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Interview with Larry Kubale [February 13, 2003]

Alex Steele:

Today is February 13th. We are interviewing Mr. Larry Kubale?

Larry Kubale:

Right.

Alex Steele:

And would you please state your name and your date of birth.

Larry Kubale:

Lawrence W. Kubale, better known as Larry. And born September 13th, 1921.

Alex Steele:

Can you state the current address.

Larry Kubale:

Correct. 1328 Reed Street, R-E-E-D, of Green Bay, Wisconsin.

Alex Steele:

The other names of people attending the interview are Alex Steele as the interviewer and Joe Hannen (phonetic) for technical support. What branch of the service did you serve in?

Larry Kubale:

I started out in the ordinance prior to World War II, down in Puerto Rico, and I came back from Puerto Rico actually on the date they bombed Pearl Harbor. I was coming back to go to flight school.

Alex Steele:

What was your rank when you served?

Larry Kubale:

Down there? I started in the Air Force. I was a flight officer.

Alex Steele:

Okay. Were you drafted or did you enlist?

Larry Kubale:

No, I was enlisted. I wasn't old enough to get drafted at that time.

Alex Steele:

Where were you living at the time you enlisted?

Larry Kubale:

Reedsville, R-E-E-D-S-V-I-L-L-E. Reedsville, Wisconsin.

Alex Steele:

And why did you decide to do enlist?

Larry Kubale:

Actually I had some preliminary stuff when I was in high school. One of the doctors in town who is associated with the Legion, and they had a course they were giving down at Fort Sheridan that was equivalent to the ROTC. And one month each summer for four years in a row, and you'd come out of there you were a 2nd lieutenant in the infantry. But after two summers down there, then they cancelled the thing out in '39. They figured something else was coming. A lot of guys were in the Armed Services, and they didn't have enough people or equipment or stuff available to continue this program. So the program ceased at that point. So actually in early 1940 when we were talking about having another course of that thing, they said it's not going to be done anymore. So I started looking around to go into the service. So I tried to enlist in the fall of 1940. But they wouldn't let me get in at that time. They said everything was getting ready for conscription and everything else. So you got to wait for the January issue people to get drafted and go in with that same bunch. So I actually got in January 28th of 1941. So I was in service a year and then Puerto Rico at the time doing ammunition inspections. They were getting the islands -- actually like huge, oh, quonset huts underground with ammunition, all the bombs and all the shells and everything they needed. Actually it was preparatory to -- for the canal, the Canal Zone. It was setting up -- they had different bases set up. But in late summer, I guess I was talking to the CO at the time, and he happened to mention something whether I was interested in going into the Air Force and I said, certainly was better than this. There was no future in that as far as I could see. So actually on December 7th I was on board a boat coming back to the States. Couple guys there, the Panama Canal Zone, a couple of guys from furlough came back and went to flight school.

Alex Steele:

Why did you pick the Army, instead of, say, the Navy or another one of the branches?

Larry Kubale:

In the beginning I couldn't get into anything else at the time. That's what conscription was for because Fort Sheridan is basically infantry. And then what they give us, oh, serious of tests and they pick because of the background and fishing and stuff -- I knew guns and weapons -- and I got 2nd ordinance and I got over to Savannah, and that was a proving ground. And I was there for two months when they decided they were going to ship an organization back from World War I located in Rock Island, Arkansas, and they were going to take that whole gang. They sent them all down -- lock, stock, and barrel -- down to Puerto Rico. At that point I was in. -- because I had one year, one year conscription, at that point I had to take a release from that in order to go down to Puerto Rico because then I'd be in for three years. So they chopped that short too.

Alex Steele:

Do you recall your first few days in the service?

Larry Kubale:

Uh, it was pretty much actually because they had that infantry training and two months of that I was corporal at that time and they wanted me to stay on the base where I was at Fort Sheridan to start with and stay in the infantry and they couldn't see no sense in that. I had enough of that. So I went into the ordinance, figuring that was something I knew, and from there just gradually mushroomed to Air Force where I ended up.

Alex Steele:

All right. Where did you serve in World War II?

Larry Kubale:

World War II?

Alex Steele:

Yep. And where did you go while you were serving in World War II? What were some of the different countries and locations you were in?

