The condition of Niagara Falls, and the measures needed to preserve them.

The condition of Niagara Falls, and the measures needed to preserve them.

By J.B. Harrison.

Eight letters published in the New York Evening post, the New York tribune, and the Boston daily advertiser, during the summer of 1882.

Annotation: Charles Eliot Norton, writer and Professor of History of Fine Art at Harvard University, and landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted were among the leaders of the public campaign to save the beauty of Niagara Falls through the creation of a state-owned reservation. Facing significant opposition from such figures as New York Governor Alonzo Cornell, they sought to marshal public enthusiasm by publishing a series of letters about the plight of the Falls and the plans to save them in major New York and Boston newspapers in 1881 and 1882. In 1881, the letters were written by a young Englishman, Henry Norman; in 1882, by a Unitarian minister, Jonathan Baxter Harrison, who worked tirelessly in the Niagara campaign. His letters, which had considerable popular impact and unquestionably contributed to the success of the campaign in the establishment of the State Reservation at Niagara in 1885, are here collected in pamphlet form. They offer insights into the perceptions, thought and values which guided the burgeoning preservationist conservation movement in late nineteenth-century America, and into the techniques of an early and successful campaign for state-level conservation.


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