilt and lives are sacrificed, not by the one or two, but by the hundred. But there is another battle to be fought in Africa, in the interests of the Christianity that is in England and America; a battle against superstition, and all the ignorance and violence in~ cluded in it, against the slave trade and its demoralizing influences. It, too, will cost men and money. In its accomplishment, lives will be laid down. Already in the new fields opening, one and another have fallen, until six, perhaps, have thus far given up their lives in this cause. The advance guard, the scouts, have not all escaped the perils of such service. It costs money, too; but it will not cost half as much to convert a savage African as it will to kill him. Missions are cheap compared with war. And then, look at the end of it all. Money and blood to extend territory, to defend a flag! Where is the treasury, and where the lives ready to be laid down that the banner of the Prince of Peace may be set up in Equatorial Africa, and its inhabitants be made subjects of Him whose dominion hath no end l Read these emphatic words of David Livingstone, so well illustrated by his own quietly heroic life: We talk of sacrifices until we fear the word is nauseous to God. We have no English female missionary biography worth reading, because it is all polluted by the black mans idea of sacrifice. It ought not so to be. Jesus became a missionary and gave His life for us. Ilundreds of young men annually leave our shores as cadets. When any dangerous expedition is planned by Government, more volun- teers apply than are necessary to man it. On the proposal to send a band of brave men in search of Sir John Franklin, a full complement for the ships could have been procured .of officers alone, without any common sailors. And what thousands rushed to California from different parts of America on the discovery of gold How many husbands left their wives and families! How many Christian men tore themselves away from all home endearments to suffer and toil and perish by cold and starvation on the overland route ! How many sank from fever and exhaus- tion on the banks of the Smcrameuto ! Yet no word of sacrifices there ! Our talk of sacrifices is ungenerous and heathenish. THE NEGRO HEGIRA. It is not many months since we had to record the Liberian exodus fever. The movement which excited so great hopes among the deluded blacks has passed out of sight, and the holders of ten-dollar shares in the barque Azor are no nearer the tropical shores of Africa than they were a year ago. From those who went ~ut in so ill-advised a manner, for a long time almost nothing came back to us but their wail of suffering as they reached their journeys end. And now another impulse has seized upon thousands apparently of the negro population of Mississippi and Louisiana, to leave the places where they were born and reared and seek ~new homes. As early as the middle of March probably fifteen hundred had found their way to Sr. Louis under the impression, it is said, that they would be supported in that city and provided with free transportation to Kansas, where, on arrival, they would receive from the Government, lands, mules, money and agricultural implements. A small proportion of them appeared to be in comfortable circumstances, and proceeded by steamer or rail to Kansas City or Topeka. Others were entirely destitute and dependent from the first on charita 134 The Negro hegira. ble aid. Thousands more were reported as only deterred from coming by lack of means to pay their way up the river. The mayor and citizens of St. Louis were in quite a panic over their visitors. What should they do with them, or how keep them away? But the feeling of kinship led the colored people of the city to give them such welcome as they might. The basements of three c& lored churches were opened to them, and food and shelter were generously given by their brethren according to the flesh, and they were helped toward their destination as far as might be. Thus another is added to the many strange, sad stories in the history of this dark-skinned race. This sudden impulse moving upon this great mass of men and women may not have been reasonable, and yet it must have had a reason. Kansas seem~ to be to them a magical name, synonymous with freedom, friends and happiness, in their crude thought. It was sought to turn some of them to Iowa, where work and pay were offered; but no, Kansas was the goal from which they could not be turned away. There seems to be no possible interpretation of thi~ so general migration, other than that they have given up in despair the thought of peace or prosperity in their old homes. For of all the inhabitants of our soil they are the least migratory in their nature; they cling to the old State and the old homestead on which they were reared. But repeated wrongs have worked at last on their slow minds the conviction that better things can only be in store for them far away. Not political deprivations, for they seem easily to have given up that contest, and they dont vote much;~~ but the wrongs of a~ hard tenantry system, by which they have been compelled to rent land at $10 am acre for the yearland worth not much more than that at salewith various other extortionate charges by the way, bringing the laborer out at the years end no better, but rather the worse off for all his toil, and with no liberty even of com- plaint; these are the things which have at length wrought out their natural and inevitable result. The consequences of this movement, if it be suffered to go onand who can stop it Iare manifold and of most serious import. The planters are already alarmed at the lack of laborers for the year which is just opening upon them. A desertion of hands is a most dire calamity in an agricultural community. Po- litical changes may follow those of population, and if this hegira goes on, the pro- portion of representation may be seriously changed between Louisiana and Kansas. There can be no question but that the negro can, if he be well treated, do better in the Gulf States than in the cold climate of Kansasat raising cotton and the sugar-cane than wheat and stock. Is there no serious warning in this movement to the people of thbse States ?a lesson not political so much as indus- trial ; an intimation that fair treatment even of the lowest, poorest and most ignorant classes, especially if they are held by no artificial bond like ownership~ is essential to a rendering of the service for which they were valued once as slaves,. and for which they are no less indispensable as freemen. There is policy as well as right in justice, and the law of gravitation is as real and as irresisti- ble in masses of men as in the realm of material things. The South needs the negro quite as much as the negro needs the South ; and unless its leaders of thought and action help its people to recognize their mutual dependence, and teach them to conciliate and not to abuse the arm that is ready to sow and gather their crops, they will have to do without it. The present hegira is but a hint of what may be. Is it not a hint, also, as to how so great a loss may be avoided ?: For, after all, dislike the truth who may, the negro is a man and a brother. IJTornan~8 Work Con greyationalism in the South. 135 WOMANS WORK FOR WOMAN. Every once in a while a feeling prevalent in the churches gets voice in the question: Cannot women find some recognized method of doing more for the elevation of the freed women of the South than they are doing now? There has been an unwillingness on the part of many to agitate this question lest there might be in it a seeming antagonism to the work of the Womans Board; a work that in origin and development is so clearly providential. Still the want has been keenly felt. Some attention has been given it, and in a few instances the thought has developed into action. Nearly two years ago Mrs. Zachary Eddy, of Detroit, interested a number of iadies in Eastern Michigan in the matter, and the result was that these ladies became responsible for the support of a lady missionary, to be appointed by the American Missionary Association, to work exclusively among the freed women; and the work then begun has been steadily sustained ever since by Miss Hattie Milton~ at Memphis, Tena. It is no longer an experiment, it is now a success. Miss Milton, in a letter, not long since, says: This has been the happiest year of my life; for this work has its own reward, both to the missionary and those who send her, which is more valuable than silver or gold. I sometimes think the angels might almost envy us in this work. Within a few months the ladies connected with the First and Second Churches of Oberlin have united to support a lady missionary among the freed women. The money is already provided for, and the missionary will soon start on her mis- sion of love. And now I learn that the young ladies connected with the Congre- gational church in Waukegan, this State, have organized a society for the same purpose, the aim being to work chiefly throngh the Sunday-school. Monthly meetings, called mission parties, are held. A profitable programme is pre- pared, consisting of an essay, information from some mission station, brief ad- dresses and singing. To these meetings invitations are issued by card, with the understanding that everybody invited will come. Thus far two meetings have been held, and they give promise of great popularity. May there not be in the organization of this young ladies society, designing to work through the Sunday-school, a suggestion that the ladies might take up everywhere? Why not, after first defining the word young to have reference to feeling rather than years, organize young ladies missionary societies in all our churches, to work through the Sunday-schools for the support of lady missiona- ries among the freed women?Scaoonv, in The CongreqationaUst. CONGREGATIONALISNI IN THE SOUTH. 2. Since the War. DiST. SEC. C. L. WOODWORTH, DOSTOK. The denomination which took possession of this country in the name of Christ, which brought in the cabin of the Mayflower the model of a democratic state, as well as of a democratic church, was, practically, ruled out of the South for two hundred and fifty years. Only since 1865 has it been possible for her to enter the South in all the largeness of her freedom and of her faith. If it now be asked, What has she to show for these thirteen years of opportunity among the poorest of the poor, we answer, Something of which she need not be ashamed. Within five months from the time when the first gun of the rebellion sent its shot at the heart of the Union, Congregationalism, through the American Mission-

Woman's Work for Woman Editorial 135

IJTornan~8 Work Con greyationalism in the South. 135 WOMANS WORK FOR WOMAN. Every once in a while a feeling prevalent in the churches gets voice in the question: Cannot women find some recognized method of doing more for the elevation of the freed women of the South than they are doing now? There has been an unwillingness on the part of many to agitate this question lest there might be in it a seeming antagonism to the work of the Womans Board; a work that in origin and development is so clearly providential. Still the want has been keenly felt. Some attention has been given it, and in a few instances the thought has developed into action. Nearly two years ago Mrs. Zachary Eddy, of Detroit, interested a number of iadies in Eastern Michigan in the matter, and the result was that these ladies became responsible for the support of a lady missionary, to be appointed by the American Missionary Association, to work exclusively among the freed women; and the work then begun has been steadily sustained ever since by Miss Hattie Milton~ at Memphis, Tena. It is no longer an experiment, it is now a success. Miss Milton, in a letter, not long since, says: This has been the happiest year of my life; for this work has its own reward, both to the missionary and those who send her, which is more valuable than silver or gold. I sometimes think the angels might almost envy us in this work. Within a few months the ladies connected with the First and Second Churches of Oberlin have united to support a lady missionary among the freed women. The money is already provided for, and the missionary will soon start on her mis- sion of love. And now I learn that the young ladies connected with the Congre- gational church in Waukegan, this State, have organized a society for the same purpose, the aim being to work chiefly throngh the Sunday-school. Monthly meetings, called mission parties, are held. A profitable programme is pre- pared, consisting of an essay, information from some mission station, brief ad- dresses and singing. To these meetings invitations are issued by card, with the understanding that everybody invited will come. Thus far two meetings have been held, and they give promise of great popularity. May there not be in the organization of this young ladies society, designing to work through the Sunday-school, a suggestion that the ladies might take up everywhere? Why not, after first defining the word young to have reference to feeling rather than years, organize young ladies missionary societies in all our churches, to work through the Sunday-schools for the support of lady missiona- ries among the freed women?Scaoonv, in The CongreqationaUst. CONGREGATIONALISNI IN THE SOUTH. 2. Since the War. DiST. SEC. C. L. WOODWORTH, DOSTOK. The denomination which took possession of this country in the name of Christ, which brought in the cabin of the Mayflower the model of a democratic state, as well as of a democratic church, was, practically, ruled out of the South for two hundred and fifty years. Only since 1865 has it been possible for her to enter the South in all the largeness of her freedom and of her faith. If it now be asked, What has she to show for these thirteen years of opportunity among the poorest of the poor, we answer, Something of which she need not be ashamed. Within five months from the time when the first gun of the rebellion sent its shot at the heart of the Union, Congregationalism, through the American Mission-

Dist. Sec. C. L. Woodworth Woodworth, C. L., Dist. Sec. Congregationalism in the South Editorial 135-137

IJTornan~8 Work Con greyationalism in the South. 135 WOMANS WORK FOR WOMAN. Every once in a while a feeling prevalent in the churches gets voice in the question: Cannot women find some recognized method of doing more for the elevation of the freed women of the South than they are doing now? There has been an unwillingness on the part of many to agitate this question lest there might be in it a seeming antagonism to the work of the Womans Board; a work that in origin and development is so clearly providential. Still the want has been keenly felt. Some attention has been given it, and in a few instances the thought has developed into action. Nearly two years ago Mrs. Zachary Eddy, of Detroit, interested a number of iadies in Eastern Michigan in the matter, and the result was that these ladies became responsible for the support of a lady missionary, to be appointed by the American Missionary Association, to work exclusively among the freed women; and the work then begun has been steadily sustained ever since by Miss Hattie Milton~ at Memphis, Tena. It is no longer an experiment, it is now a success. Miss Milton, in a letter, not long since, says: This has been the happiest year of my life; for this work has its own reward, both to the missionary and those who send her, which is more valuable than silver or gold. I sometimes think the angels might almost envy us in this work. Within a few months the ladies connected with the First and Second Churches of Oberlin have united to support a lady missionary among the freed women. The money is already provided for, and the missionary will soon start on her mis- sion of love. And now I learn that the young ladies connected with the Congre- gational church in Waukegan, this State, have organized a society for the same purpose, the aim being to work chiefly throngh the Sunday-school. Monthly meetings, called mission parties, are held. A profitable programme is pre- pared, consisting of an essay, information from some mission station, brief ad- dresses and singing. To these meetings invitations are issued by card, with the understanding that everybody invited will come. Thus far two meetings have been held, and they give promise of great popularity. May there not be in the organization of this young ladies society, designing to work through the Sunday-school, a suggestion that the ladies might take up everywhere? Why not, after first defining the word young to have reference to feeling rather than years, organize young ladies missionary societies in all our churches, to work through the Sunday-schools for the support of lady missiona- ries among the freed women?Scaoonv, in The CongreqationaUst. CONGREGATIONALISNI IN THE SOUTH. 2. Since the War. DiST. SEC. C. L. WOODWORTH, DOSTOK. The denomination which took possession of this country in the name of Christ, which brought in the cabin of the Mayflower the model of a democratic state, as well as of a democratic church, was, practically, ruled out of the South for two hundred and fifty years. Only since 1865 has it been possible for her to enter the South in all the largeness of her freedom and of her faith. If it now be asked, What has she to show for these thirteen years of opportunity among the poorest of the poor, we answer, Something of which she need not be ashamed. Within five months from the time when the first gun of the rebellion sent its shot at the heart of the Union, Congregationalism, through the American Mission- 136 Con gregationalism in the South. ary Association, was at Fortress Monroe with bread and clothing, with books and Bibles, with teachers and preachers. Nor was this the only channel of its charity to the needy. It maintained a vast work of physical relief during and after the soar, through the New England and National Freedmens Aid Societies, and through agencies of more private bounty. And not alone in the way of physical relief, but a large number of teachprs were sent out by these same agencies, and kept in the field for years and years. They have passed away, indeed, but the amount expended by them was very large, how large we will not try to estimate even approximately. The Society first in the field alone remains to do the work for the Congrega- tional churches. No sooner had General Butler established himself at Fortress Monroe than the Association pushed in its workers among the unhoused, half- clothed, half-starved thousands of contrabands that had flocked inside his lines. From that beginning, in 1861, the work has spread into every Southern State, and though its income and its working force are scarcely half what they were in 1870, yet it is among the great societies which our churches cherish and love. It has just completed seventeen full years of labor on the Southern field, and the number of laborers sent out year by year are tabulated below: Teachers, 1862 . 15 I Teachers, 1872 346 1863 83 1873 323 1864 250 1874 273 1865 3~J0 1875 260 1866 353 1876 206 1887 528 1877 203 1868 532 1878 208 1869 532 1870 533 Total No. of Teachers 5,267 1871 321 The tangible results of this work, as they appear in permanent Christian insti- tutions, and their natural outcome in the South, will be seen in the statement below: DETAILS OF SCHOOL WORK AT THE SOUTH. Chartered institutions, 8.Hampton N. and A. Institute, Hampton, Va.: Number of pupils, 332; boarding accommodations for 180. Berea College, Berca, Ky.: Number of pupils, 273; boarding accommodations for 180. Fisk University, Nashville, Tenn.: Nun~ber of pupils, 338; boarding accommodations for 150. Atlanta University, Atlanta~ Ga.: Number of pupils, 244; boarding accommoda- tions for 150. Talladega College, Talladega, Ala.: Number of pupils, 272; boarding accommodations for 100. Tougaloo University, Tougaloo, Miss.: Num- ber of pupils, 193; boarding accommodations for 90. Straight University, New Orleans, La.: Number of pupils, 287; no boarding accommodations. Normal In- stitute, Austin, Texas: Number of pupils, 146. Other Institutions, 11.Normal School, Wilmington, N. C.: Number of pupils, 126; Washington School, Raleigh, N. C., 435; Avery Institute, Charleston, S. Q, 294; Brewer Normal School, Greenwood, S. C., 58; Storrs School, Atlanta, Ga.~, 701; Lewis High School, Macon, Ga., 93; Trinity School, Athens, Ala., 158; Em- erson Institute, Mobile, Ala., 117; Swayne School, Montgomery, Ala., 436; Bur- rell School, Selma, Ala., 421; Le Moyne School, Memphis, Tenn., 184; Common Schools, 15 ;tot al,37. Whole number of pupils, 7,229. Scholars in the South, taught by our former pupils, estimated at 100,000. Item8 from tAe Field. Whole number of churches in the South, 64.Yirginia, 1; North Carolina, 5; South Carolina, 2; Georgia, 12; Kentucky, 7; Tennessee, 4; Alabama, 13; Louisi- ana, 12; Mississippi, 1 Kansas, 2; Texas, 5. Whole number of church members, 4,189. From this exhibit it will be seen that eight of the schools are chartered, and contain nearly two thousand students. Four of them are of college grade, and are doing regular college work. The other schools are of Normal grade, and de- signed to bring forward, as rapidly as possible, the teachers for the untaught mil- lions. They are all children of the Association, and in them are gathered up the fruits of Congregational liberality and labor in behalf of the colored race. These schools are an enduring investment for this work, and hold property in buildings, lands, apparatus and endowments, to the value, probably, of eight hundred thou- sand dollars. It should be said, however, that many of the buildings were put up by aid from the Freedmens Bureau; but this aid was set apart as the propor- tion of the public moneys which should appropriately flow through Congrega- tional channels. The churches established in the South are a result of the same effort. Their chapels and houses of worship represent a money value of fifty thousand dollars more. What Congregationalism has to show is in these perma- nent institutions for the mental and moral training of the colored people. It is not all that is needed, but it is an investment of inestimable value, and one which will compare favorably with the work of any other denomination, for thorough educational and religious work among the enfranchised race. ITEMS FROM THE FIELD. DUDLEY, N. C.- We have quite a class of teachers in the school, and I have spent a part of each day with them. I induced one of the young men I found in Woodbridge to come here for the present. He has had but little schooling, but is far ahead of all the young people here and has taught several terms. He is now commencing Latin and Algebra. He desires to fully fit himself for work among his people, and his present idea is to devote himself to teaching. He has a splen- did voice and has never had any drill. One great object in bringing him here was to train his voice and give him instrumental lessons, and he is doing finely. Another was to secure him, if possible, to us, and find a chance for him in one of the A. M. A. Colleges. Is there any way of getting help for such a young man ? McI~vosu, Liberty Co., Ga. Nineteen persons united with the church last Sunday on confession of faith. WOODYILLE, GaThe annual examination of the school was held March 28th. From 400 to 500 persons were present. One conversion from the Sunday-school during the month. The St. Philips Society, Sengstack& s Band of Hope, and Sons and Daugh- ters of Jerusalem, celebrated emancipation, Jan. 1st, in the Congregational church. Rev. Mr. Markham, of Savannah, addressed them on the results of freedom and the work of the A. NI. A. A thank-offering was sent in the form of a contribu- tion to the Association. TALLADEGA, Ala.Nine young men, students at Talladega, after examination, were approved to preach by the Alabama Conference. MONTGOMERY, Ala.A deep religious interest has been manifested during the last month. Some of our pupils are trusting in a newly-found Saviour. A Sab- bath afternoon Bible-reading at the school-house has been blessed.

