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Interview with Diane Henderson [2/24/2004]

Prudence Hilger:

Today we are talking to Diane Henderson at the home of Prudy Hilger. Diane is a nurse She served in the arnny. She has some very interesting tales to tell about Desert Shield. She has some interesting tales to tell about military hospitals and we'll just get started with some of our form questions. Now, Diane, you enlisted?

Diane Henderson:

In the Army Nurse Corps on August 21, 1970. Now how I came into the Army was, I received a nursing scholarship from the Army Nurse Corps and it was called the Walter Reed Army Institute Of Nursing. And it was a scholarship where you got your bachelor degree in nursing through the military, and in order to accept the scholarship I had to join the Army. So I obviously accepted the scholarship as they paid for everything. They paid tuition, they paid books, they paid room and board and because I had to enlist into the army as a Private First Class they paid me a salary for going to school. First two years of my college education I went to the college of my choice, and I went to Chico State up in Chico, California. It was a state college at the time and those two years I just worked on my general education requirements such as urinatomy, physiology, chemistry, history, English; those type of things. All I had to do was maintain a C average in every class and the Army paid for everything. And they paid me a salary. I think I started off with 190.00 dollars a month and then we got a nice little raise to 400 dollars just for going to school. And then my junior year they transferred everybody that was in that program in 1970. 1972, August of '72, I was transferred back to Walter Reed in Washington D.C. and there we went to school, we were considered University of Maryland students. I actually had my degree from the University of Maryland up in Baltimore, Maryland...never once saw the campus. We were considered extended campus, so our instructors were considered University of Maryland faculty, but they were also Army personnel. We lived at Walter Reed. We lived in a dorm called Delano Hall It was named after Jane Delano who was one of the superintendents of the Army Nurse Corps way back in the 1900's. I don't know exactly when. And we lived in that dorm, we had our classes in the dorm, our faculty instructors had their offices in the dorm. The only time we ever got out of the dorm was when we walked over to the hospital to the mess hall to eat meals. So it was really a confined environment.

Prudence Hilger:

Very confined. Spell Delano Hall.

Diane Henderson:

D.E.L.A.N.O. So the two years we got our clinicals at Walter Reed or military hospitals. We did go to one civilian hospital in Washington D.C. But most of our training was at Walter Reed, Bethesda naval hospital. We went down to DeWitt Army Hospital in Fort Bellbar, Virginia. So we did some training there. So I got all my clinical training at Walter Reed, primarily. And, of course, we also had our didactic classes. Once we graduated from the program, I graduated May, 31, 1974. I was actually discharged from the service, and then commissioned the next day as a First Lieutenant in the inactive reserves, and then brought back on active duty when I reported to basic training at Fort Sam Huston in San Antonio, Texas the 7th of July. So I had a three year obligation to serve in the Army to pay back for my education, which was really kind of nice since I got four years of education and only had to serve three years back. So my first assignment was at Fort Ord in Monterey, California. So that's how I came to be in the Army.

Prudence Hilger:

That's quite a tale. So after your education when you were a nurse, how much did you make?

Diane Henderson:

Actually I don't really remember. I know at one time if you add the salary, and the B 0 Q, which is your housing allowance and your subsistence, I want to say within three years I was bringing home around 900 dollars a month.

Prudence Hilger:

That was pretty good pay back then.

Diane Henderson:

Pretty much for a nurse, because for a nurse in the mid-seventies the average salary for a nurse was like five to six dollars an hour. So I was actually making a little bit more than that. Because the nice thing about the military is they pay you based on your rank and your years in service, not for what you do.

Prudence Hilger:

Well, I suppose they figure if you've got a high rank, you must be doing well. And you entered that branch because you wanted to be a nurse?

Diane Henderson:

Right.

Prudence Hilger:

How about your teachers?

