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Interview with Norwood Teague [Undated]

Kristina Graeber:

All right. Here we are. This is an interview with Norwood Teague, World War II veteran. You were present at Pearl Harbor in the bombing, when the Japanese bombed. Do you want to maybe just kind of give us an overview of your experience there, just tell your story?

Norwood Teague:

Well, I can give you this -- I can give you the writing to you rather than go through that verbally, anyway, unless you want it on tape.

Kristina Graeber:

I would want it on tape, actually. If you don't want to go into detail, that's okay.

Norwood Teague:

Okay. Well, I went into the service right after graduating from North Carolina State in the summer of 1940. I received my commission as an ensign in the U.S. Navy in November of 1940 and was assigned to the battleship USS Tennessee, which was here in Long Beach at the time. It was part of the Pacific Fleet, but the ship was stationed in Pearl Harbor, but the ship was here. I joined the ship the 1st of December 1940 and was on board at the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The Tennessee was in port along with all the other battleships. We were tied up by the keys just ahead of the Arizona with the West Virginia outboard of us, tied up together. The Maryland was ahead of us with the Oklahoma all going -- in those days when we had battleships, which we don't have anymore, they were named for states, so all the battleships had state names. We had no idea. I mean, the attack was a total surprise as far as having the attack is concerned. We knew we were going to be at war. We didn't know when or where, whether it would be European only or whether it would be Europe and Asia or Japan, but there was no question we were going to get involved in the European part of the war. But Japan had designs on expanding territory for raw materials and for places people could go. They were getting pretty over-populated in the islands of Japan, and they had imperial ambitions. The tension had been building, of course, with the two Japanese ambassadors in Washington right at that time trying to work out differences, and it became more evident that things were getting far more tense. But to have them perform a surprise attack was quite a surprise to everybody. I had the midwatch that night from midnight till 4:00 in the morning. And it was a beautiful night, balmy, full moon. I was relieved at 3:45, and I went down to bed, to my room. I did not have to go to quarters. I didn't have to go to 8:00 o'clock quarters or be at my -- my assistant division officer took the quarters. I was division officer. So I was sleeping in that morning, and I could sleep in. At 7:55 I was awakened very rudely by a loud explosion and a tremendous vibration. It must have been when the Arizona blew up, which it did. The bomb was always rumored -- I'm never sure whether it was ever substantiated -- that a bomb went down the stack and exploded in the engine room. A bomb did go down right beside a turret through the decks and exploded in a magazine and the magazines went up, which was a tremendous explosion. I went to my -- I was in damage control, and I was a repair party officer. My repair station was on the third deck. So I just went to my report station, and kind of like everybody else, we were asking what's going on. We hadn't been topside; we hadn't seen anything. So we didn't know for a long time, a lot of rumors, and it was very -- just confusion and in a daze, so to speak, until we were ordered to open some doors to allow corpsmen to take casualties up forward to sickbay, to the hospital section. Then reality sank in a little bit. We didn't do anything for a while. There wasn't much we could do down there. The after-repair party, repair two, were more actively engaged, because the fire from the Arizona -- See, if you think of my ship was here, and the Arizona was here headed this way. This was the bow, and this was the back. There was only 100 feet between. My room was right here, right on the third deck, last room at the stern, so I was only about 125 feet from the Arizona. The high level bombers came in along with the torpedo bombers first. The torpedo bombers dropped their torpedoes over there coming this way. Well, we had the West Virginia was sitting here, so the West Virginia took all the torpedoes that were headed toward us. The Maryland was here, and the Oklahoma took all the torpedoes that were for the Maryland. But the Oklahoma capsized, the West Virginia sank straight down but against us after it blew up. Towards the end of the attack -- the attack only lasted two hours. Now, a little over halfway through the attack, I was ordered to go to the next deck; I was on the third deck. The second deck, main deck, was open, go up on the second deck to fight fires. Well, I didn't find any flames. There was a lot of smoke, a tremendous amount of smoke. So I took a hose and a portable rescue breathing apparatus and went into a compartment, had a lifeline hooked to me. And I climbed into two or three compartments, and all I felt was smoke and heat. When I opened the door reluctantly, ___+ door that was bogged down. No fire came out when I opened it, a lot of heat, so I opened the door carefully so that I wasn't in front of it. A lot of heat and smoke, and the smoke was extremely thick, about that thick. I had to battle that. And up here and ahead here and obviously -- it was paint smoke. The paint got so hot that it smoldered; didn't flame, but it smoldered and gave off this heavy, thick smoke. We found 12 and 14 layers of paint afterwards in some places. No fire retardant. Fire retardant paint was developed after the war started. After about 30, maybe 40 minutes of investigating, I gave my lifeline a jerk, and I was led back out because my rescue breathing apparatus wasn't working too well. They were very crude in those days. What it was was an oxygen bottle about 2 inches in diameter and about 10 inches long that had a gauge on it to tell you how much oxygen was in the bottle and a rubber hose that you put in your mouth. Then you had a clip like a clothespin to put on your nose to keep from getting it through your nose, then you put on goggles. Very crude. Later a very efficient rescue breather, a breathing apparatus, was developed like a gas mask all in one piece, and it works much better. Anyway, when I got out of the compartments, I decided to go up to the next deck to go up and get some fresh air. So I went to a hatchway and went up the ladder and stuck my head out the quarterdeck. And I looked up, and there were two airplanes flying over with red dots under their wings, Japanese planes. And we had already gotten information that we were under attack by Japanese planes, and I decided that was no place for me up there. I needed to be -- what we found, and I think everybody finds -- that everybody finds in a war situation or in any tension situation, the best place for you to be is in your home base; your battle station is your home base. My battle station was down below. I had friends who during the war said how in the world can you be down there? We were right at what we call torpedo junction, damage -- I became a damage control officer. I was in damage control central. I said, I don't know. How can you stand to be up there watching everything going on and having all the guns firing all around you and all that? Because the guns make a very -- the 3-inch guns when I went topside at Pearl was going -- had a tremendous crack, initial crack. The bigger they get, they get more of a boom, but the smaller 3-inch guns was a sharp crack. Anyway, I went back down below, and it wasn't too long before the guns all quieted down because the attack was over. When I put my head out, there was no more attacking except the planes that were strafing. The two planes that flew over had been strafing.