Larry Kubale:

After flying school and after I got into the gliders and , it was the first class of gliders. At that point they didn't have anything other than sail planes. So cargo gliders weren't even invented at that point. After about seven weeks of that stuff, I was an instructor in sail planes, and had about sixteen students in four classes. And that was just south of Lubbock, Texas, and Lubbock was where the original cargo gliders were located. And I so I went up and got into that. And actually on December 23rd of '42 I got my wings and bars as a flight officer, glider pilot. And from there it was a transition period before -- I was ready to go overseas with an organization that was -- it was scheduled to go down to New Guinea but about three or four days before they were getting ready to ship out -- I was in a training officers group at that time -- it was a small group of 374, troop carrier group, and the old man, he said, "You guys are getting restless." He said, "I guess get us all a ball game going between the officers and enlisted men." So we set that thing up. In the middle of the game sitting on the bench, and some kid come up to bat and let the bat slide out of his hands and hit me flat out right square in the mouth and my teeth, and I had blood running through my fingers like mud. And they sent me into the hospital. And that gang went overseas. And then when I got out of the hospital, a couple weeks later, then they sent me down to Louisville, Kentucky, where they were teaching the commando training for the glider pilots. So after 20 weeks of that, I was shipped overseas. I went over October of '43. Yeah, October of '43 and landed in England.

Alex Steele:

Where else did you go, other than England? Where did your duties take you throughout Europe?

Larry Kubale:

Well, from England we went up from the base in Nottingham, down the coastal area near Oxford, England. And from there we made the landing on D-Day in France. We left at 9:30 at night on the 6th of June and landed in the fields of Normandy at 11:05 at night. Of course the gliders had no motors, no support, no parachutes. I was flying a British glider. That one there, that big one there. It had the jeep, trailer full of munitions and ten men in there. And we landed in a field that ended up in the woods, stopping in between two trees. When the thing got to the end of the field, the nose busted off first, the wings got sheared off, and then the other two wheels went flying. And she settled to the ground and that's where we -- the guy flying with us, he went right through the nose of the glider. He had the control in his hands and side by side the cockpit area, and he went right through the nose. The steering column in his hands and foot still on the rudder. And that whole section of the glider went out. And he was on the other side of the road, on the edge of that road. All that he had was a busted leg. I was with the infantry then, the paratroopers.

Alex Steele:

When you said you were at the D-Day invasion, you saw combat. What was that like?

Larry Kubale:

Well, actually landing at eleven o'clock at night, by the time the thing got organized, it was close to midnight. And the guys that I had with me, they were actually paratroopers. And with the 101st Airborne. So they had their mission to do. And once you're on the ground, you're infantry with them, whatever group you're in. So I was with them for about four or five days. And then run into the one star general, Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt's grandson, running around the jeep. He says, "How many glider pilots can you find?" I don't know. Probably a dozen or so hanging around here, in the woods or so." Get a hold of them." What do you need them for?" There's 1500 Germans captured so far. They've got to get them down to the beach." That group was sent back to the United States for prisoner of war camp. But they didn't give us any trouble. The first night we took their shoes away from them. When we found out they didn't want to run away some of these guys came from the Russian front before they got to the area where they were captured and they were glad to be going some place but not in service again. So that was no problem at all.

Alex Steele:

Were there a lot of casualties in your unit?

Larry Kubale:

No, not in ours. Actually when we left England the Chief of the Air Force and British group, which were under them in a sense in training, they figured that fifty percent of us wouldn't make France -- wouldn't get to France from England. And of the fifty that made it half of them would be coming back after it was over. They figured our ratio of casualties would be a little bit on the high side, but we only lost five men.

Alex Steele:

Would you -- can you tell us about a couple of your most memorable experiences.

Larry Kubale:

Landing a glider at night with no lights, eleven o'clock at night was kind of rough. All you had was once we made land fall, you had the Air Force stuff going on, all the aerial hitting around and what have you. We were flying at five hundred feet in the air. They could get us with a rifle. They didn't get too many of us in the air, but some of the guys -- prior to our landing just south of the Village of Ste Mere-Eglise, the area that we were supposed to be in, the Germans were there with a group. They were a training group. But they realized that something was coming because the paratroopers were in ahead of us. Some of them waiting a couple hours before we got there. And we were just bringing supplies for them and they were -- they pretty well had things under control at that point. But a lot of paratroopers were on the ground dead and a lot of them were suffering, some of them were shot. And in the trees we saw some -- they poured gas on them and set on them on fire. Before or after they were dead, I don't know. But the people that we were with, the paratroopers, they were a rough bunch of sons of guns and they just about -- Somebody hollered out, "Comrade." They said, "Comrade, hell" and they shot him. Because they were so damn mad because their folks were killed. And by that time there was an awful lot of Germans dead on the ground and American soldiers too. They were all over the place. You were lucky you wasn't one of them, I guess.

