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Interview with Don Schol [8/12/2011]

Katherine Sheffield:

Are we ready to get started here? All right. Well, good afternoon. Today is August 12, 2011. My name is Kathy Sheffield. I am conducting an oral history interview for the Veterans History Project at the Court Reporting Institute in Dallas, Texas. Peri Wood is the professional court reporter who is the transcriber. We have a student court reporter here, Jose Beltran, who is also going to be recording the interview. And we have with us Mr. Don Schol. If you would, sir, please state your name and address for the record.

Don Schol:

My name is Don R. Schol. I live in Argyle, Texas; 1937 East Hickory Hill Road, Argyle, Texas.

Katherine Sheffield:

Okay. When were you born, sir?

Don Schol:

I was born in June 11, 1941.

Katherine Sheffield:

Okay. Before we were bombed?

Don Schol:

Before we were bombed. That's right.

Katherine Sheffield:

Okay. And you were born, where were you born?

Don Schol:

I was born in Buffalo Center, Iowa.

Katherine Sheffield:

Okay. And what are the names of your parents?

Don Schol:

Henry Joseph Schol and Margaret Rose Snell, maiden name.

Katherine Sheffield:

Did you have any brothers or sisters?

Don Schol:

No, I did not.

Katherine Sheffield:

Okay. Only child. Well, were you drafted or did you enlist?

Don Schol:

Well, that's an interesting story. I was at the University of Texas. I graduated with master of fine arts degree, and was 25 years old at that time. I thought that I was going to escape the draft. But as soon as I got out of school, I received a draft notice. I came to Board 29 here in Dallas for a physical and testing, and I was told that I was eligible and that I would be inducted within a week or so from that date. And so I gave some thought to enlisting for infantry OCS, which is what I did. I was interviewed and they told me then that I would be guaranteed to go to officer candidate school --

Katherine Sheffield:

Okay.

Don Schol:

-- which I did. That was at Fort Benning, Georgia.

Katherine Sheffield:

Yes. So this was what year again was that?

Don Schol:

That was in the summer of 1966.

Katherine Sheffield:

Okay.

Don Schol:

June of 1966.

Katherine Sheffield:

So Vietnam was just gearing up.

Don Schol:

Just charging, yes. Just getting underway.

Katherine Sheffield:

Um-hum.

Don Schol:

I might add -- can I add some notes --

Katherine Sheffield:

Sure.

Don Schol:

-- that I've learned through another friend who is a Vietnam veteran and is also a historian of the Vietnam war, that during that period of time in June of '66, the Pentagon realized they did not have enough junior officers to staff all of the units they were going to deploy to Vietnam. So they came up with the idea to draft college graduates. They needed 10,000 second lieutenants to staff the platoons that they were going to deploy. That's why at my age I got swept up in that, along with all the rest of my colleagues that I went through training with. We were all college graduates.

Katherine Sheffield:

Okay. So you then were in the Army.

Don Schol:

I was, yes, enlisted in the Army.

Katherine Sheffield:

And so what were your -- where did you have basic training?

Don Schol:

I was sent to Fort Dix, New Jersey, for basic training. And their philosophy was to get you as far away from home as they could so you wouldn't run away. And so I went to Fort Dix, New Jersey, for basic training and advanced infantry training. And then I was sent to Fort Benning, Georgia, to the infantry school, which was then called the Benning School for Boys.

Katherine Sheffield:

How were your first days in the Service? Were you acclimating well or was it not --

Don Schol:

Yeah, sure. Very poignant question you offer.

Katherine Sheffield:

-- not exactly what it was cracked up to be?

Don Schol:

I -- I know that, you know, when I first went to what they call the reception station at Fort Dix, it was a bit of a shock for all of us. I mean, we flew into the area and were taken there, and we were drove in in the middle of the night. And we got off these buses and immediately the Army hit us in the face, you know. And within the next few days we had all our hair shaved off, all our clothes issued and so forth. And then we were assigned a drill sergeant who barked at us. And it was -- it was quite an experience. It was a shock for all of us.

Katherine Sheffield:

Okay. And you were in the infantry then?

Don Schol:

Infantry. I was destine to be an infantry soldier, yes. It's not exactly what I had in mind, but, you know...

Katherine Sheffield:

And so then you went from Fort Dix to where?

Don Schol:

To Fort Benning.