Kristina Graeber:

What's strafing?

Norwood Teague:

It means shooting their guns --

Kristina Graeber:

Okay. Gotcha.

Norwood Teague:

-- shooting their wing guns at whatever they could point them at, point the airplane at, you know, and shoot. Strafing means, you know, fire laid down like that. Those planes weren't strafing. They weren't shooting their guns when they flew over, I'm pretty sure, but they had been and maybe they were later -- I mean, in a different place. We on the Tennessee and the Maryland were the two in what I call the eye of the storm, the quietest place in Pearl Harbor. And we were in the quietest place because the Maryland and the Tennessee had the West Virginia and the Oklahoma outboard of them and took the torpedoes. We got -- we got bomb hits from high-level bombers in the beginning, and the smoke from the Arizona put a smokescreen over us, so we didn't get any -- we got two or three near-misses with dive bombing. They couldn't see us because we were covered with smoke. And by the time I put my head up, the smoke had kind of cleared a bit; otherwise, I probably wouldn't have been able to see. The Arizona was on fire, and the fuel oil had spilled out into the harbor, so all of this water here around our stern and the West Virginia's stern was on fire. And it was from that heat -- and there was fire aft. See, I was exploring this part of the ship on the port side, this part. There was some fire back in here farther aft, but the repair party, number one repair party, which was on this level, had their hoses over the side putting water into the harbor to keep the oil away. Plus the fact that our duty officer -- because the captain wasn't aboard, he was at home, had been home. He got aboard later during the attack. But when the attack started, the captain was ashore. The duty officer got the boilers up and started turning the engines over to get the propellers, the four propellers to put a wake, which was a very smart move, put a wake back here. But the ship didn't move. He got this -- he got the propellers turning over to 99 RPM, which was equivalent to about 12 knots or 15 miles an hour. We didn't move because the West Virginia had sunk against us and pushed us into the concrete keys where we were moored. Later, to get us out, the Maryland had to get out because the West Virginia sunk there and the Oklahoma capsized. The Maryland got a near-miss, I think, or it could have been through the decks, but right in their bow. And it flooded, the bow flooded, and so their nose was in the mud because we only had I think four or five feet clearance at low tide. Anyway, after we got the Maryland patched and pumped off, this was two or three days later, they blasted these keys away, these tie-downs, _____+. That freed us up and we could be pulled out. After the attack was over, after the guns quieted down, we began doing some, you know, wondering what had happened and started doing some investigation and assessing damage and that stuff. And I think most of the rest of the day, I can't remember eating that day at all. I didn't have breakfast, obviously, but I can't remember whether I had lunch or dinner. I probably did get something somewhere. I went topside right after the guns -- soon after the guns stopped firing and went topside and looked around. And that beautiful balmy night the night before was the most devastating havoc that morning you can imagine. We were discussing things that needed to be done with the department, the damage control department, and the damage control officer. About 4:00 o'clock, I guess, he ordered me to go over to the Navy Yard to see about getting -- replenish our oxygen bottles and CO2 fire extinguishers; we'd used them all up. So I went over to the Navy Yard, got aboard and went over to the Navy Yard, and went to the fire station, and I was told if I'd come back at 10:00 o'clock that night, I'd be able to get them. So I went back to the ship and got a working party of five -- got a five-man working party together, loaded the oxygen bottles and the CO2 fire extinguishers in a boat and went back to the Navy Yard about 9:00 o'clock. Got