Alex Steele:

Can you tell a little bit more about what a glider is and how it gets itself going.

Larry Kubale:

Well, the thing has to be towed by a C-47 airplane, and it was about four hundred feet of rope attached to the plane. And because of the area where these guys had been on maneuvers over there, when they realized something was coming in, they flooded that area. So they changed the landing zone we were supposed to land to another area we hadn't seen before on maps or anything else. Entire panorama set up of where we were supposed to be hedge rows and all the things we would be running into. We didn't know that our landing area was being changed, but the co-pilots did. But when we got over the area, I think they figured it was close enough to where they were supposed to be. They give you the green light and you cut loose and go in there and land the things. And then you're infantry, or whatever you're carrying with you, until you can make your way back to the channel and go back to England.

Alex Steele:

What medals and citations were you awarded?

Larry Kubale:

By the time I got done, I got a Distinguished Flying Cross for Holland and couple air medals for Holland, Normandy, and south of France and Purple Heart a couple of times. And you pick up your campaign medal and stuff, medals with -- oh, it had one silver star or a couple bronze stars on it, and couple other awards that were given en masse to the group for our participation.

Alex Steele:

How did you stay in touch with your family while you were in the service?

Larry Kubale:

Well, there was no problem there. You didn't have e-mails at that time through -- got one page -- at that time one page written, you know. Everything had to be censored. They had crossed the stuff out. They don't know where you were. After awhile they figured where you were at because of the invasion and stuff.

Alex Steele:

How was the food? Like was it good or...

Larry Kubale:

We had no problem because we had a good group there where we were stationed at and the chow was fine for us, you know. We had K-ration stuff with us when we were over, and those, they were edible. We were used to that stuff. There was no problem with that stuff at all.

Alex Steele:

You have enough supplies for your time in the war or were you guys all scraping around for stuff?

Larry Kubale:

No. We had more than enough equipment.

Alex Steele:

Was it a pretty stressful situation serving or...

Larry Kubale:

Well, never having been shot at, landing at night like that, by the time morning came you realized you were still alive with the paratroopers. The Village of Ste Mare-Eglise had been fairly well cleaned out with paratroopers during that last 24 hours, so they were going through the village after that, getting a few Germans that were pretty much holed up in town to get them out of there. But most of them by that time they were willing to surrender. They realized it was over.

Alex Steele:

Did you have any good lunch charms that you took with you?

Larry Kubale:

No.

Alex Steele:

You guys were there for a long time. How did you entertain yourselves when you got some free time?

Larry Kubale:

Actually when I got through there in Normandy, by the time we got back to England they gave us a couple weeks off. And so a buddy and I got on a train and headed north into England. We had been stationed in Nottingham at the beginning, so we were heading up in that general direction. We went up a couple -- not that many miles north into a small town, and we got into a bunch people there that had just returned from Africa. It was like the USO. They'd been down there, and so we were entertained by them and went to their big gala, first presentation that was made in England after they came back. So we were invited to see that, which was good luck or what have you. So we stuck around for a couple of days.

Alex Steele:

You mentioned the USO. Did you get to see any neat entertainers or what kind of entertainment did they bring for you?

Larry Kubale:

We didn't have the -- Well, Glenn Miller was there, of course, with his band. Saw him at base. And while we were up there in the town of Manchester at that show, we ran into the wife of the commanding general of the Dutch Army and had been introducing or talking about where this guy had been. And once we were over in Italy, because this guy knew what he was doing, a lot of his troop actually was behind enemy lines. A number of times they were further ahead entering the troops. And so at intermission they saw this girl that we'd been talking to at the hotel. She was the one that set us up with that theatrical group for the evening entertainment. This woman that was there, lady, she was escorted by old Blood and Guts Patton. So I ran into them that night and met him. When he found out we were glider pilots, he said anybody would be a damn fool to do that, fly one of those things, nothing to defend yourself in the air, no motor, no parachute. A bunch of crazy bastards. "I'll buy the first drink." And he did. More than one too.

Alex Steele:

What other areas were you able to see while traveling in the service?