Katherine Sheffield:

To Fort Benning, I'm sorry, Georgia. And from there to where?

Don Schol:

I was there for six months of officer training at Fort Benning. And during that period of time, because they knew we were all going to Vietnam, they sent us through ranger school, which was an unusual thing at that particular time, because they -- they figured without ranger training, we probably wouldn't survive in Vietnam because we were told the average lifespan of a second lieutenant in the field for the first time was about 15 minutes.

Katherine Sheffield:

Oh, that was encouraging, sure. So then from Benning you went to --

Don Schol:

From -- I went to Fort Hood. I was assigned temporarily to Fort Hood, Texas.

Katherine Sheffield:

Then from Fort Hood, did you go to Vietnam from there?

Don Schol:

Yes.

Katherine Sheffield:

Okay. And where did you go in Vietnam.

Don Schol:

The first post that I was assigned to, I was assigned to USARV, that's U.S. Army, Vietnam, headquarters at Long Bend Post in Bien Hoa. And because I was going to be an artist for them, that would have been -- that was my parent unit in Vietnam. It used to be headquarters. I answered to a colonel that was in charge of that program, combat artist program.

Katherine Sheffield:

And explain a little bit about the combat artist program.

Don Schol:

It was a unique program I think. In Vietnam was the first time such a program was ever used to bring soldiers, that is, combat-trained soldiers. That was one of the requirements. You had to be a combat-trained soldier to participate in this program, but you also had to have credentials that verified that you were an artist or had artistic training. And the idea was that they wanted the combat art teams -- there were nine teams altogether. I was with Combat Team 5, and there were five members per team. They wanted us to go into the field as soldiers but to observe the war and participate and record our experiences in a manner -- more artistic manner than just a photograph. There were a lot of combat photographers, but they wanted us to look at the war in a different way. You know, historically, everything we see about the Revolutionary War and Civil War and so forth, we look at works of art. We didn't have cameras during the Revolutionary War, so there's a long tradition of combat art in the United States. And there were certain people in Washington at the time, in particular a woman by the name of Eugenia Nolan that worked with the Office of Military History, and she was largely responsible for initiating this program. And so because there was an effort to document the war like it had never been documented before, General SLA Marshall initiated a program called "The After Action Report," which copious notes were taken after a major activity or action, combat action. And so the Combat Artist Program complemented that kind of activity. And so we were sent to the field. And I'll never forget our colonel told us, Colonel Quigley, said, Gentlemen, I want you to remember you're soldiers first, artists second. And by that, he meant that wherever we went, we travelled the various units all over Vietnam, and we were expected to participate in whatever was happening while when we had the opportunity to create or generate ideas for works of art. It was obvious we weren't going to be doing a lot of drawing or painting in combat. So what we did, we carried cameras, we carried sketchbooks and M-16s, and we recorded the war the best way we could for a later time. Which then after we finished our tour, we were sent to Schofield barracks in Hawaii where we were given a studio to work in, in one of those old barracks buildings from World War II, and it was fully equipped. And during that time, then, we were expected to create finished works of art that would become part of the National Archives War Collection.

Katherine Sheffield:

What were your subjects that they were wanting you to record? Would you record battle scenes or individuals or --

Don Schol:

A little bit of everything. Whatever presented itself. It depended on those guys -- - those members of my team that were painters did battle scenes and things. I was trained as a sculptor, and I was probably one of the only sculptors in that combat art program. I created sculptural figures of soldiers and things of that nature out of clay and fired them and so forth. So the way I approached it was a little bit different. When I was in the field, I drew soldiers and their unforms and their equipment. And when we were underway, I would draw landscapes and things that I saw. When the bullets started flying, I put my sketchbook away and paid attention to what was going on. So a lot of what we do was from memory, from firsthand experience. And I spent a lot of time on helicopters during helicopter assaults and things of that nature. So helicopters became a mainstay of the imagery that I created for the Military History Program.

Katherine Sheffield:

Absolutely fascinating. I'm aware of George Stevens and his unit that was sent over when D-Day was going the happen in World War II.

Don Schol:

Right.

Katherine Sheffield:

And his unit -- his California, you know, the Hollywood film --

Don Schol:

Right.

Katherine Sheffield:

-- his unit all went over there and recorded the landing on D-Day, and some of the most iconic images we have are some of his reporting.