Items from the Field Editorial 137-138

Item8 from tAe Field. Whole number of churches in the South, 64.Yirginia, 1; North Carolina, 5; South Carolina, 2; Georgia, 12; Kentucky, 7; Tennessee, 4; Alabama, 13; Louisi- ana, 12; Mississippi, 1 Kansas, 2; Texas, 5. Whole number of church members, 4,189. From this exhibit it will be seen that eight of the schools are chartered, and contain nearly two thousand students. Four of them are of college grade, and are doing regular college work. The other schools are of Normal grade, and de- signed to bring forward, as rapidly as possible, the teachers for the untaught mil- lions. They are all children of the Association, and in them are gathered up the fruits of Congregational liberality and labor in behalf of the colored race. These schools are an enduring investment for this work, and hold property in buildings, lands, apparatus and endowments, to the value, probably, of eight hundred thou- sand dollars. It should be said, however, that many of the buildings were put up by aid from the Freedmens Bureau; but this aid was set apart as the propor- tion of the public moneys which should appropriately flow through Congrega- tional channels. The churches established in the South are a result of the same effort. Their chapels and houses of worship represent a money value of fifty thousand dollars more. What Congregationalism has to show is in these perma- nent institutions for the mental and moral training of the colored people. It is not all that is needed, but it is an investment of inestimable value, and one which will compare favorably with the work of any other denomination, for thorough educational and religious work among the enfranchised race. ITEMS FROM THE FIELD. DUDLEY, N. C.- We have quite a class of teachers in the school, and I have spent a part of each day with them. I induced one of the young men I found in Woodbridge to come here for the present. He has had but little schooling, but is far ahead of all the young people here and has taught several terms. He is now commencing Latin and Algebra. He desires to fully fit himself for work among his people, and his present idea is to devote himself to teaching. He has a splen- did voice and has never had any drill. One great object in bringing him here was to train his voice and give him instrumental lessons, and he is doing finely. Another was to secure him, if possible, to us, and find a chance for him in one of the A. M. A. Colleges. Is there any way of getting help for such a young man ? McI~vosu, Liberty Co., Ga. Nineteen persons united with the church last Sunday on confession of faith. WOODYILLE, GaThe annual examination of the school was held March 28th. From 400 to 500 persons were present. One conversion from the Sunday-school during the month. The St. Philips Society, Sengstack& s Band of Hope, and Sons and Daugh- ters of Jerusalem, celebrated emancipation, Jan. 1st, in the Congregational church. Rev. Mr. Markham, of Savannah, addressed them on the results of freedom and the work of the A. NI. A. A thank-offering was sent in the form of a contribu- tion to the Association. TALLADEGA, Ala.Nine young men, students at Talladega, after examination, were approved to preach by the Alabama Conference. MONTGOMERY, Ala.A deep religious interest has been manifested during the last month. Some of our pupils are trusting in a newly-found Saviour. A Sab- bath afternoon Bible-reading at the school-house has been blessed. 138 General Note8. MARION Ala~ There are thirty subscribers to the New York Witness among the colored people in this placea fact which speaks well for their general intel- ligence. MOBILE, Ala. God is pouring out His Spirit on our school. Several have expressed a hope in Christ and many more are inquiring. The interest is among the older scholars. We have ~a daily fI~fteen-minute prayer-meeting just before school, and a half-hour prayer-niecting after school on Friday. Pray for us. ANNIsTON, Ala.Sabbath-school very interesting, especially to the older peo- ple. One conversion. CORPUS CHRIs~rr, Texas.The church has been revived. Six members lhu~ far have been received on profession. FLATOKIA, Fayette Co., Texas.This young church has twenty-five members, and several are waiting an opportunity to unite. It is negotiating for a church building. CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. The Sabbath-school is well attended. We bad a con- cert last Sabbath evening; the house was crowded and the exercises went off quite well, after which a collection for the A. M. A. was taken. INDIAN AGENCY, KESHENA, Wis.From the report of the school at the Green Bay Agency we extract the following: Our school closed on the 20th, and we are happy to report that this has been the most favorable term since the opening of the boarding-school. We have had very little sickness and very few changes, nearly all who came at the beginning of the term remaining till its close. In this respect, of steady, persevering work, we notice great improvement. It is so contrary to the habits of the Indian that we note it with pleasure. The progress, too, in studies is very satisfactory. GENERAL NOTES. The Freedmen. In commenting on the Windom Emigration Scheme, the Atlanta Constitution says: In Georgia the colored people are doing as well as could be expected. If they are to remain citizens they onght to be educated, and they ought to have constantly before them the example of the whites. They are beginning to appre- ciate the responsibilities of citizenship; they are thrifty enough to accumulate property, and they are anxious to take advantage of the educational opportunities afforded them. The colored man is valuable to the South. The white people know it. The above is important testimony to his worth and increasing usefulness. The Bainbridge Democrat gives, unwittingly, testimony to the industry and thrift of the colored laborer: The ambition of every negro man is to have a home of his own; and it is no mean ambition; yet, if something is not done, this genera- tion will live to see the day when this class of labor cannot be obtained at any price; and if we cannot supply it with labor just as good, there will be no other alterna- tive for the white man but to go. People have no use for lands ~vhen there is nobody to cultivate them; and as the colored people set up in their little cabins upon their poor and sickly lands, just in proportion will our finest and best acres depreciate in value. This is a question big with interest to our people, beside

General Notes Editorial 138-140

138 General Note8. MARION Ala~ There are thirty subscribers to the New York Witness among the colored people in this placea fact which speaks well for their general intel- ligence. MOBILE, Ala. God is pouring out His Spirit on our school. Several have expressed a hope in Christ and many more are inquiring. The interest is among the older scholars. We have ~a daily fI~fteen-minute prayer-meeting just before school, and a half-hour prayer-niecting after school on Friday. Pray for us. ANNIsTON, Ala.Sabbath-school very interesting, especially to the older peo- ple. One conversion. CORPUS CHRIs~rr, Texas.The church has been revived. Six members lhu~ far have been received on profession. FLATOKIA, Fayette Co., Texas.This young church has twenty-five members, and several are waiting an opportunity to unite. It is negotiating for a church building. CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. The Sabbath-school is well attended. We bad a con- cert last Sabbath evening; the house was crowded and the exercises went off quite well, after which a collection for the A. M. A. was taken. INDIAN AGENCY, KESHENA, Wis.From the report of the school at the Green Bay Agency we extract the following: Our school closed on the 20th, and we are happy to report that this has been the most favorable term since the opening of the boarding-school. We have had very little sickness and very few changes, nearly all who came at the beginning of the term remaining till its close. In this respect, of steady, persevering work, we notice great improvement. It is so contrary to the habits of the Indian that we note it with pleasure. The progress, too, in studies is very satisfactory. GENERAL NOTES. The Freedmen. In commenting on the Windom Emigration Scheme, the Atlanta Constitution says: In Georgia the colored people are doing as well as could be expected. If they are to remain citizens they onght to be educated, and they ought to have constantly before them the example of the whites. They are beginning to appre- ciate the responsibilities of citizenship; they are thrifty enough to accumulate property, and they are anxious to take advantage of the educational opportunities afforded them. The colored man is valuable to the South. The white people know it. The above is important testimony to his worth and increasing usefulness. The Bainbridge Democrat gives, unwittingly, testimony to the industry and thrift of the colored laborer: The ambition of every negro man is to have a home of his own; and it is no mean ambition; yet, if something is not done, this genera- tion will live to see the day when this class of labor cannot be obtained at any price; and if we cannot supply it with labor just as good, there will be no other alterna- tive for the white man but to go. People have no use for lands ~vhen there is nobody to cultivate them; and as the colored people set up in their little cabins upon their poor and sickly lands, just in proportion will our finest and best acres depreciate in value. This is a question big with interest to our people, beside General iYotes. 139 which others sink into nothingness. Application The colored laborer is becom- ing a settled, independent property holder, and his own master. When he can work, buy and sell for himself, and own his cabin, he is emancipated from dom- ineering dictation. Whoever owns his own labor must control the market. After all, there is an inclination to block this aspiration of the colored man. The Atlanta constitution holds that it is an open question whether this effort should be encouraged. It holds that there are two solutions of the labor problem which is now vexing the farmers. Either the negro must be made comfortable as a tenant, ~r he must be encouraged to provide himself a home. Either sometliino~ like the n English tenant system must be adopted or the sysbem of small farms will prevail. There is something peculiarly attractive in this English system. Whether it could be made to fit the peculiar needs of the present and the contingencies of the future, is a question that the editor is not just now prepared to discuss. The colored man being an American citizen, it is improbable that the English tenant system can be made to fit . his case. The rights of citizenship will ~secure to him the rights of labor. The homestead delivers him from serfdom, and secures to him the independent ballot. Many influential colored men are advocating colonization as a remedy for the evils that afflict their race. One says, We cannot get equal rights in the South before the law. A white man will pay ten dollars for the same offence that a negro will go to that second death, the chain-gang, for. He also says, There are some counties in Georgia, and in every one of the Southern states, where a white man will whip a negro just the same as formerly. Again, a certain lawyer defending a white man the other day, at Jefferson, in Georgia, said, God made the negro inferior, and the white man was justified in killing the negro for in- sulting him. The jury acquitted the white man (Atlanta Rep., March 1). The darkness still lingers. The Afarietta Journal, Cobb County, Ga., reports that a young colored man, now a school-teacher, but who has been studying law for the last three years, will soon apply for admission to the bar, and says that he is so thoroughly pre- pared that his application cannot be denied. A National Emigration Aid society has been organized at Washington, with Senator Windom at its head, its object being to assist and regulate emigration from the South to the West. Rev. Dr. J. E. Rankin is one of its Executive Com- mittee, as are also Senator Hamlin, Representative Garfield and other leading men. At the recent anniversary of the City Bible Society in Atlanta, Ga., it was reported that the colporteur, who had just commenced the canvass of the commu- nity, had found that of the first one hundred and fifty-eight white families visited in the first ward, twenty-six were destitute of the Word of God; and that of the first one hundred and seventy-two colored families visited in the same ward, forty- eight of them have no Bibles. Rev. Dr. Haygood, who stated the fact, said that it had surprised and gratified him to find that so large a proportiofi of the colored families had supplied themselves with the Scriptures. It gave him great encour- agement for the welfare of the country. Of one hundred and seventy-two col- ored families, one hundred and twenty-four had the Bible. This people hunger for the Word. Here is a wide field for the American Bible Society. 140 A Tour into the Southwest. Africa. The Church Missionary Society has ordained missionaries at nine stations on the River Niger, under the charge of the native Bishop Crowther. At some of these stations the idols have already been given up. At others there has been long and severe persecution, which, however, appears to have largely broken down. On the whole, these missions have been a great success. The Cardiff Livingstone ~is8ion (Welsh) was originated about three years ago, and has two stations on the Congo River. Dr. Laws and Mr. Stewart, of the Scottish Missionary Society on Lake Nyassa, are examining the cou~itry on the west coast of the Lake to find a perma- nent location better adapted to the wants of the mission than Livingstonia. They have visited several of the tribes, being received with some suspicion, and finding it hard to make it understood that they are neither there to fight nor to trade. At last advices (Oct. 30th) they were still investigating. Gordon Pacha, Governor-General of Southern Egypt, reports that the cap- ture of all the slave depots is considered certain. The Egyptians, he says, killed ten chiefs and~ 2,000 men while following up a victory they had gained over the slave-traders. The steamer Kangaroo, with part of the cable to be laid between Natal and Aden, last month left the Thames for Natal via the Suez Canal. The Natal and Zanzibar section will be open for business in July. This will place South Africa within a weeks communication of London. The remainder of the line will be completed before the end of the present year. Mr. Henry M. Stanley is reported to be now on his way to Zanzibar with a commission from the King of the Belgians to re-organize the hitherto unsuccessful Belgian expedition. The Khedive has dismissed his English and French Ministers, and appointed a Cabinet composed exclusively of his own subjects. He has also prepared a financial scheme on his own account, and set aside that of the English financier. This revolutionary conduct will re-awaken anxiety in both England and France, for the future of Egypt and for the safety of European capital invested in that country. THE FREEDMEN. REv. JOS. E. ROY, D. D., FIELD SUPERINTENDENT, ATLANTA, GA. A TOUR INTO THE SOUTHWEST. Through Alabama, Mississippi and Texas. It took seven weeks. It started off the re-renting of the same. Erected by with a week in the revival meeting at the Freedmens Bureau, it had been put Talladega College, where some score and into the hands of a local Board of Trust, a half of souls were hopefully led to and by that Board it had been leased for Christ. ten years to the American Missionary I tarried for a day at Montgomery to Association, which, after running it for contract for the repairing and re-painting several years, sub-rented it to the City of the Swayne School building, and for Board of Educationthe A. M. A. giv

Tour into the Southwest The Freedmen 140-143

140 A Tour into the Southwest. Africa. The Church Missionary Society has ordained missionaries at nine stations on the River Niger, under the charge of the native Bishop Crowther. At some of these stations the idols have already been given up. At others there has been long and severe persecution, which, however, appears to have largely broken down. On the whole, these missions have been a great success. The Cardiff Livingstone ~is8ion (Welsh) was originated about three years ago, and has two stations on the Congo River. Dr. Laws and Mr. Stewart, of the Scottish Missionary Society on Lake Nyassa, are examining the cou~itry on the west coast of the Lake to find a perma- nent location better adapted to the wants of the mission than Livingstonia. They have visited several of the tribes, being received with some suspicion, and finding it hard to make it understood that they are neither there to fight nor to trade. At last advices (Oct. 30th) they were still investigating. Gordon Pacha, Governor-General of Southern Egypt, reports that the cap- ture of all the slave depots is considered certain. The Egyptians, he says, killed ten chiefs and~ 2,000 men while following up a victory they had gained over the slave-traders. The steamer Kangaroo, with part of the cable to be laid between Natal and Aden, last month left the Thames for Natal via the Suez Canal. The Natal and Zanzibar section will be open for business in July. This will place South Africa within a weeks communication of London. The remainder of the line will be completed before the end of the present year. Mr. Henry M. Stanley is reported to be now on his way to Zanzibar with a commission from the King of the Belgians to re-organize the hitherto unsuccessful Belgian expedition. The Khedive has dismissed his English and French Ministers, and appointed a Cabinet composed exclusively of his own subjects. He has also prepared a financial scheme on his own account, and set aside that of the English financier. This revolutionary conduct will re-awaken anxiety in both England and France, for the future of Egypt and for the safety of European capital invested in that country. THE FREEDMEN. REv. JOS. E. ROY, D. D., FIELD SUPERINTENDENT, ATLANTA, GA. A TOUR INTO THE SOUTHWEST. Through Alabama, Mississippi and Texas. It took seven weeks. It started off the re-renting of the same. Erected by with a week in the revival meeting at the Freedmens Bureau, it had been put Talladega College, where some score and into the hands of a local Board of Trust, a half of souls were hopefully led to and by that Board it had been leased for Christ. ten years to the American Missionary I tarried for a day at Montgomery to Association, which, after running it for contract for the repairing and re-painting several years, sub-rented it to the City of the Swayne School building, and for Board of Educationthe A. M. A. giv A Tour into the Sout/iwe8t. 141 ing the rent, keeping the house in re- pair and appointing the teachers, the city paying the salaries. This arrange- ment was renewed for another five years by the appropriate legal papers. The teachers and the pastors family that of Rev. Dr. Flavel Bascom, for the winterare domiciled in the Home. A quiet, persuasive spiritual work was at that time manifest in the school. The pastor was found to be happy in his work, and to have made many friends in the city, being a regular member of the weekly ministers meeting. On the tour a week was given to New Orleans for the inspection of the church and educational work in that vicinity, and for attendance upon the first meet- ing of the Sunday-school Association of Louisiana. This cause got a grand send- off. The Northern helpers were greatly useful. The Freedmens interest was well represented in the Association, as re- ported last month. The Straight Uni- versity, with its edifice rebuilt upon a much better location, was found in a healthy working condition, with 200 pupils in the academic department; twenty-five in the law department, one-half of them white; and ten in the theological. The Central Church Pres. Alexander, l)astor had been having a revival that had brought in a score of members. The three or four other churches were found in a hopeful condition under their native pastors. Great was the satisfaction in preaching for some of these congregations. Straight is now in great need of dormitory build- ings for boarding students. A couple of days was given to Terre- bonne parish in preaching for Rev. Daniel Clay, and in visiting the other pastors and churches under his fatherly eye. Mr. Clay, a son of the great Commoner, is doing much in bring- ing the Gospel among the common people of his race. The tour led us by another cluster of Louisiana churches, the one centering at New Iberia, on the Bayou Teche, in the region of the ancient settlement of Evangelines story. Two parish seats and three settlements belong to this cluster. All but one have plain houses of worship. All are under colored preachers. At New Iberia, be- sides fair public schools for the Freed- men, there is a fine select school in Grant Hall, built by the colored people. Three sermons sought to confirm these ~hurches in the Gospel way. Thence across the Gulf to Texas. The Barnes Institute, at Galveston, built by the Bureau, and run for a time by the American Missionary Association, is now used for a Freedmens public school, with four teachers and over three hun- dred scholars. At Houston the ~Greg- ory Institute duplicates the history of The Barnes, and is doing remarkably well. Such is also the story of the In- stitute at Waco. The American Mis- sionary Association may count in with its best work the founding of these In- stitutes, which being well set up have flowed into the public school system. The impetus given and the standard put up yet abide in large measure. The tour finds its western limit at San Antonio, that ancient seat of Spanish Romanism, with its antique mission for- tifications yet standing in their frowning strength. That early pre-emption se- cures two-thirds of the pre-ent popula- tion, 21,OOQ, to the Romanists, who have three massive stone cathedralsone for the Spanish, one for the German and one for the English speaking people, and who have their extensive Nunnery and Jesuit College, which are patronized not a little by American families. This city is the metropolis for Southwestern Texas, which is as large as the whole of New England. It has also an immense wholesale trade with cities in Mexico. San Antonio becomes also a strategic point for Protestantism. The M. E. Church North is just now establishing itself here at large expense. The col 142 A Jour into the Sout/iwe6t. ored people are well supplied with churches and schools. The second best Protestant church edifice is that of the African M. E. Church, just completed, at a cost of $8,000, and nearly all paid for. Superintendent West was there the same Sabbath, reconnoitering. He was urged by the M. E. Sbuth people to re- main and hold a protracted meeting; but a campaign just at hand in Massachu- setts prevented. Western Texas was suf- fering dreadfully from an eight months drought. The plain of San Antonio was an exception, being irrigated by the waters of the mighty springs just above the city, which, forming the San Antonio River, furnish the hydrant supply for that great population, and send babbling streams through all the streets and over all the surrounding gardens and farms. So may that sainted city be a fountain of moral refreshing in all that region! The Tillotson Normal Institute of Texas, under the excellent Mrs. Garland, has already sent out twenty teachers. Its beautiful site, overlooking the city, is this summer to be crowned with its comely edifice, which, beyond the outer shell, is to await the incoming of funds for its completion. This trip has re- sulted with me in a profound impression as to the need of this institution and as to the grand sweep of its future useful- ness. Nothing better can be done for the Freedmen of Texas. This empire, stretching a thousand miles on the Rio Grande and eight hundred miles east- ward to the Sabine, calls mightily for such an institute to train those who shall be the teachers of her sable chil- dren. These immense areas of cheap, rich, southern lands, that were never cursed by the tilth of slavery, are calling in the Freedmen to take to themselves homes and farms and the respectability that comes from ownership of the soil. Such people, most of all, hunger for good schools. Texas is liberal toward her colored school children. To furnish them teachers, skilled in the art and trained so that they shall exert a whole- some social and spiritual influence, is the great desideratum. The cluster of churches made up of Corpus Christi, Goliad, Helena, Schu- lenburg and Flatonia, are organized into the Congregational Association of South- western Texas. The only two without houses of worship are now moving to purchase church houses. Rev. B. C. Church is a very patriarch among them. Rev. S. M. Coles, pastor and teacher at Corpus, is a colored graduate of Yale. Brothers Thompson and Turner, native pastors, are sound, pure and able men. it was a treat to minister the Word to each of these hungering congrega- tions. At Flatonia, when the local authorities went back upon their promise of the public school-room for a service which had been advertised in the town news- paper, because the white citizens would not allow that place to be used by fig- gers, we resorted to the platform of the R. R. Station, in the center of the vil- lage, and had a rousing open-air meet- ing that attracted many of the white citizens, who were cordially welcomed to our place of worship, for our God is no respecter of persons. At Corpus Christi a two days meeting followed upon some special interest, under the preaching of Mr. Thompson, which had greatly confirmed the church, and had added a half dozen to the company of the believers. One day by the mail-schooner from Corpus to Indianola, another day by steamer to Galveston, and a third day by Morgans line, carried the tour back to New Orleans. A day there for supplementary reconnoissance, a Sab- bath with the thriving church of Rev. D. L. Hickok, and the Emerson Insti- tute at Mobile, and then a long run up to Atlanta finished this tour of many hundred miles among our schools and churches of the Southwest. A Lady illi8sionary NeededA Pro?nising Field. 143 GEORGIA. A Lady Missionary Needed. REV. S. S. ASHLEY, ATLANTA, GA. I desire to call your attention to the need of a missionary for this city. This has been a pressing necessity in all the past of the work here, but at present is more urgent than ever. This city is rapidly increasing in population. The increase of the colored population keeps pace with the white in numbers, and far outstrips the white in ignorance and poverty. The number of vagabond black children here would astonish you. On the Sabbath, the vacant lots and out- skirts of the city are thronged with them. They are without parental re- straint, and never attend meeting or Sabbath-school. They are ripening in vice and crime. There is a chain-gang in the city, composed, as I learn, of boys ranging from ten to fifteen years of age. There are many children among the county convicts. Thus they are drifting to the penitentiary and to ruin. Once in the penitentiary, they are lost, for the convict prison system of this State is bad. This city is full of devil-traps. These strangers who are moving in will largely become victims. Now, we should have some agency by which as many as possi- ble of these families can be reached. Their domestic condition is deplorable. In fact, this may be said of the colored families generally of the South. They need influences and instruction that can best, and, as I believe, only be car- ried to them by a woman missionary. The women, the mothers, the home- makers Qf this people, must be instructed and led to better things in their homes. The.y must be seen in their houses. With such homes as are common among them, it is well nigh impossible for them to be Christians. Large families living in one roomyou know how it iscomfort, cleanliness, modesty and religious devo- tion are almost impossible. Illiterate, the Bible must be read to them; igno- rant of their moral duties as parents, they must be taught. Strangers to do- mestic comforts and necessities, they must be made acquainted with them. Superstitious and fanatical, they must be introduced to places and modes of a scriptural, instructive and reasonable worshipa thousand matters of great importance must be brought to their at- tention and kept before their minds, un- til the proper impression is produced. This can only be done by a missionary moving about among them at their homes. This person should be a woman, because women are principally to be reached. Now, can you not commission Miss Ste- venson for this work? In connection with her school, she now does a great deal in this direction, but not a tithe of what needs to be done. She is thor- oughly acquainted with all these people, has had ten years experience among them, and is admirably adapted to the work. She has a heart for it. Please consider this. Another matter: The young men con- nected with this church and congrega- tion have organized a Library Associa- tion. A Library has been startednum- ber of volumes at present very small. I have thought that perhaps you had in or about your office some spare books that you could send to us. We want to build up a Parish Library. I should like, especially, some works on Africa. ALABAMA. TenantryA Promising FieldPolities. REV. FLAVEL BASCOM, D.D., MONTGOMERY. I gave you some first impressions on entering the service of the A. M. A. last autumn, and you now ask for my im- pressions after three months experience and observation. So brief a residence in a single South- ern city does not qualify one to speak with authority on the various questions pertaining to your work among the Freed- men; but it does enable him to test your

