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Interview with Ralph Nash [8/12/2003]

Prudence Hilger:

Today is August 12th, 2003. I am in the home of Ralph Nash in Denver, Colorado. Mr. Nash is a veteran of World War II. He is almost a miraculous survivor of Pearl Harbor. He has been very generous in sharing his history. He has spoken in schools, is still very active. Let's leave it at that, Mr. Nash. The work that you are doing now, you are active ... tell me the group that you are involved with ...

Ralph Nash:

Well, I'm in the Pearl Harbor Survivors and The Colorado State Chairman of the Pearl Harbor Survivors. We have four chapters in Colorado and basically Denver is the largest chapter ... chapter 1, and then there are 2,3 and 4 and these chapters are in Pueblo, Colorado Springs and Grand Junction.

Prudence Hilger:

I see. Were you drafted or did you enlist?

Ralph Nash:

I enlisted.

Prudence Hilger:

And you started out in the Coast Guard?

Ralph Nash:

No, my first tour of duty would have been when I was in High school. Then I went into the Army. Actually they had an army program called Citizens Military Training Camps. And they were at Fort Snelling and other places in the United States. Basically they were to train basic Red, White and Blue. That would be when you had finished the basic Red, White and Blue you would be an officer in the army. I had training also at Fort Ripley in Minnesota, Fort Snelling in Minnesota, and basically that was it. Infantry training and artillery training.

Prudence Hilger:

Mr. Nash, why did you join?

Ralph Nash:

Then I joined the Coast Guard because in those days you couldn't buy a job. You graduated from high school and of course, there was no job in the job market as we would call it today. It was a very poor time really for anybody to come out of any schooling because there were no jobs available. So then I joined the Coast Guard because at that particular time the Coast Guard, I had read was the oldest Naval Service we had in the United States ... older than the Navy. It was the revenue cutter service. And when we joined the Coast Guard, my twin brother also a week later joined the Coast Guard and some others friends of ours joined. And then learned later that some of us were going to Hawaii. And to I volunteered to go to Hawaii. My twin brother had already been selected as one ofthe persons to go to Hawaii. And we went to Hawaii in 1939 and I was there from 1939, '40, '41, '42 and 1943 in the Pacific area. And after the attack we were assigned duties, and I was on a sub chaser, and we escorted ships down through the South Pacific. These would be troop, ammunition ships, or just plain shipping. In other words, we were their protection from the submarines.

Prudence Hilger:

Were they aware that there was a possibility that Hawaii would be attacked?

Ralph Nash:

Oh, yes. We talked about it .. .it's interesting ... on the morning ofthe attack which is December 7th, I was on duty and on watch and I came on the bridge 0400 hours (4 a.m.) and at that time I said to the Chief, 'What does your Japanese landlady say about an attack on Pearl?' And he answered by stating this 'She says that there will be an attack at Pearl sometime in December.' And I said, well, this would be a good day for an attack; all the ships are in the harbor. And as though as I had prophesized this, all of a sudden we were coming down from the north end of Oahu, the island in the Pacific, which is truly for the Pearl Harbor, the Honolulu and so forth ... and as most people know the Waikiki beach area. And were patrolling at that time in the morning. We had a patrol all the way from Kahuku Point on the north tip of the island all the way down to Barber's Point, Pearl Harbor on to Waikiki Beach area to the main turn around area, we would turn around to do the patrol again. And as we were talking, it was about 4:30 in the morning, we noticed something, that some ship passed us in the dark, and we were very close to Pearl Harbor at that time, and I said to him, "that's either a submarine or a tanker." And he said "Well, yeah, it would one or the other and it must be one of ours because it's above water".

Prudence Hilger:

And you were on your ship.

Ralph Nash:

We were on our ship, yeah. But it's a funny think when I think back, that could well have been one of the mother subs, they bring in the smaller subs, because they were the first ones that fired on us at that time in the morning. Very early. At about 7:15. No, prior to that I would say that we received on our radio, our radio-man came on the bridge (Silva) and came on and he spoke both to the chief and me and said, 'we've picked up motor sounds. It's probably a submarine in the defensive area right off of this would be right off of Arbors Point.' And I said, "That would have to be a sub it's under water .. jt would have to be an enemy sub, you see. So we started to follow it, but it kept in shore, away from us. It kept in the shallow parts ofthe water. It was obviously a small sub in the shallow parts ofthe water, and couldn't get on top of it. So we kept going down and following the sound and as we got down we turned to about 90 degrees on the compass, that's the steering compass on the ship and turned 90 degrees that would be facing ... we would be going right into Pearl Harbor. This was at 7:45. This is 10 minutes before the main attack came in. And all of a sudden there were about sixteen near hits to our vessel. Somebody was shelling us from out in the ocean. Shells were coming in. They were trying to hit us and sink us in the Harbor entrance, obviously... We got in and we started ... we were zigzagging across the Harbor. And then as we got into wide-pool point we turned around, we started to turn around and we were almost rammed by one of our ships coming out, which we later learned, was the one that rammed the sub that we were chasing coming in. That was one of our destroyers coming out. And then as I said it almost rammed us. And then we made a turn around ... came out ofthe Harbor. And then as we were coming out ofthe Harbor, there were planes coming out of the Harbor ... this was the main attack. And the planes were strafing us. You could hear pinging off the ship, you could metal hitting the ship, you could hear the sounds and then we realized that we really were at war then."

Prudence Hilger:

I see ... and the name of your ship?

Ralph Nash:

The Tiger, the USS Tiger.

Prudence Hilger:

And what were the casualties?

Ralph Nash:

The casualties you talk about the wounded and so forth ... the casualties probably about 4,000 (Pearl Harbor). That is on the tape. That is confirmed on a tape called "Sacrifice Pearl Harbor". One of the tapes that I have.

Prudence Hilger:

OK.

Ralph Nash:

That is the figures that they have listed. In other words we weren't allowed to talk about this after Pearl. They didn't want us to talk anything about the loss at (Pearl Harbor).

Prudence Hilger:

And you were telling me that the Japanese strafed downtown. Civilians ....

Ralph Nash:

Oh, yeah. They were trying. They flew over the city of Honolulu and, of course, they were trying to knock out the powerhouse but the Taney (?) USCG37 was protecting the power plant and they put so much flack and shells in the air that a plane would be foolish to go in that area so they stayed out of that area, but the Taney did shoot down some planes. They shot down some planes ... there were about 29 or 30 planes, Japanese planes shot down during the attack."

Prudence Hilger:

Oh, is that right? And you were never a prisoner, of course?

Ralph Nash:

No. never a prisoner ...

Prudence Hilger:

They never could have taken prisoners Pearl. .. did you ever know anyone taken prisoner?

Ralph Nash:

Yea, I knew a Pacheco, but he was a prisoner out of the Philippines. He was on the death march and he recently died. And was originally from Colorado.

Prudence Hilger:

Is that right? I'm sure you have some medals.

Ralph Nash:

Oh, yea. We have Pearl Harbor Medals... Pearl Harbor Medal was a Congressional Medal passed by the members of Congress for the survivors of Pearl Harbor. Of course there was Good Conduct Medal with the rest ofthem ... everybody gets those. Well, everybody that behaves themselves."

Prudence Hilger:

Right. How did you stay in touch with your family when you were on Pearl Harbor?

Ralph Nash:

You couldn't. Well at first you could send a telegraph. That was it. Western Union and so forth. That's about it. Well, you could write letters. Of course then they didn't know for days...I don't think they knew for two weeks after Pearl Harbor whether or not we were killed or not, you know.

Prudence Hilger:

Oh, my! You couldn't call?

Ralph Nash:

No, you couldn't call. No way to call them. So ... there was some worry as to whether did we make it not because they know you're at Pearl, you know."

Prudence Hilger:

What was the food like in the service back then?

Ralph Nash:

The food was excellent on the Tiger. And the Taney, we had pretty good food, but the Tiger was better then because we were on subsistence. And the cook had so much money and he would go out in the open market off the ship and buy the food so he would get fresh. .. so he would get us really good food. The food was excellent. I tell you, at Christmas and Thanksgiving during those times, we would have beef, turkey, chicken and often times steak on the ship. There were 44 of us aboard the ship."

Prudence Hilger:

Oh, so it was relatively small then?

Ralph Nash:

Well, yea ... 140 foot long. It was a rough ship to be on during bad weather. And as always, we were out there in bad weather.

Prudence Hilger:

Doesn't sound like it was a picnic anytime. And what was your job on this ship?

Ralph Nash:

At first I was leading seaman. Then I became coxswain, then boatswain's sons mate then I made boatswain's mate 2nd, 1st and then I was made temporary chief (petty officer) and I was in charge of an 84 footer. And then I had a crew of 14 and it waS a sub chaser.

Prudence Hilger:

And you went out and chased subs?