Don Schol:

Right.

Katherine Sheffield:

And the liberation of France, and he was there, and he got photographs of -- and film, archive film of Dachau and, you know, all those fellows --

Don Schol:

Sure.

Katherine Sheffield:

-- at that time. So I'm certainly aware of the movies, but paintings and -- that's just a really foreign thing to me. I think that's -- that's wonderful. Another interpretation of what the recordkeeping is --

Don Schol:

Right.

Katherine Sheffield:

-- happening.

Don Schol:

Exactly. I mean, we travelled with a lot of combat photographers, and there were a lot of artists from Washington that were official artists for -- what do I want to say? The institute in Washington where they keep all the works of art. A lot of them specialized in military uniforms. And some of them came over because during the Vietnam War, out in the field, soldiers departed from the routine uniform because of the weather and the jungle and so forth, and that was tolerated for the most part. And so the soldiers developed a lot of variations on the standard-issue uniform. So a lot of these artists would come over and record them. Of course they would travel with us because my team -- I had these four men that travelled with me. We tried to travel together as a team; we didn't always do that. But a lot of these visiting artists and photographers would want to go to the field with us because we knew our way around. We knew how to catch a helicopter and go where we were going to go. And I always carried a set of orders that allowed me to get on any vehicle or aircraft or whatever we needed to get on to travel wherever we needed to travel. Periodically, the colonel briefed us where particular action was taking place. And he said, Okay, this is where I want you to go, and you'll assign yourself to these various units that were in the field. And when we did that, then it was my responsibility to get my team to that location however we could do that, whether we flew by prop plane or helicopter, whatever, catch a ride on a jeep or whatever. And we got there and then I would announce our arrival to the commander of that particular unit that we were assigned to or visiting and let them know what we were up to. And then we went on various operations with them. The first time that I went to the field, I went with one of my close friends who I had been in school with in Austin. And he was on my team, and we were sent to the north part of South Vietnam to the 1st Cav, which was an air calvary unit. And we were assigned to the 3rd Brigade, the first of the 99th Air Assault Group, and we travelled with them. That was the same unit that was pictorialized in the movie "Apocalypse Now." And when people ask me what was my experience of Vietnam, I always say "Apocalypse Now," and people go, Oh, that was Hollywood fiction. Oh no. Oh, no, it wasn't. Because, you know, Robert Duval in the movie was commander of that particular unit. We flew with those guys and they were pretty crazy. They were pretty crazy. And I mean, you know, they had to be to do what they did.

Katherine Sheffield:

Love the smell of napalm in the morning.

Don Schol:

But when you see that, you know, in the movie, you think it's something they made up. But --

Katherine Sheffield:

Yeah.

Don Schol:

-- and that movie was actually shot in the Philippines. But a lot of the activities that took place in that movie, I experienced, and it was that bizarre. When people ask me what was your experience in Vietnam, I would say it was pretty bizarre. It wasn't like my father told me about World War II. It was a total different experience.

Katherine Sheffield:

Yes.

Don Schol:

And some of the stories that I could tell would -- you wouldn't believe. Want me tell you one?

Katherine Sheffield:

Sure.

Don Schol:

One that I love to tell is when we went to this -- the first of the 9th Cav -- all of the calvary units, many of them became -- instead of riding horses, they were riding helicopters. So the 1st Cav, that was the 1st Calvary unit, were flying helicopters. In other words, they would take their soldiers into an operator area with a helicopter. Anyway, so the first night we were there, we were at a landing zone in the northern part of South Vietnam, Chu Lai. And we were told to dig a foxhole for the night because there would probably be incoming rounds, mortar rounds from enemy positions and so forth. So we did. My friend Richard Strong and I started digging a foxhole. And all we had for dinner that night was some warm beer and soda crackers, but that was okay. And as soon as it got dark we looked down the hill and there was this big, wooden form painted white. It looked like a drive-in movie theater. So we were sitting there waiting in the dark, and all of the sudden we see some images flashing on this big board. And sure enough, there it was, Vic Morrow and that TV series "Combat." They were showing that image, showing some of those "Combat" issues. I mean, it was so bizarre. And we were -- you know, we had a few beers by then and it got even more bizarre. And mortar rounds starting coming in and things happening in the sky at night and so forth. And they were just -- you know, they were psyching everybody up for war. And off in the distance, we could see a plane called -- they called "Puff the Magic Dragon," which was a C-147 that was equipped with 20-millimeter canons sticking out of the -- it would was fly along and it would fly tilt, you know, towards the ground, and it would put a round in every square foot. That would, you know, shake Charlie up pretty good at night. We could see that going on. It was kind of like being at a Fourth of July celebration with things happening in the air all over. And we were looking at this, this Vic Morrow movie screen, you know. And mortar rounds started coming in to us, and we realized that our foxhole wasn't deep enough, wasn't quite deep enough. We didn't have enough sandbags. So we got out and ran and found a bigger bunker to wait out the rest of the night. We didn't get a lot of sleep that night. That was our first big adventure to the field.