Rev. S. S. Ashley Ashley, S. S., Rev. Georgia, Atlanta--Lady Missionary Needed The Freedmen 143

A Lady illi8sionary NeededA Pro?nising Field. 143 GEORGIA. A Lady Missionary Needed. REV. S. S. ASHLEY, ATLANTA, GA. I desire to call your attention to the need of a missionary for this city. This has been a pressing necessity in all the past of the work here, but at present is more urgent than ever. This city is rapidly increasing in population. The increase of the colored population keeps pace with the white in numbers, and far outstrips the white in ignorance and poverty. The number of vagabond black children here would astonish you. On the Sabbath, the vacant lots and out- skirts of the city are thronged with them. They are without parental re- straint, and never attend meeting or Sabbath-school. They are ripening in vice and crime. There is a chain-gang in the city, composed, as I learn, of boys ranging from ten to fifteen years of age. There are many children among the county convicts. Thus they are drifting to the penitentiary and to ruin. Once in the penitentiary, they are lost, for the convict prison system of this State is bad. This city is full of devil-traps. These strangers who are moving in will largely become victims. Now, we should have some agency by which as many as possi- ble of these families can be reached. Their domestic condition is deplorable. In fact, this may be said of the colored families generally of the South. They need influences and instruction that can best, and, as I believe, only be car- ried to them by a woman missionary. The women, the mothers, the home- makers Qf this people, must be instructed and led to better things in their homes. The.y must be seen in their houses. With such homes as are common among them, it is well nigh impossible for them to be Christians. Large families living in one roomyou know how it iscomfort, cleanliness, modesty and religious devo- tion are almost impossible. Illiterate, the Bible must be read to them; igno- rant of their moral duties as parents, they must be taught. Strangers to do- mestic comforts and necessities, they must be made acquainted with them. Superstitious and fanatical, they must be introduced to places and modes of a scriptural, instructive and reasonable worshipa thousand matters of great importance must be brought to their at- tention and kept before their minds, un- til the proper impression is produced. This can only be done by a missionary moving about among them at their homes. This person should be a woman, because women are principally to be reached. Now, can you not commission Miss Ste- venson for this work? In connection with her school, she now does a great deal in this direction, but not a tithe of what needs to be done. She is thor- oughly acquainted with all these people, has had ten years experience among them, and is admirably adapted to the work. She has a heart for it. Please consider this. Another matter: The young men con- nected with this church and congrega- tion have organized a Library Associa- tion. A Library has been startednum- ber of volumes at present very small. I have thought that perhaps you had in or about your office some spare books that you could send to us. We want to build up a Parish Library. I should like, especially, some works on Africa. ALABAMA. TenantryA Promising FieldPolities. REV. FLAVEL BASCOM, D.D., MONTGOMERY. I gave you some first impressions on entering the service of the A. M. A. last autumn, and you now ask for my im- pressions after three months experience and observation. So brief a residence in a single South- ern city does not qualify one to speak with authority on the various questions pertaining to your work among the Freed- men; but it does enable him to test your

Rev. Flavel Bascom, D.D. Bascom, Flavel, Rev., D.D. Alabama, Montgomery--Tenantry, Promising Field, Politics The Freedmen 143-145

A Lady illi8sionary NeededA Pro?nising Field. 143 GEORGIA. A Lady Missionary Needed. REV. S. S. ASHLEY, ATLANTA, GA. I desire to call your attention to the need of a missionary for this city. This has been a pressing necessity in all the past of the work here, but at present is more urgent than ever. This city is rapidly increasing in population. The increase of the colored population keeps pace with the white in numbers, and far outstrips the white in ignorance and poverty. The number of vagabond black children here would astonish you. On the Sabbath, the vacant lots and out- skirts of the city are thronged with them. They are without parental re- straint, and never attend meeting or Sabbath-school. They are ripening in vice and crime. There is a chain-gang in the city, composed, as I learn, of boys ranging from ten to fifteen years of age. There are many children among the county convicts. Thus they are drifting to the penitentiary and to ruin. Once in the penitentiary, they are lost, for the convict prison system of this State is bad. This city is full of devil-traps. These strangers who are moving in will largely become victims. Now, we should have some agency by which as many as possi- ble of these families can be reached. Their domestic condition is deplorable. In fact, this may be said of the colored families generally of the South. They need influences and instruction that can best, and, as I believe, only be car- ried to them by a woman missionary. The women, the mothers, the home- makers Qf this people, must be instructed and led to better things in their homes. The.y must be seen in their houses. With such homes as are common among them, it is well nigh impossible for them to be Christians. Large families living in one roomyou know how it iscomfort, cleanliness, modesty and religious devo- tion are almost impossible. Illiterate, the Bible must be read to them; igno- rant of their moral duties as parents, they must be taught. Strangers to do- mestic comforts and necessities, they must be made acquainted with them. Superstitious and fanatical, they must be introduced to places and modes of a scriptural, instructive and reasonable worshipa thousand matters of great importance must be brought to their at- tention and kept before their minds, un- til the proper impression is produced. This can only be done by a missionary moving about among them at their homes. This person should be a woman, because women are principally to be reached. Now, can you not commission Miss Ste- venson for this work? In connection with her school, she now does a great deal in this direction, but not a tithe of what needs to be done. She is thor- oughly acquainted with all these people, has had ten years experience among them, and is admirably adapted to the work. She has a heart for it. Please consider this. Another matter: The young men con- nected with this church and congrega- tion have organized a Library Associa- tion. A Library has been startednum- ber of volumes at present very small. I have thought that perhaps you had in or about your office some spare books that you could send to us. We want to build up a Parish Library. I should like, especially, some works on Africa. ALABAMA. TenantryA Promising FieldPolities. REV. FLAVEL BASCOM, D.D., MONTGOMERY. I gave you some first impressions on entering the service of the A. M. A. last autumn, and you now ask for my im- pressions after three months experience and observation. So brief a residence in a single South- ern city does not qualify one to speak with authority on the various questions pertaining to your work among the Freed- men; but it does enable him to test your 141 ZlienantryA Promising FieldPolitics. methods and to examine the results achieved. He can thus judge of the adaptation of means employtmd to the ends desired, and can forecast the future with more confidence. There are some things of which I am fully persuaded, by my short residence at the South; one of these is, that the colored people in this country are not dying out. I occasionally hear it said that they are. Possibly the wish is father to the thought. But they are not only here to stay, but they are here to multiply and increase as did the Jews in Egypt; and they are already so large a factor in our population that their character and con- dition are to affect the character and welfare of our country far more than is generally realized. I have been happily disappointed in witnessing the industry and thrift of the Freedmen as mechanics and common laborers; the colored men seem to do very nearly all the work which is done, and with the aid of the women, who are equally industrious, they secure an honest and,what is to them, a comfortable living. The most dependent and least pro- gressive class of the Freedmen are those who work the plantations on shares. The planter dictates his own terms to the tenantfurnishes him team and tools at his own pricesells him provisions on credit at rates far above the cash market price, and then charges interest, fixing the per cent. to suit himself. When the crop is gathered, if the renter does not find himself in debt to his landlord, he is more fortunate than many. He rarely finds himself richer for his summers work. The simple rules of arithmetic, thoroughly understood by the tenant, will remedy all this ; and when I hear the colored children at school reciting the multiplication table so enthusiastic- ally, I am sure it is a prophecy of a good time coming~~ to them. My observation convinces me that the colored people are v& y desirous for the education of their children, and that their children acquire learning with as much facility as any other class. Let all the colored children and youth of the Southern States have access to schools conducted by competent teachers, and in a very few years they will solve the political and social problems that are just now so embarrassing. They will not only take care of themselves, but they wili be very valuable auxiliaries in taking care of the nation. I find in the colored churches of dif- ferent denominations specimens of very estimable Christian character. I find, also, just those infirmities which I should expect if God made the Caucasian and the African of the same blood. I have found the colored congregations very decorous and eagerly attentive to the preaching of the Gospel. I find them quite accessible for religious conversa- tion, and apparently thankful for the in- terest manifested in their behalf. They furnish, therefore, a field for Christian effort that is full of promise. If there is another missionary field more inviting, or promising richer harvests to faithful culture, I know not where it is found. I am profoundly impressed with the importance of the schools, and espe- cially of the higher institutions estab- lished by the American Missionary Asso- ciation, and by the Mission Boards of other Christian denominations. These institutions must train multitudes of competent teachers, who will educate the masses. In these institutions must also be educated a native ministry to meet the wants of their people at home, and to carry the Gospel to the dark con- tinent from which their fathers came. It is difficult to conceive of a work more important, or promising more beneficent results, than that which is being done by the higher educational institutions for the Freedmen. The importance of enlarging their capacity for receiving pupils, and enabling them to aid indigent pupils in defraying the expenses of their education, cannot be over-estimated. Emerson InstduteJiater Encouragements. 145 The relation of the Freedmen to poli- tics raises questions that are very per- plexing and threatening. The Southern States have, for the present, virtually dis- franchised the colored men; and they seem united and firm in the purpose to ex- clude them from all influence in politics, unless they will vote for the party that so recently sought to perpetuate their bondage by a dissolution of the Union. What, thcn, should the colored men do, and what should their friends do for them I Many of them are intelligent and patmiotic, and worthy to have a share in the government of the State and the nation. But many of them are as utterly unfit, at present, for such re- sponsibility as are the most ignorant classes in our Northern cities; but they are improving. Every year adds to their intelligence, and if the helping hand of Christian philanthropy is not withheld, they will, by education, by temperance, by morality and more intelligent piety, by industry and the accumulation of property, win for themselves a position of respectability. They will not then need soldiers to protect them at the polls. They will take care of them- selves. Their ballots will be received and counted. Not only so, among the whites there will be two parties, as of old, that xviii vie with each other in soliciting the colored vote, by out-bid- ding each other in the promise of favors in return. Is it not wisdom, then, for the colored man patiently to bide his time, meanwhile striving more earnestly for the qualifications than for the rights of a voter I And is it not wiser for the friends of the Freedman to furnish him every facility for acquiring the qualifica- tions of a voter, than to wrangle f or- ever about his rights Emerson InstituteEarly Discouragements, Later Encouragements. REV. D. L. HICIjOK, MOBILE. For various reasons, among them the sickness of yellow fever, our work here commenced under very unfavorable cir cumstances. Our school opened the 20th of November, almost two months after the regular time, with only 17 scholars the first week, and with but little pros- pect of any considerable increase. Th~ teachers were all new except Miss Ste~ phenson, and hence they did not know what to expect, and therefore not enough about the work to be discouraged. Igno- ran Ce, sometimes at least, is bliss. If it did not give us faith it saved us from being faithless. There are some things that are food in a negative way by pre- venting the usual waste in the system. Knowledge is power. Ignorance is somewhere along there when it saves us from the need of power. We accepted what we found as being all that we had any right in our simplicity to expect, and carefully hid it as leaven in the meal. The leaven, however, seemed wonder- fully little, and the meal a great deal more than three measures; but God has blessed our work beyond our expectation and faith. The measure, according to our faith, was pressed down and run- ning over. Our numbers rapidly in- creased so that by Christmas we had about 75 scholars, and after the holidays our numbers came up to more than 150. We still have accessions every week, and the prospect is that before the close of the year we shall have more scholars than we have room for. Already the primary room is filled beyond its seating capacity. The school has at present four depart- ments: the primary, which numbers about 60; the intermediate, which num- bers between 40 and 50; the normal, which numbers about the same; and the higher normal, which at present is only a small class studying Latin, geometry and natural philosophy. The A class of the normal, which is quite large, will soon be in this department. We feel that we are having the confi- dence and co-operation of the colored people. The last few weeks has encour- aged us very much. We recently had a literary, musical and social entertainment

Rev. D. L. Hickok Hickok, D. L., Rev. Alabama, Mobile--Emerson Institute--Early Discouragements, Later Encouragements The Freedmen 145-146

Emerson InstduteJiater Encouragements. 145 The relation of the Freedmen to poli- tics raises questions that are very per- plexing and threatening. The Southern States have, for the present, virtually dis- franchised the colored men; and they seem united and firm in the purpose to ex- clude them from all influence in politics, unless they will vote for the party that so recently sought to perpetuate their bondage by a dissolution of the Union. What, thcn, should the colored men do, and what should their friends do for them I Many of them are intelligent and patmiotic, and worthy to have a share in the government of the State and the nation. But many of them are as utterly unfit, at present, for such re- sponsibility as are the most ignorant classes in our Northern cities; but they are improving. Every year adds to their intelligence, and if the helping hand of Christian philanthropy is not withheld, they will, by education, by temperance, by morality and more intelligent piety, by industry and the accumulation of property, win for themselves a position of respectability. They will not then need soldiers to protect them at the polls. They will take care of them- selves. Their ballots will be received and counted. Not only so, among the whites there will be two parties, as of old, that xviii vie with each other in soliciting the colored vote, by out-bid- ding each other in the promise of favors in return. Is it not wisdom, then, for the colored man patiently to bide his time, meanwhile striving more earnestly for the qualifications than for the rights of a voter I And is it not wiser for the friends of the Freedman to furnish him every facility for acquiring the qualifica- tions of a voter, than to wrangle f or- ever about his rights Emerson InstituteEarly Discouragements, Later Encouragements. REV. D. L. HICIjOK, MOBILE. For various reasons, among them the sickness of yellow fever, our work here commenced under very unfavorable cir cumstances. Our school opened the 20th of November, almost two months after the regular time, with only 17 scholars the first week, and with but little pros- pect of any considerable increase. Th~ teachers were all new except Miss Ste~ phenson, and hence they did not know what to expect, and therefore not enough about the work to be discouraged. Igno- ran Ce, sometimes at least, is bliss. If it did not give us faith it saved us from being faithless. There are some things that are food in a negative way by pre- venting the usual waste in the system. Knowledge is power. Ignorance is somewhere along there when it saves us from the need of power. We accepted what we found as being all that we had any right in our simplicity to expect, and carefully hid it as leaven in the meal. The leaven, however, seemed wonder- fully little, and the meal a great deal more than three measures; but God has blessed our work beyond our expectation and faith. The measure, according to our faith, was pressed down and run- ning over. Our numbers rapidly in- creased so that by Christmas we had about 75 scholars, and after the holidays our numbers came up to more than 150. We still have accessions every week, and the prospect is that before the close of the year we shall have more scholars than we have room for. Already the primary room is filled beyond its seating capacity. The school has at present four depart- ments: the primary, which numbers about 60; the intermediate, which num- bers between 40 and 50; the normal, which numbers about the same; and the higher normal, which at present is only a small class studying Latin, geometry and natural philosophy. The A class of the normal, which is quite large, will soon be in this department. We feel that we are having the confi- dence and co-operation of the colored people. The last few weeks has encour- aged us very much. We recently had a literary, musical and social entertainment 146 Revival of EducationA Useful ckurcA. for the pupils and patrons of the school. It was held in the normal room of our building, which we also use as an assem- bly room, where we provided extra seats somewhat beyond rather than according to our faith; but not only was every seat filled, many went away because they could not even find standing room. At the close of the literary exercises the pu- pils brought forward their parents and friends and introduced theni to the teach- ers, when sociability and the shaking of the hands became the order for the re- mainder of the evening. The history of our school work for the past few months is repeated in our Sab- bath-school and church work. We be- gan with scarcely more than five loaves and two fishes. At the first religious meeting which I attended there were just seven present five colored and two white people. What were they among so many? But God has graciously given us the increase here also. Our Sabbath- school now numbers 60, with 10 teach- ers, and is increasing every Sabbath. It is yet a small school, indeed, but it is in good working order. The ma- chinery is complete in all its parts. Its lack is inward rather than out- ward. It needs only the animating power of the Holy Spirit to make it a living body. We have got the dust to- gether and have formed it, and we are praying that God would breathe into its nostrils that it may become a living soul. To this end the teachers have just re- solved to hold a half-hour prayer-meet- ing at the close of the school each Sab- bath. Our church is quite small. Congre- gationalisin makes but little show in this typical Southern city. It will be a good many years before we have New England on the Gulf; yet I believe the leaven is here that is to leaven the lump. Our church contains a few earnest, faithful workers. There are those who have watched with Christ in the dark hour. Their days of vigilance will soon be over, when they may sleep in Jesus and take their rest. May God bless them! A Revival of EducationA Useful Church. REV. GEORGE E. HILL, MARION. I cannot say that we are enjoying a revival of religion, but we are in the midst of a revival of education, which is here at the South, emphatically, the handmaid of the Gospel. The Lincoln Normal Institute, for colored pupils of both sexes, was founded in 1869 by the A. M. A. Six years ago it passed into the hands of the State, which makes an annual appropriation of $4,000 for the teachers salaries. This year the school has taken a fresh start, having enrolled 217 pupils, and a new building is about to be erected for their accommodation. In the Nor.- mal Department for the training of teachers, there are classes in Latin, Greek and French, as well as the higher English branches. The order and dis- cipline are equal to the average of our high schools at the North. Its pupils sustain a literary society, for weekly essays and discussions, and also publish a monthly paper. One young man walks ten miles every day to attend the school. The influence of such an institution is felt in the very atmosphere. The fever for learning is contagious. Men wh~ work hard all day in the field or at their trade are so eager for knowledge that, to meet the demand, classes have just~ been organized for a night school. Meanwhile our little church is keeping on the even tenor of its way. There have been several hopeful conversions, and four are about to unite by profession. No falling off in attendance on Sabbath or evening meetings. Four of our young people are this year at Talladega Col- lege, and two promising young men have the ministry in view. Nineteen were present at our teachers meeting last week.

