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Interview with Christine Lynn Johnston [9/13/2004]

Steve Estes:

My name is Steve Estes and today is September 13, 2004. I'm in San Francisco, California, and I'm interviewing ... Christine Johnston

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Christine Johnston in Peoria, Arizona.

Steve Estes:

Alright. When and where were you bom, Chris?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I was bom 9-16-1972, in Phoenix, Arizona.

Steve Estes:

And what did your parents do when you were a kid?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

... My mom worked at like an auto parts store that my step-father had owned.

Steve Estes:

So had your parents gotten divorced before you were-well, that can't be possible.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yeah, it's a long story. My parents, biological mother and father, were never married. He had left when I was younger and my mom remarried when I was about two.

Steve Estes:

Did you know your biological dad?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Um,yeah.

Steve Estes:

So he was around Phoenix but not just-

Christine Lynn Johnston:

No, I didn't see him from age 7 to thirty .. . last year.

Steve Estes:

So what was it like growing up in Phoenix?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I lived here until I was 7, then moved to Lake Havasu, Arizona, and grew up there. It was a fun place to live. I grew up on a lake. Lots of stuff to do. Smalltown.

Steve Estes:

How far is that from Phoenix?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

It's about a three-hour drive.

Steve Estes:

Okay. How would you describe yourself in high school? Were you a jock? Were you a brain?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Oh, no, far from a brain, [laughs] Probably a jock more than anything. I played sports all-year-round usually.

Steve Estes:

What sports did you play?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Tennis was my main one.

Steve Estes:

Okay. Why did you decide to go into the Army? And did you go in right after high school?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I went in two months after I graduated from high school. Kind of had started doing that as a junior in high school. I went in because I didn't think I had any other options because I didn't do that well academically in high school. I felt like-colleges weren't calling, MENSA wasn't calling, so I just figured that was my only option to try to get a career or earn money from college.

Steve Estes:

So were you in high school like a junior ROTC kind of thing or the equivalent of that?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

No, we didn't have that where I was at. Small town didn't have it.

Steve Estes:

But had you signed up when you were a junior?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yeah, I beheve so.

Steve Estes:

Did you go down to a recruiting office?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I did. I was interested in the Air Force and went and was talking to people about that. And then they couldn't guarantee me a medical job, because I was interested in the medical field, so the Air Force recruiter said, nobody is going to guarantee you a job, we just are going to give you a job wherever we need one. He said, "I'd like to see you go to another recruiter and see them guarantee that." I was like, "Okay, hold on," walked across the hallway, said to the army guy, can you guarantee me a job, I don't want more than four years. And he said sure. So I went to the Army.

Steve Estes:

So what had originally drawn you to the Air Force?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I think it didn't just seem as--I don't know at the time-that was a long time ago-I think it just seemed more like it would be more appropriate for me or be more ftm or not as ... hard, maybe, [laughs] If you think that Marines is down on the hardest end then go the other way. I just think the Air Force and the flying was probably interesting to me at the time. Not that I was going to go into that area, but it just seemed cool.

Steve Estes:

Had anyone in your family served in the military?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

My paternal grandfather was a Marine.

Steve Estes:

hi World War II?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

...Yes.

Steve Estes:

Had you talked to him about joining the miUtary.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

No, he passed away when I was hke in junior high, so I didn't. It's just something I've known as I got older.

Steve Estes:

So that wasn't any factor in your decision to go?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

My biological father was in the Marines, but I didn't have any contact with him, so I didn't know that. So i didn't have any family members that I knew hadn't been in the military when I went in.

Steve Estes:

How did your family and fiiends react when you told them you were going to go into the Army?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Ummmm, it kind of depends on what period of time, because I went in right when the Gulf War was starting so the family was pretty nervous for me going in, I think, and worried. My family is pretty supportive as far as whatever you want to do is fine with us, it makes us happy, you know that sort of thing. So they were encouraging, they weren't discouraging.

Steve Estes:

I don't meant to push you on this, but if you can remember more specifically the gist of the conversations that maybe you and your mom had about like the Gulf War and her worries.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

... I don't think there was as much there, I can remember, as far as conversations until after I got in. Every time I called home, that it was panic that I was going to tell her I had orders to go over, that kind of thing. I don't think it's any words, a lot of tears because of the concern.

