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Interview with Glen B. Weber [8/6/2002]

William M. Gibson:

This is Bill Gibson with United States Senator Richard Lugar's office. We're here today in the Indianapolis office for the Senator. It's August 6th, 2002. We are interviewing Glen B. Weber. He is currently residing at 1439 North Fenton Avenue in Indianapolis, Indiana, zip code 46219, and Mr. Weber was in the Air Force during World War II in both the Eighth Bomber Command and Ninth Bomber Command, and achieved the highest rank of sergeant. Mr. Weber, thanks for being with us today. The first thing we always ask is how did you get in the military; did you enlist or were you drafted, and what branch of service did you go into if there's a reason you went into that branch.

Glen B. Weber:

Okay. I was drafted. When the war came along in 1941, I took a defense training course and became a machinist and came to Indianapolis, Indiana, and went to Allison Engineering, where I was a tool and cutter grinder. And as the war progressed, I was drafted and went into the Army at Camp Atterbury here in Indianapolis. That was November the 21st of 1942. I went to Miami, Florida for my basic training, and from Miami they sent me to Madison, Wisconsin, in the middle of the winter. It was 23 below zero when we got to Madison, Wisconsin, and we'd come there from the sunny shores of Miami, Florida at Christmastime. I went to radio school.

William M. Gibson:

That was in Madison?

Glen B. Weber:

Yes, in Madison, Wisconsin. I learned Morse code and achieved a speed of, I think we had to pass 16 words a minute to get out of radio school. From radio school I was sent to Atlantic City to await shipment overseas. They didn't waste any time back in those days; you went right away.

William M. Gibson:

Now how long were you in radio school? How long did that take?

Glen B. Weber:

Radio school, I've forgotten. It was about a 12, 12-week course, I think. My memory, I'm 81 years old, and at this point in time my memory is not as good as it used to be.

William M. Gibson:

That's understood.

Glen B. Weber:

So we went to Atlantic City to await shipment overseas, and I was very fortunate, I got to go overseas on the Queen Mary. There were 20-some thousand men aboard the Queen Mary, and in New York Harbor when we boarded the Queen Mary, the Ile de France was lying on her side in the port there; she had gone through a tremendous fire there at dockside and had capsized, and the Queen Elizabeth was in port also, so I got to see all three vessels. As we went out on the Queen Mary, I was assigned to sleep on the deck one night and the engine room the next night. It was a five-day trip across the Atlantic. We zigzagged across the Atlantic turning every, as I recall, it was every nine minutes. I think it takes seven minutes to launch a torpedo or something from a U-boat, and the U-boat activity in the Atlantic back in the, early 1943 was very heavy, and we zigzagged clear across the Atlantic, went to Greenland and Iceland up near there, and we landed in Gorrick, Scotland. I mentioned 20-some thousand people on the Queen Elizabeth -- or Queen Mary, I beg your pardon, Queen Mary -- and I only ate every other day. I ate the day that I was on KP in the officers' mess, and on the next day I'd just eat a candy bar because it was one entire chow line the whole, whole day long. I like to froze to death sleeping on the outer deck as we went near Iceland and Greenland, but everything worked out all right. I got very warm in the engine room on the next night when I was on KP.

William M. Gibson:

Now did you get seasick or anything or was it --

Glen B. Weber:

No, I did not. Not on the Queen Mary. I did coming home on a liberty ship, but not on the way there. It was a nice trip across, no complaints. We landed Gorrick, Scotland and offloaded. I was taken immediately to High Wickham, which is a park right outside of London. It was Eighth Bomber Command at that time, and I was assigned to the Eighth Bomber Command as a replacement radio operator. I was ready to, I was available for anything for the Air Force as a radio operator. At this time the British Intelligence Service, MI-6, had captured the Ultra code-breaking machine in some naval activities earlier, and they were very well-progressed in breaking the German signals, and I'll explain a little more in depth a little later, but they were forming a company of Americans -- we were the first Americans to be trained by the British in this Ultra, which was -- Ultra was the code name for wireless intelligence, of British military intelligence. It was called Y intelligence in the United States for wire. So I was taken out of a replacement pool and put in this new company that came over after I did, and we were sent, we were in London, and we were billeted then in Grosvenor Square in the heart of London, and for three months we went to an American intelligence school where we were briefed on some of the procedures that we would be doing with the British intelligence. From there, after three months of training there, we were sent to Cheadle, England in northern England, and I worked for nine months with British military intelligence where they trained us in the actual operation of German intercept work.