Rev. George E. Hill Hill, George E., Rev. Alabama, Marion--Revival of Education--A Useful Church The Freedmen 146-147

146 Revival of EducationA Useful ckurcA. for the pupils and patrons of the school. It was held in the normal room of our building, which we also use as an assem- bly room, where we provided extra seats somewhat beyond rather than according to our faith; but not only was every seat filled, many went away because they could not even find standing room. At the close of the literary exercises the pu- pils brought forward their parents and friends and introduced theni to the teach- ers, when sociability and the shaking of the hands became the order for the re- mainder of the evening. The history of our school work for the past few months is repeated in our Sab- bath-school and church work. We be- gan with scarcely more than five loaves and two fishes. At the first religious meeting which I attended there were just seven present five colored and two white people. What were they among so many? But God has graciously given us the increase here also. Our Sabbath- school now numbers 60, with 10 teach- ers, and is increasing every Sabbath. It is yet a small school, indeed, but it is in good working order. The ma- chinery is complete in all its parts. Its lack is inward rather than out- ward. It needs only the animating power of the Holy Spirit to make it a living body. We have got the dust to- gether and have formed it, and we are praying that God would breathe into its nostrils that it may become a living soul. To this end the teachers have just re- solved to hold a half-hour prayer-meet- ing at the close of the school each Sab- bath. Our church is quite small. Congre- gationalisin makes but little show in this typical Southern city. It will be a good many years before we have New England on the Gulf; yet I believe the leaven is here that is to leaven the lump. Our church contains a few earnest, faithful workers. There are those who have watched with Christ in the dark hour. Their days of vigilance will soon be over, when they may sleep in Jesus and take their rest. May God bless them! A Revival of EducationA Useful Church. REV. GEORGE E. HILL, MARION. I cannot say that we are enjoying a revival of religion, but we are in the midst of a revival of education, which is here at the South, emphatically, the handmaid of the Gospel. The Lincoln Normal Institute, for colored pupils of both sexes, was founded in 1869 by the A. M. A. Six years ago it passed into the hands of the State, which makes an annual appropriation of $4,000 for the teachers salaries. This year the school has taken a fresh start, having enrolled 217 pupils, and a new building is about to be erected for their accommodation. In the Nor.- mal Department for the training of teachers, there are classes in Latin, Greek and French, as well as the higher English branches. The order and dis- cipline are equal to the average of our high schools at the North. Its pupils sustain a literary society, for weekly essays and discussions, and also publish a monthly paper. One young man walks ten miles every day to attend the school. The influence of such an institution is felt in the very atmosphere. The fever for learning is contagious. Men wh~ work hard all day in the field or at their trade are so eager for knowledge that, to meet the demand, classes have just~ been organized for a night school. Meanwhile our little church is keeping on the even tenor of its way. There have been several hopeful conversions, and four are about to unite by profession. No falling off in attendance on Sabbath or evening meetings. Four of our young people are this year at Talladega Col- lege, and two promising young men have the ministry in view. Nineteen were present at our teachers meeting last week. ConcertLast Years Graduates (lifts Acknowledged. 147 At the Home we have three meet- ings Sunday evenings: one for women, one for boys, and a girls, class prayer meeting, with a kindergarten for the little ones during the week. One of the pleasant incidents in our winters work has been the distribution of five barrels of clothing from kind friends at the North. The people are poor, but not penurious. A girls sew- ing class has sent $21, the avails of their handiwork, for the Mendi Mis- sion, and the church appropriates the weekly offering once a month towards the pastors salary. It is truly delightful to see the readi- ness of this people for religious instruc- tion, and to witness the fruits of our labor in their marked elevation. They are quick, industrious, pleasing, and un- obtrusive in their manners, with a decid- ed distaste for loudness of every sort; showing, too, as much decorum at church, and as proper a regard for the Sabbath, as I have ever seen in any com- munity. From all which, it may be inferred that here, at least, the uplifting process has already passed the stage of incip- iency. LOUISIANA. ConcertLast Years GraduatesGifts Acknowledged. PROF. J. K. COLE, STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY. We have reached another mile-stone in our school work. Many of our older pupils, especially the senior class, would have been glad to keep in harness, but circumstances were favorable for a two days break in school routine, and we have it. Last evening the singing class, under the direction of Prof. MePherron, gave a concert at Central Church. Phe house was filled with as fine an audience as could be gathered in any city. There was a generous sprinkling of white folks, including several of the local board of trustees and other appreciative friends. The proceeds will help some of our needy students to books; while a greater and more lasting good will result from the influence of the music sungnot upon those only who took part in the singing, but upon the large audience who listened so attentively, and who were cheered and encouraged by what the young people of their race are doing. New scholars come in almost every week, and though some drop out our number is kept well up to 200. We hear interesting and encouraging reports from our last years graduates, who are all teaching. Dr. J. E. Roy has lately seen two of them, and re- ports that they are doing well. One has an evening school for the parents and older ones, and both are doing good work in Sabbath-school. In a letter just received from one of them she says that she has to humor the parents in their whims, or they keep their children out of school. She writes: Before school began my ability to teach was doubted by a father. He wanted to get a book for his son, who had never been to school; he intended to buy a Websters speller. I told him what book he needed, but he would not get it until many of the patrons of the school reasoned him into it. I have a Sabbath-school, which is almost beyond my ability to teach. I am superintend- ent, treasurer, secretary, and every- thing. I find it difficult to interest the children. Last Sabbath there was an at- tendance of twenty-seven. Of her day- school she writes: It is very difficult to make the children think that they do not know everything. Many of them have been studying books that they can- not even read understandingly. I am trying to govern by kindness as much as possible, and punish only when I see that I cannot possibly help it. 1 think the children are progressing as rapidly as they could anywhere under like cir- cumstances. Thus the . influence of our school and

Prof. J. K. Cole Cole, J. K., Prof. Louisiana--Straight University--Concert--Last Year's Graduates--Gifts Acknowledged The Freedmen 147-148

ConcertLast Years Graduates (lifts Acknowledged. 147 At the Home we have three meet- ings Sunday evenings: one for women, one for boys, and a girls, class prayer meeting, with a kindergarten for the little ones during the week. One of the pleasant incidents in our winters work has been the distribution of five barrels of clothing from kind friends at the North. The people are poor, but not penurious. A girls sew- ing class has sent $21, the avails of their handiwork, for the Mendi Mis- sion, and the church appropriates the weekly offering once a month towards the pastors salary. It is truly delightful to see the readi- ness of this people for religious instruc- tion, and to witness the fruits of our labor in their marked elevation. They are quick, industrious, pleasing, and un- obtrusive in their manners, with a decid- ed distaste for loudness of every sort; showing, too, as much decorum at church, and as proper a regard for the Sabbath, as I have ever seen in any com- munity. From all which, it may be inferred that here, at least, the uplifting process has already passed the stage of incip- iency. LOUISIANA. ConcertLast Years GraduatesGifts Acknowledged. PROF. J. K. COLE, STRAIGHT UNIVERSITY. We have reached another mile-stone in our school work. Many of our older pupils, especially the senior class, would have been glad to keep in harness, but circumstances were favorable for a two days break in school routine, and we have it. Last evening the singing class, under the direction of Prof. MePherron, gave a concert at Central Church. Phe house was filled with as fine an audience as could be gathered in any city. There was a generous sprinkling of white folks, including several of the local board of trustees and other appreciative friends. The proceeds will help some of our needy students to books; while a greater and more lasting good will result from the influence of the music sungnot upon those only who took part in the singing, but upon the large audience who listened so attentively, and who were cheered and encouraged by what the young people of their race are doing. New scholars come in almost every week, and though some drop out our number is kept well up to 200. We hear interesting and encouraging reports from our last years graduates, who are all teaching. Dr. J. E. Roy has lately seen two of them, and re- ports that they are doing well. One has an evening school for the parents and older ones, and both are doing good work in Sabbath-school. In a letter just received from one of them she says that she has to humor the parents in their whims, or they keep their children out of school. She writes: Before school began my ability to teach was doubted by a father. He wanted to get a book for his son, who had never been to school; he intended to buy a Websters speller. I told him what book he needed, but he would not get it until many of the patrons of the school reasoned him into it. I have a Sabbath-school, which is almost beyond my ability to teach. I am superintend- ent, treasurer, secretary, and every- thing. I find it difficult to interest the children. Last Sabbath there was an at- tendance of twenty-seven. Of her day- school she writes: It is very difficult to make the children think that they do not know everything. Many of them have been studying books that they can- not even read understandingly. I am trying to govern by kindness as much as possible, and punish only when I see that I cannot possibly help it. 1 think the children are progressing as rapidly as they could anywhere under like cir- cumstances. Thus the . influence of our school and 148 Revival Organ and Paper8 Needed. our teaching is extended, and in this way are the masses to he reached. Christian people of the North, let the means be liberally provided to educate these teachers who are to carry light and knowledge to their people. Our work is not all overspread with cloudless skies. We are under many disadvantages, and experience some sore disappointments. Not all whom we look upon with great hopes and earnest desires that their future may be marked by Christian usefulness, meet our expec- tations. We find careless and idle and heedless pupils; some, though they are very eager to learn, and work hard, make very slow progress; but, to the credit of this people be it said, a stubborn or wilfully disobedient pupil is rare. On the whole, the encouraging cases are largely in the majority, and the opposite kind lead us to exercise more care, per- severance, patience and prayerfulness. Our thanks are due to the ladies of the Congregational Church at Coichester, Conn., and to the ladies of the Free Church, Andover, Mass., for a barrel of bedding each, for the Mission Home. The contents were especially acceptable at the time received, for the Sunny South had on, just then, a decidedly winterish aspect, with the mercury at 18 degrees. Now we are in the midst of spring, with a profusion of orange blossoms, roses and green leaves. TEXAS. Revival-Ministerial Carpentry Organ and Papers Needed. REv. S. M. COLES, CORPUS CHRISTI. Surely the Lord is in this place and I knew it not. I have been led to feel the force of these words with somewhat of the surprise of their author, within the last two or three weeks. My work among this people has been, I confess, a little discouraging ; but now the Lord has smiled upon us, aye, He has showered upon us blessings from heaven. Brother Thompson, from Helena, has been with us the last four weeks~ We have worked together, and God has crowned our fee- ble efforts with success. In our con ference we decided to hold a series of religious meetings, intending there- by to stir up, if possible, the mem- bers of the church to greater activity. These meetings were commenced, and, as they continued, the interest deepened, both Christians and sinners being im- pressed. Many rose and asked the church to pray for them. To our great surprise and joy, sinners have come flocking homer backsliders have been reclaimed, the church has been made alive, and many out of Christ are inquiring. The manifest re- sult of our season of revival thus far is that six have been added to the church. Four young ladies, all under twenty-three years of age, joined,, by the profession of their faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. One who had backslidden came and acknowl- edged her sins, professing her belief that God had forgiven the same, asked par- don of the church, and was received back again into the fold. Another came, by letter, from the Baptist church. He was formerly a member of this church, and, as he said, he only came back again. And let me say, that these meetings were not characterized by ex- citement; not the least shouting was manifest during their continuance, but there was a deep seriousness shown upon each countenance. The colored people here are so wild and physical in their re- ligious meetings, while our church is so quiet, that they speak skeptically about our Christianity. An A. M. E. minister asked one of our young converts to- day, when she was converted. They are still looking througm Elijahs wind, earthquake and fire for the appearance of God, and but few wish to receive Him thniugh the still small voice. Our financial condition is not what we could wish, hut in the circumstances I do not think it could be much better.. The members failed this year to meet their pledges ; they are fifty dollars

Rev. S. M. Coles Coles, S. M., Rev. Texas--Corpus Christi--Revival--Ministerial Carpentry--Organ and Papers Needed The Freedmen 148-149

148 Revival Organ and Paper8 Needed. our teaching is extended, and in this way are the masses to he reached. Christian people of the North, let the means be liberally provided to educate these teachers who are to carry light and knowledge to their people. Our work is not all overspread with cloudless skies. We are under many disadvantages, and experience some sore disappointments. Not all whom we look upon with great hopes and earnest desires that their future may be marked by Christian usefulness, meet our expec- tations. We find careless and idle and heedless pupils; some, though they are very eager to learn, and work hard, make very slow progress; but, to the credit of this people be it said, a stubborn or wilfully disobedient pupil is rare. On the whole, the encouraging cases are largely in the majority, and the opposite kind lead us to exercise more care, per- severance, patience and prayerfulness. Our thanks are due to the ladies of the Congregational Church at Coichester, Conn., and to the ladies of the Free Church, Andover, Mass., for a barrel of bedding each, for the Mission Home. The contents were especially acceptable at the time received, for the Sunny South had on, just then, a decidedly winterish aspect, with the mercury at 18 degrees. Now we are in the midst of spring, with a profusion of orange blossoms, roses and green leaves. TEXAS. Revival-Ministerial Carpentry Organ and Papers Needed. REv. S. M. COLES, CORPUS CHRISTI. Surely the Lord is in this place and I knew it not. I have been led to feel the force of these words with somewhat of the surprise of their author, within the last two or three weeks. My work among this people has been, I confess, a little discouraging ; but now the Lord has smiled upon us, aye, He has showered upon us blessings from heaven. Brother Thompson, from Helena, has been with us the last four weeks~ We have worked together, and God has crowned our fee- ble efforts with success. In our con ference we decided to hold a series of religious meetings, intending there- by to stir up, if possible, the mem- bers of the church to greater activity. These meetings were commenced, and, as they continued, the interest deepened, both Christians and sinners being im- pressed. Many rose and asked the church to pray for them. To our great surprise and joy, sinners have come flocking homer backsliders have been reclaimed, the church has been made alive, and many out of Christ are inquiring. The manifest re- sult of our season of revival thus far is that six have been added to the church. Four young ladies, all under twenty-three years of age, joined,, by the profession of their faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. One who had backslidden came and acknowl- edged her sins, professing her belief that God had forgiven the same, asked par- don of the church, and was received back again into the fold. Another came, by letter, from the Baptist church. He was formerly a member of this church, and, as he said, he only came back again. And let me say, that these meetings were not characterized by ex- citement; not the least shouting was manifest during their continuance, but there was a deep seriousness shown upon each countenance. The colored people here are so wild and physical in their re- ligious meetings, while our church is so quiet, that they speak skeptically about our Christianity. An A. M. E. minister asked one of our young converts to- day, when she was converted. They are still looking througm Elijahs wind, earthquake and fire for the appearance of God, and but few wish to receive Him thniugh the still small voice. Our financial condition is not what we could wish, hut in the circumstances I do not think it could be much better.. The members failed this year to meet their pledges ; they are fifty dollars 3lempkisThe Yellow Fever Fund. 149~ short. But this was caused by having to meet unforeseen expenses. We enclosed our church lot just before Christmas. I advised them to do this, as the edifice was so much exposed. The carpenters work I did myself, and charged them nothing for it. My Sablfath-school is quite prosperous, but it is not so large now as it has been. Children need some- thing to draw their attention. I find that they are wonderfully attracted by music. We need an organ; but we are too poor to buy one. Will some kind friend send us an organ for our Sabbath- school? I am sure that great good could be done with an organ in attracting the attention of children and drawing them in from the streets. There are numbers of children strolling around on the Sahbath. Children here are allowed to go where they wish. If they want to come to my school, they come ; if not, they stay away; and parents have but little influ- ence over them in this respect. I would like to capture such, and~ I think I should be able to do this with music and papers. Cannot some of the friends of the mis- sionary cause send us their old Sabbath- school papers when they are done with them, remembering that God will bless their beneficence TENNESSEE. Material and Spiritual Value of the Yellow Fever Fund. MISS MA~~IIE A. MILTON. Various sums were sent to our treas- ury for the relief of the yellow fever sufferers. This little fund has been dis- tributed in New Orleans, Memphis and Mobile. The accompanying letter from Miss Milton shows the manner of its dis- tribution in Memphis: Most of those whom I found worthy of relief were people who were suffering from the effects of the fever, and could only make money enough to pay the rent. To such, a few barrels of coal or some provision and shoes gave a start, so that they could get on very well alone. We have had an unusually cold winter, and people have consequently needed more fuel, the sickly ones often having to remain in bed to keep warm. A pastor of one of the colored churches has beeii a~ great help in this work, by reporting needy cases in his part of the city. One poor woman, whom he reported, when visited, said, Sore the Lord must have sent you, for I have tried ever since I had the fever to get help, but being blind could not succeed. She was fur- nished with fuel and provision. She then said, You see how good the Lord is to me because I trust Him. Another man had always done very- well until he had the fever, from which he partially recovered, but had a relapse which laid him on his bed for months.. His wife also was sick, and the. family were in great distress when I visited. them, and sent relief, which so encour- aged them that the man was soon able to be at work again, and is doing well now. I had never gained access to this neigh-. borhood before, but by relieving this family I gained the confidence of the peo- ple, and they invited me to hold a weekly prayer-meeting there, which is well at- tended. Several families which have been relieved now send their children to our Sunday-school. Although several thou- sand dollars were sent here to relieve yel-.. low fever sufferers, many of the colored people received but little, some nothing.. It is very sad to hear of those who were so feeble that they could not stand in. the ranks to await their turn at the re- lief office, but sat on the ground till night came, and then receiving no at-- tention, went home to die! One man,. who had always been a good provider,.. sent his family to the country during the fever, but fell a victim .to it.himself,,and died, leaving his wife a nice house and. lot, but with several debts unpaid, and not a dollar for her support. Within a week after his death a beautiful baby. opened its. .wondering eyes for the first. time in this world Qf trouble. The poor. heart-broken mother, i~stea.d of welcom-~

Miss Hattie A. Milton Milton, Hattie A., Miss Tennessee--Material and Spiritual Value of the Yellow Fever Fund The Freedmen 149-150

