Theodor de Bry. Adam and Eve in America. Engraving in Thomas Hariot, A Briefe and True Report of . . . Virginia (Frankfurt, 1590). Rare Book and Special Collections Division. LC-USZC4-5347. Theodor de Bry. Adam and Eve in America. Engraving in Thomas Hariot, A Briefe and True Report of . . . Virginia (Frankfurt, 1590). Rare Book and Special Collections Division. LC-USZC4-5347.

Eve, a European maiden with the anatomically awkward body type familiar from Northern European engravings by such artists as Albrecht Dürer, looks knowingly over her shoulder as she reaches for the fatal apple indicated by the she-demon-serpent entwined at the center of the tree of knowledge, while Adam gazes guilelessly heavenward. In the background are the consequences of her action—Adam tills the soil while Eve mothers Cain in a makeshift shelter. In Eve: The History of an Idea (1984), John Phillips describes his impression from studying many pictures of Eve conversing with her snake-woman adviser: ”the artist is governed by a male dread of conspiring females, the fear of the witches' coven” (p. 62).

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