William M. Gibson:

So did all the training that you did on Morse code end up going for naught?

Glen B. Weber:

Oh, no. No, no.

William M. Gibson:

It didn't.

Glen B. Weber:

It's Morse code.

William M. Gibson:

It's Morse code, okay.

Glen B. Weber:

German traffic was Morse code.

William M. Gibson:

Okay.

Glen B. Weber:

And a lot of Q signals. Q signals, I'll go into that in a little more depth as I explain the procedure. In this giant room that I worked in in Cheadle, they had military intelligence, they had naval intelligence, and they had Air Force intelligence all working in the same room. I was assigned to work with the Air Force, air intelligence. And in trying to explain this just a little bit, the Enigma machine was used in breaking the code, but as well there was a thing called the Bird Book that was captured by the British in the raid on Dieppe. And the Germans changed their code every day, and if you could catch, if you could find and read the transmissions from the first German airplane up in the morning, it was Westo One (ph), it was a naval, it was a weather plane that flew out of Stavanger, Norway, and if we could find him and send the message in to our cryptographers and they break that message, they were then able to break all the Air Force traffic all day long. So Westo One was a very important one to find and copy. As we were copying traffic, the way it would work, if we had direction-finding trucks located out in the field, and if a German bomber unit became active and I found him in my searching over the dial -- we came to recognize the sound of the German transmitter and the German fist, and this Westo One that I'm speaking of, we got to know him so well that we knew what operator was on each day because of the way he sent code, and I have another story that I'll relate about the naval traffic on that. In fact, this would be a good time perhaps. The Scharnhorst, the giant German war vessel, was being copied by the British naval unit, and when they were getting ready to track it down for the final assault they took the radio crew from our location there in Cheadle, I came to work one midnight and the radio crew was all gone from the naval section, and we wondered where they were. And we didn't know until later when they came back and they were elated. They had sent them out to be in on the sinking of the Scharnhorst. And they sent them there because they were so aware of the German transmit -- they recognized the German Scharnhorst transmitter, they recognized the fist of the operators, they were so -- they just knew the operation so well.

William M. Gibson:

Now what would be some of the things that you looked for that would tell you which fist it was, or how did you distinguish between --

Glen B. Weber:

The way a fellow would send, just little idiosyncrasies like as I'm talking to you here, the way you smile or the way your hand movements, little things that you notice, you notice them in radio traffic as well. You'll notice the quivering of fist, the way a guy sends dot-ditty, dot-ditty, dot, dot, dot and that kind of thing.

William M. Gibson:

Okay.

Glen B. Weber:

So back -- I was describing the direction-finding signals that we had in the field. We had three trucks located in the field there at Cheadle, and as we would search and find a German unit that was operating -- at the first part of the war, when I was first in London, the three months through the intelligence training there in London first, the American intelligence training, we were being bombed almost every night. The Germans had air superiority and they came over, and because of their superiority they flew direct to their targets, they didn't zigzag like the Americans did, and they talked frequently on the air because they didn't worry too much about us, they just were air superiority. So as the Germans were coming, when they would, when I would copy them, I notified the trucks what frequency I was on, the trucks would get on the same frequency, so every time the Germans sent a message, the trucks heard it as well and they dialed in their antenna to look, to pinpoint the location of the German bomber group. By knowing the bomber group, where it, we could tell where it left from. If it left from Bordeaux, France or where, we would know what type of unit, what kind of plane they were flying, we would know the speed of the plane, we'd know how much fuel it held, and because it was flying direct, we knew pretty well whether it was headed for Southampton, where we had shipping amassed, or where we were amassing shipment for the invasion and so forth, or whether it was coming to London or whether it was going in northern England. So every time it would send a message, we would pinpoint its location. We knew when to expect it into England. So we'd notify the fighter groups, and the fighter groups would gas up and they would get ready to go out and intercept the bombers as they were coming in. They knew exactly when they wanted to take off because they knew every place the plane was; they knew where it was going to be, and they knew where they, was the best place to intercept it. They would fly up and they would intercept it, and the fighters would take a certain toll at that point, then they would break off, come back in and land and fuel up. The bombers would come on in on their bombing run, ack-ack would get a certain toll as well, there would be some, some injured from the fighting out here, and then they'd come in and there would be more injured in the ack-ack from the ground fire.