Larry Kubale:

When we got back to the base after two weeks of goofing around in England, they had plenty of gliders and equipment down in Italy to make the south of France invasion, so they needed glider pilots, so a bunch of us volunteered for that. And they flew us out in the ocean in Africa and came up through Iran, Algiers, and into Sicily, from Sicily into Italy. So we were stationed at a base that was another troop carrying group, stationed there right off the Isle of Alba. And from there we flew to the south of the France in August. So between June th and August 15th, weren't many days in between that. But that was a daylight landing we made up there. And a buddy of mine from Seattle, we played a game of cribbage and I bet him. So he was the pilot and I was the co-pilot. And we landed in a vineyard and they had these glider stakes in between the vineyard and the peach trees. And then they set up those poles. It's called anti-glider stakes. And the Germans had the prisoners of war set them in. So rather than hit them, we took the peach trees. And couple of them and did pretty good. They got out all right, no problem, except you realized you got a peach tree in your lap after you get in.

Alex Steele:

Do you recall any particularly humorous or unusual incidents that happened?

Larry Kubale:

Not particularly. We got through with that invasion of the south of France, we were in Italy, for they give us ten days off to go home to scrounge around in there. So never having seen that before, it was pretty interesting. We did that. And we got back, checked the officers' club everyday and make sure you see your name on the bulletin board or get back to the base because they're flying you back to England. So we got shipped back to England again. And then in September we had the Holland invasion.

Alex Steele:

Did you take a lot of photographs while you were there?

Larry Kubale:

No.

Alex Steele:

What do you think of your officers and your fellow soldiers?

Larry Kubale:

They were a good bunch. It was a very close knit group and because they -- after Holland -- I got shot up in Holland, and after that was over, we were -- they had simultaneous, at the same time, they had the Hollanders were losing bombers, all their big planes. In fact, my brother was killed over there. The night before I went back to base with him at night. The next day he was hit in the shoulder with some flak and he went back the next day and never came back. But it was quite interesting to see them. He was--they were flying B-24's. So I met a nice crew and the whole gang that he was with. But when I got back to the base after I got out of the hospital, after Holland, they were so short of navigators because every one of these planes -- losing 40 planes a day -- had a navigator. And they didn't have as much navigators as they should have had. And I had some navigational training in flying school, so they checked their records and they had a record of that on my papers. So they give us a quick course in dead reckoning for navigators. So then we were flying navigator and co-pilots on the C-47 on the re-supplies, food and gas for Patton and the men that were released out of the prisoner of war camps and stuff. And so then we got into Austria, Hungary, Germany, and all over the place. You fly in, did briefing at four-thirty in the morning, five o'clock your breakfast. Right after that you go in for more briefing, and then fly into Germany or wherever you were flying with the gas. You had to land right next to the tanks, that's where they wanted the equipment and stuff. And if you couldn't make it back across the Rhine before eight o'clock, because anybody would be shot down, then stay inn Germany over night and then fly back the next day. They would do it twice a day and you were off a couple of days. So that was a lot better than flying glider stick.

Alex Steele:

Did you keep a personal journal while you were over there?

Larry Kubale:

No.

Alex Steele:

Do you recall when your service ended?

Larry Kubale:

Well, we were in Paris after the early part of'45. We were transferred, the whole group, down in France and our base was just south of Paris, a small town. And so from there we flew the re-supply stuff on that base. And we happened to be in Paris the day when VE Day occurred. And they were -- automatically go back and back to the base and shipped us back to the States, preparatory to going to the South Pacific. While we were home on leave, the thirty-day leave, then VJ Day happened. So we didn't have to go, and they gave us leave, and we got out of there. So actually I was home for a month prior to going out to Santa Ana, California on assignment. And after that I got home, got married couple months later. So I was on leave until December 9th.

Alex Steele:

What did you do in the days and weeks after you left the service?

Larry Kubale:

Well, right after that I got out of there. I got home in early October and I got married on the 25th of October, and then went out to see a couple of buddies of mine out in the Dakotas, and came back and went back to work.

Alex Steele:

When you came back, did you go right to work or did you go to some school first?

Larry Kubale:

Well, I could have, but I didn't -- like a dummy. I went in to -- I knew the president of the cheese factory, a cheese outfit in Manitowoc. And I'd been in correspondence with him. A relative of mine was one of their -- actually she started out a nurse and stayed on as a companion to one of older ladies in the family. So he, right off the bat, he says come and work for him. So I worked for him for a couple of months. But I realized then that my back was in pretty bad shape and I knew I couldn't stay with that. So I went down to Milwaukee and there transferred up, went to school in Oshkosh. I got out of that thing and went to work for the reformatory.