there. I scouted around and commandeered a pushcart; loaded the oxygen bottles and extinguishers in the pushcart and then started for the fire station and then we heard airplanes, aircraft, and that, you know, was not a good sound. We turned around, because we were headed away from the dock, turned around and looked over at Battleship Row, and here was one or two airplanes coming in with their running lights out right down low over Battleship Row. And I said to my chief that was with me, I said, "Who are those guys with running lights off?" About that time a gun opened up, and suddenly every gun in Pearl Harbor opened up on those planes. Turned out that there was six airplanes from the USS Enterprise aircraft carrier that was at sea, did not come into Pearl that weekend, along with the Lexington, another aircraft carrier, the only two aircraft carriers out there, and they had not come into port that weekend. But these six planes had gotten lost because it had gotten dark, and they were ordered to land on -- Pearl Harbor has an island right in the middle called Ford Island, and that was a Navy airstrip, so they were ordered to land on Ford Island. They didn't know what had gone on that morning, so they came in as they would normally come, with running lights off. And the approach was to come down Battleship Row down to this end of Ford island and land on the airstrip over there. The gunners were not going to ask questions as to who you are. They were airplanes, and they had been under attack that morning, so a gunner opened up. And once that gunner opened up, everybody opened up. And we lost three airplanes and two pilots of the six. It was the first death from friendly fire in World War II. Anyway, after that calmed down -- I even had a Marine sentry about 15 feet from me firing his rifle at those planes a half a mile away. That's how nervous people were. We then left the landing once that quieted down and went toward the Navy Yard fence with a little bit of apprehension because we heard rumors that saboteurs had tried to climb over the fence or cut the fence. But the street to the fire station was just inside the fence, so you had to go up to that street to go down to the fire station. We made a turn when we got to the street, and everything was blacked out. The moon hadn't come up yet, and all of the lights in the Navy Yard were turned off. So by the time up there, it was dark. We turned and started down the street, and out of the darkness came a voice saying, "Who goes there?" And I seem to think I said, "It's me." And he said, "Who in the H is me?" And I said very rapidly, "Ensign Teague, USS Tennessee, with a working party headed for the fire station." He said proceed -- after a pause he said, "Proceed." And I thought later how fortunate we were that that Marine didn't have an itchy finger. Anyway we got our oxygen bottles and CO2 extinguishers and headed back to the dock, to our boat, and went back to the ship. The day was over. 10:30, about, and I didn't have anyplace to sleep. My room down here was knee-deep in water from hoses that had been squirting, plus the fact that it was contaminated from knee-deep all the way up with just packed with paint smoke. So I found a cot and a blanket and a pillow somewhere, and I went down to damage control central department, damage control central, and that was my room for a week. Then I moved in with two friends. That was the day. Total devastation, total amazement, dazed. But we were doing our job. We had to do our job, didn't think beyond just that. Some people have asked how Pearl Harbor changed me. I don't know. I didn't have time to figure out how it changed me because we left Pearl Harbor -- we were able to get out and underway about the 20th of December, and we headed back to Bremerton, Washington, to the Navy Yard in Bremerton, Washington. And as soon as I got there, I got on the phone, and I asked this girl to come up and marry me, and she did. So we started our married life on January 5th, less than a month after Pearl Harbor. That changed me. I'll print that out and I'll give it to you.

Kristina Graeber:

All right.