Diane Henderson:

Well, obviously, the instructors at Walter Reed. I remember some of them with fond memories, most of them with not fond memories. I think part of it was, we were such a contained environment. You could never get away from the environment of the program. Again, the instructors were there, your classes were there, you lived there. So I can remember leaving the gates of Walter Reed and feeling like this huge pressure was lifted off my shoulders. And then when I came back into the gates of Walter Reed it's like all that pressure just came back on you. I will say the program changed me in the way I handled myself. I was a very reticent type person. I never spoke In front of a class If I could help it. I hated getting up in front of people and making any type of oral presentation. I would have problems trying to express what I wanted to say, even though I knew the information. I couldn't say certain words. For example I had to give a class presentation on rehabilitation. This is back when they were doing the projects for the lower minority and I could not say the word (rehabilitation) during the whole presentation. So this is why I never wanted to get up and three months of being in Walter Reed I figured if I don't stand up for myself they would just walk all over me. So basically what it became was I learned to be aggressive. And then I modified that to where I feel that I'm now assertive. I was not an assertive child in that respect so I'll say Walter Reed pretty much changed my personality. We had instructors like for example, my first small group advisor was a gentleman; he happened to have a psych background in nursing. And he came into - we had a small group - and there's like maybe 10 of us. And he actually came into this group and his first goal was to see everybody break down and cry. It was like (what kind of comment was that?!) This was also the man who told me my junior [year] that not only would I not pass my state boards in order to practice in the field of nursing, I would never succeed. So, this the kind of mentality. These guys were really...they were...you know there's a phrase that says nursing eats their young. It s like - nurses are not nice to nurses -and that was very evident in nursing school. So truly I hated Walter Reed. It had a lot of, you know, [psychosomatic] physical illnesses. You hang around with a lot of people who are just as unhappy as you are so you sort of feed off of each others frustrations. So when I left Walter Reed in 1974, not only was I not going to be in the Army, three years later, which was going to be the end of my commitment, I was not going to be a nurse either. That's how it was. The only good thing that came out of Walter Reed was I met my husband there.

Prudence Hilger:

Isn't that something? What happened to keep you in?

Diane Henderson:

Well, when I got to Fort Ord it was great. It was a different environment. You were actually working with patients. You don't have that educational mind set, you don't have somebody hovering over you. The group of people I worked with, the enlisted personnel, they were fantastic because most of the young men and women were mostly Viet Nam Veterans. Their technical skills were outstanding. And when I was at Walter Reed we didn't learn technical skills. I never learned how to start an IV, or draw blood or insert a catheter or put a nasal tube down someone's stomach. We never learned all that because we were so busy focusing on the didactic stuff. So these people trained me. And I met a woman she hired on a month after came in to Fort Org in August of 1974 so she came in in September of '74. Her name was Laura Craig. She was a civilian nurse who'd been working almost 20 years. She was fantastic. She sort of took me under her wing and trained me to certain aspects of nursing. So I really enjoyed myself. I still was planning on getting out in 1977 because my husband, who was in the Marine Corps, he was in Okinawa, he came back in 1975. He was stationed in Pendleton which was an eight hour drive, so we didn't live together the first few years of our married lives. So I was going to get out and we were going to go back to Mobile, Alabama, which is where he was from; however, that didn't come to pass. We had our first baby in '76, so all of a sudden we have another person to be responsible for and so we thought "well, we'll just stay in another three or four years." Because civilian nursing they didn't pay very well, nor did they have retirement programs. So the army had a retirement program so we thought, "well, we'll stay in a few more years and then we'll reconsider. So the next thing you know it's ten years later, so what's another ten? So that's what kept me in the service.

Prudence Hilger:

And so you were in for 20 years?

Diane Henderson:

25 and a half years.

Prudence Hilger:

And your husband stayed at home for a while?

Diane Henderson:

Yea. When he got out of the service, he got a job with Mobile Oil as a marketing representative and they sent him to Los Angeles. And that was a six hour drive. And then his marketing rep actual location was actually the Bay area of San Francisco and I was still out in Monterey, California and that was a three hour drive. So he finally, about three months before our first child was due to be born he quit his job with Mobile and he came down and we actually lived together as husband and wife for the first time in almost three and a half years. So we went to Fort Monmouth, NJ, in 1977 so I had to apply for voluntary indefinite status, so I applied and that means you can stay in for at least 20 years. So I received that ( ? ) sort of thing. And as soon as I went voluntary indefinite status they transferred me to Fort Monmouth, NJ. We went to this little Podunk hospital, which was like two wards. So I went from 4 wards, which was a major community hospital and we had all the services, we had ICUs, we had everything. You go to this 2- ward hospital. We actually got there the 4th of July weekend. The post was dead because It was a holiday weekend. We pulled up in front of the hospital. It was built somewhere in the fifties, similar to what you see down at the Air Force Academy hospital. So a very small community hospital and there was this huge generator sitting out in front of the hospital and I told my husband "My god, this place doesn't even have electricity!" That's what it looked like. Actually it was the generators for the air conditioning component, which didn't work, so that was it. So I worked on a surgical floor. We were surgery, we were orthopedics. When we had ENT, neurology, we were them. We were also the pediatrics floor and the recovery room. The medical floor was the medical floor and the quote-unquote ICU, which was more of an observation room. Anybody that was truly sick, we shipped out to the civilian hospitals. And so Tom followed me and so he actually went to school for heating, air conditioning, refrigeration and he got a job working in the type of trade and was doing very and then, of course, we got transferred to Germany he became the manager of a bowling alley, the man cannot stand to bowl, but he became the manager and he also worked the commissary system and the supply system. And then when we went to Fort Carson he was not really able to get a job that would off-set child care expenses, so he just stayed at home and took care of the kids and maintained the household. Then we went to Fort Stewart, Georgia, where after we got the kids settled he found a job managing a motel, and did that for the 2 and one half years that we were there. And then we came to Fitszimmons in '89, is when I arrived here. And what we did is we bought our house, we finished the basement, we hadn't seen my family for almost four years so in August we went on vacation to see Mom and Dad in California and the idea was once we got back from vacation he would go out and look for a job. Well, the day I sign in from vacation was the day I got called in Desert Shield, Desert Storm. So I was told to report in the next day with my duffle bag packed. I just thought it was an exercise. So I arrived at Fitzsimmons at eight o'clock, and they said "well, you're not going home." You're going to Fort Sill and then you're going to go on, but we can't tell you where because it's top secret. And so I said, "well, I need to call my husband. So I called my husband and said, honey, I'm not coming home." He said "what?!!" And I didn't. I didn't come home for another 7 and a half months.

Prudence Hilger:

Oh my.

Diane Henderson:

Yes, that was really interesting.

Prudence Hilger:

I can imagine. And how did your children survive? No Mama?

Diane Henderson:

Well, they've been pretty good. And the years we've been moving. For example when we came back from Germany, I had four children at the time and they were two to six at the time. So we got to Fort Carson in May, 1983. And we bought a house, we'd never bought a house, but it was being built so we had to wait a couple months. Now whenever we got somewhere I almost immediately had to go to work so Tom would have to establish the household, get the kids settled, receive the household goods, those types of things. But because the house had to be built which would be about the middle of July, he decided to take the kids back to Mobile and stay with his uncle so we found a one-bedroom apartment where we could do it month by month, so I stayed here in Colorado Springs, and was working and he was with the kids. Well, we didn't actually move into the house until the middle of September. Well, after two months the kids wore him into the ground. So I flew down to Mobile, we drove back, we found a motel that (I lied about how many kids we had because I couldn't find a place that would accept that many children). So I found a place in Manitou Springs that had three queen sized beds, it had an efficiency kitchen where you could make some meals, it had some pots and pans those types of things. So she asked me how may kids do you have and said two. I was hoping she wouldn't notice. And fortunately she was out of town and whoever was managing the place had four children so I figured she couldn't say too much. But I was getting to the point that I was going to call someone and complain discrimination because of the number of children I had. So we stayed there for six weeks and then we moved into our place. But the kids, you know, they've always had their father and they've always been pretty good. But I remember the day we left Colorado Springs and they were all in the van and Catherine who was two, she had that thumb in her mouth and her eyes were really big and she was sucking on her thumb. Kevin and Catherine were crying and Tommy who's my oldest he would have been about six or seven was like, "Bye. Mom!" So he was happy to back and see Papa, and Maudy and stuff and the grandparents and stuff, but it was funny; when I went down there I would call once a week and the kids would be pretty good but Margaret would cry every time when I got on the phone. Every week she would cry and then when I got back down there and were driving back it was funny because these kids would be surrounding me, even Tommy, who was not the most affectionate as he got older, he would be just close to me. Or I can remember being in the front seat and looking back and there's Katherine with her thumb in her mouth and her eyes would be so big and if I would look back at her and smile, she would Just smile like crazy. She was just happy to see Mom. Then as the kids got older, when we went to Georgia we were separated for another two months. Again we found a place to rent, we couldn't get in until the first of August. I had to be at Fort Stewart the first of June, so he again took them to Mobile, but they were older and they understood it a bit better and they handled it better. When I went to the Gulf War they were just getting ready to start school. (All of them), but again they had their Dad. I mean their dad has been great. They have a great relationship with their father. And so it was pretty much ok. I can remember Catherine writing to me and she was unhappy because Dad wouldn't let her do something and when was I going to come home? She would have been about eight at the time, and there was one time she wrote me a letter and Dad had been listening to some music and there was one particular song that came on and Dad started crying. And It upset her. And I was getting to the point of "don't write me any more, you're getting me upset". But I think they pretty much adapted to the whole situation. And then when I came home everybody would say to me, "your children must be so happy that you're home." And actually, the person that was truly happy was my husband. Because after 24 hours, the novelty wore off. They were in their pre-teens their teenage years, and what's important in that time was their friendships, not so much Mom and Dad. So me, coming home. Oh yea. It's nice. Bye, Mom I'm off to see my friends. My husband was happy. He was ecstatically happy.