Ralph Nash:

Yea, well, we escorted ships down to the South Pacific. I had Doris Duke's yacht at one time. She turned it over to the service for a dollar. And so we took it over. It was fast, good ship 65 feet long, 68 feet long, actually. It was pretty good. Good duty ...

Prudence Hilger:

Did you have a good luck charm?

Ralph Nash:

No.

Prudence Hilger:

How about. .. were you ever entertained by Bob Hope, anyone ?

Ralph Nash:

No. We missed all of those. We were on patrols so we had to escort ships and we would escort them down, let's say down through the Hawaiian chain. We would take them down, let's say as far as Midway or to Wake or to Guam and then we'd turn around and refuel at Midway and come back to Pearl. And so we missed, missed it all. We'd just miss them. They'd be at a certain point but we were out on the ocean, so we missed them.

Prudence Hilger:

Did you have leave? Did you have leave any time that you were there?

Ralph Nash:

No.

Prudence Hilger:

None?!

Ralph Nash:

No. They didn't want us to come back so we could go in on the beach. We might get a week or two, which there would be liberty - you could go on liberty in Hawaii. We'd just have liberty in Hawaii.

Prudence Hilger:

That was it? And Roosevelt didn't want you talking about anything?

Ralph Nash:

No. No he didn't want us talking about anything. Don't talk about your mishaps or anything that went on under the war. Don't discuss part any of it.

Prudence Hilger:

And he knew that this was all going to take place, right?

Ralph Nash:

Oh, he knew it. On the one tape that I have called "Sacrifice Pearl Harbor?" He knew it. "Sacrifice Pearl Harbor" is a tape produced by British Broadcasting Company and also the TLC on the cable, which is the learning channel.

Prudence Hilger:

Oh, good.

Ralph Nash:

You can buy that for about 39.95 or something. It shows .. .it's a heck of a good tape. It's about an hour, hour and a half long and it really points the finger right at him. And he laid an awful lot. .. he kept us in the islands ignorant of the things that were really going on. He didn't want us to know about it and he kept out of the communication loops totally so we didn't know anything. He kept the Admiral and the General out of it. Admiral Kimmel was an honorable man - so was General Short .... good men! And he made them the most hated men in the world. And he (Roosevelt) was the liar!

Prudence Hilger:

Oh my! And so your officers ... you had a lot of respect for your officers?

Ralph Nash:

Well, we had a lot of mustang officers ... mustang. It means they worked their way up through the ranks. Mustang officers work up through the ranks. I was offered a commission before I left the service. Before I left the main part of the service I was offered a commission as a lieutenant JG lieutenant junior grade and I would be a watch officer aboard the Liberty or whatever ship they put me on, but I refused to take the commission because I would have had to go right back to sea again ... after I got back to the States I would have had to right back to sea again.

Prudence Hilger:

And you were married then?

Ralph Nash:

I was married then and I turned down the commission ... my wife and I discussed it and my brother; my brother was a pilot .... "

Prudence Hilger:

Ok, I just have a couple more things. Did you keep a diary?

Ralph Nash:

No. I've got a good memory.

Prudence Hilger:

You sure do. Tell me again ... 'Sacrifice Pearl Harbor' ...

Ralph Nash:

'Sacrifice Pearl Harbor ...'

Prudence Hilger:

And that's the tape?

Ralph Nash:

And it's a very good tape. I have a copy here.

Prudence Hilger:

Do you sell it?

Ralph Nash:

Ah, I could just give it to you ...

Prudence Hilger:

Are you sure? Cause I'd be happy ...

Ralph Nash:

I had some tapes made for our group.

Prudence Hilger:

Ok.

Ralph Nash:

And I think they cost me $7.00 .... something like that.

Prudence Hilger:

Well, we'll settle for that. Ah I think one of the most important things about the history (of) World War II are the deceptions and I think to this day some of the people don't know.

Ralph Nash:

Well, just let me show you.

Prudence Hilger:

Well, I just saw a glimpse of your "Sacrifice Pearl Harbor" which definitely puts the blame where the blame lies. Most interesting 3 minutes of a film I have ever seen ... ever regarding World War II. Ok, so you didn't keep a diary but your memory is probably clearer than any diary I've ever seen. After service ... what'd you do after service?