Norwood Teague:

One of the things that I left out was that I had -- we were going out on Monday to conduct damage control exercise drills on each ship. In other words, we would be at sea, but we -- the group of officers on this ship would go over to another ship while we were at sea and conduct the damage control crew and some would come over to us. And I'd been trying to tell them, let's have gunnery exercises at the same time. We want to make it more realistic. We could have gunnery exercises. We could use some light tear gas and light smoke as confusion. We could flood a void, cause the ship to list a little bit, require the other people to counterfly it to get it back level, and I wasn't getting anywhere. But when the guns started that morning, I thought they'd heard me, and that's why I was confused, dazed and confused. Anyway, that's that. That's the one day.

Kristina Graeber:

Were you in the Army at all after that?

Norwood Teague:

Navy.

Kristina Graeber:

Navy, excuse me. Were you shipped overseas?

Norwood Teague:

You mean after Pearl Harbor?

Kristina Graeber:

Um-hmm.

Norwood Teague:

I was on the battleship Tennessee until September of '42. That's December '41 to September of '42. In September -- and we operated out of San Francisco Bay during that time.

Kristina Graeber:

What were you doing during that time?

Norwood Teague:

I was a member of the ship's crew. I was in damage control.

Kristina Graeber:

Yeah. I mean, were you sailing to anywhere?

Norwood Teague:

Oh, yeah, we'd go out. We headed for -- in April we headed south -- didn't know where we were going -- but south of Hawaii. We got about Judson Island, which is south of Hawaii, and we were turning back. That was at the time of the Battle of the Coral Sea. April, I think it was, March or April. But in May, we headed out again north -- didn't know exactly where -- but when we got there, we were going toward Dutch Harbor up in the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. And we went out for four or five days, I guess, and we returned back. That was at the Battle of Midway. We did not get to the Battle of Midway because the Battle of Midway was between aircraft carriers. There was what was called a feint, a false maneuver, that the Japanese sent ships across to the Aleutians, toward the Aleutians, toward Anchorage, Alaska, to draw the battleships up there, which they did. It was not a significant force, and they never -- we never got any combat at all. I never was in combat on the Tennessee except for that first day. The Tennessee didn't get -- we went into -- when I had left the Tennessee, they were in Bremerton for modernization, and they were there probably four or five months, and they didn't get into any combat until the Battle of the Philippines, and that would be in '44. So the battleships didn't get much -- the they did get in combat at the -- both Battles of the Philippines were battleships. In September, I was transferred first to the California, which was exactly like the Tennessee, but not here, went up there, sunk in Pearl. And I was sent -- I was ordered to the California as a damage control skeleton crew, meaning a skeleton crew engaged in salvaging the California. Fortunately, I think I'm guessing what happened, because about 12 days later, I had not gotten transportation to Pearl out of Seattle. I was just waiting for transportation, and I got a change of orders. Those orders were cancelled, and I got new orders. I think the fortunate thing was that the captain's wife had taken Eloise and my roommate's wife under her wing and just kind of mothered them. She liked the two of them. We had an apartment in the same apartment house that the captain had; actually, with some other officers in San Francisco, while we were in San Francisco, and we decided she just was very fond of the two girls. And just before I got orders, I had offered our little 1935 Ford coupe to them for a five-day leave. The captain had decided to take five days to go and do some things, and I said why don't you take our car. So he did. I think -- when I got orders to the California, I told him, I said, "Captain, this is the worse thing in the world. I don't want to go to Hawaii and go to a sunken battleship." You know, I didn't want action, necessarily, I just didn't want that kind. I had a feeling that he intervened some way with Washington and got my orders changed, which was the greatest thing for me because I went to the -- the orders were cancelled to the California, and new orders were cut to the USS Essex, the newest aircraft carrier, that was not in commission yet. It would go in commission three and a half months later. And we was in Newport News, Virginia, the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company. So we took off from Bremerton in the little Ford and drove to North Carolina, drove every other night, all night, which, you know, we'd take turns at night driving. And that way we could get there sooner because my folks hadn't met her, hadn't met Eloise. And we'd been married now, what, maybe eight and a half months, and I wanted to get there to introduce her and have a few days. I had five days' travel time and four days' proceed time. You're always given four days to get ready to go and make way, and then a certain amount, depending on where you go, of travel time. Cross-country was four days' proceed time and five days' travel time. So we got to Raleigh, and we had almost four days there before we went on to Newport News and reported aboard the Essex. I was on the Essex getting it ready for commissioning. It was commissioned the 31st of December 1942. So I'd been out there since October. And I was on the Essex until December of '44, so I was over there a little over two years. We operated entirely in the Pacific. Did our shakedown cruise from Newport News, Virginia, to Trinidad and back, and then off to the Pacific, using Pearl Harbor as our home base. Then in December of 1944, I was ordered off of the Essex to Philadelphia to the damage control officer's school, advanced school. So I left the Essex at sea off the Philippines just before the worse typhoon the Navy ever went through occurred. And I went -- I left the Essex, was transferred to a tanker for transportation back into Ulithi, which Ulithi Lagoon was our advance base, Navy advance base, where I was -- would get further transportation. The typhoon hit two days later before the task force was completely fueled, and we went right through the middle of it. It was awful. The tanker squadron had four tankers, six destroyers and two little jeep carriers, aircraft carriers. The two aircraft carriers were -- the flight decks were badly damaged, just peeled back through wave and wind. And then we lost three destroyers, or six destroyers were sunk, one of them with all hands lost. But then I got back and -- finally got back to the U.S., and I went to damage control school in Philadelphia Navy Yard, and there I got orders to the new aircraft carrier Boxer, which again was being built -- like all the aircraft carriers -- had been built at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company. So I went to the Boxer, and I was on the Boxer until the end of the war. The Boxer never got into any combat. We were in commission in April of '45 and went to Guantanamo Bay for our shakedown, to Guantanamo Bay and back, and went from Newport News, went through -- came through the canal into San Francisco, and we were in San Francisco _____+. Because I'd been in the service for five and a half years, I had enough points that I could be relieved right away. So I of course to be relieved, I wanted to go back to school. I did not want to be a career Naval officer _____+. I decided I wanted to be _____+. And I wanted -- after five and a half years, after I graduated -- I graduated from North Carolina State in 1940 and received five and a half years. I needed some refresher work. I wanted to go back to school. I got out -- I actually got out in October, but my date of getting out is November 30th because I'd accumulated some leave. And that's an overview. Do you have anything specific?

