[Home] [Current Tables of Contents]

[ HLAS Online Home Page | Search HLAS Online | Help | FAQ | Comments ]


Volume 59 / Social Sciences

GEOGRAPHY: MIDDLE AMERICA


TOM L. MARTINSON, Professor of Geography, Auburn University, Alabama
GARY S. ELBOW, Professor of Geography, Texas Tech University


THE CONSERVATION VERSUS DEVELOPMENT DEBATE continues in publications about geography in Central America and the Caribbean this biennium. The debate is illustrated in the context of gender studies, population growth and urbanization, environmental change, and tourism, among many other topics.

Of special interest in this chapter are articles on the role of women in development by Rowlands (item #bi 99003560#), Momsen (item #bi 98002584#), Klak (item #bi 98003594#), and Thomasson (item #bi 98003668#).

The role of urbanization in the region is highlighted by works from Guilbe (item #bi 99003606#) and Quiles Rodríguez (item #bi 98013314#) in Puerto Rico; Montiel Rodríguez in Cuba (item #bi 97005997#); Pagney in Guadeloupe (item #bi 99003755#); Coyula Cowley et al. for three countries: Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic (item #bi 98011279#); and Alonso Santos for Central America (item #bi 97016722#).

Environmental themes are introduced by Thomas-Hope (item #bi 98001557#), and supplemented by country or regional-scale studies by Alves-Milho in Nicaragua (item #bi 98001590#), Rubio in El Salvador (item #bi 98006417#), Horn (item #bi 99007796#) and Adamson (item #bi 98013066#) in Costa Rica, Condit in Panama (item #bi 99004011#), Lora Salcedo in the Dominican Republic (item #bi 98001562#), and Vargas Ulate for all of Central America (item #bi 99006515#).

Tourism, a particularly important issue in this region, received attention from Chase et al. in Costa Rica (item #bi 99002752#), and the OAS (item #bi 98001593#) and Lorah (item #bi 98002582#) in Antigua.

Works on historical geography top the list of materials on Mexico this biennium. Siemans' book on the San Juan River wetlands of Veracruz is a benchmark study that will be a fundamental reference on historical land use change in Mexico (item #bi 98014451#). Sluyter's works on the impact of cattle ranching in the same area (items #bi2002006913#, #bi2002006912#, and #bi 00005884#) complement Siemans' work on a smaller scale and in a more limited time frame. Aguilar-Robledo continues the emphasis on the environmental impacts of cattle ranching with his study of the Huasteca Potosina (item #bi 99000895#). In a similar vein is Endfield and O'Hara's study of environmental change in colonial Michoacán (item #bi 00005885#). Butzer's study of roadside ventas (item #bi2002006903#) and Driever's work on factors that affected decision-making on the coast-to-highland route (item #bi 97008899#) also complement each other. Other historical geography publications on Mexico include Doenges study of marriage mobility (item #bi2002006904#), Nickel's work on mapping and surveying in colonial Mexico (item #bi 98010842#), and Vollmer's paper on early colonial Pánuco (item #bi 98010841#).

In addition, a number of works deal with the Mexico City metropolitan area, especially the areas of rapid urbanization in the eastern part of Mexico state (items #bi 98013181#, #bi 98004636#, and #bi 98003870#). Also on Mexico City, a compilation of articles on land titling contains much information for urban colonies (for individual reviews in HLAS 59, see items #bi 98004636#, #bi 98004637#, and #bi 98004630#). Much more ambitious and broader in scope is Garza's review of 50 years of Mexican urban and regional research (item #bi 98001860#) that will become an essential reference for scholars and professional planners alike.

Of note for Guatemala is the appearance of work on environmental issues in the Petén (items #bi2001000128#, #bi2002000999#, and #bi2002001000#). These studies may reflect the easing of political problems in that country that made fieldwork difficult in the past.


Go to the:


Begin a Basic Search | Begin an Expert Search

[ HLAS Online Home Page | Search HLAS Online | Help | FAQ | Comments ]


Library of Congress
Comments: Ask a Librarian (10/31/11)