William M. Gibson:

Right.

Glen B. Weber:

Then as they turned around to leave, the fighter planes would take off, and they knew exactly whether they wanted to go up and get them again when they came out injured, and it was a very interesting operation. I copied many, many German bombers that were shot down. They'd send a Q signal that says, I'm, enemy aircraft are sighted, in a few minutes they'd send another Q signal that I'm under attack, then another Q signal, my right engine is out, or whatever, and later on another Q signal that I'm landing at sea, and then they would begin, when they landed at sea they'd start sending As, di-dah, di-dah, di-dah, di-dah, until the As just faded out. You could visualize that plane sinking in the water as it had been shot down. It was a very interesting procedure, and it happened many, many times over the period of years. As the bombings, I mentioned the bombings that we were under during the time we were in London. We were not bombed nearly that much during the nine months we were in Cheadle, England. I don't know if it was that secret a spot, that was in the Stoke-on-Trent area, but we didn't have a lot of trouble with being bombed there. When we were sent from Cheadle to await shipment into Normandy on Omaha Beach, we were sent to a camp, I just can't recall the name of the camp right outside of our shipping point -- golly, I've forgotten that too, now -- Southampton. But the buzz bombs were in, in force then. That's when they sent the little, the little buzz bombs that flew over at about 200 feet high, and they sounded like a washing machine engine. You'd hear them put-put-put-put-put-put-put, and we were encamped in six-man tents at that time in a muddy field -- there was a lot of rain just before Normandy -- and these little things would put-put-put-put, and as long as they were put-put-putting you were all right, but when they stopped putting they immediately came to earth. And when they exploded your tent would go, from the concussion would go whoompf, whoompf, whoompf, whoompf, whoompf, whoompf, and just shake and shake and shake. Later the V1s came over, that was the first of the ones that went high in the atmosphere and came low down, and they were directed more toward London than they were toward us. We were some distance then from London. When Normandy, when invasion day came I was still at this camp, and I remember the, the sky filled with airplanes, and there's no way you can describe a thousand airplanes in the air at one time, and the roar of the planes, and the, and the sky just filled with airplanes. I was sent, soon after, after D-Day, I was sent to a staging area at Southampton and boarded an LST, and to the best of my recollection, I went into Normandy on D plus 11, and it may have been a day or two after that. I'm not, I'm not certain on the exact day I entered Normandy. But our LST pulled up on the, on the shore as close as it could and opened the front, and we came out the front of the vessel and climbed the hill, and at the top of the hill we were assigned to a field, as I recall, just to the left of the road that came up from Omaha Beach, and we were just outside a small town called Asnelles -- I-S, I can't remember how it's spelled, I-S-N-E, S-N-E-A or something -- and I was there for quite some time. It took a couple of three weeks or longer before the allied forces were able to enlarge the beach head to where Patton could begin his drive.

William M. Gibson:

Now once you got to the beaches there at Normandy, what was your unit doing; you were still breaking code?

Glen B. Weber:

We're still breaking code.

William M. Gibson:

And what type of code were you breaking and what information were you able to provide at that time?