Kristina Graeber:

I have some kind of reflection questions, I guess. In our course, we talked a lot about patriotism in terms of the war and fighting the good war and it being kind of our duty as an American citizen to fight. Did you feel anything any of that, or what are your thoughts on that?

Norwood Teague:

Of course. We had not gone through the Vietnam situation. We had the feeling, to a large extent, it was prevalent everywhere: My country right or wrong. I volunteered. I went in before the war started because I could see a war coming because the war had gotten pretty vicious in England and in Europe down there. The Battle of Britain, when it occurred, it was May of 1940 or something like that, and so we knew that -- and we had the ____+. The Germans had already sunk two or three of our merchant ships because they were taking material to England. So I don't think -- there were people who questioned, of course, but we had conscientious objectors and so forth like that. But I didn't have any question.

Kristina Graeber:

Do you still feel that way today?

Norwood Teague:

To a large extent, sure. I don't mean that our country right or wrong, that doesn't mean our country is always right. With this last affair in Iraq was wrong, look what it's proving to be. So all this mess all over the place. But I live here, and as long as I live in this country, I'm going to support what is being done. Because the country is not ruled by one person like so many countries, like Iraq was. This country is ruled by not only Congress, not just by the President, but by Congress representing the people, and some representation seems to be the states. So it's not a matter of somebody, one person, being wrong. And, you know, to a large extent, the people that are -- that are leading the country know more than I know. So I don't know that I've changed all that much.

Kristina Graeber:

Did you ever view the war as being a war for democracy?

Norwood Teague:

A what?

Kristina Graeber:

A war for democracy. Is that any of the reason that you were fighting, or is that more --

Norwood Teague:

Well, World War II was fighting for democracy. I mean, who do we have? We had Hitler and Mussolini over there, and we had Hirohito in Japan. There was for democracy in either case. So yes, we really fought for general freedom. I think that's what it was for. I think -- I'm not sure that Vietnam was not a mistake. I think it probably was a mistake; maybe not right in the beginning, but as we got more and more, and then how do you back up? You get yourself trapped sometimes. You know, you look at Korea. Korea, we were invaded. I mean, our territory that we were protecting was invaded. Look at the first Iraqi War, the Gulf War. That was an invasion. We were trying to free Kuwait. They say the Iraqi War is strictly oil. Well, it's not strictly oil. I mean, it is oil, of course, that's part of it. But that guy needed to go, and I'm just not sure we did it the best way. But I'm not a tactician or a strategist. Even though I've had training in strategy and tactics, it's still -- you know, it's too many variables.

