Full Caption: Age of Brass: Or the Triumphs of Woman's Rights. and Age of Iron: Man As He Expects to Be. Lithographs, 1869. Popular Graphic Arts Collection. Prints and Photographs Division. LC-USZC2-1921 and LC-USZC2-1922. Full Caption: Age of Brass: Or the Triumphs of Woman's Rights. and Age of Iron: Man As He Expects to Be. Lithographs, 1869. Popular Graphic Arts Collection. Prints and Photographs Division. LC-USZC2-1921 and LC-USZC2-1922.

The year these companion prints were copyrighted, 1869, may well have seemed a watershed year for those observing the evolving status of women. The American Woman Suffrage Association, founded by Lucy Stone and her husband, Henry Blackwell, and the National Woman Suffrage Association, founded by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, embarked on their separate approaches to achieving women's suffrage. Thousands of women who wntered the workforce during the Civil War continued to work outside the home, as recognized by Stanton's establishment of the Working Woman's Association in 1868. Meanwhile, Catharine E. Beecher and her sister, Harriet Beecher Stowe, in their work The American Woman's Home (1869), railed at the growing popularity of conveniences such as store-brought bread. The Currier & Ives firm—which itself employed women as artists and colorists—issued this pair of prints as satirical commentary on the women's right movement and the threat it appeared to pose to traditional gender roles

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