Alex Steele:

You said that you made some good friendships. Did you continue on any of those after the war was ended and you go home?

Larry Kubale:

Oh, yeah. That still went on. In fact, just got a letter one of our men from South Dakota, the guy that was with us on our honeymoon -- or we went up to his place for a honeymoon. And he was a prisoner of war. Got picked up on D-Day. He was a prisoner of war for a year, and then when he got out of there, he came back on the same boat that we did. And went to Fort Sheridan. Released to go permanent on thirty-day leave. And so we hung around with him. He was with us all the while we were in training at commando school. And the first reunion class of the glider outfit, that was down in Atlanta. And we ran across fifty people that you knew that you ran into at training or somewhere along the line. So I went to this reunion every year for about the first fifteen years. And they always give -- there was one just October in Lubbock because that's where our museum has been transferred, up there. So we had -- we were there for the grand opening of that. And then there was only about four of us out of the original group left.

Alex Steele:

When did you become involved in veterans' organizations?

Larry Kubale:

Uh, they had a VFW Club down in the Reedsville area that was named after my brother. So I was with that one right off the bat. Although I wasn't that active, young family, living in Green Bay. I didn't get to any of the meetings. But I'm still a member of the VFW and the Disabled American Veterans' group.

Alex Steele:

Where did you say those groups were?

Larry Kubale:

The VFW one?

Alex Steele:

Yeah.

Larry Kubale:

It's out of Reedsville, and the clubhouse is in the small town of Cato.

Alex Steele:

All right.

Larry Kubale:

The DAV is right here in town.

Alex Steele:

What did you do for your career after the war?

Larry Kubale:

I went to work at the prison.

Alex Steele:

And how long did you end up working at the prison?

Larry Kubale:

Twenty-five years.

Alex Steele:

Wow. Did your military experience influence your thinking about war and the military in general?

Larry Kubale:

Oh, yeah. I mean actually -- well, my brother-in-law, my wife's brother, was in the Pacific and he'd been -- he'd been to one of the -- We called them a path finder. They go in ahead of time and they send up communication with the landing party, all the invasions. So he made about thirty of those things in a row. And he had a tough time down there in the South Pacific, which we didn't have that sort of stuff being in the Air Force. When you got out of that, when you got out of the mission that you're on -- you're landing fifteen miles behind enemy lines. You had time, you made contact with the landing party and were ready -- ready to go in and have another one.

Alex Steele:

The veterans'organizations, what kinds of activity does your post and organization do?

Larry Kubale:

Well, right now I'm on the board with that, with the DAV, and we inherited quite a bit of money, in fact just recently. And so now we've got to give five percent of that to the people, veterans in Brown County. Which is a good deal. It's well-organized through the Salvation Army. They have -- they have a system of keeping records of every request made by veterans for assistance medical, health, food, or anything else that they need. So it's no double-dipping on this sort of thing. So now our job is to just see to it that those that need help get help. And we had one old guy that was a life member of the DAV also. And he always said, "When I go, you guys are going to get all the money that I got because there's nobody for me to leave it to." Although he'd been married, they had nothing to do with him; he had nothing to do with them. And so we ended up getting a grant of $450,000. So now we have got to give five percent away of that every year. That's a job.

Alex Steele:

How did your service experiences affect the rest of your life?

Larry Kubale:

Well, actually because of the type of service that we had and the commando training we had stuff like that, that I got to working at the reformatory. When I first started there in 1951 it was a boys' school more or less. But after a couple of years it was made into a -- discharged all these young kids, so half the crew I had was 12 years old kids -- in the laundry there. Fourteen year old kids. But the training that I'd had, I found no problem managing those kids because we had that in a sense in service too, you know. So I had no problems in that at all. It was a big help in that part of it. I had ran that laundry for seven years. And at that time I had a thousand kids working for me in that period. And they right off the bat, you interview them and find out what they could do or what they wanted to do, or what have you. Just told right off the bat, "I'm not going to lie to you. You get a pat on the back if you got that coming or a little bit lower, you get that too." But it was one of those deals of if you were fair to them they were fair to you in return. And so I never got a problem with this one, although you'd have these fights down at the shop, you went and you'd take the biggest guy down and hope somebody takes the other one. Never been knocked down. Called a lot of names, but that doesn't hurt. Didn't bother me a bit.

Alex Steele:

Is there anything else you'd like to add that we haven't asked you about? Any other stories?