Steve Estes:

I understand. So tell me about basic training. Where did you do it, first of all, just for the record?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Fort Dix, New Jersey. It was ... I had a good experience. It was a typical experience that people hear where they tear you down and build you back up kind of thing. I was young and resilient and kind of just went along with the flow. It was an exciting new experience in one way, and it was kind of nerve-racking in another. I was 17 when I went in, I hadn't even turned 18 yet. So being so young, going across the country, kind of being along and doing that kind of thing. Everything that I learned was very interesting to me. The teamwork and camaraderie, those kinds of concepts that they instill, discipline. I was active in athletics so that part was fine with me, doing, engaging in all that athletic stuff, I guess. I had a good experience. It was hard. It wasn't easy by any means.

Steve Estes:

Now were all the drill sergeants women? Or were there some men?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

No, there were probably-the majority were men-but I had probably out often, I guess, maybe four or so were women.

Steve Estes:

Were they harder on you then the men or was it the same?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I think it was about the same.

Steve Estes:

They were all hard on you? [laughs]

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yeah, they were all hard, [laughs] Hard to tell the difference between a man and a women from that perspective.

Steve Estes:

You talked about camaraderie, could you talk about any if the friends that you met when you were in basic training, people that helped you get through it?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Um ... You were paired up with someone while you were in there, so it was kind of like somebody that-they called them "Buddy Rangers" or something, I can't remember at the time. So that's like the beginning of them pairing you up and building and teaching you teamwork, you have to rely on other people, those kinds of things. So I had developed pretty good friends at that time, but as time went on, I lost track. Once after I actually got out of the military, I lost track of people.... I don't know what else to say about that.

Steve Estes:

That's okay. What was the hardest thing you had to do when you were in basic training, do you remember?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

... I think just the rigorous nature of it. The getting up so early, constantly doing things and ... I guess probably one of the hardest things was having someone yell at you and kind of not treating you poorly-I mean at that time I understood the concept, I wasn't taking it personally, but to deal with that for ten weeks or whatever, it was kind of like, okay, c'mon, this is getting old. [laughs] Them yelling at you all the time and then everybody getting in trouble if one person doesn't-so trying to deal, I guess it's the good and the bad part, the teamwork kind of thing, but when one person doesn't go along, the whole team suffers kind of thing.

Steve Estes:

Now, you went to Advanced frifantry Training after that?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yes.

Steve Estes:

And where was that?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

At Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

Steve Estes:

And what was that like?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

It was a lot better, [laughs] People weren't yelling at you as much. It was more school like, so that was the fun part. And you kind of felt like, okay, here we're getting into now what I'm going to do when I'm in here. So that part was kind of exciting to deal with that. And you got more freedom; you got to do more flin. That was the time when you got to go out once in a whole; San Antonio was a fun place.

Steve Estes:

I'm actually going to go through the military first and then talk about sexuality, but if you feel like talking about it at any time, please feel free, okay?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Okay.

Steve Estes:

After Advanced Infantry Training, how did you decide to become a combat medic or go into the medical side of the military?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Well, I was interested in the medical field, like being a doctor or a nurse going that way. I figured that when I had asked for a job they'd called at the recruiter's office "a medical specialist," so when we got to training, the sergeant said how many were told this was a medical specialist, and everybody raised their hand. And he says, well, it's called "a combat medic."

Steve Estes:

How'd you feel about that?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I was like, oh, wait a minute, because I had this vision of working in a doctor's office kind of thing, and now the Gulf War is going on, I go, okay, excuse me, now does that mean that where I'm going to be working is like in combat? So that was kind of a scary realization.

Steve Estes:

Were women serving as medics in combat during the Gulf War?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I believe so, yeah.

Steve Estes:

So were you actually being trained when the Gulf War was happening?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yes. I went in August, 1990. So it started in that month. People were getting taken out of AIT because they were in reserve units to go before we were even done.

Steve Estes:

How did those folks feel about it? Did you talk to any of them?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I think a couple. I mean a lot of them, especially reservists, had families and kids so I think that was kind of nerve-racking for them. Not being active duty and being a reservist and getting sent, I think it was hard on them. Because when you go in, you don't really think that that's going to happen so ... imtil it does.

Steve Estes:

So after you finished AIT, what was your first assigmnent?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Fort Hood, Texas. I was assigned to a hospital.

Steve Estes:

What was everyday life like at Fort Hood for you?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

... Aside from being in the military, it was pretty normal. Got up everyday. It wasn't as ... I don't know to say it.. .rigorous as Basic Training and everything. It was more just like a regular job you go to everyday, and you do other things when you get done. I didn't wear a uniform, I wore scrubs and stuff, so I didn't wear BDU's and camouflage all the time. So it seemed a little bit more like normal life than people who had to do that everyday.

Steve Estes:

Now did you live on the base?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

For most of the time, yes.