Kristina Graeber:

You were talking about people asking you if Pearl Harbor changed your life. Do you think it changed -- it was a watershed moment for America, a turning point in our history?

Norwood Teague:

Oh, no question about it. It was a watershed. It precipitated what was going to happen, and what did happen was -- to a large extent made the U.S. the No. 1 power country in the world. We were getting there before World War II, but World War II established it. That's why we're having so much trouble with France. They got their noses too far out of joint. They think they're still the No. 1 nation in the world you know, and their language is No. 1 language in the world, and the fact that they aren't anymore is hard for them to accept. But every country in the world, including France and Germany, have turned to us for help and advice and guidance. That don't mean we're always right, either.

Kristina Graeber:

Very true.

Norwood Teague:

And hopefully we never use that position. You know, ethically, it's a responsibility.

Kristina Graeber:

Do you -- it sounds like in your story there were so many close calls in terms of being right there on the Tennessee right next to the Arizona and, you know, do you ever think about how, you know, it could have been? You do you ever think about an element of fate or destiny?

Norwood Teague:

Oh, there's no question the element of fate works all the time. I think of all the close calls I've had, and I think about me meeting my wife. Five minutes would have made a total difference.

Mrs. Teague:

What do you mean by that, honey?

Norwood Teague:

Five minutes earlier or five minutes later, we may have not have come -- we may not have met. No, I think there's an awful lot of close calls in life. Everybody has them. Everybody has a --

Mrs. Teague:

Everybody has a story.

Norwood Teague:

That's true, everybody has a story. Some people have a lot more hot air than the others, too. BY

Kristina Graeber:

All right. I think that might be all I have for you.

Norwood Teague:

That's everything?

Kristina Graeber:

Yeah, that's pretty much.

Norwood Teague:

I've remained -- after the war, I what was called separated from active duty, separated from service, but stayed in the reserve, stayed in the reserve until I had 20 years and retired.

Mrs. Teague:

What are you writing this for?

Kristina Graeber:

It's a class called "America in Depression and War."

Norwood Teague:

Well, see, that 20 years or 25 years -- it wouldn't 25 -- that 15 or 16 years, that 16 years was a watershed in this country completely. The two -- the combination of the two, the Great Depression followed by World War II, I can think of things that happened and relate them. We were kicked right on the head by those two, by that period of time. This was our high school, college and post-college years. And it of course affected our parents and grandparents economically. But fortunately it didn't affect us that as much as dramatically because our parents made sure that we got the opportunities so and so forth that before --

Mrs. Teague:

I hate war. I just hate it. I always wondered what do people _____+? What good was it to them?

Norwood Teague:

Well, I'm not sure what good if anything in Iraq yet, except for getting rid of this dictator. And until we find -- you know, find evidence of him one way or the other, I think we're going to have problems there. You've got to have closure. There's no closure as long as he's presumed alive and might come back. That's what many Iraqis are afraid he might come back. And when he comes back, they're afraid that he'll behead them or you know, mass-murder them because they cooperated with the coalition forces. So until there's closure on him -- there's closure on his two sons, who were just as bad. There's no closure on him yet. It's like Bin Ladin in Afghanistan. There's no closure yet. And until that occurs, the terrorists are going to keep -- the al Qaeda group are going to keep operating, because they're hoping Bin Ladin will come back into power. That's what makes it so awful right now.

Mrs. Teague:

Well, you're always saying that there will always be wars.

Norwood Teague:

And there always will be wars because any two people, there's conflict of various times; some more than others.

Mrs. Teague:

I hate to hear that.

Norwood Teague:

I mean even you, you and I who have a minimal amount of conflict, there's still some conflict.

Mrs. Teague:

It's not war.

Norwood Teague:

It's the nature of war, though, just magnified. It's the nature. Two dogs get together, two birds get together -- a hummingbird that has his feeder out here, he'll fight off any other hummingbird that gets too close.

Mrs. Teague:

Well, it's that funny.

Unidentified Witness:

I'll go print that out. It only takes a minute. (End of track 1.)

 
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