3lempkisThe Yellow Fever Fund. 149~ short. But this was caused by having to meet unforeseen expenses. We enclosed our church lot just before Christmas. I advised them to do this, as the edifice was so much exposed. The carpenters work I did myself, and charged them nothing for it. My Sablfath-school is quite prosperous, but it is not so large now as it has been. Children need some- thing to draw their attention. I find that they are wonderfully attracted by music. We need an organ; but we are too poor to buy one. Will some kind friend send us an organ for our Sabbath- school? I am sure that great good could be done with an organ in attracting the attention of children and drawing them in from the streets. There are numbers of children strolling around on the Sahbath. Children here are allowed to go where they wish. If they want to come to my school, they come ; if not, they stay away; and parents have but little influ- ence over them in this respect. I would like to capture such, and~ I think I should be able to do this with music and papers. Cannot some of the friends of the mis- sionary cause send us their old Sabbath- school papers when they are done with them, remembering that God will bless their beneficence TENNESSEE. Material and Spiritual Value of the Yellow Fever Fund. MISS MA~~IIE A. MILTON. Various sums were sent to our treas- ury for the relief of the yellow fever sufferers. This little fund has been dis- tributed in New Orleans, Memphis and Mobile. The accompanying letter from Miss Milton shows the manner of its dis- tribution in Memphis: Most of those whom I found worthy of relief were people who were suffering from the effects of the fever, and could only make money enough to pay the rent. To such, a few barrels of coal or some provision and shoes gave a start, so that they could get on very well alone. We have had an unusually cold winter, and people have consequently needed more fuel, the sickly ones often having to remain in bed to keep warm. A pastor of one of the colored churches has beeii a~ great help in this work, by reporting needy cases in his part of the city. One poor woman, whom he reported, when visited, said, Sore the Lord must have sent you, for I have tried ever since I had the fever to get help, but being blind could not succeed. She was fur- nished with fuel and provision. She then said, You see how good the Lord is to me because I trust Him. Another man had always done very- well until he had the fever, from which he partially recovered, but had a relapse which laid him on his bed for months.. His wife also was sick, and the. family were in great distress when I visited. them, and sent relief, which so encour- aged them that the man was soon able to be at work again, and is doing well now. I had never gained access to this neigh-. borhood before, but by relieving this family I gained the confidence of the peo- ple, and they invited me to hold a weekly prayer-meeting there, which is well at- tended. Several families which have been relieved now send their children to our Sunday-school. Although several thou- sand dollars were sent here to relieve yel-.. low fever sufferers, many of the colored people received but little, some nothing.. It is very sad to hear of those who were so feeble that they could not stand in. the ranks to await their turn at the re- lief office, but sat on the ground till night came, and then receiving no at-- tention, went home to die! One man,. who had always been a good provider,.. sent his family to the country during the fever, but fell a victim .to it.himself,,and died, leaving his wife a nice house and. lot, but with several debts unpaid, and not a dollar for her support. Within a week after his death a beautiful baby. opened its. .wondering eyes for the first. time in this world Qf trouble. The poor. heart-broken mother, i~stea.d of welcom-~ 150 Native PreachersAn Advance called. ing the tiny, helpless creature, only looked at it with tearful eyes and an ach- ing heart, as she had nothing for it, most of their clothing being burned when her husband died, to prevent the spread of the disease. When I found her, the baby was three months old, and had never had but two garments, and the mother could not leave the three little ones, all under four years of age, to get work. She was relieved, and now the cold is nearly over, and as she has rented her house and taken small rooms herself, she saves a little money, which, with the work she can get, will, she hopes, keep the wolf from the door, and she is very thankful for the relief that came just when she most needed it. I will only add that this relief fund has at least doubled my field of work, besides doing much to call the attention of the people to our school. May Gods blessing rest on those interested in this good work. AFRICA. NATIVE PREACHERS--AN ADVANCE CALLEDTEN NEW COMMUNICANTSSUNDAY-SCHOOL NEEDSTHE FARM AND MILL. BET. A E. JACNSON, AVEBY STATION. We are all enjoying a moderate degree I by the American Missionary Associa- of health, which, of course, is quite tion in Africa. This one step has been encouraging to one laboring in this taken, and a sufficient time has elapsed country, and helps him to enter upon since to teach us that it is all im- the years work with renewed vigor. portant to push our work farther into Finding that I was illaable to reach a the country. There lies on either side very great number of country men who live too far from my station to attend services, I have in such localities established preaching stations conducted by the hands employed in the Mission. They meet me each Saturday afternoon, so that I may explain to them the pas- sages of Scripture that they are to use on at their respective stations. Great good is thus being accomplished. One station, in a very beautiful little town of about twelve hundred inhabi- tants, is conducted by my interpreter. The meetings are full of interest, and doubtless great good will be accom- plished by its thus being established. The chief himself is learning to take a very great interest in the meetings, and, of course, if he expresses an interest in the meetings, the subjects will always attend very largely. I hope to see the chief converted before a very great while. Another station is maintained in a smaller village, where I trust to see greater interest soon manifested. Avery is the most interior station held of us a vast territory, densely popu- lated by an anxious and thirsty people who are dying for want of the truths of the Gospel. In regard to the work at Avery, the new year has opened up quite favorably to us in all our departments. The church I am glad to say, is progressing far be- yond all expectation. Sunday, Feb. 9, was our communion day, and it did seem as if the presence of the Lord was with each one in spirit and in power. There were added to the church ten souls, who were that day with us per- mitted to partake of the Lords Supper. Another feature connected with the church work is full of interest, and that is the prayer meetings. They are, as a general thing, largely attended by the country men, and great interest is manifested among them. We hope that many will be brought to the Lord during this year ; but this will depend very greatly upon earnest prayer on the part of the Christians at home. One thing is discouraging, and that

Rev. A. E. Jackson Jackson, A. E., Rev. Native Preachers--An Advance Called--Ten New Communicants--Sunday-school Needs--The Farm and Mill Africa 150-151

150 Native PreachersAn Advance called. ing the tiny, helpless creature, only looked at it with tearful eyes and an ach- ing heart, as she had nothing for it, most of their clothing being burned when her husband died, to prevent the spread of the disease. When I found her, the baby was three months old, and had never had but two garments, and the mother could not leave the three little ones, all under four years of age, to get work. She was relieved, and now the cold is nearly over, and as she has rented her house and taken small rooms herself, she saves a little money, which, with the work she can get, will, she hopes, keep the wolf from the door, and she is very thankful for the relief that came just when she most needed it. I will only add that this relief fund has at least doubled my field of work, besides doing much to call the attention of the people to our school. May Gods blessing rest on those interested in this good work. AFRICA. NATIVE PREACHERS--AN ADVANCE CALLEDTEN NEW COMMUNICANTSSUNDAY-SCHOOL NEEDSTHE FARM AND MILL. BET. A E. JACNSON, AVEBY STATION. We are all enjoying a moderate degree I by the American Missionary Associa- of health, which, of course, is quite tion in Africa. This one step has been encouraging to one laboring in this taken, and a sufficient time has elapsed country, and helps him to enter upon since to teach us that it is all im- the years work with renewed vigor. portant to push our work farther into Finding that I was illaable to reach a the country. There lies on either side very great number of country men who live too far from my station to attend services, I have in such localities established preaching stations conducted by the hands employed in the Mission. They meet me each Saturday afternoon, so that I may explain to them the pas- sages of Scripture that they are to use on at their respective stations. Great good is thus being accomplished. One station, in a very beautiful little town of about twelve hundred inhabi- tants, is conducted by my interpreter. The meetings are full of interest, and doubtless great good will be accom- plished by its thus being established. The chief himself is learning to take a very great interest in the meetings, and, of course, if he expresses an interest in the meetings, the subjects will always attend very largely. I hope to see the chief converted before a very great while. Another station is maintained in a smaller village, where I trust to see greater interest soon manifested. Avery is the most interior station held of us a vast territory, densely popu- lated by an anxious and thirsty people who are dying for want of the truths of the Gospel. In regard to the work at Avery, the new year has opened up quite favorably to us in all our departments. The church I am glad to say, is progressing far be- yond all expectation. Sunday, Feb. 9, was our communion day, and it did seem as if the presence of the Lord was with each one in spirit and in power. There were added to the church ten souls, who were that day with us per- mitted to partake of the Lords Supper. Another feature connected with the church work is full of interest, and that is the prayer meetings. They are, as a general thing, largely attended by the country men, and great interest is manifested among them. We hope that many will be brought to the Lord during this year ; but this will depend very greatly upon earnest prayer on the part of the Christians at home. One thing is discouraging, and that Some Points on the Chinese Question. 151 is the condition of the Sabbath-school. We have no papers, no Bibles, and scarcely any singing-books, with which to carry it on. All who know any- thing of Sunday-school work are per- fectly aware that muoh depends upon the interest that one is enabled to keep up among the children and adults by such means ; it is so with you in civilized countries, much more so in a heathen country, where one is required to teach them everything. Now I am sure that some Sunday-school or some lover of the Christian cause will respond to this, my mQst humble appeal in the name of Christ, and send such books, papers, etc., to Avery Station as he can afford. The agricultural department is pro- gressing nicely. Our coffee farm is in a flourishing condition. Many of the trees are in bloom, and some have on them many berries of coffee, I think by another year a greater part of the trees will be bearing well. Our mill is now undergoing repair, and we hope to have it in perfect running order by April 1st. THE CHINESE. CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION. Auxiliary to the American Missionary Assoeiation~ PRESIDENT: Rev. J. K. McLean, D. D. vICE-PRESIDENTs: Rev. A. L. Stone, D. D., Thomas C. Wedderspoon, Req., Rev. T. K. Noble, Hon. F, F. Low, Rev. I. E. Dwinell, D. D., Hon. Samuel Cross, Rev. S. H. Willey, D. D., Edward P. Flint, Req., Rev. J. YI. Hough, D. II., Jacob S. Taher, Esq. DIRECTORS: Rev. George Mooar, D. D., Hon. E. D. Sawyer, Rev. R. P. Baker, James M. Haven~ Req., Rev. Joseph Rowell, Rev. John Kimball, E. P. Sanford, Esq. SECRETARY: Rev. w. C. Pond. TREASURER: R. Palache, Req. SOME POINTS ON THE CHINESE QUESTION. REV. was. C. POND, SAN FRANCISCO. 1. There are two sides to the question. Many Christians, both laymen and min- isters, are earnestly opposed to Chinese immigration, for reasons which seem to them ample and even imperative. As against such reasons, vituperation and contempt fall powerless. But it should be observed that these reasons do not with, at most, two exceptionsapply to Chinese immigration alone. The Irish laborer underbid the native American, and crowded him out of the field. In some cases great suffering temporarily ensued. But the American at length found other and better fields to which, indeed, the Irishmans toil prepared his way. It would be so again. The Irish, French and German immigrants have brought with them principles and prac- tices sadly at variance with those which gave us free institutions, our Christian Sabbaths, and our happy homes; and thoughtful Christians viewed this influx of an alien element with great alarm for many years. For the same reasons, and some others, they cannot but view with anxiety an influx from the heathen na- tions over our Western sea. But what did we do about it in the former case ? Did we lock the door? Did we attempt to dyke back the incoming tide? No but we said, We will lneet these people with the Gospel; we will bring their chil- dren into our public schools ; we will make the very air they breathe redolent with the principles of a genuine Chris- tian liberty, and thus we will make them no longer Irish, or French, or Germans, but, in the second generation, if not the first, Americans all. And this process is saving the nations life. Why not try it again with the new immigration from the old Orient? 2. But there are two special reasons for opposing this Chinese immigration; one is, that it consists of unmarried men, homeless and vagrant, and our country needs homes; the other is, that~

Rev. Wm. C. Pond Pond, Wm. C., Rev. Some Points on the Chinese Question The Chinese 151-153

Some Points on the Chinese Question. 151 is the condition of the Sabbath-school. We have no papers, no Bibles, and scarcely any singing-books, with which to carry it on. All who know any- thing of Sunday-school work are per- fectly aware that muoh depends upon the interest that one is enabled to keep up among the children and adults by such means ; it is so with you in civilized countries, much more so in a heathen country, where one is required to teach them everything. Now I am sure that some Sunday-school or some lover of the Christian cause will respond to this, my mQst humble appeal in the name of Christ, and send such books, papers, etc., to Avery Station as he can afford. The agricultural department is pro- gressing nicely. Our coffee farm is in a flourishing condition. Many of the trees are in bloom, and some have on them many berries of coffee, I think by another year a greater part of the trees will be bearing well. Our mill is now undergoing repair, and we hope to have it in perfect running order by April 1st. THE CHINESE. CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION. Auxiliary to the American Missionary Assoeiation~ PRESIDENT: Rev. J. K. McLean, D. D. vICE-PRESIDENTs: Rev. A. L. Stone, D. D., Thomas C. Wedderspoon, Req., Rev. T. K. Noble, Hon. F, F. Low, Rev. I. E. Dwinell, D. D., Hon. Samuel Cross, Rev. S. H. Willey, D. D., Edward P. Flint, Req., Rev. J. YI. Hough, D. II., Jacob S. Taher, Esq. DIRECTORS: Rev. George Mooar, D. D., Hon. E. D. Sawyer, Rev. R. P. Baker, James M. Haven~ Req., Rev. Joseph Rowell, Rev. John Kimball, E. P. Sanford, Esq. SECRETARY: Rev. w. C. Pond. TREASURER: R. Palache, Req. SOME POINTS ON THE CHINESE QUESTION. REV. was. C. POND, SAN FRANCISCO. 1. There are two sides to the question. Many Christians, both laymen and min- isters, are earnestly opposed to Chinese immigration, for reasons which seem to them ample and even imperative. As against such reasons, vituperation and contempt fall powerless. But it should be observed that these reasons do not with, at most, two exceptionsapply to Chinese immigration alone. The Irish laborer underbid the native American, and crowded him out of the field. In some cases great suffering temporarily ensued. But the American at length found other and better fields to which, indeed, the Irishmans toil prepared his way. It would be so again. The Irish, French and German immigrants have brought with them principles and prac- tices sadly at variance with those which gave us free institutions, our Christian Sabbaths, and our happy homes; and thoughtful Christians viewed this influx of an alien element with great alarm for many years. For the same reasons, and some others, they cannot but view with anxiety an influx from the heathen na- tions over our Western sea. But what did we do about it in the former case ? Did we lock the door? Did we attempt to dyke back the incoming tide? No but we said, We will lneet these people with the Gospel; we will bring their chil- dren into our public schools ; we will make the very air they breathe redolent with the principles of a genuine Chris- tian liberty, and thus we will make them no longer Irish, or French, or Germans, but, in the second generation, if not the first, Americans all. And this process is saving the nations life. Why not try it again with the new immigration from the old Orient? 2. But there are two special reasons for opposing this Chinese immigration; one is, that it consists of unmarried men, homeless and vagrant, and our country needs homes; the other is, that~ 152 Some Points on the (leinese Question. they are exceptionally clannish, refuse to associate and assimilate with us, and remain, after thirty years, as much an ztlien race as when they first arrived. I feel the force of these facts, but is there not a cause? They are, it is true, a very conservative race; slow to change, and ardently attached to their native land; but if it were otherwise, I submit whether the courtesies they have received are of the sort which would specially incline them to fall in love with our country or ourselves. The Chinese can lie Americanized; and in response to treatment such as European immigrants receive, would long ago have begun to make homes and to identify themselves with us. And, by the grace of God and the power of the Gospel, they might have been, and may yet be, educated into intelligent, patriotic and useful citi- zens. He who doubts this ought no longer to profess and call himself a Christian. 3. There is no occasion to be fright- ened lest we be overwhelmed by a rush of Chinese immigrants. The lapse of thirty years finds about 100,000 in the United States, and to-day they are go- ing faster than they come; going, not because they are frightened, but for the very sensible reason that they can do better elsewhere. The supply has ex- ceeded the demand. The wealthier Chi- nese find their impoverished countrymen thrown upon their charities, and they use every influence they can bring to bear to restrain others from coming. What if there are 400,000,000 of them just across the sea ; they may as well stay there and starve, as to come 10,000 miles and do the same. If the recent bill had become a law, and had been executed, no others in all the land would have profited by it so much as the Chi- nese in California. 4. The anti-Chinese mania seems to neutralize, even in otherwise honorable men, all scruple about ascertaining the truth of statements before they make them, or even about repeating state- ments proven to be false. I brand it as a falsehood that the Chinese in this country are in any sense coolies. They are freemen. If they have borrowed money to come here, it has not been of the Six Companies; nor are the terms on which such loans are made in any wise different from those on which a New Englander might borrow in order to go west. I brand it as a falsehood that there is among them any imperium in imperio, defying our laws, and meting out_to its victims punishment even unto death. The Six Companies are volun- tary societies for mutual aid. Some- times, instead of going to law, our Chinese agree to refer matters in dispute to the presidents of these companies as a board of arbitrators; but such arbitra- tion is in principle and practice exactly that which American business men often resort to; exactly that which between Christians ought to be always a sufficient substitute for suits at law. Some years ago Chinese merchants were able to arrange with the steamship companies to sell no tickets to Chimlimen unless they could show what has been incorrectly called a permit from one or the other of these companies. The object was to pre- vent men from leaving with their debts unpaid. In order to obtain one of these passes, a man must announce at the office of the company to which he be- longs his intention of returning to China, and thus give his creditors, if he have any, an opportunity to protest. The result is, I suppose, that the glori- ous Anglo-Saxon liberty of running away from unpaid bills is, for them, somewhat curtailed. But our Congrega- tional Association of Christian Chinese has the same authority to issue passes that the Six Companies have, and its passes are equally respected. And for years no Christian Chinaman has recog- nized any obligation to either of these companies in any way. I go into detail on this point, because much has been Receipts. made of it, as an out-cropping of that imperium in imperio of which so much has been said. It goes the length that I have stated, and no further. Finally, I brand as falsehoods the rep- resentations constantly made as to the success of missionary labor among the Chinese here. I am sure that Mr. Blame would not wilfully belittle such a work. lie is a follower of Christ, and a friend to his fellow-men, but he has listened to those who were neither of these, or he would never have said that not one in a thousand have even nominally professed a change from heathenism, and of this small number nearly one-half had been taught in missionary schools in 153 China. The known and counted re- sults are more than five times as large a~ the missionary, (l) whom he quotes~ represents, and of them, I venture to say, that not one in a hundred ever entered the door of a mission-school in China; while their conversion has not been merely nominal and negative, from heathenism, but real and posi- tive, to a faithful, prayerful, earnest Christian life. Meanwhile, there are grand results that cannot be measured, but which will tell mightily on the future, in the starting of thought, the loosening of the bonds of supersti- tion, the preparation of the way of the Lord. RECEIPTS ~O~ I~{ARC1I, 1879. MAINE, $38.80. Andover. S. W. Pearsonfer Student Aid... $5 00 Lyman. cong. Soc - 7 05 Yurmouth. First Cong. Cli 26 75 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $397.51. Bennington Miss Emily Whittemore, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 75 00 Concord. C. T. P 50 Exeter. A Friend, $10; Second Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db., class of boys, $2.82, for Chapel. Wilmington, N. C 12 82 Farrnington. First Cong. Cli 14 92 Fi& nerville. J. C. Martin 10 00 Francestown. R. 0. Cochran 2 00 Hanover. Dartmouth College Cli. $70 (of which $50 for the debt. See debt receipts) 20 00 Hollis. Cong. Cli. and Soc 14 75 Lyme. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to coost. Anos BAILEY L. M 35 00 Lyndeborough. Cong. Cli. and Soc 6 38 Manchester. Jasper P. George 5 00 Marlborough. Cong. Cli. and Soc. of which 5 for a pepil Taladega C.) 25 10 Nashua. Olive St. Cli. and Soc., $20.78; Miss H. M. Swallow, $10 - 30 78 Newlpawich. G.W.T.,$1;A.N.T.,$1; Ladies, 75c. for Freight; Miss A. W., SOc 3 25 North Hampton. E. Gove 10 00 Nortliwood Centre. J. M. H .... 1 00 Piermont. Cong. Cli. and Soc., $6.51; Mrs. Harden, $3.50 10 01 Portsmouth. Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db.. Infant Class of Mrs. E. P. Kimball,for Chapel, Wit inington, N. C 7 50 Troy. Cong. Cli. and Soc 5 00 West Concord. Cong. Cli ... 8 50 A Friend in N. B 100 00 vERMONT, $240.92. Bradford. Cong. Cli. and Soc 35 71 Burlington. (Winooski) Cong. Cli 68 50 Burlington. Third Cong. Cli. $13.47; N. S. H., $1 14 47 Corinth. Cong. Cli 7 61 Bummerston. Cong. Cli. and Soc 6 38 East Berkshire. Cong Cli. and Soc 6 75 Newbury. Cong. Cli. and Soc 35 00 North Craftsbury. Ladies Miss Soc., blil. of Bedding and $3,for Atlanta, Ca.;Mrs. H. C. P., $1; Others, $1 5 00 Randolph Centre. First Cong. Cli $ 7 08 South Londonderry. Mrs. Betsey Gibson 10 08 Strafford. Cong. Cli. and Soc 15 00 West Brattleborough. Cong. Cli 11 14 West Randolph. hi. A. and S. E. Albin, $6; S.I.W.,$l. 700 West Rutland. Cong. Cli. and Soc 11 34 MASSACHUSETTS, $1,970.60. Amherst. Second Cong. Cli. $9.25; Mass. Ag. Ccl. College Christian Union, $3.25 12 50. Andover. Free Cli. (of which $100 from Francis H. Johnson) $184.58; South Cong. Cli. and Soc. $41.31; Calvin, E. Goodale, $25 230 89 Arlington. Cong. Cli. and Soc 12 Sf5 Athol. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to coust. REv. HENRY A. BLAKE L. M 51 80 Blandford. Cong. Cli 5 00 Boston Highlands. Immannel Cong. Cli. and Soc., $100; H.W. T., SOc 100 50 Brocton. I. P 50 Brookline. S. A., E. H. C 10 00 Byfield. Cong. Cli. and Soc 5 35 Cambridgepoet. Cash, $10; G. B. C., SOc 10 50 Chariton. Cong. Cli. and Soc., $10; Cong. Sab. 5db., $5.69 15 69 Chelsea. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., $66 16; Mrs. E. G. P., $1, for aid of Pupils, Tulle. dega, Ala 67 96 Chestertown. S. C. A 10 Clinton. First Ryan. Cli. and Soc., $75.23; Ladies Missionary Soc.. blil. of C.,fer Fisk U. and City Mission Work, and $3 Jor Freight 78 2h Enfied Cong. Cli. and Soc. $50; Ira D. Haskell, $5 55 00 Fair Haven. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 01) Foxhorough. Cong. Cli. and Soc 52 00 Framingliam. ~ A Friend, $30, to coust. Mess MARY BILLIIeG5 L. hi. ;Ladies of Plymouth Ch. for Freight, $2 32 00 Gardner. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Graulville. Cong. Cli. and Soc 75 94 Great Barrington. L. hI. Chapin 5 00 Groton. Union Orthodox Cli 20 82 Groveland. Cong. Cli. and Soc 6 00 Haverhill. Joseph Flanders 5 00 Holbrook. Sarah J. Holbrook, for Student Aid, Fesk U 2S 00 Holden. Holden Benev. Soc., by J. Cal- vin,for Aid of Pupils, Atlanta U 10 08