Ralph Nash:

I was in the construction business and I hold 14 licenses in all ... that would be in all disciplines of construction. So I'm probably one ofthe most licensed persons you'll ever meet. And I teach classes ... now I have a school called Empire Technical Institute. I've had it for over 50 years ... the first time I started teaching was in 1947 in Jefferson County. Since then I have had this school on and offfor over 50 years. So I train people to get their licenses in the business. And I've held jobs .. .I've worked in the missile business. I was ... the first Titan missals that were ever built I was the manager of the construction company at Cape Canaveral when we built the missile silos, and we built the ... I was the complex manager in Cheyenne on the missile silos and I was the complex operation manager for Martin Company on the bombing range, which would be Buckley Field out on the bombing range ... that would be site C ... Well, I've been in the construction business for many years .. .I've built power plants and different types of facilities.

Prudence Hilger:

Homes? Ever build homes?

Ralph Nash:

I built my own. That's it. Homes are easy. But I've done commercial buildings ...

Prudence Hilger:

Now when you were at Martin, were you actually in the construction of missiles? Or the sites?

Ralph Nash:

No, the sites we put in the facility ... in other words all Martin did was bring us the missile. But Martin was the general contractor for about One hundred million dollars worth of work on each ofthose sites. I was project group manager for them at site C. And I worked on pipe processing and I've worked on copper mines that were in Peru, South America and just mainly a lot of construction jobs throughout world.

Prudence Hilger:

You were out of high school when you went into the service. So when you got back how did you learn all that construction stuff?

Ralph Nash:

Ha! Went to a lot of school ... but I had ...I'm a voracious reader. 1 read everything I can get my hands on ... and still do even today. I went to school in DU .. .I taken some civil engineering at DU .. .1 went to Dunwoody Institute in Minneapolis and learned a lot of construction. I also went to University of Wisconsin and took training in power plants and so forth. And I PhD (ed) in engineering with Columbia Pacific University of California. I've been on their faculty. I was on their faculty for thirteen or fourteen years in the construction end of their school. So mainly ... 1 have masters degrees, of course., in engineering."

Prudence Hilger:

That's incredible. Did the war ... this is almost a silly question ... did the war change your life dramatically?

Ralph Nash:

Well, yea ... all the male members of our family were in the service. My brother, Bob was in the service as a navy pilot but he came out as an enlisted man in Hawaii. He was a boatswain 1st and I was a boatswain 1st at the time in Hawaii and my later brother in law who was at Pearl with me in Hawaii ... the three of us went on liberty in Hawaii and got picked up for drunkenness and acts that we were doing at that particular time, then I didn't see Bob, my brother Bob, for a long time and then he became an officer as a pilot. And one of the most decorated pilots (you can see his picture over there). Bob was a pilot on many of the different ships. He was an Avenger pilot and he was one of the most decorated pilots in World War II."

Prudence Hilger:

That's your brother-in-law?

Ralph Nash:

No, that's my brother. He was killed during the Korean (War) ... he was called back in. And he was killed ... he and his wingman was killed. Both flew into Catalina Island in California. Hit the top of the island ... they were moving some planes up in a bad foggy weather and a bad storm coming, so they were moving planes from Las Alamedas Air Base up to Alameda Air Base and Bob and his wingman and, of course, their radio- men ... they were on both planes. There were two planes lost and four people killed because they hit the top of Catalina Island, which they didn't know was about 2600 feet high. They weren't versed at all and he didn't have any radar in his plane to know the height of that, so they figured they'd try to go over it, the rest of the fleet that was taking offwent back to Hawaii and started up. He evidently was flying by the seat ofhis pants, you know, how you get set?

Prudence Hilger:

Yea. He was called back?

Ralph Nash:

He was called back. He was teaching at the University of California at Berkley. He had three PhDs. Bob had a PHD in law, first doctor of jurisprudence in law. .. South Dakota Bob had a PHD in Physics PHD in political science. He had the highest IQ of anyone I ever met. He had a photographic mind, totally photographic. He could open a book, turn it to any page, close it, after a glance he could and he knew right what he had read.

Prudence Hilger:

Well, I think your whole family is very talented along those lines.

Ralph Nash:

We're talented but I'm not sure I'm smart. Bob was smart.

Prudence Hilger:

Now how about friendship? Do you still have friends from World War II?

Ralph Nash:

Oh, yea. My brother-in-law. We talked to him. My sister passed away not long ago. My kid sister, she married Hutch. He was with me in the Islands. He and I came back ... Gosh, I was engaged to be married at the time. To another girl. Then I married my wife.

Prudence Hilger:

And you attend not reunions, but your group that you're in.?