Katherine Sheffield:

Welcome to Vietnam.

Don Schol:

That was an apt initiation, I guess I would say.

Katherine Sheffield:

How many years were you there? How long were you there?

Don Schol:

I was there in country for six months. And then we had -- the rest of our tour was at Schofield barracks in Hawaii. But normally when soldiers were sent, particularly second lieutenants, were given six months in the field and then six months in some sort of administrative. That was sort of the routine during Vietnam.

Katherine Sheffield:

Um-hum.

Don Schol:

If they survived six months in the field, then they were rewarded with some sort of a desk job unless they wanted to stay in the field.

Katherine Sheffield:

Okay. Were there -- were there units -- now that was in '66 when you were there.

Don Schol:

I was there in '67 and '68. And '68 is when the Tet Offensive hit --

Katherine Sheffield:

Yes.

Don Schol:

-- and there was a lot of activity going on at that time.

Katherine Sheffield:

Yes.

Don Schol:

I remember we flew out on an operation, and we came back in a helicopter, and our base camp was wiped out. It was all burned out, bombed.

Katherine Sheffield:

The fall of Saigon was the -- '73 or something like that, right?

Don Schol:

Right.

Katherine Sheffield:

Was there still an artist unit that was covering that?

Don Schol:

No, not that late in the program. It started -- I was Team 5. There were nine teams, and there were a couple of teams after mine. And I understand the team after the one that I was with, there was some soldiers that were wounded. Fortunately, none of -- neither myself nor none of my men were wounded. We were -- well, we relied on our training, our infantry training to guide us.

Katherine Sheffield:

Yeah.

Don Schol:

Because a lot of times we reacted without even thinking, and that was the whole idea of having that kind of training.

Katherine Sheffield:

So are some of your sculptures that you made from your experiences over there, are they in the Library of Congress or in --

Don Schol:

Well, there's a war art collection at the Smithsonian, and it's been in storage for many, many years. Since Vietnam.

Katherine Sheffield:

Oh, my goodness.

Don Schol:

And I understand that just recently they've started opening that up and going through it. There's a lot of work to look at. And I'm told that my sculptures are in that collection. When people ask me where is your work, up until now I've always said do you remember that last scene in "Raiders of the Lost Ark, that big --

Katherine Sheffield:

The warehouse.

Don Schol:

-- the big warehouse. That's probably where it's been. It's been in big crates. And they've never had anybody that's had the ambition to want to open that up and go through all of that. Now they're trying to go through it and catalog it all.

Katherine Sheffield:

Okay. Well, that's really fascinating. First time I've ever heard of that. My ex-husband was in the military then. He was second lieutenant. Went in as a commissioned officer, and he went to the Mekong Delta. He was in military police, but they put him infantry.

Don Schol:

Um-hum.

Katherine Sheffield:

And put him in Mekong Delta. He managed to only be there four months. But when he left Vietnam on prisoner escort, they sent him to Fort Shafter, Hawaii, and that's when we got married. So I know about Schofield and Kolekole Pass and all up around there.

Don Schol:

Great.

Katherine Sheffield:

Yes.

Don Schol:

Yeah.

Katherine Sheffield:

Vietnam was a strange war.

Don Schol:

It was a very unusual war, yeah.

Katherine Sheffield:

A strange time.