Receipts for March, 1879 153-157

Receipts. made of it, as an out-cropping of that imperium in imperio of which so much has been said. It goes the length that I have stated, and no further. Finally, I brand as falsehoods the rep- resentations constantly made as to the success of missionary labor among the Chinese here. I am sure that Mr. Blame would not wilfully belittle such a work. lie is a follower of Christ, and a friend to his fellow-men, but he has listened to those who were neither of these, or he would never have said that not one in a thousand have even nominally professed a change from heathenism, and of this small number nearly one-half had been taught in missionary schools in 153 China. The known and counted re- sults are more than five times as large a~ the missionary, (l) whom he quotes~ represents, and of them, I venture to say, that not one in a hundred ever entered the door of a mission-school in China; while their conversion has not been merely nominal and negative, from heathenism, but real and posi- tive, to a faithful, prayerful, earnest Christian life. Meanwhile, there are grand results that cannot be measured, but which will tell mightily on the future, in the starting of thought, the loosening of the bonds of supersti- tion, the preparation of the way of the Lord. RECEIPTS ~O~ I~{ARC1I, 1879. MAINE, $38.80. Andover. S. W. Pearsonfer Student Aid... $5 00 Lyman. cong. Soc - 7 05 Yurmouth. First Cong. Cli 26 75 NEW HAMPSHIRE, $397.51. Bennington Miss Emily Whittemore, for Student Aid, Atlanta U 75 00 Concord. C. T. P 50 Exeter. A Friend, $10; Second Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db., class of boys, $2.82, for Chapel. Wilmington, N. C 12 82 Farrnington. First Cong. Cli 14 92 Fi& nerville. J. C. Martin 10 00 Francestown. R. 0. Cochran 2 00 Hanover. Dartmouth College Cli. $70 (of which $50 for the debt. See debt receipts) 20 00 Hollis. Cong. Cli. and Soc 14 75 Lyme. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to coost. Anos BAILEY L. M 35 00 Lyndeborough. Cong. Cli. and Soc 6 38 Manchester. Jasper P. George 5 00 Marlborough. Cong. Cli. and Soc. of which 5 for a pepil Taladega C.) 25 10 Nashua. Olive St. Cli. and Soc., $20.78; Miss H. M. Swallow, $10 - 30 78 Newlpawich. G.W.T.,$1;A.N.T.,$1; Ladies, 75c. for Freight; Miss A. W., SOc 3 25 North Hampton. E. Gove 10 00 Nortliwood Centre. J. M. H .... 1 00 Piermont. Cong. Cli. and Soc., $6.51; Mrs. Harden, $3.50 10 01 Portsmouth. Cong. Cli. Sab. 5db.. Infant Class of Mrs. E. P. Kimball,for Chapel, Wit inington, N. C 7 50 Troy. Cong. Cli. and Soc 5 00 West Concord. Cong. Cli ... 8 50 A Friend in N. B 100 00 vERMONT, $240.92. Bradford. Cong. Cli. and Soc 35 71 Burlington. (Winooski) Cong. Cli 68 50 Burlington. Third Cong. Cli. $13.47; N. S. H., $1 14 47 Corinth. Cong. Cli 7 61 Bummerston. Cong. Cli. and Soc 6 38 East Berkshire. Cong Cli. and Soc 6 75 Newbury. Cong. Cli. and Soc 35 00 North Craftsbury. Ladies Miss Soc., blil. of Bedding and $3,for Atlanta, Ca.;Mrs. H. C. P., $1; Others, $1 5 00 Randolph Centre. First Cong. Cli $ 7 08 South Londonderry. Mrs. Betsey Gibson 10 08 Strafford. Cong. Cli. and Soc 15 00 West Brattleborough. Cong. Cli 11 14 West Randolph. hi. A. and S. E. Albin, $6; S.I.W.,$l. 700 West Rutland. Cong. Cli. and Soc 11 34 MASSACHUSETTS, $1,970.60. Amherst. Second Cong. Cli. $9.25; Mass. Ag. Ccl. College Christian Union, $3.25 12 50. Andover. Free Cli. (of which $100 from Francis H. Johnson) $184.58; South Cong. Cli. and Soc. $41.31; Calvin, E. Goodale, $25 230 89 Arlington. Cong. Cli. and Soc 12 Sf5 Athol. Cong. Cli. and Soc. to coust. REv. HENRY A. BLAKE L. M 51 80 Blandford. Cong. Cli 5 00 Boston Highlands. Immannel Cong. Cli. and Soc., $100; H.W. T., SOc 100 50 Brocton. I. P 50 Brookline. S. A., E. H. C 10 00 Byfield. Cong. Cli. and Soc 5 35 Cambridgepoet. Cash, $10; G. B. C., SOc 10 50 Chariton. Cong. Cli. and Soc., $10; Cong. Sab. 5db., $5.69 15 69 Chelsea. First Cong. Cli. and Soc., $66 16; Mrs. E. G. P., $1, for aid of Pupils, Tulle. dega, Ala 67 96 Chestertown. S. C. A 10 Clinton. First Ryan. Cli. and Soc., $75.23; Ladies Missionary Soc.. blil. of C.,fer Fisk U. and City Mission Work, and $3 Jor Freight 78 2h Enfied Cong. Cli. and Soc. $50; Ira D. Haskell, $5 55 00 Fair Haven. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 01) Foxhorough. Cong. Cli. and Soc 52 00 Framingliam. ~ A Friend, $30, to coust. Mess MARY BILLIIeG5 L. hi. ;Ladies of Plymouth Ch. for Freight, $2 32 00 Gardner. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 Graulville. Cong. Cli. and Soc 75 94 Great Barrington. L. hI. Chapin 5 00 Groton. Union Orthodox Cli 20 82 Groveland. Cong. Cli. and Soc 6 00 Haverhill. Joseph Flanders 5 00 Holbrook. Sarah J. Holbrook, for Student Aid, Fesk U 2S 00 Holden. Holden Benev. Soc., by J. Cal- vin,for Aid of Pupils, Atlanta U 10 08 154 .J?ecelyt8. Ilolliston. Coil. No. 4 Sat. Evening Prayer Meeting, by John Batchelder $25 00 Littleton. Ladies Mission Circle 10 00 Lowell Ladies Benev. Soc. of First Cong. Cli. bbl 01 C. ,for Wilmington, N. C Lynn. Central Cong. Cli. and Soc 14 50 Manchester. Cong. Cli. and Soc 26 25 Mansfield Cong. Cli. and Soc 12 00 Meirose. Orthodox Cong. Cli. and Soc. (in part) 42 05 Milibury. M. D. Garfield 5 00 Newbury. First Cong. Cli. and Soc 15 65 North Abington. Freedmens Aid Soc.. bbL of C. for Fisk U. and City Mission Work, M. A., $2 for Freight 2 00 Northampton. Sab. Scli. of First Parish 46 00 Nortliborough. Mrs. A. E. D. F 1 00 Nortlifield. Trin. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 62 North Hadley. Cong. Cli. and Soc 2 45 Norton. Trin. Cong. Cli. and Soc 38 45 Norton. Wheaton Sem., for Aid of Pupils, Atlanta U 17 00 Peabody. So. Cong. Cli. and Soc 15 39 Peru. G. WeIJs 1 51 Phillipston. Cong. Cli. and Soc 5 17 Plainfiold. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Dyer 10 1.10 Quincy. Cong. Cli. and Soc 27 00 Rockland. Cong. Cli. and Soc 125 82 Rockport. A Friend. s 00 Sandwich. Mrs. E. W. Wells, $5; Mrs. Rob ert Tobey, $5 10 00 Slielburne. Ladies of Cong. Cli.. $2 and bhl. of C. for Montgomery, Ala 2 00 Somerville. Broadway Cong. Cli 14 50 South Amherst. Cong. Cli. and Soc 10 00 South Byfield. Mrs. E. H. Evans 2 00 South Framingliam. G. M. Amsden 5 00 South Royalston. Individuals, by Rev. C. L. Tomblen 1 00 South Weymouth. Union Cong. Cli. $60, to coust. MRs. HANNAH C CusrnNG and Mus. GRO. W. CONANT L. M.s; Second Cong. Oh. and Soc., $41, to coust. MRs. ALMATIA H RAW L. M 101 00 Springfield. First Cli., $57.25; Hope Cli., $15.14; Mrs. Ira Merrill, $2 74 10 Taunton. Ladies Sewing Circle of Winslow Cli., $25 for a Student, Talladega C.; also, box of C. for Talladega, and $2 for Freight 27 00 Topefield. Ladies Benev. Soc. box of C., for Wilmington, N C. Waverly. Cong. Cli. and Soc. for a Student, Atlanta U 30 00 Wellesley. Cong. Cli. and Soc., $5; L. B. H., SOc 5 50 Westhorough. Cong. Sab. Sch, $48.84; Ryan. Cong. Cli. M. C. 0011., $14.84 63 68 West Brookfield. Cong. Cli. and Soc 20 00 West Stockbridge Village. Cong. Cli. and Soc 12 94 Wilmington. Mrs. E. M. G. Noyes, for aid of Pupils, Talladega, Ala 30 00 Woburn. Cong. Cli. and Soc 150 00 Worcester. T. W. T 51 RHODE ISLAND, $30. Oak Lawn. Rev. Marcus Ames 10 00 Providence. Mrs. Lucius Lyon, $10, for Student Aid, Fisk U.; E. Weston, $5 ..... 15 00 Tiverton Four Corners. Cong. Cli 5 00 CONNECTICUT. $1,199.82. Bridgeport. First Cong. Cli 83 96 Brookfield. A Friend 5 00 Canton Centre. Mrs. S. B. H 1 02 Chester. Cong. Cli 36 80 Co]linsville, Mrs. Chidsey, for Girls md. Sch., Talladega, Ala 5 00 Danbury. E. B 1 00 Danielsonville. J. D. Bigelow 4 00 East Hampton. Talladega Soc. for Aid of Pupils, Talladega, Ala 22 00 East Hartford. First Cong. Ch 20 00 East Windsor Hill. Bbl. of C.for City Mission Work, and $lfor Freight; Mrs. C., $1 6 00 Fairdeld. First Cong. Cli 57 09 Fair Haven. Second Cong. Cli. to coust. HORACE H. STRONG L. M $40 00 Franklin. Cong. Cli 11 96 Greenwich. Second Cong. Ch, $60; R. H., SOc 60 50 Guilford. Ladies of Third Cong. Cli., bbl of C., val. $25, and Sfor Freight 5 00 Hanover. Cong. Cli. and Soc 24 5? Hartford. Windsor Av. Cong. Cli., $25.01; Collected by Mrs. G. W. Root. $11.00.... 36 01 Lakeville. Mrs. M. H. W 1 00 Ledyard. Cong. Cli 14 38 Lyme. J. A. R 50 Mansfield Centre. First Couc. Cli 6 00 Raw Britain. Mrs. N. H 110 New Hartford. Bible Class, by Rev. F. H. Adams, for Theo. Student, Fisk U 8 00 New Haven. Cli. of the Redeemer. $130; Amos Townsend, $35; East Cong. Cli., $12; 177 00 New London. First Cong. Oh. $38.23; A Thank Offering,.$3 41 23 New Preston. Rev H. Upson 5 00 Old Lyme. Cone. Cli . 14 10 Plantsville. Individuals, by Rev. L. F. Berry 10 00 Plymouth. Cong. Cli 16 00 Ridgefield. First Cong. Cli 16 11 Simsbury. First Cong. Cli 19 00 South Britain. A Friend 1 00 Tolland. Cong. Cli 4 54 Waterbury. Second Cong. Cli. and Soc 423 51 Woodbury. Benj. Fabrique 20 00 West Meriden. Mrs. M. P. B 1 (tO Wetliersfield. Mrs. Mary D. McLean, box of Books and $1.40,for Talladega, Ala.... 1 40 NEW YORK, $740.00. Batavia. A. V. S. F. 20 00 Brooklyn. Centrel cong. Sab. Sch., E. R. Kennedy, Supt., $100. for a Teacher; Miss M.E. S., SOc.; Mrs.G.H.,50c 10100 Clienango Forks. Cong. Cli 1 00 Churchville. Union Cong. Sab. Seli., for Aid of Pupils, Atlanta, U 25 00 Cincinnatus. Cincinnatus 10 00 Copenhagen. E. G 50 Crown Point. First Cong. Cli., Mrs. Tn. pliena Walker 2 00 Dryden. Mrs. L. M. K 1 00 Floyd. Welsh Cong. Cli 4 00 Flushing. First Cong. Cli 13 00 Fredonia. Preeb. Sab. Seli. $15; MaK., $15, to coust. CHRIsTINE GILBERT L. M. 30 00 Gilbertsville. Rev. A. Wood 15 00 Honeoye. Cong. Cli., $33, and Sab. Sch., $17 50 00 Kiantone. Cong. Cli. and Soc. 12 215 Livonia. G. W. Jackman, $10; M. A. Jack- man, $5; Mrs. Win. Calvert ($5 of which for Chinese M. in Cal.) $10 25 00 Lockport. Cong. Sab. Sch., to coust. Mrs. J. E. MERRITT L. M 30 00 Malone. Mrs. H. R. Wilson 5 00 Martinsburgli. Horatio Hougli, $5; Mrs. Almira Arthur, $3 8 00 Middlesex. Mr. and Mrs. Lester Adams 10 OS MiHvllle. Cong. Cli 10 34 Morrisville. Cong. Cli 27 Bi NewHambnrgh. S.H.S 50 Newark Valley. LEGACY of a deceased Sister, by Mrs. A. B. Smith 34 00 New York. K. Y. Z., for Hamplon Inst., $l.0O;Mrs. James Stokes, $10, for Cit. Work, Ogeechee, Ga.;S. T. Richards, $6; Mrs. Elizabeth Merritt, $5, Mrs. L. B. B., SOc.; S. T. G., SOc.; American Tract Soc., Grant of S. S. Papers, val. $33 122 00 Oneida. S. H. Goodwin, $10; Edward Loomis, $2 12 00 Oneonta. L. J. S.... 50 Orient. H. H. W 1 00 Parma. Mrs. Harriet Clark 5 00 Peon Tan. F. 0. Hamlin 20 00 Pouglikeepsie. Mrs. H. J. H 1 00 Pulaski. S.C 1 00 Seneca Fails. A Friend 50 5 Sherburne. Cong. Cli. Sab. Sch 56 415 Jiieceipt8. Spencerport. S. V. and M. D., $1 each, for Freight; Mary Dyer, $5, for Student Aid, Tougaloo U $ 7 00 Spencerlown. Rev. H. P. Bake 5 00 Taberg. Aaron Stedman, $2; Dewey Hop- kins, $2; A.W., $1 5 00 Turin. Mrs. Martha Woodworth . ... . 2 00 Troy. Mrs. E. C. S 1 00 Union Valley. Dr. J. Angel 10 00 Volney. First Cong. Oh. Sab. Sch 6 94 NEW JERSEY. $230.56. Morristown. Mrs. Ella M. Graves, for Aid of Pupils, Atlanta U 100 00 Newark. C. S. Haines 40 00 Orange Valley. Cong. Oh 64 01 Stanley. Hillside Missionary Sab. Sch. of Cong. Oh., for a Lady Missionary 25 00 Vineland. Cong. Oh. of the Pilgrims 1 55 PENNSYLVANIA, $14. East Springfield. Mrs. C. J. Cowles 2 00 Farmers Valley. Mrs. E. 0. 0 1 00 Hermitage. W. F. Stewart, s4; E.P., $1 5 00 Jeanesville. Welsh Cong. Oh 5 00 North East. C. A. T 1 00 OHIO, $463.68. Chatham Centre. Cong. Oh 28 00 Cincinnati. Vine St. Cong. Oh., $41.65; Rev. B. P. Aydelott, D.D., $10 51 65 Claridon. Cong. Sah. Sch.,for Atlanta, Ga 7 00 Clarksfield. Rev. J. M. and Mrs. H. B. Fra- ser 10 00 Fostoria. C. M 50 Granville. Thomas D. Williams 5 00 Earmar. Cong. Oh 35 32 Hartford. A. N., $1; J. M. J., $1; Miss H. J., $1; S. C B., $1; Others, 1 5 00 Huntington. Edward West 25 00 Kingsville. J. L. Gage 10 00 Lyme. Cong. Oh 22 58 Mechanicshurgh. Mrs. M. K. H 1 00 New Richland. Elizaheth Johnston 2 00 Oherlin. First Cong. Sah. fich., $50,fer Agi Dept., Tulludega, Ala. ;First Cong. oh. $38.74; Second Cong. Oh., $10.39 99 13 Ravenna. Ira B. Ontts 5 00 Richfield. Mrs. Un Oviatt, $5; Mrs. Sylves- ter Townsend, $2.50 7 50 Stenbenville. Cong. Sab. Sch., for Improve- ments, Tougaloo U 24 00 Strongsville. Free Cong. Oh., $6, for Touga- Ion U. ; A Friend, $3, for Student Aid, Fisk U 9 00 Wakeman. Franklin Hale 100 00 Weltington. C. F 1 00 Willoughby. Miss Mary P. Hastings, $10; Florence A. Page, $5 15 00 INDIANA, $5.50. Sparta. J.H Winchester. Mrs. John Commons ILLINOIS, $748. Avon. Mrs. Celinda Woods Chesterfield. Cong. Oh Chicago. Womans Miss. Soc. of Lincoln Park Ch., for Lady Missionary, Memphis, Tenia Dundee. Cong. Oh., $8; Mrs. Win. D., $4.. Galesbnrg. ESTATE ci Warren C. Willard, hy Prof. T. B. Willard Galeshurg. Mrs. E. T. Parker, to consi. Ds~& . GRO. T. HOLTOKE L. If Griggsville. Cong. Oh Lyonaville. Ladies of Cong. Oh., box of household goods, for Montgomery, A Naperville. A. A. Smith Odell. Mrs. H. E. Dana Peoria. Chas. Fisher, for Student Aid, Fisk U Plymouth. N. F. Burton Port Byron. A. F. Hollietor Princeton. Sah. fich. of Cong. Oh., 15.50, for Student Aid, Fisk U.;Mrs. P. B. Cores, $10 50 5 00 5 00 4 00 17 00 9 00 21 00 30 00 37 16 5 00 10 00 12 00 5 00 5 00 24 50 155 Rockford. Ladies of Cong. Oh., for aid of Pupils, Talladega, Ala $15 00 Sycamore. A. S 1 00 Tonica. V. G. S., $5; F. A. Wood, $2.50; A Friend, $2.50 10 00 Tolona. Mrs. L. Haskell 7 00 Waukegan. Yonng Ladies Missionary Soc., $15; Cong. Oh., $6.34 21 34 Waukegan. Friends, for Freight 1 00 Wheaton. First Cong. Oh 8 00 A Friend, 500 00 MICHIGAN, $567.75. Cabinet. Cong. Oh., 238.25, to consi. BER- THA CALISTA CURTIS and HAROLD MORSE Wasoar L. Ms.; Robert Dohbie, $20.50 256 75 Churches Corners. Cong. flab. fich., $11.25; H. C., SOc 11 75 Claire. A. H. Norris S 015 Detroit. Fort St. Cong. flab. fich., $50; Mrs. Z. Eddy, $25; Miss Grout, $10; Cong. fish. fich.. $2; Miss L., $1; Miss H., $1; MrsO., $1.for Lady Missionary, Memphis. Tents.; Mrs. D. P., $1; Mrs. A. D. G., $1; Others, $2.50, by Mrs. J. A. Nutting 94 50 Greenville. Cong. Oh. flab. fich. for Student Aid, Fisk U 25 91 Hancock. First Cong. Oh., $30; flab. fich. Scholars, $1 31 00 Imlay City. Cong. flab. fich., hox of Books, for Montgomery, Ala. Leland. Cong. Oh i 7 00 Milford. E. G 1 00 Pontiac. Cong. flab. fich., $1.40; Mrs. S. J. C.. $3; Dea.J. P. W., $1;Juv. Miesfioc., $1, 440 South Haven. Clark Pierce 5 00 nadilla. Mrs. Agnes D. Bird, $4; Mrs. M. M., $1 500 Union City. Mrs. I. W. Clark and Miss Sarah B. Clark, for Student Aid, Fisk U... 30 00 Vernon. BEQUEST of Sarah Holley, by D. C. Holley 100 00 Vienna. Union Cong. Oh 8 44 WISCONSIN, $127.96. Arena. Cong. Oh 5 00 Centre. Cong.Ch 2 53 Elk Grove. Cong. Oh 8 00 Milwaukee. Plymouth Oh 36 70 Oshkosh. Cong. Oh., $54.73; H. S. M., SOc. 55 25 Shopiere. Cong. Oh 15 00 Shullsburg. Cong. Oh 3 59 Whitewater. Ladies of Cong. Oh., bbl. of C., and house furnishing goods, val. $50 Mrs. Coburn, $2, for Montyonsery, Ala.... 2 00 IOWA, $1,175.15. Ashland. Ladies Miss. Soc., for Tougaloo U 2 00 Big Rock. Cong. Oh 20 00 Burlington. flab. fich. of Cong. Oh., for Student Aid, Fisk U 25 00 Des Moines. Womans Miss. Soc. of Ply- mouth Cong. Oh., for Student Aid, Fisk U. 20 00 Grinnell. ESTATE of Charles F. Dike, by Mrs. C. F. Dike, Executrix 1,000 00 Grinnell. Cong. Oh. flab. fich. and Friends, $50, for Student Aid, Fisk U.;Oong. Oh., $27.25 . 77 25 Keokuk. Will Collier, Smith Hamill, and M. Messer, $5 ea.; X. X. C., SOc., for Toss galoo Li 15 50 Nevinville. Cong. Oh 2 40 Traer. Mrs. C. H. Bissel, for Student Aid, Fisk U 5 00 Waterloo. Rev. M. K. Cross 8 00 KANSAS, $16.50. Bavaria. A. M 50 Brookville. Rev. S. G. Wright 15 00 Eudora. Mrs.L.R 100 MINNESOTA, $53.89. Clear Water. Cong. Oh 3 01 Minneapolis. Plymouth Oh 9 68 Plainview. Womans Cent. Soc 7 30 Saint Paul. Plymouth Oh 20 30 Zutubrota. First Cong. Oh. and Soc 13 80 156 Receipts. NEBRASKA, 6.50. Hastings. Mrs. N. C. B $ 1 00 Fontanelie. A Friend, 5 50 MISSOURI, SOc. Saint Louis. C. M. ~ 50 CALIFORNIA, $299 65. Los Angeles. Francis Wilson 15 00 San Francisco. Receipts of the California Chinese Mission 284 65 OREGON, $1.55. Astoria. First Cong. Ch 1 55 KENTUCKY, $5.05. .Berea. Cong. Cli Germantown. H. N TENNESSEE, $153.15. Memphis. Le Moyne Sch 4 55 50 15315 NORTH CAROLINA, $133.24. Raleigh. Washington 5db 35 80 Wilmington. Normal Sch., $93.70; First Cong. Cli., $3.74 97 44 SOUTH CAROLINA, $271.75. Charleston. Avery Inst 271 75 GEORGIA, $581.71. Atlanta. Storrs Sch., $259.30; Atlanta Uni- versity, 87 346 30 Macon. Lewis High Scb 10 90 Savannah. Beach Inst 184 51 ALABAMA, $921.81., Athens. Pub. Sch, Fund, $270; Trinity Sch., $49.40 319 40 Blount Springs. J. Q. A. E so Marion. Cong. Cli 29 48 Mobile. Emerson Inst 204 50 Montgomery. Swayne, Sch i75 110 Selma. Cong. Ch ... s 10 Taliadega. Talladega College $174.28 Governor Pat sons, for Aid of Pupils, Tel. ladega, Ala., $13.55 187 33 LOUISIANA, $138.75. New Orleans. Straight University 138 75 MISSISSIPPI, $35.55. Tougalon. Tougaloo University 35 55 TEXAS, $3. Brenham. Individuals, by Mrs. I. Howells, $2; 13.C.,$i 300 NOVA SCOTIA, $10. Yarmouth. Yarmouth Tabernacle Mission- ary Asso.,for Student Aid, Fisk U 10 00 SANDWICH ISLANDS, $1,000. A Friend 1,000 00 TURKEY, $10. Van. Dr. G. C. Reynolds and Wife......... 10 00 INCOME FUND, $311.74. fleneral Fund 311 74 Total 11,904.68 Total from Oct. 1st to March 31st. ... $77,638 09 H. W. HUBBARD, .Asst Treas RECEIVED FOR DEBT. Hanover. N. H. Dartmouth College Cli.... $50 00 Cromwell, Ct. M G. Savage 13 00 New Haven, Ct. Cenlre Cli 25 00 West Hartford, Ct. Charles Boswell 250 00 Crown Point, N. V. Mrs. George Page 23 00 Madison, Ohio. Mrs. J. G Fraser 3 00 Norlliville, Mich. D. Pomeroy 5 00 Saint Louis, Mo. Miss C. M. Janes 5 00 Woodville, Ga. St. Phullip~s Soc., $2; Band of Hope. $2.23 4 25 Tougalno, Miss. Tougaloo University 50 00 Total 430 25 Previously acknowledged in Feb. receipts 24,488 97 Total $24,919 22 RECEIPTS OF THE CALIFORNIA CHINESE MISSION. E. PAnACHE, Treasurer. Frosa Dec. 20th, 1878, to March 20th, 1879. 1. From auxiliaries: Petaluma Chinese Mission(for room).... $65 00 Sacramento Chinese Mission(12 Annual Memberships) 24 00 Santa Barbara Chinese Mission(4 Annual Memberships: Rev. J. W. Rough. 13. 13., $2; N. W. Winton, $2; Mrs. C. E. Hose, $2; Wong Ali You, $2) s 00 200 Collection Annual Meeting 2 50 Chinese Pupils 18 00 Stockton Chinese Mission Mrs. SI. C. Brown 4 00 Chinese Pupils 2 50 Total., 126 00 2. From churches: OaklandFirst Cong. Cli 36 15 SacramentoFirsI Cong. Cli 7 00 San FranciscoFirst Cong. Cli 49 il~ San FranciscoBethany Cli., I. C. H 2 On Total 94 65 3. From individuals: Pes~aderoRev. W. C. Merritt 2 00 San FranciscoRev. J. Rowell 20 00 Sonoma A Thank Offering 10 00 Total 32 00 4. From Eastern Friends: Bangor, MeUnknown, by Rev. G. W. Field, 13. 13., for Barnes Mission House. 12 00 Auburn, MassCong Sab. Sch.. by Hor- ace Hobbs,forBarnes Mission House.... 20 00 Total 32 00 Grand Total $28465 FOR TILLOTSON COLLEGIATE AND NORMAL INSTITUTE, AUSTIN, TEXAS. Cambridge, Vt. Madison Safford $25 00 Groton, Mass. Mrs. Elizabeth Farneworlli 20 00 Haverhill, Mass. Gyles Merrill and Wile.. 50 00 Wesfield, Mass. Miss E. B. Dickinson.... 100 00 Hartford, Coun. 13. H. WELLS, to coust. himself L. M 50 00 Oriskany Falls, N. Y. Joseph C. Grig~s 24 00 Union Springs, N. V. Mrs. Mary H. thomas 10 00 West Farms. N. V. Daniel Mapes 100 00 Painesville, Ohio. Mrs. Reuben Hitchcock 100 00 Total . 479 00 Previously acknowledged in Feb. receipts .1,627 17 Total $2,106 17 4 ~Q~\jTiO (157) fOllStitlltiOll of tliB AMin~ic~ll INCORPORATED JANUARY 80, 48 ART. I. This Society shall be called THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. ART. LI. The object of this Association shall be to conduct Christian missionary and educational operations, and to diffuse a knowledge of the Holy Scriptures in our own and other countries which are destitute of them, or which present open and urgent fields of effort. AET. III. Any person of evangelical sentiments, who professes faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, wbo is not a slaveholder, or in the practice of other immoralities, and who contributes o the funds, may become a member of the Society; and by the payment of thirty dollars, a life member; provided that Children and others who have not profe ~ ed their faith may be constituted life members without the privilege of voting. ART. IV. This Society shall meet annually, in the month of September, October or Novem- ber, for the election of officers and the transaction of other business, at such time and place as shall be designated by the Executive Committee. ART, V. The annual meeting shall be constituted of the regular officers and members of the Scciety at the time of such meeting, and of delegates from churches, local missionary societies, an I other co-operating bodies, each body being entitled to one representative. ART. VI. The officers of the Society shall be a President, Vice-Presidents, a Recording Secretary, Correspondin S ~cretari es, Treasurer, two Auditors, and an Executive Committee of not less than twelve, of which the Corresponding Secretaries shall be advisory, and the Treasurer ex-officio, members. ART. VII. To the Executive Committee shall belong the collecting and disbursing of funds; the appointing, counselling, sustaining and dismissing (for just and sufficient reasons) missionaries and agents; the selection of usissionary fields; and, in general, the transaction of all such business as usually appertains to the executive committees of missionary and other benevolent societies; the Committee to exercise no ecclesiastical jurisdiction over the missionaries; and its doings to be subject always to the revision of the annual meeting, which shall, by a reference mutually chosen, always entertain the complaints of any aggrieved agent or missionary; and the decision of such reference shall be final. The Executive Committee shall have authority to fill all vacancies occurring among the officers between the regular annual meetings; to apply, if they see fit, to any State Legislature for acts of incorporation; to fix the compensation, where any is given, of all officers, agents, missionaries, or others in the employment of the Society; to make provision, if any, for dis- abled missionaries, and for the widows and children of such as are deceased; and to call, in all parts of the country, at their discretion, special and general conventions of the friends of missions, with a view to the diffusion of the missionary spirit, and the general and vigorous promotion of the missionary work. Five members of the Committee shall constitute a quorum for transactiIig business. ART. VIII. This society, in collecting funds, in appointing officers, agents and missiona- ries, and in selecting fields of labor, and conducting the missionary work, will endeavor particul. ny to discountenance slavery, by refusing to receive the kisown frRits of unrequited labor, or to welcome to its employment those who hold their fellow-beings as slaves. ART. IX. Missionary bodies, churches or individuals sgreeing to the principles of this Society, and wishing to appoint and sustain missionaries of their own, shall be entitled to do so through the agency of the Executive Committee, on terms mutually agreed upon. ART. X. No amendment shall be made in this Constitution without the concurrence of two- thirds of the members present at a regular annual meeting; nor unless the proposed amend- ment has been submitted to a previous meeting, or to the Executive Committee in season to be published by them (as it shall be their duty to do, if so submitted) in the regttlar official notifications of the meeting. * By evangeiicai sentinenis, we noderstand. anong otisers, a belief in the guilty and lost condition of all men without a Saviour; the Supreme Deity, Incarnation and Atomming Sacrifice of Jesus Christ, the only Saviour of the world; ihe necessity of regenerition by the Holy Spirit, repentance, faith and holy oitedisnce in order to salvation; the immortality of the soul; and the retributions of time judgment in time eternal punishment of the wicked, and salvation of the righteous.