Ralph Nash:

Yea, I'm active in the group. I didn't want to be in one of these groups, but then one day one of our fearless leaders said,' I'd like to be state chairman for the state of Colorado'. So we made him state chairman. So then immediately our fearless leader stood up and said, , And I propose and nominate Doc Nash assistant for the state chairman.' So I thought well, that's all right because I'm not going to take the job, because I don't want it. All of a sudden this nice guy that took the job died. He was one of us old veterans, you know, he passed away he was a nice guy and we buried him, so now all of a sudden I had the job. 1 have the job ... State Chairman of the Colorado Pearl Harbor Survivors. That's it.

Prudence Hilger:

Oh, my gosh. Well, let's see. How did your service experience affect your life?

Ralph Nash:

Well ... I like the service because it was a God-send for all of us, really. You know ... it saved a heck ofa lot of us. It kept us off the streets and kept us out of the pool halls, probably. Because it was a place you could eat and sleep. You had uniforms, you had honor, privilege. That's why at this particular meeting we have coming up on August 17th• We must honor all the veterans. Every veteran ... he doesn't choose to go to war. That's not why he wants to serve ... he chooses to protect and honor our country ... that's what he does. That men and women and we should honor every one of them because whether or not they went to war or not they're all heroes because they wear the uniform. They're there to defend all of us and it's important that we do. And Rick Crandle (general manager of Denver radio station KEZW) will give that as a speech .. .! talked to him this morning about ... we got to honor all the veterans, all the veterans, all the services. They don't choose to fight, you know, they're there to protect their country.

Prudence Hilger:

Do you know, you are my fifth interview and all five said they came out of the service better off.

Ralph Nash:

Oh, yes. In fact, I would have said this, that everyone, men and women, should serve a year. Every one. Serve a year. You'll grow, and you'll be better off because you have served ...

Prudence Hilger:

Anything else you want to add?

Ralph Nash:

No, that's pretty much. I was gonna say that on the book, PEARL HARBOR SURVIVORS. There's stuff that I have put in yellow just to hi-light will be things that I personally know of myself." I could remember one thing. During the war just prior to the war, all ofa sudden, there were a lot of White House Guards, FBI, CIA that were in Washington and they were sending these guys to the Islands. And all of a sudden I was the Gimmy Legs, or Master At Arms at the Base at that time and I was off the Tiger and I was holding the job of Master At Arms and then the Old Man called me in one day and he said, 'I want you to train these officers.' They came in without any training. So all of a sudden I had what they call Father Nash's Boy Town. These were all officers. Guys that come in with ah some of them ... they all came in officers rank but they all had no real training as in the service, so all of a sudden I was giving them drill and seamanship and marching and close order drill and navigation and what have you. Just so they could take over jobs now that they were in the service they have to be trained, you know.

Prudence Hilger:

Who told you to train them?

Ralph Nash:

My Skipper, who was a Lieutenant Commander and that time in the World War I he was a Lieutenant Commander and then he went back to a Chief Warrant Officer and then this time he was Chief Warrant and then they made him a full Commander or a Lieutenant Commander I think it was. And so he just said 'it's your job. Train these people.' So they built up a tent city at Pier 4 right off Pier 4 in Honolulu and that's where Charlie Nash's Boys Town Was. That's what they'd say, 'Father Nash trained these people.

Prudence Hilger:

So you did.

Ralph Nash:

So I did. Seamanship, everything. Everything from tying knots, marching, to close order drill, take them out on the range, you know for gunnery practice. Some of them were pretty good shots. Some of these guys were (?) in one eye as we called it.

Prudence Hilger:

How do you feel about the Japanese today?

Prudence Hilger:

The Japanese, as you can hear on one of the tapes One of the people said, the Japanese were nice. (?) He went back right after they surrendered and he was there He was on the Missouri and they asked him the question. It was on the tape, you'll see about it. He said the Japanese people were nice but their leaders were not. And they weren't. Because you had Tojo ... all their leaders were bad. But the Japanese people were not. You see, Roosevelt did the most dastardly thing he could do was to take these Japanese Americans and put them into camps. That really upset a lot of us. We came from Hawaii with what they called the National Guard from Honolulu, Hawaii ... they were all Japanese Americans. They were the most decorated troops In World War II. They were called the Four Forty Second. They were the most decorated troops. They were good guys too; honorable men. But here; we didn't take the Germans and put them in camps or anything. They were far worse that the Japanese. The Japanese army was pretty bad. That's why the Four Forty Second would fight the Germans and the Italians but would not fight the Japanese because the Japs were; well you can imagine what they would do if they captured the Japanese Americans.