Glen B. Weber:

We were still breaking all, the closer we could be to the signal, the better we could read. The signal, when we were in England, was very, very weak and you were copying through very heavy static. Very difficult to read an entire message and follow it. So the closer we could be, the better we could read the signal. So we operated out of three trucks. Our trucks would back into, two of them would back in together, and the third would back in from the other angle in the form of a T. One truck was a high-frequency truck, the other was a low-frequency truck, and the message center, cryptog -- where the cryptanalysts or the cryptographers worked was in the base of the T. The way it worked was when the low-frequency trucks came on, when they found a signal of low-frequency beams along the coast line, they knew that a German bomber unit was going to become active, because they helped guide the German planes on their, on their mission. So they would tell us, and us in the high-frequency truck, we would begin looking for the actual German traffic as it was flying to its target. And then after we got our message, we would relay it to the cryptographers. Also that's the point where we would, when we would find it, we'd notify our DF trucks. We had those DF trucks that I mentioned, and they're here in the book. I had them all marked out and I've lost them now. Here they are. These are the DF trucks.

William M. Gibson:

And this is in the "Code to Victory" book by Arnold Franco?

Glen B. Weber:

Written by one of our cryptographers, right.

William M. Gibson:

And the picture is on page 23. Okay.

Glen B. Weber:

And those are the actual DF trucks. So we would notify them, they would get on there and pinpoint the location of the bomber units each time they heard them come on. So that's what we were doing in Normandy. We were bombed in Normandy several times. In fact, at one point the German forces, and I believe it was under Rommel, tried to split the allied forces, because we were spread along the beach, the British were way up at Utah or whatever, I've forgotten the names of the beaches again, and then the American forces and the Canadian and so forth. They tried to split the allied forces, and as near as I can recall, Asnelles was a little town that Rommel was trying to drive for to split the forces, and we were just outside Asnelles, and at that time -- my memory is so bad -- but I think the beach head got very small at that time, there wasn't much ____ there. As Patton, later on as Patton began his breakthrough and went through Saint-Lo we followed with him. Each time he moved, we moved as well. As I went through Saint-Lo, there was nothing standing, the whole town was destroyed. There would be pipes sticking up in the air from buildings and, where they were. The stench of the dead animals and so forth, bodies as well, was overwhelming. We went from Asnelles to a little beach town called Arromanches, as near as I can determine -- A-V-R-A-N-C-H-E-S, I think -- and then from Arromanches we went to, I think, Laval, France -- L-A-V-A-L -- and it was at Laval, I believe in an apple orchard, where we were cited by General Hoyt Vandenberg for our work in destroying -- and again my memory is so bad -- but it seemed like 656 German aircraft; us being responsible, partially responsible for helping destroy that many aircraft early in the war. From Laval, France we progressed with General Patton, and we were the first American troops to go into Paris. Our entry into Paris was triumphant. We went in by truck. And citizens, the Parisiennes lined the streets and gave us bottles of wine, and it was in August, as I recall, and they gave us fruits, peaches and pears and things, something to eat, I remember. We had, Patton had allowed, he had circled the city of Paris and let the free French retake their city. So sniping was still going on in town, they were sniping in front of police headquarters. Some of the holdouts where the Germans decided to hold out, there was still sniping in front of police headquarters and some buildings, near as I can recall. We progressed on through Paris and were assigned to a chateau called Chateau Beaumont on the far side of Paris, on the, I'll say on the, on the north side of Paris near Versailles.

William M. Gibson:

Okay.

Glen B. Weber:

And Chateau Beaumont was a place where the Germans had done the same kind of work that we were doing. They had done intercept work of the allied radio signals. And the place had been bombed pretty well, and so our quarters, when we moved in there, was bombed-out buildings, barracks. And when it got very, very cold in the winter, this is a little later on, we moved in there in August, but winter that year got very cold, and we slipped out and we took boards off the bombed-out buildings and burned them in our stoves, and that's how, more or less how we kept warm. I stayed in Paris for nine months. Another detachment took our place and moved into Belgium, and they lost all their equipment at the Battle of the Bulge; the cooks, KPs and everybody was on the firing line, and I was blessed by being back in Paris and enjoying the good life.

William M. Gibson:

And what were you, if you're in Paris at that time, what were you doing the majority of your time in Paris? Were you --

Glen B. Weber:

The very same work I was doing before.

William M. Gibson:

Very same work?

Glen B. Weber:

Yeah.

William M. Gibson:

Okay.