Prudence Hilger:

That's a lot of responsibility.

Diane Henderson:

Well, it is. Being a single parent. And he had to not only take care of the kids, maintain as normal a lifestyle as possible but he knows what war is all about. He served in the military. He worried to death about me. I knew I was safe, but he didn't know that. And so It was very hard, in fact, I think it was harder on him. I mean I didn't have to worry about my children because I know they were being well taken care of by their father because I knew their father. We'd been married 17 years when I got shipped over to the Gulf War. So I knew that they were fine and so and so all I had to worry about once you get over the initial fears, and all that, knew it was fine.

Prudence Hilger:

Do you think It was a good thing ail that happened to you? You had a lot of turmoil Was it a ...did it make you all stronger? A family unit?

Diane Henderson:

I think so because you have to rely on each other. With all the transfers with all the moves, the kids I think are pretty close to each other because when they move into a new neighborhood, they have to rely on each other for the play time, companionship. And also with four kids as they met people, that also brought more people into the home. And, also with Tom and I with all the separations and all the adversity we've learned to do very well because we have a commitment to each other. And that's too strong or too precious a relationship to just throw away just because you're separated and you may have temptations (quote-unquote). There's no sense in that. So, yes we are stronger. And I think my kids are a lot more independent, a lot more self-sufficient that someone who has not traveled around. When I was raised in a little town of Martinez, I never left the state of California until I was 20 years old. I was born in Nevada and raised in California. Those are the only two states. I don't even think I understood what living in California really meant; whereas my children when they were young, they had traveled all over the world, they knew that the United States was comprised of states, you know, that sort of thing and they knew what the world was all about compared to what I was when I was a child, you know. They were exposed to a lot of different cultures, a lot of different people, races, religions, and they accepted It; whereas when you are raised in your own little niche and you are not exposed to those type of people you don't have an understanding of what that's all about.

Prudence Hilger:

That's great. Now you were in the first Gulf War. What did you do there? I mean we didn't have a lot of casualties?

Diane Henderson:

Not initially. I landed on the 28th of August. We landed in Saudi Arabia on the 28th of August, 1990. I actually left Denver the 13th of August, and we went to Fort Sill, Oklahoma and I was attached to the 47th field hospital, and basically brought in: this is a field unit that you bring nurses and physicians into that unit, they're not And So I was assigned to that unit to fill In the professional aspect of that unit. Most of that unit was made up of enlisted personnel. Either you were 91 Charlies which is the equivalent to LPn or you are 91 Bravos which is like a nursing assistant. So we came in to fill that unit with the nurses and physicians. Most of the physicians and nurses mostly came from the hospital at Fort Sill, but then you actually had to bring others to fill in so you had people from Hawaii, Fitzsimmons all over from the hospitals that are part of the Army Nurse Corps. So we landed in the country. We landed in Bahrain. Thank god we landed at 7:30 at night because they didn't know what to do with us. We sat on that tarmac until 5:00 the next morning watching all these planes coming in...miserable weather. It was already... had to be already over a 100 degrees with a little bit of humidity factor, which you don't think of with the desert. So we finally got loaded up on buses to be shipped over to Bahrain, which is where the 47th Hospital was assigned. So there was a little military installation called Shakisa (? Unfortunately I don't know the spelling of that) but is at the tip of the island and supposedly the Bahrain people were not aware of this military installation. It was supposed to be a military secret. Well, once you get all the military people there it no longer becomes a secret. So we had - there were 5,000 Marines on this island on this little base, there was 2,000 Air Force and then our unit was about 450. So we started setting up down there and we put up the tents, we built showers, we built the wooden floors for the hospital, for the tents as well as the personnel tents. Obviously there were personnel tents. It was miserable. I mean we're talking 130 degree temperatures, normal 100 percent humidity because we were right on the water. Where my tent was you could actually look right on the water. We worked usually from about 7:30 until about 10:30 when we stood down in the heat of the day and then we would meet about 4:30 when we would work until whenever. That sort of thing: When we first got there the Air Force and the Marines had been there for about two weeks so they had pretty much set up their area. For example: the Air Force. Oh, they lived well. Let me tell you. They had air conditioned tents for their personnel, they had shower tents, so they had a female shower tent because they only had about 48 women and then the rest, of course, were men so they had several shower tents for men. So when we first got there the Air Force said, "you guys can come up on use our showers until you get yours set up." So we did. Well, all of a sudden you have about 150 women plus the 48 Air Force women using this one shower tent. It was crowded. It was a messy sort of thing. You could only take one shower a day anyway. Well, the Air Force Women complained because of the crowded thing. It was always so crowded you couldn't take a shower whenever you wanted to. So the Air Force said we couldn't use their showers anymore. Then they turned around and said we could use their showers but only from 11:00 at night until 5:00 in the morning. So It was like, forget this. So we had our shower set up and it was just a continuous shower. So the women got to shower between 7:00 and 8:00 at night so you would get out of the shower and then what would happen was then the shower is still going so you're over in this area and you're trying to get dressed and IT'S HUMID! So you're still wet. You dry off and you're still wet. And then the men... as it got toward that 8:00 time period they're out there and they can't wait to get in there get in there so they can get in and get clean... that sort of thing. And then we finally built a shower facility where you had one for the women and one for the men and you had some men and we had a wooden frame that surrounded the showers and we had pipes put in where you would turn on the water. You did what was called a Navy shower. You would turn on the water, get yourself [wet], turn it off, scrub yourself off, then turn it on and rinse yourself. You never let it run because they were from water buffalos and you had to conserve on the water. And we relied on solar energy, which up until November worked fine and then after November we're talking cold showers. I mean cold showers. It's 5:00 in the morning and you're taking cold showers, I mean cold, cold showers. And you take a shower with about 16-20 women. So you say, ok, you're just exposed. When you went to your shower you carried all your paraphenalia, you gas mask, you carried all the stuff that you would use to shower with, you know, you carried your clothes and then you carried ail that stuff back. And It was probably two blocks away from where our camp was. Oh, we built latrines. We had to learn how to build a latrine. We had Army regulations on how to build latrines. That was interesting. Good lot of manual labor when we first got out there.

Prudence Hilger:

I'm sure it was. Well, as to the latrine for the women. Might as well get down to the nitty gritty, was there a place to sit down?

Diane Henderson:

Oh, yeah. There were three hole latrines. And it was very funny because they're supposed to be a certain height up. I, being a short person could not sit on the latrine with my feet on the ground, flat. And when we first built them, we didn't have doors. So they're facing the gulf, looking out so the Marines would drive by and they were sort of looking BLAH! We finally got doors." But if you're a modest person, you're going to lose that modesty, because there's just no way. I can remember one time, I was in the shower and my chief nurse comes up to me. I was a lieutenant- colonel, she was a full bird colonel. And she comes up to me and says, "Colonel Henderson, I need you to do this, this and this. So I looked at her she's buck naked, I'm buck-naked, it's 5:00 in the morning and I cannot think of a better time to give me instructions for the day in the shower. I thought that was kind of funny.

Prudence Hilger:

Well, no. You couldn't write anything down.

Diane Henderson:

Right. There's a better place than in the shower.

Prudence Hilger:

What was the biggest disease that you had to deal with?