Prudence Hilger:

Oh, that would be terrible.

Ralph Nash:

You'd have bamboo shoots under the fingernails and everything else. They'd kill them, but very slowly.

Prudence Hilger:

Because they felt ...

Ralph Nash:

Well, because they felt that they were a traitor. But they were American citizens, you know.

Prudence Hilger:

Exactly.

Ralph Nash:

Born and raised ... you can't treat them like that. They were the most decorated troops in World War II. You know, that's the reason I often talk about it is that we had a hard go at first in the services because everything was done on the basis of World War I. The uniforms, guns, everything else .. .it was all World War I. This was World War II, you know, and we should have advanced from that type of thing but we didn't

Prudence Hilger:

Wasn't there a lot of controversy about people, military wanting more air support?

Ralph Nash:

Air? Yeah, sure. The Army, in fact, they predicted Pearl Harbor long before it ever happened. It was predicted by our Army ... Army Air Corp, which is all we had, you know. We didn't have any Air Force. We had Army Air Corps and that was it. And they predicted that it could happen. As it did. You know the odd thing about it, and this really of interest, that prior to the attack we could go into to the open sea or the wide sea which is what we would say above the Hawaiian Islands and all of a sudden they stopped us and it was Court Marshal Offense if you went into that area any more. How about that?

Prudence Hilger:

How about that?

Ralph Nash:

Oh, it's in books. There are books here that you should read really read ... These two ... Those are in that tape. (tape enclosed.) These guys knew. We were all suspicious of this. I was a Democrat as a young person, but after Pearl Harbor and I realized what Roosevelt was doing and so forth, that was enough you had to get away from liberalism. He wanted to get us in there and he needed an overt act. But these two books are absolutely must read.

Prudence Hilger:

Ok.

Ralph Nash:

Because they prove everything that on that tape.

Prudence Hilger:

Roosevelt wanted to get us in because he needed to create jobs? Is that or he thought the Germans were going to take over?

Ralph Nash:

Well, he really hated the Germans and consequently ... he wanted to send so he could help Churchill. He was buddy buddy with Churchill. And so he favored the English and so therefore and saw that they were in dire straits and even though we had some of our ships attacked over on the east coast, that wasn't enough to get us into the war. So he had to have an overt act. So why didn't he want us to go into the wide sea? He didn't want us in there because that would stop the attack from coming in. That's where the attack was coming from anyway. He predicted that. So stay out of there, don't talk about it, don't go in there, stay away. He was kind of a wretch, really. I don't like Roosevelt at all. I have no respect for him. He did help our economy but it took the world to help the economy. He didn't do that; he just got us into a war. Lindberg said (and that it'll be on that tape. You'll see it.) 'Lets not get into this thing' but Roosevelt was bound and determined that we were going to get into this war. And he had to get in there. So that's what we did. We got into a war.

Prudence Hilger:

Do you feel that way about Iraq?"

Ralph Nash:

Oh no, no, no. Iraq was a different situation and I figure we got a good president. He did what we have to do. We got to get rid of these tyrants out of their jobs. You know, we are the police force of the world whether we like it or not. We just have to be the strongest ... we are the strongest country in the world. We have more intelligence and more intelligence in our services than any country in the world. And we have go get rid of these tyrants. You know they stop everything.

Prudence Hilger:

Well, I think so too because they're bombing us!

Ralph Nash:

Of course they are. They bombed about 4,000 people ...

Prudence Hilger:

In the United States!

Ralph Nash:

And they're always after us.

Prudence Hilger:

Always.

Ralph Nash:

And traveling right now is not a very good thing. My wife and I. .. see that map over there; look at all the spots that my wife and I.

Prudence Hilger:

Oh, all over the place. Tell me about your sons, Mr. Nash.

Ralph Nash:

My youngest son, Dan is a teacher ... was at Evergreen High School in Colorado, but prior to that before he was a teacher in Spanish and German, he was a head of Hilde Corporation for all the Caribbean. And my other son, Jim Nash, the oldest son, he would be a television reporter and anchor and all positions on TV for many years. At the present time he's with Channel 5 TTLA in Los Angeles. And he's been in TV work for many, many years."

Prudence Hilger:

Well, I think we're winding down our talk. I cannot thank you enough for taking this time. It's been the most enlightening morning I think I've ever spent. And I will stay in contact as much as I can and hopefully you will be receiving a letter of thanks.

Ralph Nash:

OK.

 
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