Glen B. Weber:

We worked our radios, we copied our, the German traffic, and tried to guide fighter planes into intercepting them and this type of work.

William M. Gibson:

How long was each -- you had a group of people breaking this code. How long were each of you, during each day, breaking code? Like how long did you work?

Glen B. Weber:

Eight or nine hours.

William M. Gibson:

Eight or nine hours?

Glen B. Weber:

Yeah, we had a full shift, 24 hours a day.

William M. Gibson:

Did it become more difficult, when you were talking about with the weak signals and things like that, did it become more difficult each day towards the end of the day, or did it become easier as you kind of acclimated to the sounds, of that day, if you will?

Glen B. Weber:

We became quite well-acclimated, I believe. We, different units would come in at different strengths, depending on how far away the units were. If they were in southern, way southern France, why, they wouldn't be as loud as one that was coming from just over the border in Germany, or whatever.

William M. Gibson:

Right.

Glen B. Weber:

If you were closer, well, the signal would be louder. Let's see, I'm kind of running out, I guess, I don't mean to ...

William M. Gibson:

No, that's okay. Now after your nine months in Paris, in that area in France, where did you go after that or what was your assignment?

Glen B. Weber:

We moved on to Reims, and from Reims we crossed the Rhine River, we went to Bad Vilbel, right outside Frankfurt am Main. At Bad Vilbel we were quartered in a heart center, an old heart center, and we still did our work there, and we were there at the end of the war, when the war ended. And when the war ended we didn't think we were going home. They'd put us to studying katakana, which is the Japanese alphabet. The alphabet the Japanese have -- the Germans have more letters in their alphabet than we have, they have what we called barred letters, a barred Q and so forth, but the Japanese have many more letters in their alphabet, so ...

William M. Gibson:

Do you remember how many letters were in the German alphabet and the Japanese alphabet?

Glen B. Weber:

I do not, no, I've forgotten. I've forgotten. And at the end of the war then we began copying Russian, we copied any traffic that was on the air. We would copy Russian and we would send the messages in to the message center until they broke them and said, hey, stay on that, or, we don't need it, let that one go. So we copied Russian, we copied anything we could, we could determine. And when we came to, trying to copy something similar to the katakana, we were not copying the Japanese at that time because you couldn't hear them that far away.

William M. Gibson:

Right.

Glen B. Weber:

But when we were copying Russian or something that we didn't know, we'd put the equivalent, it sounds like a QA or PB or whatever, and we'd put that in parentheses on our thing and send it in to the message center for whatever they could do. Let's see, I guess I'm probably coming pretty near to the end of my story. The war ended. We had a lot of fun. We had found an ammunition dump nearby, a German ammunition dump, and we fired flares and had a lot of fun and that kind of stuff at the end of the war.

William M. Gibson:

Now how long after, when you got to, after you left Paris and you're in Reims, how much time did you spend still there in England doing that work that was kind of cleanup work? I mean you weren't doing quite the same as far as breaking code of active bombing missions and things like that.

Mrs. Weber:

No, he was in Germany, not England.

William M. Gibson:

Oh, you were in Germany?

Glen B. Weber:

Yes, I was in Germany.

William M. Gibson:

Right, that's what I said, Reims. But I mean you weren't doing the same work that --

Glen B. Weber:

Oh, yes, we did it clear until Germany surrendered.

William M. Gibson:

Okay. But you said you were also tracking like the Russian communications and things like that. Were you looking for specific --

Glen B. Weber:

No, this was after, after the war ended.

William M. Gibson:

After it ended, okay.

Glen B. Weber:

I was in Bad Vilbel, and that's when -- when the war ended there was no longer a German Air Force to copy. We started copying any kind of traffic we could find moving on the air, and we sent it in to the cryptographers and let them identify what it was and if it was valuable or not.

William M. Gibson:

But how long did you do that? How long after the war did you stay there?

Glen B. Weber:

When the war ended. Do you remember when the war ended? I was released in November 27th of '45. When did the war end?

Mrs. Weber:

August.

William M. Gibson:

I would say in the summertime.

Mrs. Weber:

It was in August.