Don Schol:

I was in the Delta too at Dong Tam, and spent time there with a Riverine force, which was actually a Navy unit that travelled the Delta area and patrolled that whole region. So I travelled all over Vietnam. And I thought today you were going to ask me the names of villages I was in. I was like, oh gosh, if I had a map in front of me, I could probably point out all the places. The last big battle I was in, and I was by myself, it was about time for us to go back to Hawaii, and there was one last chance. And I went out to the field all by myself and went way over near the Cambodian border to an area called -- there was a mountain out there that just rose out of the middle of nowhere. It was called Nui Bondan. And I went there. There was an air cav unit there. I spent several days with them going out on combat assaults and so forth. One day, I ended up as a door gunner on one of their gunships, which was an unusual experience, and went on some operations with them. Fortunately I came back in one piece. And then by then, I knew I was ready to leave.

Katherine Sheffield:

Didn't want to press your luck.

Don Schol:

Right.

Katherine Sheffield:

Did you make any images of the enemy?

Don Schol:

Not until recently. At that time, I didn't. I did some sketches, but I didn't. I focused mostly on our own troops. Like I said, I did lot of portraits of guys. Because guys, when they saw me drawing, they'd run up and say do my portrait. So all of those are part of that collection, those unusual -- and I, of course, was interested, as I said, in the ways guys were creating their own --

Katherine Sheffield:

Fashions.

Don Schol:

-- fashion. Which I did too actually. I know I didn't -- I never wore a helmet and neither did my team. And one time we were sent to the Americal Division, and that was sort of a strange unit, and I won't go into that, but there was an officer there that got real upset with me for not wearing a helmet. So he was going to discipline me. So he found the nastiest, moldiest, ugliest old helmet and made me wear it the whole time I was at least in their primary camp. I threw it away shortly thereafter. But there were those officers that were very strict about everything; but once you were deep in the bush, nobody really cared as long as you did your job. And everybody bonded together. And I always took really good care of my team. We hung together, and I wouldn't go anywhere -- you know, when we were traveling, I always made sure we always travelled together. There were a number of times when we were trying to catch a ride on a helicopter, and of course, what was going out first was ammunition and food and mail. And we would try to grab a ride. And I would go out first, and I remember one time it was amazing, the pilot was willing to take all five of us, but he said, I don't know if I can get off the ground with, you know, with everything that I've got. So what he did, I got on, and he'd bring the helicopter up a little bit and hover and go back down and say, Okay, get another guy on. And he kept doing that, up and down, up and down so he could, you know, that he could move.

Katherine Sheffield:

Still get off the ground.

Don Schol:

And we all five got on there, hanging on to the helicopter, and he said, All right, hang on, you know. We were like getting off the ground and just barely moving along like that. I'll never forget that.

Katherine Sheffield:

Wow. So, then, when did you get out of the Service?

Don Schol:

I got out of the Service August 31, 1969. I was -- when I left Vietnam, I was sent home to Fort Hood. And I was a first lieutenant then, and they made me a company commander. And half of the troops that I commanded were new soldiers on their way to Vietnam and the other half were Vietnam veterans. And of course the Vietnam veterans were -- they were -- they wanted out of the Army. And at that time, they instituted what they called "early out." And if you were within three months of your separation date, they would go ahead and let them out, but they were wild. I was always going into Killeen, Texas, to get them out of jail for drinking and one thing or another. So the only way that we could keep order was to take them way out in the field. And Fort Hood was 600 square miles of nothing but rugged terrain. So we'd go way out into the field. And they were okay out there because they, you know, they felt like they were back in the bush again. And so that's how we survived. And I finished my duty there, and then I was sent to Fort Sam Houston. I was going to ask to do a monument to the Vietnam War for 4th Army Headquarters at Fort Sam Houston. Brooks Medical Center, a famous medical center, was at Fort Sam Houston, which now it's totally been redone. It's magnificent. That's where they sent all the wounded soldiers. But anyway, I was going to do a big monument, a huge thing, and I had designed it, and I was waiting for orders from command way above Army headquarters. They had to call all the way to Washington. And I was waiting to get out, and I had the opportunity to get out, so I did. And I found out later that after I got out that the word came down that they were going to support me in creating this monument at Fort Sam Houston, which obviously never happened.

Katherine Sheffield:

Hum.

Don Schol:

But I was eager at that time to get back to the civilian world. And it was customary for all the Vietnam veterans to not tell anybody that we had been in the war. Particularly because I took a teaching position very quickly after that at the University of North Texas, and the war was still going on.

Katherine Sheffield:

Um-hum.