Constitution 157-158

4 ~Q~\jTiO (157) fOllStitlltiOll of tliB AMin~ic~ll INCORPORATED JANUARY 80, 48 ART. I. This Society shall be called THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. ART. LI. The object of this Association shall be to conduct Christian missionary and educational operations, and to diffuse a knowledge of the Holy Scriptures in our own and other countries which are destitute of them, or which present open and urgent fields of effort. AET. III. Any person of evangelical sentiments, who professes faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, wbo is not a slaveholder, or in the practice of other immoralities, and who contributes o the funds, may become a member of the Society; and by the payment of thirty dollars, a life member; provided that Children and others who have not profe ~ ed their faith may be constituted life members without the privilege of voting. ART. IV. This Society shall meet annually, in the month of September, October or Novem- ber, for the election of officers and the transaction of other business, at such time and place as shall be designated by the Executive Committee. ART, V. The annual meeting shall be constituted of the regular officers and members of the Scciety at the time of such meeting, and of delegates from churches, local missionary societies, an I other co-operating bodies, each body being entitled to one representative. ART. VI. The officers of the Society shall be a President, Vice-Presidents, a Recording Secretary, Correspondin S ~cretari es, Treasurer, two Auditors, and an Executive Committee of not less than twelve, of which the Corresponding Secretaries shall be advisory, and the Treasurer ex-officio, members. ART. VII. To the Executive Committee shall belong the collecting and disbursing of funds; the appointing, counselling, sustaining and dismissing (for just and sufficient reasons) missionaries and agents; the selection of usissionary fields; and, in general, the transaction of all such business as usually appertains to the executive committees of missionary and other benevolent societies; the Committee to exercise no ecclesiastical jurisdiction over the missionaries; and its doings to be subject always to the revision of the annual meeting, which shall, by a reference mutually chosen, always entertain the complaints of any aggrieved agent or missionary; and the decision of such reference shall be final. The Executive Committee shall have authority to fill all vacancies occurring among the officers between the regular annual meetings; to apply, if they see fit, to any State Legislature for acts of incorporation; to fix the compensation, where any is given, of all officers, agents, missionaries, or others in the employment of the Society; to make provision, if any, for dis- abled missionaries, and for the widows and children of such as are deceased; and to call, in all parts of the country, at their discretion, special and general conventions of the friends of missions, with a view to the diffusion of the missionary spirit, and the general and vigorous promotion of the missionary work. Five members of the Committee shall constitute a quorum for transactiIig business. ART. VIII. This society, in collecting funds, in appointing officers, agents and missiona- ries, and in selecting fields of labor, and conducting the missionary work, will endeavor particul. ny to discountenance slavery, by refusing to receive the kisown frRits of unrequited labor, or to welcome to its employment those who hold their fellow-beings as slaves. ART. IX. Missionary bodies, churches or individuals sgreeing to the principles of this Society, and wishing to appoint and sustain missionaries of their own, shall be entitled to do so through the agency of the Executive Committee, on terms mutually agreed upon. ART. X. No amendment shall be made in this Constitution without the concurrence of two- thirds of the members present at a regular annual meeting; nor unless the proposed amend- ment has been submitted to a previous meeting, or to the Executive Committee in season to be published by them (as it shall be their duty to do, if so submitted) in the regttlar official notifications of the meeting. * By evangeiicai sentinenis, we noderstand. anong otisers, a belief in the guilty and lost condition of all men without a Saviour; the Supreme Deity, Incarnation and Atomming Sacrifice of Jesus Christ, the only Saviour of the world; ihe necessity of regenerition by the Holy Spirit, repentance, faith and holy oitedisnce in order to salvation; the immortality of the soul; and the retributions of time judgment in time eternal punishment of the wicked, and salvation of the righteous. ( P58 ) ~*~ociation. ~I~e ~m~ic an ~(i~ionarp AIM AND WORK. To preach the Gospel to the poor. It originated in a sympathy with the almost frieidless slaves. Since Emancipation it has devoted its main efforts to preparing the FREEDMEN for their duties as citizens and Christians in America and as missionaries in Africa. As closely related to this, it seeks to benefit the caste-persecuted CHINESE in America, and to co.operate with the Government in its humane and Christian policy towards the INDIANS. It has also a mission in AERIcA. STATISTICS. CHURCHES: In the SoothIn Va. 1; N. C., 5; S. C., 2; Ga., 12; Ky., 7; Tenn., 4; Ala., 13; La., 12; Miss., 1; Kansas, 2; Texas, 5. Africa, 1. Among the Indians, 1. Total 66. INSTITUTIONS FOUNDED, FOSTERED OR SUSTAINED IN THE SoUTH.Chnrtered: Hampton, Va.; Berea, Ky.; Talladega, Ala.; Atlanta, Ga.; Nashville, Tenn.; Tougaloo, Miss.; New Orleans, La. ; and Austin, Texas, S. Graded or ATornsol Schools: at Wilmington, Raleigh, N. C.; Charleston, Greenwood, S. C.; Macon, Atlanta, Ga.; Montgomery, Mobile, Athens, Selma, Ala. ; Men~phis, Tenn., 11. Other Schools, 18. Total 37. TEAcHERS, MISSIONARIES AND ASSISTANTSAmong the Freedmen, 231; among the Chinese, 17; among the Indians, 17; in Africa, 14. Total, 279. STUDENTSIn Theology, 88; Law, 17; in College Conrse, 106; in other studies, 7,018. Total, 7,229. Scholars, taught by former pupils of our schools, estimated at 100,000. INDIANS under the care of the Association, 13,000. WANTS. 1. A steady INCREASE of regular income to keep pace with the growing work in the South. This increase can only be reached by regular and larger contributions from the churches the feeble as well as the strong. 2. ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS for our higher educational institutions, to accommodate the in- creasing numbers of students; MEETING HOUSES, for the new churches we are organizing; MORE MINISTERS, cultured and pious, for these churches. 3. HELP FOR YOUNG MEN, to be educated as ministers here and missionaries to Africa a pressing want. Before sending boxes, always correspond with the nearest A. M. A. office, as below. NEW YORE. ... H. W. Hubbard, Esq., 56 Ileade Street. BosToN Rev. C. L. Woodworth, Room 21, Congregational House. CHICAGO Rev. Jas. Powell, 112 West Washington Street. MAGAZINE. This Magazine will be sent, gratuitously, if desired, to the Missionaries of the Association to Life Members; to all clergymen who take up collections for the Association; to Super- intendents of Sabbath Schools; to College Libraries; to Theological Seminaries; to Societies of Inquiry on Missions; and to every donor who does not prefer to take it as a subscriber, and contributes in a year not less than five dollars. Those who wish to remember the AMERICAN MISSIONARY AsSoCL~TIoN in their last Will and Testament, are earnestly requested to use the following FORM OF A BEQUEST. I BEQUEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of dollars in trust, to pay the same in days after my decease to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treas- urer of the American Missionary Association of New York City, to be applied, under the direction of the Executive Committee of the Association, to its charitable uses and purposes.~ The Will should be attested by three witnesses [in some States three are requiredin other States only two], who should write against their names, their places of residence [if in cities, their street and number]. TIW following form of attestation will answer for every State in the Union: Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said [A. B.] as his last Will and Testament, in presence of us, who, at the request of the said A. B., and in his presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses. In some States it is required that the Will should be made at least two months before the death of the testator.