Steve Estes:

Were most of your friends folks who lived on the base? Or did you make friends off base?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Both.

Steve Estes:

What did you and your friends do for fim when you were there?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Play sports or went out to clubs, dancing, things like that.

Steve Estes:

How did you feel about the first Gulf War? Did you have any pro or anti-war sentiments? What was your feeling about it?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I was so young I didn't really understand. I didn't really at the time just kind of-- figure this is something that were sent to go do, so you do it. I didn't really have any-I was WORD because of course I didn't want to go. More of my friends that were coming back that had my job were saying how awful it was and what they had to do, so that was really like okay I don't really want to go now. And I never went over, so I went through guilt phases, feeling bad that I wasn't sent over ... and that other friends were, and that some people had problems when they came back. I kind of feel bad that I didn't have that experience.

Steve Estes:

What did they say? What made you feel like "oh, man, I really don't want to go over there"?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

One guy I worked with in the Labor and Delivery Ward, he came back and say, I was picking up dead bodies all the time and putting them in shallow graves, fraqis and things like that. I don't think I want to do that so . ..

Steve Estes:

Yeah, that's very different from Labor and Delivery, where you're bringing life in terms of maybe it's the opposite, I guess.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yeah.

Steve Estes:

Let's talk a little bit about sexuality. How did your sexuality effect your life in the military?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

... Like I said, I went in at 17, so that was about the time~I mean, I had kind of known earlier, but I wasn't accepting of myself like actually come out and say, okay, I am this way. So going in kind of shoves you back some, because when I went in was the time period when they were doing rumors of witch hunts, trying to find people and trying to kick them out and that kind of thing, so I was like, "Oh my God, I need to act a different way while I'm in here." So at the beginning I was-not was forced, but felt that I was safer, my job was secure and my personal well being, if I pretended I was straight and acted that way... or tried to make people think that that's the way that it was.

Steve Estes:

Did you have to talk about boyfriends and stuff like that?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I did. I went through period of lying, kind of just saying, yeah, I have a boyfi:~or not just being personal at all, avoiding any kind of personal conversations.

Steve Estes:

But you had friends on the base, so was that hard to do with them? Did you have to lead two different kind of lives?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Um ... yeah, a little bit, with some fHends that I didn't think would be as accepting, they didn't know. I had close fiiends who were straight and didn't know, but also had gay fiiends there. So the ones that were straight-I figured after a period of time, people just knew. It was actually like a "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" before that came out. You know you just kind of didn't say anything. People liked me; I did a good job. I got promoted really quickly, so I just figured people liked me for me. I didn't say anything, but I didn't need to say anything either.

Steve Estes:

So did you or any of your fiiends who were gay face discrimination?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

.. Discrimination in like ... my only bad experience that I had while I was in there was a good fiiend that heard rumors or somebody told them that I was, and then they didn't want to be fiiends with me anymore was the only. So, I don't know if that's discrimination.

Steve Estes:

Well, yeah, it's hard.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Someformof it, Iguess.

Steve Estes:

It's not official discrimination, right. But at the same time it still stings.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yeah.

Steve Estes:

But the fiiends that you had who were gay and you knew they were gay they didn't face anything like-well, you didn't experience any witch hunts or anything like that?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

No, not with people that I knew. It was almost like a thing that was away from you that you heard. I didn't know anybody personally that that happened to.

Steve Estes:

Now did you have a relationship or any relationships when you were in the military?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I did, yeah, one.

Steve Estes:

I would ask you more about that, but I think I'm going to let that go actually. I can tell you about that later. Let's see ... so were there any straight folks who served with you that did know you were gay? Not that you necessarily told, but you could pretty much tell they knew.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Honestly, I don't know. I can think of a handfiil of people that I thought knew or figured so, but it was never talked about. I never went that far to say that, just to avoid anything happening. I never came out to anyone.

Steve Estes:

Were you actually in when Clinton was running?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yes.

Steve Estes:

So was there any talk about him lifting the ban on your base?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

[pause] You know, nothing sticks out in my head. The people that were against-it was in Texas [laughs] a Bible Belt area, so a lot of people, even friends of mine~I became friends with a lot of civilians that worked there. It was really around a lot of people who were Southern Baptist, and I can't remember anything standing out of them talking about that, just more about not wanting Clinton because they're Republican and conservative.

Steve Estes:

Because he's liberal.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

But I can't remember anything, maybe it's because they were friends with me they weren't going to say anything in front of me, but I don't have any experience with that.

Steve Estes:

Were you pretty openly liberal?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Quiet, shy when I was in the military so I don't... I don't know if it was that apparent. I thiiik my personality is very accepting and things that were important to me when I was in there maybe people would see that being liberal and kind of open, but I never quite discussed issues, I guess.