Diane Henderson:

Well, let me talk about echelons of war. Our field hospital was what we call dirt echelon. Because we had 400 beds, so what that means is that we are like 98 percent stationary and 2 percent mobile. So to set up an installation like that, you would take days. You have to tear it down move it out and set it back up. It could actually take a month to do all that. You first echelon care is you little echelon units with medics and then they would transfer them back to the mashes. And mashes are 30 bed units, more intensive care. And you would treat and then either move them back to the unit or you would treat and move them back. And then you have cashs, which are combat Army support hospitals, mashes are mobile. And the mashes are almost 100 percent mobile. They can tear down move and put back up, probably in a day. Your cashs are 60 bed units, and then again you would treat and return to the unit and or move further back. Then you move to your field hospitals, which is 3rd echelon care and that's your 400 bed hospitals and again you treat and you can keep them longer, usually your mashs are no more than 3 days same with the cashs so they're not going to be well so you're not going to be able to go back to the unit within 3 or 4 days. Then you can pour them back. So the field hospitals, we actually kept them longer. And then if we couldn't keep them we moved them to what actually were called general hospitals and those are thousand bed hospitals. Very sophisticated hospitals. Got a chance to visit the Comfort and their ICU unit was much more sophisticated than Fitzsimmons.

Prudence Hilger:

Oh, my word. So they got really good care?

Diane Henderson:

Oh, yeah. And then if you couldn't keep them in the field hospitals, then you shipped them to Germany or to the United States. What we called (?) Overseas to the United States. I'll tell one story. When I first got set up we were called what was sort of a convalescent hospital where we would get patients that said they had a ruptured appendix. So they would come in and they would have an open wound that would have to heal because of their rupture, so we were shipped back to our hospital, and we would take care of these kids until their wound healed and they could go back to their unit. And these were 400 bed hospital. And they had tents, similar to what you see on Mash, similar to the GP lodge or the GP medium tents. We would build the floors, we had the cots. We had some supplies, linens, bed pans, and urinals (metal). We had some IV supplies, one of the IVs that we used we called medicots. I had actually used them in the mid-70's and I thought we had out-lawed them. They were so bad. What we did when we first got there, we're setting up the tents, hospital, getting squared away as far as our unit was concerned. Then we had. Then we had no supplies. We had no supplies. We started ordering supplies. Preparing for what you call your mass casualty where you have people that are so injured that they're going to die, no matter what you do, the intermediate care, which are patients that need to be taken care of immediately and you do those types of patients first as far as surgeries. Then you have delayed units, and these are people who yes, they have sustained injuries, and need to be treated and they can be held for maybe even a day, and then you have your minimal patients. Well, these are minor injuries, where you suture them up and then you send them back. I was in charge of a delayed area, which was a 120 beds but they are in 4 or 5 different tents, so my responsibility for that area was to make sure we had the supplies to services for the expectation of mass casualties. And these are like chest wounds, belly wounds, orthopedic wounds, and we had to come up with a plan with how you were going to staff that area, how you were going to supply that area so we had actually, if you think about it, Hussein didn't do anything after he invaded Kuwait. So we had almost six months to prepare. So we had enough supplies. We had enough. So up until that time, we took care of soldiers who had injuries, who had orthopedic injuries, who had that sort of thing. But the story I wanted to tell you was, we had this soldier come in and he had injured his hand somehow but it required an surgical intervention, so the orthopedic doctor came in and told him, "Ok, we're going to be doing this surgery," what all it would entail and this kid... and I looked at him and I said, "What's the matter?" and he says, "I'm in a tent." And I said, "that's right, you are." "And they want to do surgery!" And I said "That's right. But you know you would get the same care as you would if you were in a hospital setting. We have the equipment, we have the supplies, we have the nurse anesthetist, we have the surgeons, all the things you will need." And he says, "But don't you think I should go back to the United States to have this surgery?" I said," No!" But if you think of it these kids...we have modern facilities. In my career when I worked at Fort Ord, I worked in these old hospitals. We didn't even have wall oxygen or wall suction. So we had to get those massive oxygen tanks.

Prudence Hilger:

[Diane goes on to tell of the equipment they had to work with and how the nurses didn't know how to much of the treatment. They had to use massive oxygen tanks, old type blood pressure tanks etc.. They had to do a lot of training... a lot! They had to get less modern in a tent. They didn't have enough linens. Diane would not take a gun. Didn't know if she could kill someone. "Do you think the service would have made such a heroic effort to rescuer Lynch if Lynch had been a man?" "No, I don't. We have women who have been killed in combat. You don't really hear as much about that." Diane really feels that women should serve in the service.]

 
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