William M. Gibson:

July, August, or something like that.

Mrs. Weber:

August or September.

Glen B. Weber:

There were a couple of months then that we just copied anything that was working and then they just kept us busy.

William M. Gibson:

Now did anybody from, because you said you guys were learning the Japanese, trying to learn the Japanese alphabet to go and help with that. Did anybody that worked in your unit or in some of the other units, did they get sent to do that or did everybody kind of --

Glen B. Weber:

Oh, no, we were sent home.

William M. Gibson:

Everybody was sent home.

Glen B. Weber:

We were sent home, yeah. They loaded us on those little 40-and-8 cars and, railroad cars, those little cattle things that they used to use for fording, fording men and eight horses, I think that little cars, the cars, train cars held, and they loaded us in them and sent us to Le Havre. We traveled through, around Luxembourg and clear across France and to Le Havre, and we were loaded into a Liberty ship that was being sent home for diesel repairs. It had one diesel out and one diesel still worked, and it had two steam turbines. And as we were leaving the Port of Le Havre, we were hit too hard by a tug and it broke the plates open on the vessel and it began leaking water when we got in open water. And this ship was manned by a French crew, and barracks bags and shoes and everything were floating in the water, but because I was on a higher bunk, I was, it was four bunks high, as I recall, and I was on the third, third bunk up, I remained in my bunk. Other people that were in the lower bunks were sent up, up top, and I got to lay there on my bunk and watch the Frenchmen repair this vessel. And the way they did it was interesting to me, a landlubber. They came in, wading in the water carrying boards, and they clamped these boards to the side of the vessel, these ribs that go down that make a vessel, I'm not describing very well, but they clamped boards across here and then they poured some kind of quick-drying cement down in the water. I don't, I'm not, I don't understand how they do this, but it apparently sealed the leak enough that we were able to cross the Atlantic in the month of November, which is the worst month in the Atlantic in the whole year. We got in some very heavy storms. Our second diesel went out, they sent a May Day at one time because of our lack of progress. And again I'm not a shipman, but we were making three knots an hour or something, just barely going, and I would go on deck in the storm. You could look up above you, and there was water up there. This little vessel, a little Liberty ship was going down a wave and here was the next wave up above that we were going to go up. So to a landlubber, that was about as scary to me as going in on Normandy. But anyway we made it back home, and --

William M. Gibson:

Now how long did it take for the trip back?

Glen B. Weber:

It took 20-some days to come back. It took us five days on the Queen Elizabeth, and it took --

Mrs. Weber:

Queen Mary.

Glen B. Weber:

-- 20-some days on, on the Liberty ship. And when I got into New York, the Red Cross ladies were handing out milk, and I had not had milk for three years. You were not allowed to drink anything overseas that causes the possibility of tuberculosis, and all we had was canned milk, and I must have drank two quarts of milk, I think, bang, bang, bang. And when I came home --

William M. Gibson:

Now where did you land back in the United States, in New York?

Glen B. Weber:

New York.

William M. Gibson:

Do you remember what that was?

Glen B. Weber:

I saw the Statue of Liberty as I came in.

William M. Gibson:

Do you remember what that was like as far as the greeting from the, the people of New York and stuff when the ship came in?

Glen B. Weber:

Nothing. All I remember is, is the, the Red Cross people meeting us there and giving us some milk. There was no great fanfare that I recall. Then I was sent back to Indianapolis, and I was released from service at Camp Atterbury, and went immediately downtown and found that my girlfriend had waited for me for three years while I was overseas, and we started our romance all over again and we married. She's with me here today, we've been married 57 years. We've had six wonderful children, not a bad one in the bunch. And that pretty much is the story of my military life, I think.

William M. Gibson:

Now when you got back, did you expect that Betty would be here?

Glen B. Weber:

Well --

William M. Gibson:

Had you guys written a lot when you were overseas?

Glen B. Weber:

We had written a lot. I kind of gave up in the end part of the war. When it looked like we were going to Japan I didn't think it was much sense to write letters anymore, and I did, I slacked off on writing letters and kind of gave up hope for a while, but it worked out nicely.