Steve Estes:

Let me ask you, you said you played a lot of sports, what kind of sports did you play when you were in the military?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Tennis and I'd lift weights, so I did a lot of weightlifting and bodybuilding.

Steve Estes:

I was just thinking about that so it's not kind of off the schedule of questions.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Oh sure.

Steve Estes:

Let me also ask you-"Don't Ask, Don't Tell" was done after you left, is that correct?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I beUeve so. It was set in place.

Steve Estes:

So what's your opinion on "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Um ... I... I don't know, it's a hard question because if you're in there, you may thihk it's a good idea. I just don't think it's important. There shouldn't be any kind of rule on it. If people are willing to go and volunteer and do something like that and inevitably may have to go risk their life, why not let them do it? It's not like you're recruiting people-not recruiting, but drafting people, making them come in and then finding out the situation, the stuff, and how it might then hinder. I just don't think it's good.

Steve Estes:

What would your ideal policy be?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Just let whoever joined do whatever.

Steve Estes:

Okay. Why did you decide to get out of the Army?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I wanted to go to college, and I tried while I was in there and it was too hard for me because I think with the Gulf War going on we were so busy. I was having a hard time doing well taking the couple college classes that I did, so I figured it was because I was in there not having time. I wanted to get out and go to school fiiUtime.

Steve Estes:

Let me ask you this. I know you were working in Labor and Delivery, so you probably didn't see any Gulf War folks, but did they come through the hospital that you were working? Any folks who were wounded over there or veterans? [silence]

Steve Estes:

Hello? ... Chris? [recorder shuts off]

Steve Estes:

Okay

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Usually I get a warning that would have said this thing is going off, but it just dropped it so. 10

Steve Estes:

That's okay. I just asked you about-oh, I knowwhat I was asking you. Did any wounded folks or veteran folks jfrom the Gulf War come through as patients through your hospital?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I'm sure they did, but I was in the Labor and Delivery, so it wasn't-I mean, yeah, people came in that got pregnant over there.

Steve Estes:

Did you have people that got pregnant?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Oh yeah. I had a friend that got pregnant over there, and they send you back.

Steve Estes:

Is the Army mad about that? Or what's the score on that?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

You know, I don't know. I think that person might have done that to try to get out of being over there. So I don't know, I never really heard anything about that.

Steve Estes:

Was there anti-war sentiment amongst other folks that you served with? Or was it mostly like "we don't want to serve in that combat zone"?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I don't think most people were like that. I was in a medical hospital kind of thing so I guess it was just "this is our job, you're going to go over there and do that." And I think when people started coming back or got scared or when you start to get orders and hear about things, you're kind of-you're worried about getting hurt. But then you got . those other people who are like gung-ho "I'm for my country and I'm going to go over there and kick ass" kind of thing.

Steve Estes:

Even in the Medical Corps?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yeah, probably just not as much, but you'll have one or two.

Steve Estes:

So you were talking about leaving the Army, did you end up going to college in Arizona?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I did, yeah.

Steve Estes:

Where'd you go?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I went to Glendale Community College first, then transferred to Arizona State University.

Steve Estes:

Did you finish?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I did.

Steve Estes:

Congratulations. 11

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Thanks.

Steve Estes:

... I'm just writing some of this stuff down.... And you talked to me about it, but just for the record, what do you do now?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I am a counselor. I'm a full-time graduate student, then I also have a couple different jobs as counselors in different environments, mainly correctional environments, like prisons.

Steve Estes:

Did the Army help pay for you to go to college?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yeah.

Steve Estes:

Okay. Are you involved in any gay veterans groups?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

....??

Steve Estes:

If you could kind of sum up how you think serving in the military affected your life or affected you, what would you say?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

It was a great experience. It was one of the best jobs I ever had and the best learning experience, as far as laying the foundation for kind of the rest of my life. Very focused on education, and I was very supported while I was in there from people that I worked with that really encouraged me to go On and get my education. So that was a positive thing. And again just that camaraderie, teaching you discipline, teamwork, and all those concepts have really laid a foundation for me. Determination, motivation, all those things have helped me throughout my life, and I think it's because of that.

Steve Estes:

Why'd you want to participate in a veteran's history project?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

To probably give more voice to there are people that were in there that did really well. I think there's a bad-I don't know how you say it-like when I was in, people who I heard were getting kicked out because they were gay, I don't think it's because they were gay. I just had this sense that the people-and through other people talking-that it was because they didn't do a good job, and they were incompetent, so they were using the gay part as a way to kick them out.

