Dayton C. Miller, His Life, Work, and Contributions | Dayton C. Miller Flute Collection Home
Chapters 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 |
Abstract of Master's Report | List Of Figures | Appendix | Footnotes | Bibliography

CHAPTER 10

CONCLUSION

See Caption Below
Dr. Miller at Case
University

The investigation of Dayton C. Miller's professional and avocational activities, revealed his profound contributions to both science and organology. Similarly, the humanistic aspects of his involvement with his fellow man was also noted. Miller probably would have put the latter trait under the heading of ethics, for in a commencement address given at Baldwin-Wallace College on June 12, 1939, he said:

After having devoted the greater part of a lifetime to the natural sciences, I am prepared to adopt as the realities which constitute the universe three manifestations of absolute value: things which are eternally true - SCIENCE - things which are intrinsically good - ETHICS - and things which are inherently beautiful - AESTHETICS. There are not three different world of values; there is one universe of reality, a unity of good, the true, and the beautiful. 99

Miller felt that the great object of human endeavor is the attainment of knowledge. He quotes an inscription at the entrance to the University of Rochester Library:

Here is the history of human ignorance, Error, Superstition, Folly, War and Waste recorded by human intelligence for the admonition of wiser ages still to come.
Here is the history of man's hunger for Truth, Goodness and beauty, leading him slowly on through flesh to Spirit from Bondage to Freedom from War to Peace. 100

The entire text of his address reads as a positive statement towards a love of life, and of one's need to use all of their abilities and education to the fullest degree.

In conclusion I repeat the admonition: Seek education, you have now only begun. Think deeply, ponder wisely, and lay a philosophical foundation of the highest ideals on which to build your life. Resolve to make your life useful by a strong and active leadership, not in revolution and abandonment of established principles, but by strengthening the temple and towers of wisdom bequeathed to you by your noble forefathers. 101

It was the original intention of this research project to gain insight into the relationship between Dr. Miller's profession as a scientist, and his avocation as an organologist. To the writer this assumption has become fact. Indeed, Miller made scientific deductions as a result of phonedeik experiments using the flute, and made contributions to flute and musical instrument manufacturing due to his scientific findings in acoustics. Miller himself said:

The study of the laws of physics gives one an enhanced appreciation of the beauties of music, the subtlest of all the arts. 102

Perhaps a fitting summary of his personal philosophy might be taken from the closing lines of his Baldwin-Wallace address:

Prove all things; hold fast that which is good. Let all things be done decently and in order. If thou doest these things, manifest thyself to the world. 103


Chapters 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 |
Abstract of Master's Report | List Of Figures | Appendix | Footnotes | Bibliography

Dayton C. Miller, His Life, Work, and Contributions | Dayton C. Miller Flute Collection Home