Don Schol:

And so I never said anything to anybody. When I came home from Vietnam, by that time they had made me a courier, and I was bringing documents, large shipments of documents home. And I was wearing my dress greens, and I was in the airport in San Francisco. And I heard stories, but I didn't realize it would ever happen to me; a lot of young people came up and spit on me.

Katherine Sheffield:

Um-hum.

Don Schol:

That was pretty common, so I mean, I knew that it was happening, but I hoped it wouldn't happen.

Katherine Sheffield:

Yeah.

Don Schol:

That was indicative of the way people -- young people felt. Actually, the art that we created while we were at Schofield barracks, we were planning to show that or at least the Army was planning to show that at the East-West Center at the University of Hawaii. And when it was found out that we were going to do that, all the students made a large protest. So we weren't able to show the work that we had done freshly on the Army -- for the Army. There were a couple, a man and a woman, that owned a gallery in Honolulu and they heard about it. And they said, We'll let you have our gallery for two weeks, and you can put up your show there. So we did. And we got a lot of publicity on it. And I think people realized then when they saw the work that we did that we weren't war mongers or baby killers like we were accused of being. So that was sort of a --

Katherine Sheffield:

Right.

Don Schol:

-- rewarding experience in a way.

Katherine Sheffield:

Right.

Don Schol:

Then when I came home, I didn't do anything about the war for many years. I had dreams about the war for some 20 years. And I never talked about it to any other veterans until I started talking to one, one time at a party, and realized that everybody had bad experiences. And now, of course, Vietnam veterans after all these years are getting to know each other and share these stories about the war and the common experiences that we had. And as a result of that, I did a body of work, wood-cut prints, about Vietnam, a suite of 16 prints, which is now published in book form. And that's the first time that I revisited my memories of that war in 40 years -- about 40 years. So next year I understand is the 40th -- 50th year commemoration of the Vietnam War.

Katherine Sheffield:

I guess so.

Don Schol:

There are things going on all over the country, I understand. I get a newsletter from -- and I've affiliated myself with the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire, New Mexico. It was the first Memorial built to the Vietnam veterans. It was built by Dr. Westfall, and his son was killed in 1968 in Vietnam, and he wanted to do something so he bought some property on a mountainside in Angel Fire, New Mexico, and built this wonderful memorial facility on 15 acres. And I was there a year ago last May for the rededication. The State of New Mexico has taken over that facility and runs it now. And I had my first major exhibition of these -- this suite of prints that I did, Vietnam remembrances, at that facility. And there were 3,000 veterans there to see the work.

Katherine Sheffield:

Oh, my goodness.

Don Schol:

We shared a lot of stories about Vietnam. So that was the first really big experience I had talking to other, other veterans.

Katherine Sheffield:

And your memories of all of that is probably just as clear as anything.

Don Schol:

Every now and then -- it's pretty clear. Every now and then something will come up and I'll remember something that I forgot. It happens almost daily anymore.

Katherine Sheffield:

Um-hum. And so what have you been doing all these years since the war? Have you been a teacher and --

Don Schol:

I've been a college professor teaching art, sculpture, which is my field. And, I guess, the real reward in all of that has been working with young people. As of late, many of my students have been to either Iraq or Afghanistan. One of them in particular, one of my recent graduate students had two tours in Iraq. And he did his first tour and he came back, and he started working with me towards his master of fine arts degree, and then he was called back and sent back to Iraq. And since then, he's come back. So that's happening a lot now. I've been teaching long enough to be cognizant of other younger veterans and the current wars.

Katherine Sheffield:

Yep. Well, do you have anything else you would like to add to your record?

Don Schol:

Well, a lot of people ask me, you know, why did you enlist? And I said, you know, I suppose I could have gone to Canada or one of those things, but it's not part of my way of thinking. My father was a veteran of prisoner of war in World War II. My wife's father was a Navy pilot in World War II. And all my father's brothers were in World War II. I know my father enlisted. And when I realized I was going to be drafted, I kind of figured that was going to happen, but I decided it was going to be my decision. So I enlisted and I don't regret it.

Katherine Sheffield:

Well, we thank you for your service. And we thank you for participating in this program and coming here today and sharing your story with us.

Don Schol:

Thank you very much. It's been my pleasure.

Katherine Sheffield:

Thank you.

 
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