Larry Kubale:

Well, actually in 1982 the Dutch Government Defense put on a huge thank you to the allied services that invaded -- helped liberate Holland. And at one reunion that we had at Atlanta, the guy that wrote a book on paratroopers, he was running across all the glider stories that were coming out because a lot of these kids were flying gliders and bailing out in combat because there was no helicopters and nothing at that time. Somebody had to bring in the tanks, small tanks and the jeeps and all the supplies which they couldn't carry. So he was associated with the 82nd Airborne, and he heard about this deal where they wanted somebody to represent the United States at this huge ceremony going on in Holland. So they had a two-week program that they had Well, back it up a little bit. This guy when he was there, he said anything you remember from your service time, he gave us a slip for any -- if you remember incidents, any incident you remember, where you were, and what you did. If you had been wounded between the 17th and the 27th of September in 1944, you were eligible to go there as a guest of the Dutch government. So I filled the thing out and sent it back to him, and I thought that was the end of that, you know. And couple weeks later we got a call from the man that was in charge of this reunion in Holland inviting the wife and I to go over to Holland, all expenses paid, for a two-week vacation.

Alex Steele:

Oh, wow.

Larry Kubale:

And that vacation was a vacation. I mean I tell you, these people, they put us up -- there was 65 people there. I was the only glider pilot, the only guy with Air Force connected to it. The rest were -- except for paratroopers. The only guy from Wisconsin. And when I looked around, I didn't know a soul. What is this? But then they took us over there for two -- that two-week period and they had four huge buses that were hauling us around, and we hit every base they had in Holland, anyone connected with the service any way, even the veterans' homes over there. And you had to meet the mayor of the city wherever you were going in the morning for a morning breakfast and/or brunch. More are less they had parades go out of these towns, because there were people who worked on that for about two years, setting it up. And it was done well. And they had all the old jeeps and all the old equipment and the uniforms and what have you that they had on. And they had been most gracious to the British people that were killed in Holland and took care of their graves and everything else. And then they invited the people of England to come back each year about the same anniversary time. So that was all put together. And it was two weeks of people that had been prisoners out of Holland and the guys that were the underground, and you were thanked much for it. They were saying thanks. But it was a pretty big deal there and it was magnificent. It was interesting. And then last September my son-in-law, my daughter, and the wife and I went over to England and we spent a week in England and we went into France and went into town of our base where I landed near the town. I wanted to see if I would find something that I knew where I was at. And miraculously enough we had hit a bed and breakfast that was just outside of that town and this boy that was eight years old when we landed right across his house in his fields. And he had given me that book when I was over there. The museums that we were at. And the guy that wrote this book had everything, all the stuff of where everything had happened, and this guy happened to own that property. And we met him, and this is his name and address here. And this a field that this is where my glider ended up that night in Normandy. And he was there, the fellow that wrote the book. We ran across him in Lubbock, and he was the one who wrote the book here. And he's got all these pictures of everything that was done there at the time. This fellow actually, Martin, ended up being the mayor of that community for about sixty years after in history time. So he knew every place that we were at and right across his house and his fields and stuff. And for a couple of days he took off and just took us any place we wanted to go. It was beautiful. I'd like to go back and see that guy again because he was beautiful people.

Alex Steele:

Sounds like a really neat trip. Is there anything else?

Larry Kubale:

Not really.

Alex Steele:

One last question. Is there any lasting message you would like to leave us for the generations to come?

Larry Kubale:

Well, I got -- There was five boys in my family and every one of them was in service at one time or another. My older brother was killed over there in April of '44. Of course I was overseas at the time. Younger brother was in the -- wasn't service, but he was in the radio school out in Florida. But they wouldn't let him go overseas because one of us was missing and I was in service too. And then the other ones after that, one was in Korea and some in Viet Nam, and there was nobody jumping the boundaries to head in Canada in service time. It wasn't one of those kinds of deals. I think everybody -- really it wouldn't hurt -- in fact, I encouraged an awful lot of young kids that I ran into since that time to go in and get a couple years service. If you're going to do something, if you're not sure what you want to do, if you don't want to go to trade school or you don't want to go to college, put a couple of years in service. By that time they were paying off these kids pretty well for the time they spent. And they could go in and get an education, which they couldn't afford prior to that.

Alex Steele:

Well, thank you very much for sharing your experience with us.

Larry Kubale:

Okay. I hope it works out and you get that Eagle Scout.

 
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  October 26, 2011
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