Steve Estes:

Interesting.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Because I knew a lot of gay people in there that did really well and that people liked them and nobody was trying to kick them out. That made me wonder, who are all these people getting kicked out? Or if they were doing "inappropriate things."

Steve Estes:

You mean like fraternization? 12

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yeah, or just, you know, hitting on people, just sexual inappropriateness or something like that is just my guess.

Steve Estes:

Did that ever happen to you? Was anyone ever inappropriate with you that you felt like-

Christine Lynn Johnston:

No, not at all.

Steve Estes:

I guess I should say straight or gay, sexual harassment--

Christine Lynn Johnston:

No, I never had anything. And that's commonly asked now when you go to VA's and things like that because I think that's more of an issue that people are aware of that that happened to a lot of women that were in. So no, I never had any of that kind of experience.

Steve Estes:

And no other women that you knew, that you were close with?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Umm, nope, not that I can think of

Steve Estes:

Okay.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I hung around with tough people [laughs].

Steve Estes:

You hung aroimd what?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Tough people.

Steve Estes:

So they would just beat people up if they [laughs]--

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yeah.

Steve Estes:

Is there anything that I didn't ask you about that you think is important to talk about in terms of your military experience? I mean I'll say that this has been a really short interview. And you weren't in for very long, but I don't want to miss anything that you think is important.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Well, I guess it depends on how this ... I don't remember after I read this thing what exactly the whole point of your doing this is.

Steve Estes:

I can say a little bit real quick. It's basically to show that gays and lesbians and bisexual folks did serve, have served, continue to serve pretty normally, although sometimes they do face discrimination because of that. So your interview definitely shows that you can serve and have a pretty normal career, but also just getting people to talk about the fiinny stories of things that happened that don't necessarily relate to their sexuality, but just shed light on what life is like in the military during a war or during peace time. 13

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I guess I would add that people do serve in there. I know recently that I saw on a news show how many people have been kicked out because they're gay and lesbian, it was like six thousand something, and they're struggling to find people to join. You probably just kicked out a bunch of people who-they obviously volunteered to be there so why is that becoming an issue where you're really-and you're weeding out all those people who don't join because they're saying I'm gay and lesbian, why am I going to join and put myself in that situation. And there are people that are totally out and join, even knowing that going in there. So I just think the miUtary is really weeding out-not weeding out, but you know, missing out on a lot of people that would join if there wasn't a ban on that.

Steve Estes:

What's your feeling about the current Gulf War?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

I think it's sad that a lot of people are young. The older that I've gotten and realized that when you go in at a young age, they don't tell you what you're going to see when you go over there and what you're going to experience. To me it's very sad that there are so many young people that go over there and are not informed about what they're doing there and why they're there and what's going to happen and what to expect. They're not prepared as well, I think, for the emotional and psychological effects that are going to happen, and possibly physical, getting hurt and those kind of things. I figure that I'd like to work at a VA one day, so them coming through there's going to be a lot of issues around that.

Steve Estes:

Sure. You were saying that there was some-well, there were two topics, I thought, I may ask you a little bit more about. One was psychological effects on folks who went over, and I assume you meant the guy that you met that was doing the body bags-or not body bags but burying the Iraqis. What kind of effects did you see?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

People were really depressed coming back. Seeing a lot of death-I don't know if they prepared for it-but not really realizing that's what they were going to see. I did have one-there was one guy in my barracks that after he came back was sleepwalking and having nightmares and liked you'd see him out in the middle of the night, laying down, pretending he was holding a gun, like he was in a bunker kind of thing, like doing those kinds of things where he might have had some post-traumatic stress going on. People just were-just didn't like the stuff that they saw ... so that was their bad experience.

Steve Estes:

And another thing is the survivor guilt feeling that you had for not going over there. Can you talk a little bit more about that?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Just because people were going over there and having some bad experiences coming back, and that I didn't have to-I had to work more because people were gone, so you had to pick up the slack, but I just felt like other people were suffering and going over and sacrificing and I didn't have to do that. So that was kind of the survivor's guilt of not having to go over. 14

Steve Estes:

Is there anyone else who know who you think I should interview for this project?

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Yeah, I have one friend who would probably do it. I can email her then-

Steve Estes:

Yeah, you can email her and ask her, give her my contact information, and if you want me to I can re-email you. I'm gomg to turn it off Wait, first of all, before I turn off the tape, let me say thank you so much for talking to me and taking the time.

Christine Lynn Johnston:

Oh no problem.

Steve Estes:

Alright. [tape ends]

 
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