William M. Gibson:

And what did you think, Betty, when he was over there? Did you ever give up hope or were you ever mad at him for not writing as often, maybe, as you wrote him?

Mrs. Weber:

He wrote as much as possible, and I was, I moved from Vincennes to Indianapolis, and I worked at ___ Watson, and one day -- we didn't know exactly when they were coming home because they couldn't write, you know.

William M. Gibson:

Right.

Mrs. Weber:

And he came walking in at where I was working, so it was quite a shock. And it was near Thanksgiving, so right away, why, I got off work and we went back to Vincennes to, for Thanksgiving.

William M. Gibson:

Do you remember what you felt, Mr. Weber, when that, when you finally saw her after three years?

Glen B. Weber:

I was very happy to see her. It was a, it was a wonderful day in my life.

Mrs. Weber:

It was really wonderful that, to know that he had come home.

William M. Gibson:

Yeah. Now did you get, did you get to have Thanksgiving together then that year?

Mrs. Weber:

Yes, we did.

William M. Gibson:

Since it was near Thanksgiving?

Mrs. Weber:

Yes, and then we weren't married then until June. June the 2nd.

Glen B. Weber:

By the way, all of our things, all of our business was declass -- was highly classified, and it was declassified in 1987, and there's a lady by the name of Diane Putnam in the Office of Air Force History who has much of the story on our unit.

William M. Gibson:

Now when you got back, since you had done such classified work and everything, were you able to share with your friends and family the types of things that you had been doing over there or were you encouraged not to?

Glen B. Weber:

We were not supposed to, but I think I cheated. I did cheat a little.

William M. Gibson:

And what did you do, when you got back to the United States and finally got back here to Indiana, did you, at that time did you go back into the work force, did you go back to school or what?

Glen B. Weber:

Very difficult to find a job when I got back. The only job I could find was driving city bus in Vincennes, Indiana.

Mrs. Weber:

You went to business school.

Glen B. Weber:

Well, I started the business school, yes. We started a small business. My father and three other gentlemen started a little company, and I went to Columbus Business College, and our business failed because we couldn't get good steel back in those days, it was all reserved for the military, and pickled steel wouldn't hold enamel, it would pop off, so that ruined our business, and so then I got to driving a city bus. And in driving the city bus, I met the program director of the radio station, and I asked him how he got an easy job like that, and he said, if you think it's so easy, come down and audition. And I did, and I failed miserably, I couldn't read a paragraph without making mistakes. But he liked me and he let me have some extra work at the station, so I worked extra there and drove my bus, and then my father started a storm window business and I hung storm windows for him. So on my days off I did all kinds of work. And finally I worked into radio altogether, and later got into TV, and much later I got into Channel 6 here in Indianapolis, and I worked 21 years for Channel 6, and then I worked for about 10 years for Jeff Smorgan (ph), a ____+, and that again is the story of my life, and I thank you very much for listening.

William M. Gibson:

Oh, that's okay. I just have a question for you, Mrs. Weber. When he got back and showed up at your work and then you guys went back to Vincennes, did you stay in the work force? Because I know that was the first kind of introduction to the work force for a lot of the women that were here at home. Did you stay in the work force --

Mrs. Weber:

No.

William M. Gibson:

-- or did you end up staying home after that?

Mrs. Weber:

No, I did not. I never -- in our era, the wife took care of the children.

William M. Gibson:

Right.

Mrs. Weber:

And that was our life, and I never worked out my whole life.

Glen B. Weber:

She stayed at home and took care of the children.

Mrs. Weber:

He took care of everything.

Glen B. Weber:

And they're all wonderful children.

William M. Gibson:

And that's a full-time job.

Mrs. Weber:

And that's a full-time job, but that's all different now, I know, but, no, I stayed home.

William M. Gibson:

Well, that's terrific. Well, Mr. Weber, thank you very much for your time, and we'll make sure to get this record --

Glen B. Weber:

My pleasure.

William M. Gibson:

-- to the Library of Congress. Thank you, Mrs. Weber.

Mrs. Weber:

Yes. (END OF CD.)

 
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  October 26, 2011
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