Work, Statistics, Wants, Magazine, Form of a Bequest 158-160

( P58 ) ~*~ociation. ~I~e ~m~ic an ~(i~ionarp AIM AND WORK. To preach the Gospel to the poor. It originated in a sympathy with the almost frieidless slaves. Since Emancipation it has devoted its main efforts to preparing the FREEDMEN for their duties as citizens and Christians in America and as missionaries in Africa. As closely related to this, it seeks to benefit the caste-persecuted CHINESE in America, and to co.operate with the Government in its humane and Christian policy towards the INDIANS. It has also a mission in AERIcA. STATISTICS. CHURCHES: In the SoothIn Va. 1; N. C., 5; S. C., 2; Ga., 12; Ky., 7; Tenn., 4; Ala., 13; La., 12; Miss., 1; Kansas, 2; Texas, 5. Africa, 1. Among the Indians, 1. Total 66. INSTITUTIONS FOUNDED, FOSTERED OR SUSTAINED IN THE SoUTH.Chnrtered: Hampton, Va.; Berea, Ky.; Talladega, Ala.; Atlanta, Ga.; Nashville, Tenn.; Tougaloo, Miss.; New Orleans, La. ; and Austin, Texas, S. Graded or ATornsol Schools: at Wilmington, Raleigh, N. C.; Charleston, Greenwood, S. C.; Macon, Atlanta, Ga.; Montgomery, Mobile, Athens, Selma, Ala. ; Men~phis, Tenn., 11. Other Schools, 18. Total 37. TEAcHERS, MISSIONARIES AND ASSISTANTSAmong the Freedmen, 231; among the Chinese, 17; among the Indians, 17; in Africa, 14. Total, 279. STUDENTSIn Theology, 88; Law, 17; in College Conrse, 106; in other studies, 7,018. Total, 7,229. Scholars, taught by former pupils of our schools, estimated at 100,000. INDIANS under the care of the Association, 13,000. WANTS. 1. A steady INCREASE of regular income to keep pace with the growing work in the South. This increase can only be reached by regular and larger contributions from the churches the feeble as well as the strong. 2. ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS for our higher educational institutions, to accommodate the in- creasing numbers of students; MEETING HOUSES, for the new churches we are organizing; MORE MINISTERS, cultured and pious, for these churches. 3. HELP FOR YOUNG MEN, to be educated as ministers here and missionaries to Africa a pressing want. Before sending boxes, always correspond with the nearest A. M. A. office, as below. NEW YORE. ... H. W. Hubbard, Esq., 56 Ileade Street. BosToN Rev. C. L. Woodworth, Room 21, Congregational House. CHICAGO Rev. Jas. Powell, 112 West Washington Street. MAGAZINE. This Magazine will be sent, gratuitously, if desired, to the Missionaries of the Association to Life Members; to all clergymen who take up collections for the Association; to Super- intendents of Sabbath Schools; to College Libraries; to Theological Seminaries; to Societies of Inquiry on Missions; and to every donor who does not prefer to take it as a subscriber, and contributes in a year not less than five dollars. Those who wish to remember the AMERICAN MISSIONARY AsSoCL~TIoN in their last Will and Testament, are earnestly requested to use the following FORM OF A BEQUEST. I BEQUEATH to my executor (or executors) the sum of dollars in trust, to pay the same in days after my decease to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treas- urer of the American Missionary Association of New York City, to be applied, under the direction of the Executive Committee of the Association, to its charitable uses and purposes.~ The Will should be attested by three witnesses [in some States three are requiredin other States only two], who should write against their names, their places of residence [if in cities, their street and number]. TIW following form of attestation will answer for every State in the Union: Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said [A. B.] as his last Will and Testament, in presence of us, who, at the request of the said A. B., and in his presence, and in the presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses. In some States it is required that the Will should be made at least two months before the death of the testator. (159 ) 73,620 lYIORE S111~er S8Wi11~ Jadhilles Sold 1111878 Than in any previous year. In 1870 1878 we sold 127,833 356,432 Sewing Machines, Our sales have increased enormously every year through the whole period of hard times. We now Sell Three-quarters of all the Sewing Machines sold in the World. For the accommodation of the Public we have 1,500 subordinate offices In the United States and Canada, and 8)000 offices in the Old World and South America. PRICES GREATLY REDUCED. Waste no money on cheap counterfeits, Send for our handsomely Illustrated Price List. THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Principal Office, 3~ Union Square, ITew York. Established A. D. 1850. NIANJIAT TAN Life Insurance Co., 156 Broadway, New York, HAS PAID 2DEJAmI~ $7,400,000 0~ I.j I HAS PAID ~ Return Premiums to $4~WUUUU PolicyHolders, HAS A SURPLUS OF $1,700,000 OVER LIABILITIES By New York Standard qI Valuation. It gives the Best insurance on the Best Lives at the most Favorable Rates. EZAMIbTE THE PLA1~S ~TD HATES OF THIS COMPA~T. HENRY STOKES. PRESIDENT. C. Y. wEMPLE. S. N. STEBBINS, Tice-President. ActuaW. H. T. WEMPLE, J. L. HALSEY, H. B. STOKES, Secretary. Assistant Secretaries. Bro~ll Bros. & Co. BANKERS, 69 & 61 Wall Stroot, N~w York, 211 ~hostllllt St., Phu1ad.o1~liia, 66 St8to Stroot, Bostoil. Issue Commercial Credits. make Cable transfers of Money between this Country and Eng- land, and buy and sell Bills of Exchange on Great Britain and Ireland. They also issue, against cash deposited, or satisfactory guarantee of repayment, ~ir~vIar 6rgdils for Tra~~II~rs, In DOLLARS for use in the United States and adjacent countries~ and in POUNDS STERLING, for use in any part of the world. (160) A. S. BARNES & CO. DUDLEYS PATENT PUBLiSH THE ONLY DIAGONAL S6N~S f61{ IIIE S~N~IIJMfl~. ROAD SCRAPER THE HYMN AND TUNE BOOK which stands th test. Revised and enlarged. Prices greatly re- duced. Editions for every want. For Samples IS THE BEST. (loaned without chargej and Terms address the Weighs hut 10 lbs., has Publishers. ________ Steel Cutter Plate, can LYMAN ABBOT be worked sqnare or at ~ any desired an- gle, and is rapidly superseding all Com~y C~ ~C 1~vi EVEEWhlIVIl others where it Illustrated and Popular, giving the latest views of is known. the best Biblical Scholars on all disputed points. A concise, strong and faithful Exposition in (5) eight volumes. octavo. AGENTS WANTED IN EVERY LOCALITY. A Few of Many Testimonials of its Value: Works in rough or smooth ground. No one who has used it will be without it.M. Bariholo- EDITED BY mew & Sons, Goshen, Ct. Rev. J. E. RANKIN, D.~. aild Rev. E. S. L@RENZ. I~~~Select~men of the Town of Litchfield, Ct., iiy is the heat Scraper ever invented, md cheerfully Endorsed by FRANCIS MURPHY, aad recommend it to all interested in Roads, as calcn- nsed exclusively in his meetiugs. lated materially to lessen the expense of making This is the first practicable Collection of Hymns and repairing the same. and Tunes aboonding in vigorous Pieces adapted Is twice as good as you representit. With same to the Gospel Temperance Movement, it is also labor will do two or three times as much is any the best Book for Church Prayer Meet- scraper I ever saw. Answers our fullest expects- ings. ______ tions.H. TUCKER, of Rockville. Price 35 cts. postpaid. Special Rates Leaves a road in better shape, and is easier for by the quantity, man and team than any scraper I ever saw. J. S. DONT FAIL TO EXAMINE AT ONCE. KINNEY, Washington. Send for circular. S. H. DUDLEY, A. S. BA~~ES & CO., Publishers, Bantam Falls, Lmtchfield County, Ct. New York and Chicago. N. TIBBALS & SONS, The Book of Psalms. 37 Park Row, ITew York. A5~ANG1D T~ 5~SPO~3ITE 5EADII~G fl 30 YEARS IN THE BOOK BUSINESS. SABBATH SCHOILS, IHURCHESORFAMILY WORSHIP. We endeavor to get every valuable work in every de- The current version is strictly followed, the only partmeot of Biblical and Theologf-al Literature. For peculiarity being the arrangement according to the example: We have different works on Bible Eviden- Original Perellelisms, for convenience in responsive ceo, Irom Augustine down; ieo on Bible Interpretation; reading. Two sizes. Prices: 32mo, Limp Cloth, 15d ou Homiletics; 200 on Lsctures to the Vonuc and Lectures to Children; also on Prayers, Baptism, Propli- 30 ets. per copy, $25 per 100; l6mo, Cloth, 70 cts. per ecy, Church History, etc., etc. copy,$5lper 100. Sent post-paid on receipt of price. Sunday-School Libraries a Specialty, TAINTOR SHITHESS, MERHILL & Ci Publithira Send for particulars. 7i58 Ba-oadway, New kork. UNFERMENTED WINE Meneely& Kimberly, Pure Juice of the Grape; no Alcohol; BELL FOUNDERS, TROY, N. Y. tested br years; received International Medial. Manufacture a superior quality of BELLS. T. H. JOHNSON, New Brunswick, N. J. Special attention given to CHURCH BHLLS. National Temperance Society, 58 Reade st., N.Y. ~ Catalogues sent Iree to parties needing hells. Congregational and Baptist Publication Societies, Boston and Philadelphia. ___ BUY THE BEST GOODS BOGLE & LYLES, Nos. 87 & 89 Park Place NEW YORK, Dealers in As now improved, saves one-third the time. OIIOIIJE CANNED FRUITS If I were bereft of it, I should feel myself bereft of my ri hr hand. Bxv. LYMAN ABBOTT, Ed. (h. Union. VEGETABLES, POTTED MEATS, ETC., Can be sent hy mail in a registered letter. Send Sole Agents for for circulars. Manufactured by JOHN S. PURDY, RICHARDSQN & ROBBINS 212 Broadway, Cor. Fulton St., New York. Extra Yellow Peaches. ZMPO~STA~T TO OLUGYMEW.

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The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 6 Congregational work Pilgrim missionary Congregationalist and herald of gospel liberty American Missionary Association. New York June 1879 0033 006
The American missionary. / Volume 33, Issue 6, miscellaneous front pages 160A-160B

VOL. XXXIII. No.6. THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. To the Poor the Gospel is PrHached. CONTENTS: JUNE, 1879. Q GEORGIAMidway lI~. DorchesterAcad emyNew Churcl~ press Slash 172 SOUTH CAROLINA, CHARLESTON Plymouth Church and Avery Institute 174 ALABAMAState Conference 176 LoUIsIANASooth-Western ConferenceRe vivals and Conversions 178 EDITORIAL. PARAGRAPH MONET WHICH COSTS MONEY 161 RAILROADS AND RIVERS 162 CONGREGATIONALISM IN THE SOUTH 164 WORK STOPPED, BUT THE RECOMPENSE CON TINUED 165 ITEMS FROM THE FIELD 166 GENERAL NOTES 167 OUR QUERY COLUMN 169 THE FREEDMEN. A TOUR OF A MONTH THROUGH THE SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES: Rev. J. E. Roy, D. D. 169 TENNESSEE, MEMPHISStUdGUtS Day at Le Moyne 171 GEORGIANO. 1 MILLER STATIONPerils of Young ConvertsAn Open loose 171 THE INDIANS. SPICE o~ MISSIONARY LIFE 181 THE CHINESE. THE CONGREGATIONAL WAY IN MISSION WORE: Rev. Win. C. Pond 184 GOLDEN WEDDING GIFTS 186 RECEIPTS 186 WORE, STATISTICS, WANTS, & C 190 INEW YORTiI: th~ ~mevi~u ~Uii0nav~ ROOMS, 56 READR STREET. Price, 50 Cents a Year, in advance. 56 READE STREET, N. ~. PRESIDENT. HoN. E. S. TOBEY, Boston. VICE-PRESIDENTS. Hon. F. D. PARIsH, Ohio. Hon. B. D. HOLTON, Wis. Hon. WILLIAM CLAFLIN, Mass. Rev. STEPHEN THIJESTON, D. D., Me. Rev. SAMUEL HARRIS, D. D., Ct. WM. C. CHAPIN, Esq., R. I. Rev. W. T. EUSTIS, D. D., Mass. Hon. A. C. BARSTOW, R. I. Rev. THATCHER THAYER, D. D., R. I. Rev. RAY PALMER, D. D., N. Y. Rev. J. M. STURTEVANT, D. D., Ill. Rev. W. W. PATTON, D. D., D. C. Hon. SEYMOUR STRAIGHT, ta. HORACE HALLOCK, Esq., Mich. Rev. CYRUS W~ WALLACE, D. D., N. H. Rev. EDWARD HAWKS, Ct. DOUGLAS PUTNAM, Esq., Ohio. Hon. THADDEUS FAIRBANKS, Vt. SAMUEL D.PORTER, Esq., N. Y. Rev. M. M. G. DANA, D. D., Minn. Rev. H. W. BEECEIER, N. Y. Gen. 0. 0. HOWARD, Oregon. Rev. G. F. MAGOUN, D. D., Iowa. Col. C. G. HAMMOND, Ill. EDWARD SPAULDING, N. D., N. H. DAVID RIPLEY, Esq., N. J. Rev. WM. M. BARBOUR, D. D., Ct. Rev. W. L. GAGE, Ct. A. S. HATCH, Esq., N. Y. Rev. J. H. FAIRCHILD, D. D., Ohio. Rev. H. A. STIRSON, Minn. Rev. 3. W. STRONG, D. D., Miun. Rev. GEORGE THACHER, LL. D., Iowa. Rev. A. L. STONE, D. D., California. Rev. G. H. ATKINSON, D. D., Oregon. Rev. J. E. RANKIN, D. D., D. C. Rev. A. L. CHAPIN, D. D., Wis. S. D. SMITH, Esq., Mass. PETER SMITH, Esq., Mass. Dea. JOHN C. WHITIN, Mass. Rev. WM. PATTON, D. D., Ct. Hon. .T. B. GRINNELL, Iowa. Rev. WM. T. CARR, Ct. Rev. HORACE WINSLOW, Ct. Sir PETER COATS, Scotland. Rev. HENRY ALLON, D. D., London, Eng. WM. E. WHITING, l~sq., N. Y. 3. M. PINKERTON, Esq., Mass. Rev. F. A. NOBLE, D. D., Ct. DANIEL HAND, Esq., Ct. A. L. WILLISTON, Esq., Mass. Rev. A. F. BEARD, D. D., N. Y. FREDERICK BILLINGS, Esq., Vt. JOSEPH CARPENTER, Esq., R. I. CORRESPONDING SECRETARY. REV. M. B. STRIEBY, D. D., 56 Reade Street, N. Y. DISTRICT SECRETARIES. REV. C. L. WOODWORTH, Boston. REV. G. D. PIKE, New York. REV. JAS. POWELL, ChiCago. EDGAR KETCHTJM, ESQ., Treasurer, N. Y. H. W. HUU~ARD ESQ. Assistant Treasurer, N. Y. 11EV. N. B. STRIEBY, ReCording Secretary. ALONKO S. BALL, A. S. BARNES, EDWARD BEECHER, GEO. N. BOYNTON, WM. B. BROWN, EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. CLINTON B. ThSE, ADDISON P. FOSTER, B. A. GRAVES, S. B. HALLIDAY, SAML HOLMES, S. S. JOCELYN, ANDREW LESTER, CHAS. L. MEAD, JOHN H. WASHBURN, G. B. WILLCOX. COMMUNICATIONS relating to the business of the Association may be addressed to either of the Secretaries as above; letters for the Editor of the American Missionary~~ to Rev. Geo. N. Boynton, at the New York Office. DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS should be sent to H. W. Hubbard, Asst Treasurer, No. 56 Reade Street, New York, or, When more convenient, to either of the Branch Offices, 21 Congregational Ilouse, Boston, Mass., or 112 West Washington Street, Chicago, Ill. A payment of thirty dollars at one time constitutes a Life Member. Correspondents are specially requested to place at the head of each letter the name of their Post Office, and the Connty and State in Which it is located.

Paragraph Editorial 161

TIlE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL. XXXJJL JUNE, 1879. No. 6. We are in receipt of several communications suggesting that we, as aa Associ- ation, should do something for the relief of the negro emigrants to Kansas. We are compelled to say to this, however, that 1. We cannot divert funds from our over- drawn treasury from the work to which we are pledged and the responsibilities we have definitely assumed. 2. Our legitimate work is with the Freedmen in the South, where our schools and churches are, and where the mass of the people will be for a very long time yet. 3. That assistance to reach their destination has been given to them from many sources, and that their greatest need of help for a time will be after reaching Kansas, in securing and settling upon lands. 4. That we cherish the deepest interest in the suffering multitudes who have already left their homes, and will cheerfully transmit, for friends who may prefer to send through us, such moneys as may be designed for this specific object, and will use our utmost diligence to see that they accomplish the end for which they are set apart. MONEY WHICH COSTS MONEY. It is unfortunate, perhaps, that the agents of the beneficence of the churches and Christian people of the land should be compelled so often to rise and explain, but the necessity will in all probability continue so long as there is a possibility of misunderstanding facts and figures. We are all creatures of associa- tion, and things which are coupled together are apt to make unwarranted impressions on our minds. For instance, the name of the American Missionary Association has been of late passing the rounds of the public press in connection with large sums of money. $150,000 to four of its institutions from the Stone estate; $20,000 for Fisk Uni- versity from the Graves legacy; $20,000 from the estate of Deacon James Smith, of Philadelphia; $12,000 announced last month from the Avery estate, and which is to be increased to about $18,000 ; $15,000 from Mr. Arthington, of Leeds. All this sounds very rich and prosperous, and our contributors say: They are rich and increased in goods. For a time, at least, they will do well. Let us thank God for their prosperity, and turn to those whose wants are more pressing than theirs can be. Just here is where the explanation must be made. First, thea, almost none of

Money which Costs Money Editorial 161-162

TIlE AMERICAN MISSIONARY. VOL. XXXJJL JUNE, 1879. No. 6. We are in receipt of several communications suggesting that we, as aa Associ- ation, should do something for the relief of the negro emigrants to Kansas. We are compelled to say to this, however, that 1. We cannot divert funds from our over- drawn treasury from the work to which we are pledged and the responsibilities we have definitely assumed. 2. Our legitimate work is with the Freedmen in the South, where our schools and churches are, and where the mass of the people will be for a very long time yet. 3. That assistance to reach their destination has been given to them from many sources, and that their greatest need of help for a time will be after reaching Kansas, in securing and settling upon lands. 4. That we cherish the deepest interest in the suffering multitudes who have already left their homes, and will cheerfully transmit, for friends who may prefer to send through us, such moneys as may be designed for this specific object, and will use our utmost diligence to see that they accomplish the end for which they are set apart. MONEY WHICH COSTS MONEY. It is unfortunate, perhaps, that the agents of the beneficence of the churches and Christian people of the land should be compelled so often to rise and explain, but the necessity will in all probability continue so long as there is a possibility of misunderstanding facts and figures. We are all creatures of associa- tion, and things which are coupled together are apt to make unwarranted impressions on our minds. For instance, the name of the American Missionary Association has been of late passing the rounds of the public press in connection with large sums of money. $150,000 to four of its institutions from the Stone estate; $20,000 for Fisk Uni- versity from the Graves legacy; $20,000 from the estate of Deacon James Smith, of Philadelphia; $12,000 announced last month from the Avery estate, and which is to be increased to about $18,000 ; $15,000 from Mr. Arthington, of Leeds. All this sounds very rich and prosperous, and our contributors say: They are rich and increased in goods. For a time, at least, they will do well. Let us thank God for their prosperity, and turn to those whose wants are more pressing than theirs can be. Just here is where the explanation must be made. First, thea, almost none of 162 ]i?ailroad8 and Ji~ivers. these bequests are in our hands as yet. The largest of all is coupled with condi- tions which we hope to be able to meet, but of which, until we shall have met them, we have no right to be sure. But secondly, and what is of more consequence, with one possible exception, the way in which all this money is to be expended is determined before it reaches our treasury. The donors have examined the field, or parts of it, for themselves, and have given their gifts, not to us, but only through us, to certain definite fields and uses. Most of this, which is for home use, is to build buildings, and must go for that purpose. But it will cost us money to see these buildings built ; the oversight, the correspondence, and the co-operation of all sorts will be a drain upon our time and treasury; and when the much needed buildings shall have been erected, the enlarged work to which they lead will increase very consider- ably the annual expense for which we must provide. Other of these funds are for a new mission fiel